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Viewing archives for Child Development and Learning

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Siyu Ma is a Dphil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Siyu Ma is a Dphil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Siyu Ma is a Dphil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Siyu Ma is a Dphil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Siyu Ma is a Dphil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Siyu Ma is a Dphil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Siyu Ma is a Dphil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Siyu Ma is a Dphil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Siyu Ma is a Dphil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Siyu Ma is a Dphil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Siyu Ma is a Dphil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Siyu Ma is a Dphil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Siyu Ma is a Dphil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Siyu Ma is a Dphil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Siyu Ma is a Dphil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Siyu Ma is a Dphil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Siyu Ma is a Dphil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Siyu Ma is a Dphil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Siyu Ma is a Dphil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Siyu Ma is a Dphil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Siyu Ma is a Dphil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Siyu Ma is a Dphil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Siyu Ma is a Dphil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Siyu Ma is a Dphil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Siyu Ma is a Dphil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Siyu Ma is a Dphil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Siyu Ma is a Dphil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Siyu Ma is a Dphil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Siyu Ma is a Dphil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Siyu Ma is a Dphil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Siyu Ma is a Dphil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Siyu Ma is a Dphil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Siyu Ma is a Dphil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Siyu Ma is a Dphil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Siyu Ma is a Dphil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Siyu Ma is a Dphil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Siyu Ma is a Dphil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Siyu Ma is a Dphil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Siyu Ma is a Dphil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Siyu Ma is a Dphil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Siyu Ma is a Dphil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Siyu Ma is a Dphil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Siyu Ma is a Dphil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Siyu Ma is a Dphil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Siyu Ma is a Dphil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Siyu Ma is a Dphil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Siyu Ma is a Dphil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Siyu Ma is a Dphil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Siyu Ma is a Dphil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Siyu Ma is a Dphil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Siyu Ma is a Dphil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Siyu Ma is a Dphil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Siyu Ma is a Dphil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Siyu Ma is a Dphil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Siyu Ma is a Dphil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Siyu Ma is a Dphil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Siyu Ma is a Dphil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Siyu Ma is a Dphil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Siyu Ma is a Dphil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Siyu Ma is a Dphil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Siyu Ma is a Dphil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Siyu Ma is a Dphil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Siyu Ma is a Dphil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Siyu Ma is a Dphil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Siyu Ma is a Dphil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Siyu Ma is a Dphil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Siyu Ma is a Dphil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Siyu Ma is a Dphil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Siyu Ma is a Dphil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Siyu Ma is a Dphil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Siyu Ma is a Dphil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Siyu Ma is a Dphil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Siyu Ma is a Dphil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Siyu Ma is a Dphil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Siyu Ma is a Dphil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Siyu Ma is a Dphil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Siyu Ma is a Dphil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Siyu Ma is a Dphil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Siyu Ma is a Dphil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Siyu Ma is a Dphil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Siyu Ma is a Dphil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Siyu Ma is a Dphil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Siyu Ma is a Dphil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Siyu Ma is a Dphil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Siyu Ma is a Dphil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Siyu Ma is a Dphil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Siyu Ma is a Dphil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Siyu Ma is a Dphil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Siyu Ma is a Dphil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Siyu Ma is a Dphil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguist