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Viewing archives for Child Development and Learning

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Julia teaches and supervises on the MSc in Education and is involved in the Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment; Core Principles of Child Assessment, and the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing papers.

Before joining the Department of Education she worked in the Department of Experimental Psychology (2013-2023) and continues collaborations there, including co-leading the WISDOM (working in schools to deliver on mental health) Network: https://wisdom.mhid.org.uk.

Her research is concerned with child development, primarily peer relationships, bullying and mental health. She works with primary, secondary and special education schools across the UK and with children aged 4-18. She is also an advocate for public and community engagement, especially with school staff and parents.

Julia wants to support every child to achieve their potential in school.

Recently funded PI projects:

  • Feasibility trial of an anti-bullying programme for children in special schools.
  • Pupil interactions and networks in special schools.
  • Mental health in schools with diversity.
  • Special schools, mental health and bullying.
  • Teaching staff perspectives: Using VR to enhance PSHE learning.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Henry is a Swire Scholar and is currently reading for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. His doctoral research is fully funded by the Swire Charitable Trust and St Antony’s College.

Henry’s research interests lie primarily in classroom dynamics, specifically the interaction of cognitive, affective and motivational experiences in education settings. His DPhil research seeks the rapprochement between the dominant nomothetic (group-focus) approach in the field of education and psychology with the idiographic (person-focus) approach, which is mostly overlooked. Henry is also interested in advanced quantitative methods (e.g., Dynamic Structural Equation Modelling) and analysing ambulatory assessment data.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Henry undertook a placement year as a research assistant in the Child Development and Learning research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford, whilst completing his BSc in Psychology at the University of Surrey. He continued and completed his MSc in Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford.

 

Publications

Lo, H. T. F. 2022. Children’s Momentary Executive Function Fluctuation in Real-World Classrooms: An Intensive Longitudinal Study. MSc Dissertation. University of Oxford, U.K.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay is a second-year DPhil student investigating how classroom characteristics are related to Pakistani children’s development. She is supervised by Professor Iram Siraj and Dr Katharina Ereky-Stevens and her work is being supported by the Aga Khan University (Pakistan). Anushay received the Patrice Engle Dissertation Grant Award from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) in 2023.

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay also works as a part-time research  assistant at the Developmental Diversity Lab at UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families. Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (under review). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child and Family Factors, Emotion Recognition Accuracy, and Social Behaviour.

Presentations

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (2023, March). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child-Level Factors and Emotion Recognition Accuracy [Paper Presentation]. Society for Research in Child Development, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  4. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom.

Posters

  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Julia teaches and supervises on the MSc in Education and is involved in the Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment; Core Principles of Child Assessment, and the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing papers.

Before joining the Department of Education she worked in the Department of Experimental Psychology (2013-2023) and continues collaborations there, including co-leading the WISDOM (working in schools to deliver on mental health) Network: https://wisdom.mhid.org.uk.

Her research is concerned with child development, primarily peer relationships, bullying and mental health. She works with primary, secondary and special education schools across the UK and with children aged 4-18. She is also an advocate for public and community engagement, especially with school staff and parents.

Julia wants to support every child to achieve their potential in school.

Recently funded PI projects:

  • Feasibility trial of an anti-bullying programme for children in special schools.
  • Pupil interactions and networks in special schools.
  • Mental health in schools with diversity.
  • Special schools, mental health and bullying.
  • Teaching staff perspectives: Using VR to enhance PSHE learning.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Henry is a Swire Scholar and is currently reading for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. His doctoral research is fully funded by the Swire Charitable Trust and St Antony’s College.

Henry’s research interests lie primarily in classroom dynamics, specifically the interaction of cognitive, affective and motivational experiences in education settings. His DPhil research seeks the rapprochement between the dominant nomothetic (group-focus) approach in the field of education and psychology with the idiographic (person-focus) approach, which is mostly overlooked. Henry is also interested in advanced quantitative methods (e.g., Dynamic Structural Equation Modelling) and analysing ambulatory assessment data.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Henry undertook a placement year as a research assistant in the Child Development and Learning research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford, whilst completing his BSc in Psychology at the University of Surrey. He continued and completed his MSc in Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford.

 

Publications

Lo, H. T. F. 2022. Children’s Momentary Executive Function Fluctuation in Real-World Classrooms: An Intensive Longitudinal Study. MSc Dissertation. University of Oxford, U.K.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay is a second-year DPhil student investigating how classroom characteristics are related to Pakistani children’s development. She is supervised by Professor Iram Siraj and Dr Katharina Ereky-Stevens and her work is being supported by the Aga Khan University (Pakistan). Anushay received the Patrice Engle Dissertation Grant Award from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) in 2023.

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay also works as a part-time research  assistant at the Developmental Diversity Lab at UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families. Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (under review). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child and Family Factors, Emotion Recognition Accuracy, and Social Behaviour.

Presentations

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (2023, March). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child-Level Factors and Emotion Recognition Accuracy [Paper Presentation]. Society for Research in Child Development, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  4. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom.

Posters

  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Julia teaches and supervises on the MSc in Education and is involved in the Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment; Core Principles of Child Assessment, and the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing papers.

Before joining the Department of Education she worked in the Department of Experimental Psychology (2013-2023) and continues collaborations there, including co-leading the WISDOM (working in schools to deliver on mental health) Network: https://wisdom.mhid.org.uk.

Her research is concerned with child development, primarily peer relationships, bullying and mental health. She works with primary, secondary and special education schools across the UK and with children aged 4-18. She is also an advocate for public and community engagement, especially with school staff and parents.

Julia wants to support every child to achieve their potential in school.

Recently funded PI projects:

  • Feasibility trial of an anti-bullying programme for children in special schools.
  • Pupil interactions and networks in special schools.
  • Mental health in schools with diversity.
  • Special schools, mental health and bullying.
  • Teaching staff perspectives: Using VR to enhance PSHE learning.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Henry is a Swire Scholar and is currently reading for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. His doctoral research is fully funded by the Swire Charitable Trust and St Antony’s College.

Henry’s research interests lie primarily in classroom dynamics, specifically the interaction of cognitive, affective and motivational experiences in education settings. His DPhil research seeks the rapprochement between the dominant nomothetic (group-focus) approach in the field of education and psychology with the idiographic (person-focus) approach, which is mostly overlooked. Henry is also interested in advanced quantitative methods (e.g., Dynamic Structural Equation Modelling) and analysing ambulatory assessment data.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Henry undertook a placement year as a research assistant in the Child Development and Learning research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford, whilst completing his BSc in Psychology at the University of Surrey. He continued and completed his MSc in Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford.

 

Publications

Lo, H. T. F. 2022. Children’s Momentary Executive Function Fluctuation in Real-World Classrooms: An Intensive Longitudinal Study. MSc Dissertation. University of Oxford, U.K.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay is a second-year DPhil student investigating how classroom characteristics are related to Pakistani children’s development. She is supervised by Professor Iram Siraj and Dr Katharina Ereky-Stevens and her work is being supported by the Aga Khan University (Pakistan). Anushay received the Patrice Engle Dissertation Grant Award from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) in 2023.

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay also works as a part-time research  assistant at the Developmental Diversity Lab at UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families. Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (under review). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child and Family Factors, Emotion Recognition Accuracy, and Social Behaviour.

Presentations

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (2023, March). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child-Level Factors and Emotion Recognition Accuracy [Paper Presentation]. Society for Research in Child Development, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  4. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom.

Posters

  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Julia teaches and supervises on the MSc in Education and is involved in the Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment; Core Principles of Child Assessment, and the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing papers.

Before joining the Department of Education she worked in the Department of Experimental Psychology (2013-2023) and continues collaborations there, including co-leading the WISDOM (working in schools to deliver on mental health) Network: https://wisdom.mhid.org.uk.

Her research is concerned with child development, primarily peer relationships, bullying and mental health. She works with primary, secondary and special education schools across the UK and with children aged 4-18. She is also an advocate for public and community engagement, especially with school staff and parents.

Julia wants to support every child to achieve their potential in school.

Recently funded PI projects:

  • Feasibility trial of an anti-bullying programme for children in special schools.
  • Pupil interactions and networks in special schools.
  • Mental health in schools with diversity.
  • Special schools, mental health and bullying.
  • Teaching staff perspectives: Using VR to enhance PSHE learning.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Henry is a Swire Scholar and is currently reading for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. His doctoral research is fully funded by the Swire Charitable Trust and St Antony’s College.

Henry’s research interests lie primarily in classroom dynamics, specifically the interaction of cognitive, affective and motivational experiences in education settings. His DPhil research seeks the rapprochement between the dominant nomothetic (group-focus) approach in the field of education and psychology with the idiographic (person-focus) approach, which is mostly overlooked. Henry is also interested in advanced quantitative methods (e.g., Dynamic Structural Equation Modelling) and analysing ambulatory assessment data.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Henry undertook a placement year as a research assistant in the Child Development and Learning research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford, whilst completing his BSc in Psychology at the University of Surrey. He continued and completed his MSc in Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford.

 

Publications

Lo, H. T. F. 2022. Children’s Momentary Executive Function Fluctuation in Real-World Classrooms: An Intensive Longitudinal Study. MSc Dissertation. University of Oxford, U.K.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay is a second-year DPhil student investigating how classroom characteristics are related to Pakistani children’s development. She is supervised by Professor Iram Siraj and Dr Katharina Ereky-Stevens and her work is being supported by the Aga Khan University (Pakistan). Anushay received the Patrice Engle Dissertation Grant Award from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) in 2023.

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay also works as a part-time research  assistant at the Developmental Diversity Lab at UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families. Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (under review). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child and Family Factors, Emotion Recognition Accuracy, and Social Behaviour.

Presentations

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (2023, March). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child-Level Factors and Emotion Recognition Accuracy [Paper Presentation]. Society for Research in Child Development, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  4. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom.

Posters

  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Julia teaches and supervises on the MSc in Education and is involved in the Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment; Core Principles of Child Assessment, and the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing papers.

Before joining the Department of Education she worked in the Department of Experimental Psychology (2013-2023) and continues collaborations there, including co-leading the WISDOM (working in schools to deliver on mental health) Network: https://wisdom.mhid.org.uk.

Her research is concerned with child development, primarily peer relationships, bullying and mental health. She works with primary, secondary and special education schools across the UK and with children aged 4-18. She is also an advocate for public and community engagement, especially with school staff and parents.

Julia wants to support every child to achieve their potential in school.

Recently funded PI projects:

  • Feasibility trial of an anti-bullying programme for children in special schools.
  • Pupil interactions and networks in special schools.
  • Mental health in schools with diversity.
  • Special schools, mental health and bullying.
  • Teaching staff perspectives: Using VR to enhance PSHE learning.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Henry is a Swire Scholar and is currently reading for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. His doctoral research is fully funded by the Swire Charitable Trust and St Antony’s College.

Henry’s research interests lie primarily in classroom dynamics, specifically the interaction of cognitive, affective and motivational experiences in education settings. His DPhil research seeks the rapprochement between the dominant nomothetic (group-focus) approach in the field of education and psychology with the idiographic (person-focus) approach, which is mostly overlooked. Henry is also interested in advanced quantitative methods (e.g., Dynamic Structural Equation Modelling) and analysing ambulatory assessment data.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Henry undertook a placement year as a research assistant in the Child Development and Learning research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford, whilst completing his BSc in Psychology at the University of Surrey. He continued and completed his MSc in Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford.

 

Publications

Lo, H. T. F. 2022. Children’s Momentary Executive Function Fluctuation in Real-World Classrooms: An Intensive Longitudinal Study. MSc Dissertation. University of Oxford, U.K.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay is a second-year DPhil student investigating how classroom characteristics are related to Pakistani children’s development. She is supervised by Professor Iram Siraj and Dr Katharina Ereky-Stevens and her work is being supported by the Aga Khan University (Pakistan). Anushay received the Patrice Engle Dissertation Grant Award from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) in 2023.

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay also works as a part-time research  assistant at the Developmental Diversity Lab at UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families. Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (under review). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child and Family Factors, Emotion Recognition Accuracy, and Social Behaviour.

Presentations

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (2023, March). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child-Level Factors and Emotion Recognition Accuracy [Paper Presentation]. Society for Research in Child Development, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  4. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom.

Posters

  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Julia teaches and supervises on the MSc in Education and is involved in the Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment; Core Principles of Child Assessment, and the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing papers.

Before joining the Department of Education she worked in the Department of Experimental Psychology (2013-2023) and continues collaborations there, including co-leading the WISDOM (working in schools to deliver on mental health) Network: https://wisdom.mhid.org.uk.

Her research is concerned with child development, primarily peer relationships, bullying and mental health. She works with primary, secondary and special education schools across the UK and with children aged 4-18. She is also an advocate for public and community engagement, especially with school staff and parents.

Julia wants to support every child to achieve their potential in school.

Recently funded PI projects:

  • Feasibility trial of an anti-bullying programme for children in special schools.
  • Pupil interactions and networks in special schools.
  • Mental health in schools with diversity.
  • Special schools, mental health and bullying.
  • Teaching staff perspectives: Using VR to enhance PSHE learning.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Henry is a Swire Scholar and is currently reading for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. His doctoral research is fully funded by the Swire Charitable Trust and St Antony’s College.

Henry’s research interests lie primarily in classroom dynamics, specifically the interaction of cognitive, affective and motivational experiences in education settings. His DPhil research seeks the rapprochement between the dominant nomothetic (group-focus) approach in the field of education and psychology with the idiographic (person-focus) approach, which is mostly overlooked. Henry is also interested in advanced quantitative methods (e.g., Dynamic Structural Equation Modelling) and analysing ambulatory assessment data.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Henry undertook a placement year as a research assistant in the Child Development and Learning research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford, whilst completing his BSc in Psychology at the University of Surrey. He continued and completed his MSc in Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford.

 

Publications

Lo, H. T. F. 2022. Children’s Momentary Executive Function Fluctuation in Real-World Classrooms: An Intensive Longitudinal Study. MSc Dissertation. University of Oxford, U.K.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay is a second-year DPhil student investigating how classroom characteristics are related to Pakistani children’s development. She is supervised by Professor Iram Siraj and Dr Katharina Ereky-Stevens and her work is being supported by the Aga Khan University (Pakistan). Anushay received the Patrice Engle Dissertation Grant Award from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) in 2023.

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay also works as a part-time research  assistant at the Developmental Diversity Lab at UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families. Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (under review). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child and Family Factors, Emotion Recognition Accuracy, and Social Behaviour.

Presentations

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (2023, March). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child-Level Factors and Emotion Recognition Accuracy [Paper Presentation]. Society for Research in Child Development, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  4. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom.

Posters

  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Julia teaches and supervises on the MSc in Education and is involved in the Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment; Core Principles of Child Assessment, and the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing papers.

Before joining the Department of Education she worked in the Department of Experimental Psychology (2013-2023) and continues collaborations there, including co-leading the WISDOM (working in schools to deliver on mental health) Network: https://wisdom.mhid.org.uk.

Her research is concerned with child development, primarily peer relationships, bullying and mental health. She works with primary, secondary and special education schools across the UK and with children aged 4-18. She is also an advocate for public and community engagement, especially with school staff and parents.

Julia wants to support every child to achieve their potential in school.

Recently funded PI projects:

  • Feasibility trial of an anti-bullying programme for children in special schools.
  • Pupil interactions and networks in special schools.
  • Mental health in schools with diversity.
  • Special schools, mental health and bullying.
  • Teaching staff perspectives: Using VR to enhance PSHE learning.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Henry is a Swire Scholar and is currently reading for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. His doctoral research is fully funded by the Swire Charitable Trust and St Antony’s College.

Henry’s research interests lie primarily in classroom dynamics, specifically the interaction of cognitive, affective and motivational experiences in education settings. His DPhil research seeks the rapprochement between the dominant nomothetic (group-focus) approach in the field of education and psychology with the idiographic (person-focus) approach, which is mostly overlooked. Henry is also interested in advanced quantitative methods (e.g., Dynamic Structural Equation Modelling) and analysing ambulatory assessment data.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Henry undertook a placement year as a research assistant in the Child Development and Learning research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford, whilst completing his BSc in Psychology at the University of Surrey. He continued and completed his MSc in Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford.

 

Publications

Lo, H. T. F. 2022. Children’s Momentary Executive Function Fluctuation in Real-World Classrooms: An Intensive Longitudinal Study. MSc Dissertation. University of Oxford, U.K.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay is a second-year DPhil student investigating how classroom characteristics are related to Pakistani children’s development. She is supervised by Professor Iram Siraj and Dr Katharina Ereky-Stevens and her work is being supported by the Aga Khan University (Pakistan). Anushay received the Patrice Engle Dissertation Grant Award from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) in 2023.

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay also works as a part-time research  assistant at the Developmental Diversity Lab at UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families. Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (under review). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child and Family Factors, Emotion Recognition Accuracy, and Social Behaviour.

Presentations

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (2023, March). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child-Level Factors and Emotion Recognition Accuracy [Paper Presentation]. Society for Research in Child Development, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  4. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom.

Posters

  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Julia teaches and supervises on the MSc in Education and is involved in the Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment; Core Principles of Child Assessment, and the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing papers.

Before joining the Department of Education she worked in the Department of Experimental Psychology (2013-2023) and continues collaborations there, including co-leading the WISDOM (working in schools to deliver on mental health) Network: https://wisdom.mhid.org.uk.

Her research is concerned with child development, primarily peer relationships, bullying and mental health. She works with primary, secondary and special education schools across the UK and with children aged 4-18. She is also an advocate for public and community engagement, especially with school staff and parents.

Julia wants to support every child to achieve their potential in school.

Recently funded PI projects:

  • Feasibility trial of an anti-bullying programme for children in special schools.
  • Pupil interactions and networks in special schools.
  • Mental health in schools with diversity.
  • Special schools, mental health and bullying.
  • Teaching staff perspectives: Using VR to enhance PSHE learning.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Henry is a Swire Scholar and is currently reading for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. His doctoral research is fully funded by the Swire Charitable Trust and St Antony’s College.

Henry’s research interests lie primarily in classroom dynamics, specifically the interaction of cognitive, affective and motivational experiences in education settings. His DPhil research seeks the rapprochement between the dominant nomothetic (group-focus) approach in the field of education and psychology with the idiographic (person-focus) approach, which is mostly overlooked. Henry is also interested in advanced quantitative methods (e.g., Dynamic Structural Equation Modelling) and analysing ambulatory assessment data.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Henry undertook a placement year as a research assistant in the Child Development and Learning research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford, whilst completing his BSc in Psychology at the University of Surrey. He continued and completed his MSc in Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford.

 

Publications

Lo, H. T. F. 2022. Children’s Momentary Executive Function Fluctuation in Real-World Classrooms: An Intensive Longitudinal Study. MSc Dissertation. University of Oxford, U.K.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay is a second-year DPhil student investigating how classroom characteristics are related to Pakistani children’s development. She is supervised by Professor Iram Siraj and Dr Katharina Ereky-Stevens and her work is being supported by the Aga Khan University (Pakistan). Anushay received the Patrice Engle Dissertation Grant Award from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) in 2023.

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay also works as a part-time research  assistant at the Developmental Diversity Lab at UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families. Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (under review). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child and Family Factors, Emotion Recognition Accuracy, and Social Behaviour.

Presentations

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (2023, March). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child-Level Factors and Emotion Recognition Accuracy [Paper Presentation]. Society for Research in Child Development, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  4. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom.

Posters

  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Julia teaches and supervises on the MSc in Education and is involved in the Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment; Core Principles of Child Assessment, and the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing papers.

Before joining the Department of Education she worked in the Department of Experimental Psychology (2013-2023) and continues collaborations there, including co-leading the WISDOM (working in schools to deliver on mental health) Network: https://wisdom.mhid.org.uk.

Her research is concerned with child development, primarily peer relationships, bullying and mental health. She works with primary, secondary and special education schools across the UK and with children aged 4-18. She is also an advocate for public and community engagement, especially with school staff and parents.

Julia wants to support every child to achieve their potential in school.

Recently funded PI projects:

  • Feasibility trial of an anti-bullying programme for children in special schools.
  • Pupil interactions and networks in special schools.
  • Mental health in schools with diversity.
  • Special schools, mental health and bullying.
  • Teaching staff perspectives: Using VR to enhance PSHE learning.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Henry is a Swire Scholar and is currently reading for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. His doctoral research is fully funded by the Swire Charitable Trust and St Antony’s College.

Henry’s research interests lie primarily in classroom dynamics, specifically the interaction of cognitive, affective and motivational experiences in education settings. His DPhil research seeks the rapprochement between the dominant nomothetic (group-focus) approach in the field of education and psychology with the idiographic (person-focus) approach, which is mostly overlooked. Henry is also interested in advanced quantitative methods (e.g., Dynamic Structural Equation Modelling) and analysing ambulatory assessment data.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Henry undertook a placement year as a research assistant in the Child Development and Learning research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford, whilst completing his BSc in Psychology at the University of Surrey. He continued and completed his MSc in Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford.

 

Publications

Lo, H. T. F. 2022. Children’s Momentary Executive Function Fluctuation in Real-World Classrooms: An Intensive Longitudinal Study. MSc Dissertation. University of Oxford, U.K.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay is a second-year DPhil student investigating how classroom characteristics are related to Pakistani children’s development. She is supervised by Professor Iram Siraj and Dr Katharina Ereky-Stevens and her work is being supported by the Aga Khan University (Pakistan). Anushay received the Patrice Engle Dissertation Grant Award from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) in 2023.

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay also works as a part-time research  assistant at the Developmental Diversity Lab at UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families. Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (under review). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child and Family Factors, Emotion Recognition Accuracy, and Social Behaviour.

Presentations

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (2023, March). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child-Level Factors and Emotion Recognition Accuracy [Paper Presentation]. Society for Research in Child Development, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  4. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom.

Posters

  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Julia teaches and supervises on the MSc in Education and is involved in the Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment; Core Principles of Child Assessment, and the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing papers.

Before joining the Department of Education she worked in the Department of Experimental Psychology (2013-2023) and continues collaborations there, including co-leading the WISDOM (working in schools to deliver on mental health) Network: https://wisdom.mhid.org.uk.

Her research is concerned with child development, primarily peer relationships, bullying and mental health. She works with primary, secondary and special education schools across the UK and with children aged 4-18. She is also an advocate for public and community engagement, especially with school staff and parents.

Julia wants to support every child to achieve their potential in school.

Recently funded PI projects:

  • Feasibility trial of an anti-bullying programme for children in special schools.
  • Pupil interactions and networks in special schools.
  • Mental health in schools with diversity.
  • Special schools, mental health and bullying.
  • Teaching staff perspectives: Using VR to enhance PSHE learning.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Henry is a Swire Scholar and is currently reading for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. His doctoral research is fully funded by the Swire Charitable Trust and St Antony’s College.

Henry’s research interests lie primarily in classroom dynamics, specifically the interaction of cognitive, affective and motivational experiences in education settings. His DPhil research seeks the rapprochement between the dominant nomothetic (group-focus) approach in the field of education and psychology with the idiographic (person-focus) approach, which is mostly overlooked. Henry is also interested in advanced quantitative methods (e.g., Dynamic Structural Equation Modelling) and analysing ambulatory assessment data.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Henry undertook a placement year as a research assistant in the Child Development and Learning research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford, whilst completing his BSc in Psychology at the University of Surrey. He continued and completed his MSc in Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford.

 

Publications

Lo, H. T. F. 2022. Children’s Momentary Executive Function Fluctuation in Real-World Classrooms: An Intensive Longitudinal Study. MSc Dissertation. University of Oxford, U.K.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay is a second-year DPhil student investigating how classroom characteristics are related to Pakistani children’s development. She is supervised by Professor Iram Siraj and Dr Katharina Ereky-Stevens and her work is being supported by the Aga Khan University (Pakistan). Anushay received the Patrice Engle Dissertation Grant Award from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) in 2023.

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay also works as a part-time research  assistant at the Developmental Diversity Lab at UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families. Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (under review). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child and Family Factors, Emotion Recognition Accuracy, and Social Behaviour.

Presentations

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (2023, March). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child-Level Factors and Emotion Recognition Accuracy [Paper Presentation]. Society for Research in Child Development, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  4. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom.

Posters

  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Julia teaches and supervises on the MSc in Education and is involved in the Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment; Core Principles of Child Assessment, and the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing papers.

Before joining the Department of Education she worked in the Department of Experimental Psychology (2013-2023) and continues collaborations there, including co-leading the WISDOM (working in schools to deliver on mental health) Network: https://wisdom.mhid.org.uk.

Her research is concerned with child development, primarily peer relationships, bullying and mental health. She works with primary, secondary and special education schools across the UK and with children aged 4-18. She is also an advocate for public and community engagement, especially with school staff and parents.

Julia wants to support every child to achieve their potential in school.

Recently funded PI projects:

  • Feasibility trial of an anti-bullying programme for children in special schools.
  • Pupil interactions and networks in special schools.
  • Mental health in schools with diversity.
  • Special schools, mental health and bullying.
  • Teaching staff perspectives: Using VR to enhance PSHE learning.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Henry is a Swire Scholar and is currently reading for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. His doctoral research is fully funded by the Swire Charitable Trust and St Antony’s College.

Henry’s research interests lie primarily in classroom dynamics, specifically the interaction of cognitive, affective and motivational experiences in education settings. His DPhil research seeks the rapprochement between the dominant nomothetic (group-focus) approach in the field of education and psychology with the idiographic (person-focus) approach, which is mostly overlooked. Henry is also interested in advanced quantitative methods (e.g., Dynamic Structural Equation Modelling) and analysing ambulatory assessment data.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Henry undertook a placement year as a research assistant in the Child Development and Learning research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford, whilst completing his BSc in Psychology at the University of Surrey. He continued and completed his MSc in Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford.

 

Publications

Lo, H. T. F. 2022. Children’s Momentary Executive Function Fluctuation in Real-World Classrooms: An Intensive Longitudinal Study. MSc Dissertation. University of Oxford, U.K.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay is a second-year DPhil student investigating how classroom characteristics are related to Pakistani children’s development. She is supervised by Professor Iram Siraj and Dr Katharina Ereky-Stevens and her work is being supported by the Aga Khan University (Pakistan). Anushay received the Patrice Engle Dissertation Grant Award from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) in 2023.

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay also works as a part-time research  assistant at the Developmental Diversity Lab at UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families. Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (under review). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child and Family Factors, Emotion Recognition Accuracy, and Social Behaviour.

Presentations

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (2023, March). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child-Level Factors and Emotion Recognition Accuracy [Paper Presentation]. Society for Research in Child Development, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  4. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom.

Posters

  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Julia teaches and supervises on the MSc in Education and is involved in the Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment; Core Principles of Child Assessment, and the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing papers.

Before joining the Department of Education she worked in the Department of Experimental Psychology (2013-2023) and continues collaborations there, including co-leading the WISDOM (working in schools to deliver on mental health) Network: https://wisdom.mhid.org.uk.

Her research is concerned with child development, primarily peer relationships, bullying and mental health. She works with primary, secondary and special education schools across the UK and with children aged 4-18. She is also an advocate for public and community engagement, especially with school staff and parents.

Julia wants to support every child to achieve their potential in school.

Recently funded PI projects:

  • Feasibility trial of an anti-bullying programme for children in special schools.
  • Pupil interactions and networks in special schools.
  • Mental health in schools with diversity.
  • Special schools, mental health and bullying.
  • Teaching staff perspectives: Using VR to enhance PSHE learning.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Henry is a Swire Scholar and is currently reading for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. His doctoral research is fully funded by the Swire Charitable Trust and St Antony’s College.

Henry’s research interests lie primarily in classroom dynamics, specifically the interaction of cognitive, affective and motivational experiences in education settings. His DPhil research seeks the rapprochement between the dominant nomothetic (group-focus) approach in the field of education and psychology with the idiographic (person-focus) approach, which is mostly overlooked. Henry is also interested in advanced quantitative methods (e.g., Dynamic Structural Equation Modelling) and analysing ambulatory assessment data.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Henry undertook a placement year as a research assistant in the Child Development and Learning research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford, whilst completing his BSc in Psychology at the University of Surrey. He continued and completed his MSc in Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford.

 

Publications

Lo, H. T. F. 2022. Children’s Momentary Executive Function Fluctuation in Real-World Classrooms: An Intensive Longitudinal Study. MSc Dissertation. University of Oxford, U.K.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay is a second-year DPhil student investigating how classroom characteristics are related to Pakistani children’s development. She is supervised by Professor Iram Siraj and Dr Katharina Ereky-Stevens and her work is being supported by the Aga Khan University (Pakistan). Anushay received the Patrice Engle Dissertation Grant Award from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) in 2023.

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay also works as a part-time research  assistant at the Developmental Diversity Lab at UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families. Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (under review). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child and Family Factors, Emotion Recognition Accuracy, and Social Behaviour.

Presentations

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (2023, March). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child-Level Factors and Emotion Recognition Accuracy [Paper Presentation]. Society for Research in Child Development, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  4. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom.

Posters

  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Julia teaches and supervises on the MSc in Education and is involved in the Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment; Core Principles of Child Assessment, and the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing papers.

Before joining the Department of Education she worked in the Department of Experimental Psychology (2013-2023) and continues collaborations there, including co-leading the WISDOM (working in schools to deliver on mental health) Network: https://wisdom.mhid.org.uk.

Her research is concerned with child development, primarily peer relationships, bullying and mental health. She works with primary, secondary and special education schools across the UK and with children aged 4-18. She is also an advocate for public and community engagement, especially with school staff and parents.

Julia wants to support every child to achieve their potential in school.

Recently funded PI projects:

  • Feasibility trial of an anti-bullying programme for children in special schools.
  • Pupil interactions and networks in special schools.
  • Mental health in schools with diversity.
  • Special schools, mental health and bullying.
  • Teaching staff perspectives: Using VR to enhance PSHE learning.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Henry is a Swire Scholar and is currently reading for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. His doctoral research is fully funded by the Swire Charitable Trust and St Antony’s College.

Henry’s research interests lie primarily in classroom dynamics, specifically the interaction of cognitive, affective and motivational experiences in education settings. His DPhil research seeks the rapprochement between the dominant nomothetic (group-focus) approach in the field of education and psychology with the idiographic (person-focus) approach, which is mostly overlooked. Henry is also interested in advanced quantitative methods (e.g., Dynamic Structural Equation Modelling) and analysing ambulatory assessment data.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Henry undertook a placement year as a research assistant in the Child Development and Learning research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford, whilst completing his BSc in Psychology at the University of Surrey. He continued and completed his MSc in Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford.

 

Publications

Lo, H. T. F. 2022. Children’s Momentary Executive Function Fluctuation in Real-World Classrooms: An Intensive Longitudinal Study. MSc Dissertation. University of Oxford, U.K.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay is a second-year DPhil student investigating how classroom characteristics are related to Pakistani children’s development. She is supervised by Professor Iram Siraj and Dr Katharina Ereky-Stevens and her work is being supported by the Aga Khan University (Pakistan). Anushay received the Patrice Engle Dissertation Grant Award from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) in 2023.

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay also works as a part-time research  assistant at the Developmental Diversity Lab at UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families. Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (under review). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child and Family Factors, Emotion Recognition Accuracy, and Social Behaviour.

Presentations

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (2023, March). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child-Level Factors and Emotion Recognition Accuracy [Paper Presentation]. Society for Research in Child Development, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  4. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom.

Posters

  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Julia teaches and supervises on the MSc in Education and is involved in the Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment; Core Principles of Child Assessment, and the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing papers.

Before joining the Department of Education she worked in the Department of Experimental Psychology (2013-2023) and continues collaborations there, including co-leading the WISDOM (working in schools to deliver on mental health) Network: https://wisdom.mhid.org.uk.

Her research is concerned with child development, primarily peer relationships, bullying and mental health. She works with primary, secondary and special education schools across the UK and with children aged 4-18. She is also an advocate for public and community engagement, especially with school staff and parents.

Julia wants to support every child to achieve their potential in school.

Recently funded PI projects:

  • Feasibility trial of an anti-bullying programme for children in special schools.
  • Pupil interactions and networks in special schools.
  • Mental health in schools with diversity.
  • Special schools, mental health and bullying.
  • Teaching staff perspectives: Using VR to enhance PSHE learning.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Henry is a Swire Scholar and is currently reading for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. His doctoral research is fully funded by the Swire Charitable Trust and St Antony’s College.

Henry’s research interests lie primarily in classroom dynamics, specifically the interaction of cognitive, affective and motivational experiences in education settings. His DPhil research seeks the rapprochement between the dominant nomothetic (group-focus) approach in the field of education and psychology with the idiographic (person-focus) approach, which is mostly overlooked. Henry is also interested in advanced quantitative methods (e.g., Dynamic Structural Equation Modelling) and analysing ambulatory assessment data.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Henry undertook a placement year as a research assistant in the Child Development and Learning research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford, whilst completing his BSc in Psychology at the University of Surrey. He continued and completed his MSc in Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford.

 

Publications

Lo, H. T. F. 2022. Children’s Momentary Executive Function Fluctuation in Real-World Classrooms: An Intensive Longitudinal Study. MSc Dissertation. University of Oxford, U.K.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay is a second-year DPhil student investigating how classroom characteristics are related to Pakistani children’s development. She is supervised by Professor Iram Siraj and Dr Katharina Ereky-Stevens and her work is being supported by the Aga Khan University (Pakistan). Anushay received the Patrice Engle Dissertation Grant Award from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) in 2023.

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay also works as a part-time research  assistant at the Developmental Diversity Lab at UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families. Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (under review). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child and Family Factors, Emotion Recognition Accuracy, and Social Behaviour.

Presentations

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (2023, March). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child-Level Factors and Emotion Recognition Accuracy [Paper Presentation]. Society for Research in Child Development, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  4. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom.

Posters

  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Julia teaches and supervises on the MSc in Education and is involved in the Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment; Core Principles of Child Assessment, and the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing papers.

Before joining the Department of Education she worked in the Department of Experimental Psychology (2013-2023) and continues collaborations there, including co-leading the WISDOM (working in schools to deliver on mental health) Network: https://wisdom.mhid.org.uk.

Her research is concerned with child development, primarily peer relationships, bullying and mental health. She works with primary, secondary and special education schools across the UK and with children aged 4-18. She is also an advocate for public and community engagement, especially with school staff and parents.

Julia wants to support every child to achieve their potential in school.

Recently funded PI projects:

  • Feasibility trial of an anti-bullying programme for children in special schools.
  • Pupil interactions and networks in special schools.
  • Mental health in schools with diversity.
  • Special schools, mental health and bullying.
  • Teaching staff perspectives: Using VR to enhance PSHE learning.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Henry is a Swire Scholar and is currently reading for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. His doctoral research is fully funded by the Swire Charitable Trust and St Antony’s College.

Henry’s research interests lie primarily in classroom dynamics, specifically the interaction of cognitive, affective and motivational experiences in education settings. His DPhil research seeks the rapprochement between the dominant nomothetic (group-focus) approach in the field of education and psychology with the idiographic (person-focus) approach, which is mostly overlooked. Henry is also interested in advanced quantitative methods (e.g., Dynamic Structural Equation Modelling) and analysing ambulatory assessment data.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Henry undertook a placement year as a research assistant in the Child Development and Learning research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford, whilst completing his BSc in Psychology at the University of Surrey. He continued and completed his MSc in Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford.

 

Publications

Lo, H. T. F. 2022. Children’s Momentary Executive Function Fluctuation in Real-World Classrooms: An Intensive Longitudinal Study. MSc Dissertation. University of Oxford, U.K.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay is a second-year DPhil student investigating how classroom characteristics are related to Pakistani children’s development. She is supervised by Professor Iram Siraj and Dr Katharina Ereky-Stevens and her work is being supported by the Aga Khan University (Pakistan). Anushay received the Patrice Engle Dissertation Grant Award from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) in 2023.

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay also works as a part-time research  assistant at the Developmental Diversity Lab at UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families. Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (under review). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child and Family Factors, Emotion Recognition Accuracy, and Social Behaviour.

Presentations

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (2023, March). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child-Level Factors and Emotion Recognition Accuracy [Paper Presentation]. Society for Research in Child Development, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  4. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom.

Posters

  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Julia teaches and supervises on the MSc in Education and is involved in the Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment; Core Principles of Child Assessment, and the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing papers.

Before joining the Department of Education she worked in the Department of Experimental Psychology (2013-2023) and continues collaborations there, including co-leading the WISDOM (working in schools to deliver on mental health) Network: https://wisdom.mhid.org.uk.

Her research is concerned with child development, primarily peer relationships, bullying and mental health. She works with primary, secondary and special education schools across the UK and with children aged 4-18. She is also an advocate for public and community engagement, especially with school staff and parents.

Julia wants to support every child to achieve their potential in school.

Recently funded PI projects:

  • Feasibility trial of an anti-bullying programme for children in special schools.
  • Pupil interactions and networks in special schools.
  • Mental health in schools with diversity.
  • Special schools, mental health and bullying.
  • Teaching staff perspectives: Using VR to enhance PSHE learning.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Henry is a Swire Scholar and is currently reading for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. His doctoral research is fully funded by the Swire Charitable Trust and St Antony’s College.

Henry’s research interests lie primarily in classroom dynamics, specifically the interaction of cognitive, affective and motivational experiences in education settings. His DPhil research seeks the rapprochement between the dominant nomothetic (group-focus) approach in the field of education and psychology with the idiographic (person-focus) approach, which is mostly overlooked. Henry is also interested in advanced quantitative methods (e.g., Dynamic Structural Equation Modelling) and analysing ambulatory assessment data.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Henry undertook a placement year as a research assistant in the Child Development and Learning research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford, whilst completing his BSc in Psychology at the University of Surrey. He continued and completed his MSc in Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford.

 

Publications

Lo, H. T. F. 2022. Children’s Momentary Executive Function Fluctuation in Real-World Classrooms: An Intensive Longitudinal Study. MSc Dissertation. University of Oxford, U.K.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay is a second-year DPhil student investigating how classroom characteristics are related to Pakistani children’s development. She is supervised by Professor Iram Siraj and Dr Katharina Ereky-Stevens and her work is being supported by the Aga Khan University (Pakistan). Anushay received the Patrice Engle Dissertation Grant Award from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) in 2023.

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay also works as a part-time research  assistant at the Developmental Diversity Lab at UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families. Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (under review). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child and Family Factors, Emotion Recognition Accuracy, and Social Behaviour.

Presentations

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (2023, March). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child-Level Factors and Emotion Recognition Accuracy [Paper Presentation]. Society for Research in Child Development, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  4. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom.

Posters

  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Julia teaches and supervises on the MSc in Education and is involved in the Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment; Core Principles of Child Assessment, and the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing papers.

Before joining the Department of Education she worked in the Department of Experimental Psychology (2013-2023) and continues collaborations there, including co-leading the WISDOM (working in schools to deliver on mental health) Network: https://wisdom.mhid.org.uk.

Her research is concerned with child development, primarily peer relationships, bullying and mental health. She works with primary, secondary and special education schools across the UK and with children aged 4-18. She is also an advocate for public and community engagement, especially with school staff and parents.

Julia wants to support every child to achieve their potential in school.

Recently funded PI projects:

  • Feasibility trial of an anti-bullying programme for children in special schools.
  • Pupil interactions and networks in special schools.
  • Mental health in schools with diversity.
  • Special schools, mental health and bullying.
  • Teaching staff perspectives: Using VR to enhance PSHE learning.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Henry is a Swire Scholar and is currently reading for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. His doctoral research is fully funded by the Swire Charitable Trust and St Antony’s College.

Henry’s research interests lie primarily in classroom dynamics, specifically the interaction of cognitive, affective and motivational experiences in education settings. His DPhil research seeks the rapprochement between the dominant nomothetic (group-focus) approach in the field of education and psychology with the idiographic (person-focus) approach, which is mostly overlooked. Henry is also interested in advanced quantitative methods (e.g., Dynamic Structural Equation Modelling) and analysing ambulatory assessment data.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Henry undertook a placement year as a research assistant in the Child Development and Learning research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford, whilst completing his BSc in Psychology at the University of Surrey. He continued and completed his MSc in Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford.

 

Publications

Lo, H. T. F. 2022. Children’s Momentary Executive Function Fluctuation in Real-World Classrooms: An Intensive Longitudinal Study. MSc Dissertation. University of Oxford, U.K.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay is a second-year DPhil student investigating how classroom characteristics are related to Pakistani children’s development. She is supervised by Professor Iram Siraj and Dr Katharina Ereky-Stevens and her work is being supported by the Aga Khan University (Pakistan). Anushay received the Patrice Engle Dissertation Grant Award from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) in 2023.

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay also works as a part-time research  assistant at the Developmental Diversity Lab at UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families. Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (under review). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child and Family Factors, Emotion Recognition Accuracy, and Social Behaviour.

Presentations

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (2023, March). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child-Level Factors and Emotion Recognition Accuracy [Paper Presentation]. Society for Research in Child Development, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  4. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom.

Posters

  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Julia teaches and supervises on the MSc in Education and is involved in the Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment; Core Principles of Child Assessment, and the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing papers.

Before joining the Department of Education she worked in the Department of Experimental Psychology (2013-2023) and continues collaborations there, including co-leading the WISDOM (working in schools to deliver on mental health) Network: https://wisdom.mhid.org.uk.

Her research is concerned with child development, primarily peer relationships, bullying and mental health. She works with primary, secondary and special education schools across the UK and with children aged 4-18. She is also an advocate for public and community engagement, especially with school staff and parents.

Julia wants to support every child to achieve their potential in school.

Recently funded PI projects:

  • Feasibility trial of an anti-bullying programme for children in special schools.
  • Pupil interactions and networks in special schools.
  • Mental health in schools with diversity.
  • Special schools, mental health and bullying.
  • Teaching staff perspectives: Using VR to enhance PSHE learning.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Henry is a Swire Scholar and is currently reading for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. His doctoral research is fully funded by the Swire Charitable Trust and St Antony’s College.

Henry’s research interests lie primarily in classroom dynamics, specifically the interaction of cognitive, affective and motivational experiences in education settings. His DPhil research seeks the rapprochement between the dominant nomothetic (group-focus) approach in the field of education and psychology with the idiographic (person-focus) approach, which is mostly overlooked. Henry is also interested in advanced quantitative methods (e.g., Dynamic Structural Equation Modelling) and analysing ambulatory assessment data.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Henry undertook a placement year as a research assistant in the Child Development and Learning research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford, whilst completing his BSc in Psychology at the University of Surrey. He continued and completed his MSc in Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford.

 

Publications

Lo, H. T. F. 2022. Children’s Momentary Executive Function Fluctuation in Real-World Classrooms: An Intensive Longitudinal Study. MSc Dissertation. University of Oxford, U.K.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay is a second-year DPhil student investigating how classroom characteristics are related to Pakistani children’s development. She is supervised by Professor Iram Siraj and Dr Katharina Ereky-Stevens and her work is being supported by the Aga Khan University (Pakistan). Anushay received the Patrice Engle Dissertation Grant Award from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) in 2023.

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay also works as a part-time research  assistant at the Developmental Diversity Lab at UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families. Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (under review). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child and Family Factors, Emotion Recognition Accuracy, and Social Behaviour.

Presentations

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (2023, March). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child-Level Factors and Emotion Recognition Accuracy [Paper Presentation]. Society for Research in Child Development, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  4. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom.

Posters

  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Julia teaches and supervises on the MSc in Education and is involved in the Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment; Core Principles of Child Assessment, and the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing papers.

Before joining the Department of Education she worked in the Department of Experimental Psychology (2013-2023) and continues collaborations there, including co-leading the WISDOM (working in schools to deliver on mental health) Network: https://wisdom.mhid.org.uk.

Her research is concerned with child development, primarily peer relationships, bullying and mental health. She works with primary, secondary and special education schools across the UK and with children aged 4-18. She is also an advocate for public and community engagement, especially with school staff and parents.

Julia wants to support every child to achieve their potential in school.

Recently funded PI projects:

  • Feasibility trial of an anti-bullying programme for children in special schools.
  • Pupil interactions and networks in special schools.
  • Mental health in schools with diversity.
  • Special schools, mental health and bullying.
  • Teaching staff perspectives: Using VR to enhance PSHE learning.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Henry is a Swire Scholar and is currently reading for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. His doctoral research is fully funded by the Swire Charitable Trust and St Antony’s College.

Henry’s research interests lie primarily in classroom dynamics, specifically the interaction of cognitive, affective and motivational experiences in education settings. His DPhil research seeks the rapprochement between the dominant nomothetic (group-focus) approach in the field of education and psychology with the idiographic (person-focus) approach, which is mostly overlooked. Henry is also interested in advanced quantitative methods (e.g., Dynamic Structural Equation Modelling) and analysing ambulatory assessment data.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Henry undertook a placement year as a research assistant in the Child Development and Learning research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford, whilst completing his BSc in Psychology at the University of Surrey. He continued and completed his MSc in Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford.

 

Publications

Lo, H. T. F. 2022. Children’s Momentary Executive Function Fluctuation in Real-World Classrooms: An Intensive Longitudinal Study. MSc Dissertation. University of Oxford, U.K.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay is a second-year DPhil student investigating how classroom characteristics are related to Pakistani children’s development. She is supervised by Professor Iram Siraj and Dr Katharina Ereky-Stevens and her work is being supported by the Aga Khan University (Pakistan). Anushay received the Patrice Engle Dissertation Grant Award from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) in 2023.

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay also works as a part-time research  assistant at the Developmental Diversity Lab at UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families. Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (under review). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child and Family Factors, Emotion Recognition Accuracy, and Social Behaviour.

Presentations

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (2023, March). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child-Level Factors and Emotion Recognition Accuracy [Paper Presentation]. Society for Research in Child Development, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  4. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom.

Posters

  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Julia teaches and supervises on the MSc in Education and is involved in the Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment; Core Principles of Child Assessment, and the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing papers.

Before joining the Department of Education she worked in the Department of Experimental Psychology (2013-2023) and continues collaborations there, including co-leading the WISDOM (working in schools to deliver on mental health) Network: https://wisdom.mhid.org.uk.

Her research is concerned with child development, primarily peer relationships, bullying and mental health. She works with primary, secondary and special education schools across the UK and with children aged 4-18. She is also an advocate for public and community engagement, especially with school staff and parents.

Julia wants to support every child to achieve their potential in school.

Recently funded PI projects:

  • Feasibility trial of an anti-bullying programme for children in special schools.
  • Pupil interactions and networks in special schools.
  • Mental health in schools with diversity.
  • Special schools, mental health and bullying.
  • Teaching staff perspectives: Using VR to enhance PSHE learning.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Henry is a Swire Scholar and is currently reading for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. His doctoral research is fully funded by the Swire Charitable Trust and St Antony’s College.

Henry’s research interests lie primarily in classroom dynamics, specifically the interaction of cognitive, affective and motivational experiences in education settings. His DPhil research seeks the rapprochement between the dominant nomothetic (group-focus) approach in the field of education and psychology with the idiographic (person-focus) approach, which is mostly overlooked. Henry is also interested in advanced quantitative methods (e.g., Dynamic Structural Equation Modelling) and analysing ambulatory assessment data.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Henry undertook a placement year as a research assistant in the Child Development and Learning research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford, whilst completing his BSc in Psychology at the University of Surrey. He continued and completed his MSc in Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford.

 

Publications

Lo, H. T. F. 2022. Children’s Momentary Executive Function Fluctuation in Real-World Classrooms: An Intensive Longitudinal Study. MSc Dissertation. University of Oxford, U.K.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay is a second-year DPhil student investigating how classroom characteristics are related to Pakistani children’s development. She is supervised by Professor Iram Siraj and Dr Katharina Ereky-Stevens and her work is being supported by the Aga Khan University (Pakistan). Anushay received the Patrice Engle Dissertation Grant Award from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) in 2023.

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay also works as a part-time research  assistant at the Developmental Diversity Lab at UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families. Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (under review). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child and Family Factors, Emotion Recognition Accuracy, and Social Behaviour.

Presentations

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (2023, March). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child-Level Factors and Emotion Recognition Accuracy [Paper Presentation]. Society for Research in Child Development, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  4. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom.

Posters

  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Julia teaches and supervises on the MSc in Education and is involved in the Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment; Core Principles of Child Assessment, and the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing papers.

Before joining the Department of Education she worked in the Department of Experimental Psychology (2013-2023) and continues collaborations there, including co-leading the WISDOM (working in schools to deliver on mental health) Network: https://wisdom.mhid.org.uk.

Her research is concerned with child development, primarily peer relationships, bullying and mental health. She works with primary, secondary and special education schools across the UK and with children aged 4-18. She is also an advocate for public and community engagement, especially with school staff and parents.

Julia wants to support every child to achieve their potential in school.

Recently funded PI projects:

  • Feasibility trial of an anti-bullying programme for children in special schools.
  • Pupil interactions and networks in special schools.
  • Mental health in schools with diversity.
  • Special schools, mental health and bullying.
  • Teaching staff perspectives: Using VR to enhance PSHE learning.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Henry is a Swire Scholar and is currently reading for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. His doctoral research is fully funded by the Swire Charitable Trust and St Antony’s College.

Henry’s research interests lie primarily in classroom dynamics, specifically the interaction of cognitive, affective and motivational experiences in education settings. His DPhil research seeks the rapprochement between the dominant nomothetic (group-focus) approach in the field of education and psychology with the idiographic (person-focus) approach, which is mostly overlooked. Henry is also interested in advanced quantitative methods (e.g., Dynamic Structural Equation Modelling) and analysing ambulatory assessment data.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Henry undertook a placement year as a research assistant in the Child Development and Learning research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford, whilst completing his BSc in Psychology at the University of Surrey. He continued and completed his MSc in Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford.

 

Publications

Lo, H. T. F. 2022. Children’s Momentary Executive Function Fluctuation in Real-World Classrooms: An Intensive Longitudinal Study. MSc Dissertation. University of Oxford, U.K.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay is a second-year DPhil student investigating how classroom characteristics are related to Pakistani children’s development. She is supervised by Professor Iram Siraj and Dr Katharina Ereky-Stevens and her work is being supported by the Aga Khan University (Pakistan). Anushay received the Patrice Engle Dissertation Grant Award from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) in 2023.

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay also works as a part-time research  assistant at the Developmental Diversity Lab at UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families. Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (under review). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child and Family Factors, Emotion Recognition Accuracy, and Social Behaviour.

Presentations

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (2023, March). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child-Level Factors and Emotion Recognition Accuracy [Paper Presentation]. Society for Research in Child Development, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  4. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom.

Posters

  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Julia teaches and supervises on the MSc in Education and is involved in the Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment; Core Principles of Child Assessment, and the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing papers.

Before joining the Department of Education she worked in the Department of Experimental Psychology (2013-2023) and continues collaborations there, including co-leading the WISDOM (working in schools to deliver on mental health) Network: https://wisdom.mhid.org.uk.

Her research is concerned with child development, primarily peer relationships, bullying and mental health. She works with primary, secondary and special education schools across the UK and with children aged 4-18. She is also an advocate for public and community engagement, especially with school staff and parents.

Julia wants to support every child to achieve their potential in school.

Recently funded PI projects:

  • Feasibility trial of an anti-bullying programme for children in special schools.
  • Pupil interactions and networks in special schools.
  • Mental health in schools with diversity.
  • Special schools, mental health and bullying.
  • Teaching staff perspectives: Using VR to enhance PSHE learning.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Henry is a Swire Scholar and is currently reading for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. His doctoral research is fully funded by the Swire Charitable Trust and St Antony’s College.

Henry’s research interests lie primarily in classroom dynamics, specifically the interaction of cognitive, affective and motivational experiences in education settings. His DPhil research seeks the rapprochement between the dominant nomothetic (group-focus) approach in the field of education and psychology with the idiographic (person-focus) approach, which is mostly overlooked. Henry is also interested in advanced quantitative methods (e.g., Dynamic Structural Equation Modelling) and analysing ambulatory assessment data.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Henry undertook a placement year as a research assistant in the Child Development and Learning research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford, whilst completing his BSc in Psychology at the University of Surrey. He continued and completed his MSc in Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford.

 

Publications

Lo, H. T. F. 2022. Children’s Momentary Executive Function Fluctuation in Real-World Classrooms: An Intensive Longitudinal Study. MSc Dissertation. University of Oxford, U.K.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay is a second-year DPhil student investigating how classroom characteristics are related to Pakistani children’s development. She is supervised by Professor Iram Siraj and Dr Katharina Ereky-Stevens and her work is being supported by the Aga Khan University (Pakistan). Anushay received the Patrice Engle Dissertation Grant Award from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) in 2023.

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay also works as a part-time research  assistant at the Developmental Diversity Lab at UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families. Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (under review). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child and Family Factors, Emotion Recognition Accuracy, and Social Behaviour.

Presentations

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (2023, March). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child-Level Factors and Emotion Recognition Accuracy [Paper Presentation]. Society for Research in Child Development, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  4. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom.

Posters

  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Julia teaches and supervises on the MSc in Education and is involved in the Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment; Core Principles of Child Assessment, and the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing papers.

Before joining the Department of Education she worked in the Department of Experimental Psychology (2013-2023) and continues collaborations there, including co-leading the WISDOM (working in schools to deliver on mental health) Network: https://wisdom.mhid.org.uk.

Her research is concerned with child development, primarily peer relationships, bullying and mental health. She works with primary, secondary and special education schools across the UK and with children aged 4-18. She is also an advocate for public and community engagement, especially with school staff and parents.

Julia wants to support every child to achieve their potential in school.

Recently funded PI projects:

  • Feasibility trial of an anti-bullying programme for children in special schools.
  • Pupil interactions and networks in special schools.
  • Mental health in schools with diversity.
  • Special schools, mental health and bullying.
  • Teaching staff perspectives: Using VR to enhance PSHE learning.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Henry is a Swire Scholar and is currently reading for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. His doctoral research is fully funded by the Swire Charitable Trust and St Antony’s College.

Henry’s research interests lie primarily in classroom dynamics, specifically the interaction of cognitive, affective and motivational experiences in education settings. His DPhil research seeks the rapprochement between the dominant nomothetic (group-focus) approach in the field of education and psychology with the idiographic (person-focus) approach, which is mostly overlooked. Henry is also interested in advanced quantitative methods (e.g., Dynamic Structural Equation Modelling) and analysing ambulatory assessment data.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Henry undertook a placement year as a research assistant in the Child Development and Learning research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford, whilst completing his BSc in Psychology at the University of Surrey. He continued and completed his MSc in Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford.

 

Publications

Lo, H. T. F. 2022. Children’s Momentary Executive Function Fluctuation in Real-World Classrooms: An Intensive Longitudinal Study. MSc Dissertation. University of Oxford, U.K.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay is a second-year DPhil student investigating how classroom characteristics are related to Pakistani children’s development. She is supervised by Professor Iram Siraj and Dr Katharina Ereky-Stevens and her work is being supported by the Aga Khan University (Pakistan). Anushay received the Patrice Engle Dissertation Grant Award from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) in 2023.

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay also works as a part-time research  assistant at the Developmental Diversity Lab at UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families. Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (under review). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child and Family Factors, Emotion Recognition Accuracy, and Social Behaviour.

Presentations

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (2023, March). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child-Level Factors and Emotion Recognition Accuracy [Paper Presentation]. Society for Research in Child Development, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  4. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom.

Posters

  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Julia teaches and supervises on the MSc in Education and is involved in the Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment; Core Principles of Child Assessment, and the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing papers.

Before joining the Department of Education she worked in the Department of Experimental Psychology (2013-2023) and continues collaborations there, including co-leading the WISDOM (working in schools to deliver on mental health) Network: https://wisdom.mhid.org.uk.

Her research is concerned with child development, primarily peer relationships, bullying and mental health. She works with primary, secondary and special education schools across the UK and with children aged 4-18. She is also an advocate for public and community engagement, especially with school staff and parents.

Julia wants to support every child to achieve their potential in school.

Recently funded PI projects:

  • Feasibility trial of an anti-bullying programme for children in special schools.
  • Pupil interactions and networks in special schools.
  • Mental health in schools with diversity.
  • Special schools, mental health and bullying.
  • Teaching staff perspectives: Using VR to enhance PSHE learning.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Henry is a Swire Scholar and is currently reading for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. His doctoral research is fully funded by the Swire Charitable Trust and St Antony’s College.

Henry’s research interests lie primarily in classroom dynamics, specifically the interaction of cognitive, affective and motivational experiences in education settings. His DPhil research seeks the rapprochement between the dominant nomothetic (group-focus) approach in the field of education and psychology with the idiographic (person-focus) approach, which is mostly overlooked. Henry is also interested in advanced quantitative methods (e.g., Dynamic Structural Equation Modelling) and analysing ambulatory assessment data.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Henry undertook a placement year as a research assistant in the Child Development and Learning research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford, whilst completing his BSc in Psychology at the University of Surrey. He continued and completed his MSc in Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford.

 

Publications

Lo, H. T. F. 2022. Children’s Momentary Executive Function Fluctuation in Real-World Classrooms: An Intensive Longitudinal Study. MSc Dissertation. University of Oxford, U.K.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay is a second-year DPhil student investigating how classroom characteristics are related to Pakistani children’s development. She is supervised by Professor Iram Siraj and Dr Katharina Ereky-Stevens and her work is being supported by the Aga Khan University (Pakistan). Anushay received the Patrice Engle Dissertation Grant Award from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) in 2023.

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay also works as a part-time research  assistant at the Developmental Diversity Lab at UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families. Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (under review). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child and Family Factors, Emotion Recognition Accuracy, and Social Behaviour.

Presentations

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (2023, March). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child-Level Factors and Emotion Recognition Accuracy [Paper Presentation]. Society for Research in Child Development, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  4. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom.

Posters

  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Julia teaches and supervises on the MSc in Education and is involved in the Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment; Core Principles of Child Assessment, and the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing papers.

Before joining the Department of Education she worked in the Department of Experimental Psychology (2013-2023) and continues collaborations there, including co-leading the WISDOM (working in schools to deliver on mental health) Network: https://wisdom.mhid.org.uk.

Her research is concerned with child development, primarily peer relationships, bullying and mental health. She works with primary, secondary and special education schools across the UK and with children aged 4-18. She is also an advocate for public and community engagement, especially with school staff and parents.

Julia wants to support every child to achieve their potential in school.

Recently funded PI projects:

  • Feasibility trial of an anti-bullying programme for children in special schools.
  • Pupil interactions and networks in special schools.
  • Mental health in schools with diversity.
  • Special schools, mental health and bullying.
  • Teaching staff perspectives: Using VR to enhance PSHE learning.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Henry is a Swire Scholar and is currently reading for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. His doctoral research is fully funded by the Swire Charitable Trust and St Antony’s College.

Henry’s research interests lie primarily in classroom dynamics, specifically the interaction of cognitive, affective and motivational experiences in education settings. His DPhil research seeks the rapprochement between the dominant nomothetic (group-focus) approach in the field of education and psychology with the idiographic (person-focus) approach, which is mostly overlooked. Henry is also interested in advanced quantitative methods (e.g., Dynamic Structural Equation Modelling) and analysing ambulatory assessment data.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Henry undertook a placement year as a research assistant in the Child Development and Learning research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford, whilst completing his BSc in Psychology at the University of Surrey. He continued and completed his MSc in Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford.

 

Publications

Lo, H. T. F. 2022. Children’s Momentary Executive Function Fluctuation in Real-World Classrooms: An Intensive Longitudinal Study. MSc Dissertation. University of Oxford, U.K.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay is a second-year DPhil student investigating how classroom characteristics are related to Pakistani children’s development. She is supervised by Professor Iram Siraj and Dr Katharina Ereky-Stevens and her work is being supported by the Aga Khan University (Pakistan). Anushay received the Patrice Engle Dissertation Grant Award from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) in 2023.

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay also works as a part-time research  assistant at the Developmental Diversity Lab at UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families. Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (under review). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child and Family Factors, Emotion Recognition Accuracy, and Social Behaviour.

Presentations

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (2023, March). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child-Level Factors and Emotion Recognition Accuracy [Paper Presentation]. Society for Research in Child Development, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  4. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom.

Posters

  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Julia teaches and supervises on the MSc in Education and is involved in the Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment; Core Principles of Child Assessment, and the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing papers.

Before joining the Department of Education she worked in the Department of Experimental Psychology (2013-2023) and continues collaborations there, including co-leading the WISDOM (working in schools to deliver on mental health) Network: https://wisdom.mhid.org.uk.

Her research is concerned with child development, primarily peer relationships, bullying and mental health. She works with primary, secondary and special education schools across the UK and with children aged 4-18. She is also an advocate for public and community engagement, especially with school staff and parents.

Julia wants to support every child to achieve their potential in school.

Recently funded PI projects:

  • Feasibility trial of an anti-bullying programme for children in special schools.
  • Pupil interactions and networks in special schools.
  • Mental health in schools with diversity.
  • Special schools, mental health and bullying.
  • Teaching staff perspectives: Using VR to enhance PSHE learning.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Henry is a Swire Scholar and is currently reading for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. His doctoral research is fully funded by the Swire Charitable Trust and St Antony’s College.

Henry’s research interests lie primarily in classroom dynamics, specifically the interaction of cognitive, affective and motivational experiences in education settings. His DPhil research seeks the rapprochement between the dominant nomothetic (group-focus) approach in the field of education and psychology with the idiographic (person-focus) approach, which is mostly overlooked. Henry is also interested in advanced quantitative methods (e.g., Dynamic Structural Equation Modelling) and analysing ambulatory assessment data.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Henry undertook a placement year as a research assistant in the Child Development and Learning research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford, whilst completing his BSc in Psychology at the University of Surrey. He continued and completed his MSc in Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford.

 

Publications

Lo, H. T. F. 2022. Children’s Momentary Executive Function Fluctuation in Real-World Classrooms: An Intensive Longitudinal Study. MSc Dissertation. University of Oxford, U.K.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay is a second-year DPhil student investigating how classroom characteristics are related to Pakistani children’s development. She is supervised by Professor Iram Siraj and Dr Katharina Ereky-Stevens and her work is being supported by the Aga Khan University (Pakistan). Anushay received the Patrice Engle Dissertation Grant Award from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) in 2023.

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay also works as a part-time research  assistant at the Developmental Diversity Lab at UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families. Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (under review). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child and Family Factors, Emotion Recognition Accuracy, and Social Behaviour.

Presentations

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (2023, March). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child-Level Factors and Emotion Recognition Accuracy [Paper Presentation]. Society for Research in Child Development, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  4. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom.

Posters

  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Julia teaches and supervises on the MSc in Education and is involved in the Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment; Core Principles of Child Assessment, and the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing papers.

Before joining the Department of Education she worked in the Department of Experimental Psychology (2013-2023) and continues collaborations there, including co-leading the WISDOM (working in schools to deliver on mental health) Network: https://wisdom.mhid.org.uk.

Her research is concerned with child development, primarily peer relationships, bullying and mental health. She works with primary, secondary and special education schools across the UK and with children aged 4-18. She is also an advocate for public and community engagement, especially with school staff and parents.

Julia wants to support every child to achieve their potential in school.

Recently funded PI projects:

  • Feasibility trial of an anti-bullying programme for children in special schools.
  • Pupil interactions and networks in special schools.
  • Mental health in schools with diversity.
  • Special schools, mental health and bullying.
  • Teaching staff perspectives: Using VR to enhance PSHE learning.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Henry is a Swire Scholar and is currently reading for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. His doctoral research is fully funded by the Swire Charitable Trust and St Antony’s College.

Henry’s research interests lie primarily in classroom dynamics, specifically the interaction of cognitive, affective and motivational experiences in education settings. His DPhil research seeks the rapprochement between the dominant nomothetic (group-focus) approach in the field of education and psychology with the idiographic (person-focus) approach, which is mostly overlooked. Henry is also interested in advanced quantitative methods (e.g., Dynamic Structural Equation Modelling) and analysing ambulatory assessment data.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Henry undertook a placement year as a research assistant in the Child Development and Learning research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford, whilst completing his BSc in Psychology at the University of Surrey. He continued and completed his MSc in Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford.

 

Publications

Lo, H. T. F. 2022. Children’s Momentary Executive Function Fluctuation in Real-World Classrooms: An Intensive Longitudinal Study. MSc Dissertation. University of Oxford, U.K.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay is a second-year DPhil student investigating how classroom characteristics are related to Pakistani children’s development. She is supervised by Professor Iram Siraj and Dr Katharina Ereky-Stevens and her work is being supported by the Aga Khan University (Pakistan). Anushay received the Patrice Engle Dissertation Grant Award from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) in 2023.

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay also works as a part-time research  assistant at the Developmental Diversity Lab at UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families. Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (under review). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child and Family Factors, Emotion Recognition Accuracy, and Social Behaviour.

Presentations

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (2023, March). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child-Level Factors and Emotion Recognition Accuracy [Paper Presentation]. Society for Research in Child Development, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  4. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom.

Posters

  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Julia teaches and supervises on the MSc in Education and is involved in the Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment; Core Principles of Child Assessment, and the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing papers.

Before joining the Department of Education she worked in the Department of Experimental Psychology (2013-2023) and continues collaborations there, including co-leading the WISDOM (working in schools to deliver on mental health) Network: https://wisdom.mhid.org.uk.

Her research is concerned with child development, primarily peer relationships, bullying and mental health. She works with primary, secondary and special education schools across the UK and with children aged 4-18. She is also an advocate for public and community engagement, especially with school staff and parents.

Julia wants to support every child to achieve their potential in school.

Recently funded PI projects:

  • Feasibility trial of an anti-bullying programme for children in special schools.
  • Pupil interactions and networks in special schools.
  • Mental health in schools with diversity.
  • Special schools, mental health and bullying.
  • Teaching staff perspectives: Using VR to enhance PSHE learning.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Henry is a Swire Scholar and is currently reading for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. His doctoral research is fully funded by the Swire Charitable Trust and St Antony’s College.

Henry’s research interests lie primarily in classroom dynamics, specifically the interaction of cognitive, affective and motivational experiences in education settings. His DPhil research seeks the rapprochement between the dominant nomothetic (group-focus) approach in the field of education and psychology with the idiographic (person-focus) approach, which is mostly overlooked. Henry is also interested in advanced quantitative methods (e.g., Dynamic Structural Equation Modelling) and analysing ambulatory assessment data.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Henry undertook a placement year as a research assistant in the Child Development and Learning research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford, whilst completing his BSc in Psychology at the University of Surrey. He continued and completed his MSc in Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford.

 

Publications

Lo, H. T. F. 2022. Children’s Momentary Executive Function Fluctuation in Real-World Classrooms: An Intensive Longitudinal Study. MSc Dissertation. University of Oxford, U.K.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay is a second-year DPhil student investigating how classroom characteristics are related to Pakistani children’s development. She is supervised by Professor Iram Siraj and Dr Katharina Ereky-Stevens and her work is being supported by the Aga Khan University (Pakistan). Anushay received the Patrice Engle Dissertation Grant Award from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) in 2023.

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay also works as a part-time research  assistant at the Developmental Diversity Lab at UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families. Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (under review). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child and Family Factors, Emotion Recognition Accuracy, and Social Behaviour.

Presentations

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (2023, March). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child-Level Factors and Emotion Recognition Accuracy [Paper Presentation]. Society for Research in Child Development, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  4. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom.

Posters

  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Julia teaches and supervises on the MSc in Education and is involved in the Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment; Core Principles of Child Assessment, and the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing papers.

Before joining the Department of Education she worked in the Department of Experimental Psychology (2013-2023) and continues collaborations there, including co-leading the WISDOM (working in schools to deliver on mental health) Network: https://wisdom.mhid.org.uk.

Her research is concerned with child development, primarily peer relationships, bullying and mental health. She works with primary, secondary and special education schools across the UK and with children aged 4-18. She is also an advocate for public and community engagement, especially with school staff and parents.

Julia wants to support every child to achieve their potential in school.

Recently funded PI projects:

  • Feasibility trial of an anti-bullying programme for children in special schools.
  • Pupil interactions and networks in special schools.
  • Mental health in schools with diversity.
  • Special schools, mental health and bullying.
  • Teaching staff perspectives: Using VR to enhance PSHE learning.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Henry is a Swire Scholar and is currently reading for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. His doctoral research is fully funded by the Swire Charitable Trust and St Antony’s College.

Henry’s research interests lie primarily in classroom dynamics, specifically the interaction of cognitive, affective and motivational experiences in education settings. His DPhil research seeks the rapprochement between the dominant nomothetic (group-focus) approach in the field of education and psychology with the idiographic (person-focus) approach, which is mostly overlooked. Henry is also interested in advanced quantitative methods (e.g., Dynamic Structural Equation Modelling) and analysing ambulatory assessment data.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Henry undertook a placement year as a research assistant in the Child Development and Learning research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford, whilst completing his BSc in Psychology at the University of Surrey. He continued and completed his MSc in Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford.

 

Publications

Lo, H. T. F. 2022. Children’s Momentary Executive Function Fluctuation in Real-World Classrooms: An Intensive Longitudinal Study. MSc Dissertation. University of Oxford, U.K.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay is a second-year DPhil student investigating how classroom characteristics are related to Pakistani children’s development. She is supervised by Professor Iram Siraj and Dr Katharina Ereky-Stevens and her work is being supported by the Aga Khan University (Pakistan). Anushay received the Patrice Engle Dissertation Grant Award from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) in 2023.

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay also works as a part-time research  assistant at the Developmental Diversity Lab at UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families. Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (under review). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child and Family Factors, Emotion Recognition Accuracy, and Social Behaviour.

Presentations

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (2023, March). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child-Level Factors and Emotion Recognition Accuracy [Paper Presentation]. Society for Research in Child Development, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  4. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom.

Posters

  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Julia teaches and supervises on the MSc in Education and is involved in the Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment; Core Principles of Child Assessment, and the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing papers.

Before joining the Department of Education she worked in the Department of Experimental Psychology (2013-2023) and continues collaborations there, including co-leading the WISDOM (working in schools to deliver on mental health) Network: https://wisdom.mhid.org.uk.

Her research is concerned with child development, primarily peer relationships, bullying and mental health. She works with primary, secondary and special education schools across the UK and with children aged 4-18. She is also an advocate for public and community engagement, especially with school staff and parents.

Julia wants to support every child to achieve their potential in school.

Recently funded PI projects:

  • Feasibility trial of an anti-bullying programme for children in special schools.
  • Pupil interactions and networks in special schools.
  • Mental health in schools with diversity.
  • Special schools, mental health and bullying.
  • Teaching staff perspectives: Using VR to enhance PSHE learning.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Henry is a Swire Scholar and is currently reading for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. His doctoral research is fully funded by the Swire Charitable Trust and St Antony’s College.

Henry’s research interests lie primarily in classroom dynamics, specifically the interaction of cognitive, affective and motivational experiences in education settings. His DPhil research seeks the rapprochement between the dominant nomothetic (group-focus) approach in the field of education and psychology with the idiographic (person-focus) approach, which is mostly overlooked. Henry is also interested in advanced quantitative methods (e.g., Dynamic Structural Equation Modelling) and analysing ambulatory assessment data.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Henry undertook a placement year as a research assistant in the Child Development and Learning research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford, whilst completing his BSc in Psychology at the University of Surrey. He continued and completed his MSc in Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford.

 

Publications

Lo, H. T. F. 2022. Children’s Momentary Executive Function Fluctuation in Real-World Classrooms: An Intensive Longitudinal Study. MSc Dissertation. University of Oxford, U.K.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay is a second-year DPhil student investigating how classroom characteristics are related to Pakistani children’s development. She is supervised by Professor Iram Siraj and Dr Katharina Ereky-Stevens and her work is being supported by the Aga Khan University (Pakistan). Anushay received the Patrice Engle Dissertation Grant Award from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) in 2023.

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay also works as a part-time research  assistant at the Developmental Diversity Lab at UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families. Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (under review). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child and Family Factors, Emotion Recognition Accuracy, and Social Behaviour.

Presentations

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (2023, March). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child-Level Factors and Emotion Recognition Accuracy [Paper Presentation]. Society for Research in Child Development, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  4. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom.

Posters

  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Julia teaches and supervises on the MSc in Education and is involved in the Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment; Core Principles of Child Assessment, and the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing papers.

Before joining the Department of Education she worked in the Department of Experimental Psychology (2013-2023) and continues collaborations there, including co-leading the WISDOM (working in schools to deliver on mental health) Network: https://wisdom.mhid.org.uk.

Her research is concerned with child development, primarily peer relationships, bullying and mental health. She works with primary, secondary and special education schools across the UK and with children aged 4-18. She is also an advocate for public and community engagement, especially with school staff and parents.

Julia wants to support every child to achieve their potential in school.

Recently funded PI projects:

  • Feasibility trial of an anti-bullying programme for children in special schools.
  • Pupil interactions and networks in special schools.
  • Mental health in schools with diversity.
  • Special schools, mental health and bullying.
  • Teaching staff perspectives: Using VR to enhance PSHE learning.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Henry is a Swire Scholar and is currently reading for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. His doctoral research is fully funded by the Swire Charitable Trust and St Antony’s College.

Henry’s research interests lie primarily in classroom dynamics, specifically the interaction of cognitive, affective and motivational experiences in education settings. His DPhil research seeks the rapprochement between the dominant nomothetic (group-focus) approach in the field of education and psychology with the idiographic (person-focus) approach, which is mostly overlooked. Henry is also interested in advanced quantitative methods (e.g., Dynamic Structural Equation Modelling) and analysing ambulatory assessment data.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Henry undertook a placement year as a research assistant in the Child Development and Learning research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford, whilst completing his BSc in Psychology at the University of Surrey. He continued and completed his MSc in Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford.

 

Publications

Lo, H. T. F. 2022. Children’s Momentary Executive Function Fluctuation in Real-World Classrooms: An Intensive Longitudinal Study. MSc Dissertation. University of Oxford, U.K.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay is a second-year DPhil student investigating how classroom characteristics are related to Pakistani children’s development. She is supervised by Professor Iram Siraj and Dr Katharina Ereky-Stevens and her work is being supported by the Aga Khan University (Pakistan). Anushay received the Patrice Engle Dissertation Grant Award from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) in 2023.

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay also works as a part-time research  assistant at the Developmental Diversity Lab at UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families. Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (under review). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child and Family Factors, Emotion Recognition Accuracy, and Social Behaviour.

Presentations

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (2023, March). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child-Level Factors and Emotion Recognition Accuracy [Paper Presentation]. Society for Research in Child Development, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  4. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom.

Posters

  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Julia teaches and supervises on the MSc in Education and is involved in the Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment; Core Principles of Child Assessment, and the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing papers.

Before joining the Department of Education she worked in the Department of Experimental Psychology (2013-2023) and continues collaborations there, including co-leading the WISDOM (working in schools to deliver on mental health) Network: https://wisdom.mhid.org.uk.

Her research is concerned with child development, primarily peer relationships, bullying and mental health. She works with primary, secondary and special education schools across the UK and with children aged 4-18. She is also an advocate for public and community engagement, especially with school staff and parents.

Julia wants to support every child to achieve their potential in school.

Recently funded PI projects:

  • Feasibility trial of an anti-bullying programme for children in special schools.
  • Pupil interactions and networks in special schools.
  • Mental health in schools with diversity.
  • Special schools, mental health and bullying.
  • Teaching staff perspectives: Using VR to enhance PSHE learning.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Henry is a Swire Scholar and is currently reading for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. His doctoral research is fully funded by the Swire Charitable Trust and St Antony’s College.

Henry’s research interests lie primarily in classroom dynamics, specifically the interaction of cognitive, affective and motivational experiences in education settings. His DPhil research seeks the rapprochement between the dominant nomothetic (group-focus) approach in the field of education and psychology with the idiographic (person-focus) approach, which is mostly overlooked. Henry is also interested in advanced quantitative methods (e.g., Dynamic Structural Equation Modelling) and analysing ambulatory assessment data.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Henry undertook a placement year as a research assistant in the Child Development and Learning research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford, whilst completing his BSc in Psychology at the University of Surrey. He continued and completed his MSc in Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford.

 

Publications

Lo, H. T. F. 2022. Children’s Momentary Executive Function Fluctuation in Real-World Classrooms: An Intensive Longitudinal Study. MSc Dissertation. University of Oxford, U.K.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay is a second-year DPhil student investigating how classroom characteristics are related to Pakistani children’s development. She is supervised by Professor Iram Siraj and Dr Katharina Ereky-Stevens and her work is being supported by the Aga Khan University (Pakistan). Anushay received the Patrice Engle Dissertation Grant Award from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) in 2023.

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay also works as a part-time research  assistant at the Developmental Diversity Lab at UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families. Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (under review). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child and Family Factors, Emotion Recognition Accuracy, and Social Behaviour.

Presentations

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (2023, March). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child-Level Factors and Emotion Recognition Accuracy [Paper Presentation]. Society for Research in Child Development, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  4. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom.

Posters

  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Julia teaches and supervises on the MSc in Education and is involved in the Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment; Core Principles of Child Assessment, and the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing papers.

Before joining the Department of Education she worked in the Department of Experimental Psychology (2013-2023) and continues collaborations there, including co-leading the WISDOM (working in schools to deliver on mental health) Network: https://wisdom.mhid.org.uk.

Her research is concerned with child development, primarily peer relationships, bullying and mental health. She works with primary, secondary and special education schools across the UK and with children aged 4-18. She is also an advocate for public and community engagement, especially with school staff and parents.

Julia wants to support every child to achieve their potential in school.

Recently funded PI projects:

  • Feasibility trial of an anti-bullying programme for children in special schools.
  • Pupil interactions and networks in special schools.
  • Mental health in schools with diversity.
  • Special schools, mental health and bullying.
  • Teaching staff perspectives: Using VR to enhance PSHE learning.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Henry is a Swire Scholar and is currently reading for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. His doctoral research is fully funded by the Swire Charitable Trust and St Antony’s College.

Henry’s research interests lie primarily in classroom dynamics, specifically the interaction of cognitive, affective and motivational experiences in education settings. His DPhil research seeks the rapprochement between the dominant nomothetic (group-focus) approach in the field of education and psychology with the idiographic (person-focus) approach, which is mostly overlooked. Henry is also interested in advanced quantitative methods (e.g., Dynamic Structural Equation Modelling) and analysing ambulatory assessment data.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Henry undertook a placement year as a research assistant in the Child Development and Learning research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford, whilst completing his BSc in Psychology at the University of Surrey. He continued and completed his MSc in Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford.

 

Publications

Lo, H. T. F. 2022. Children’s Momentary Executive Function Fluctuation in Real-World Classrooms: An Intensive Longitudinal Study. MSc Dissertation. University of Oxford, U.K.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay is a second-year DPhil student investigating how classroom characteristics are related to Pakistani children’s development. She is supervised by Professor Iram Siraj and Dr Katharina Ereky-Stevens and her work is being supported by the Aga Khan University (Pakistan). Anushay received the Patrice Engle Dissertation Grant Award from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) in 2023.

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay also works as a part-time research  assistant at the Developmental Diversity Lab at UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families. Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (under review). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child and Family Factors, Emotion Recognition Accuracy, and Social Behaviour.

Presentations

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (2023, March). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child-Level Factors and Emotion Recognition Accuracy [Paper Presentation]. Society for Research in Child Development, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  4. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom.

Posters

  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Julia teaches and supervises on the MSc in Education and is involved in the Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment; Core Principles of Child Assessment, and the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing papers.

Before joining the Department of Education she worked in the Department of Experimental Psychology (2013-2023) and continues collaborations there, including co-leading the WISDOM (working in schools to deliver on mental health) Network: https://wisdom.mhid.org.uk.

Her research is concerned with child development, primarily peer relationships, bullying and mental health. She works with primary, secondary and special education schools across the UK and with children aged 4-18. She is also an advocate for public and community engagement, especially with school staff and parents.

Julia wants to support every child to achieve their potential in school.

Recently funded PI projects:

  • Feasibility trial of an anti-bullying programme for children in special schools.
  • Pupil interactions and networks in special schools.
  • Mental health in schools with diversity.
  • Special schools, mental health and bullying.
  • Teaching staff perspectives: Using VR to enhance PSHE learning.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Henry is a Swire Scholar and is currently reading for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. His doctoral research is fully funded by the Swire Charitable Trust and St Antony’s College.

Henry’s research interests lie primarily in classroom dynamics, specifically the interaction of cognitive, affective and motivational experiences in education settings. His DPhil research seeks the rapprochement between the dominant nomothetic (group-focus) approach in the field of education and psychology with the idiographic (person-focus) approach, which is mostly overlooked. Henry is also interested in advanced quantitative methods (e.g., Dynamic Structural Equation Modelling) and analysing ambulatory assessment data.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Henry undertook a placement year as a research assistant in the Child Development and Learning research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford, whilst completing his BSc in Psychology at the University of Surrey. He continued and completed his MSc in Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford.

 

Publications

Lo, H. T. F. 2022. Children’s Momentary Executive Function Fluctuation in Real-World Classrooms: An Intensive Longitudinal Study. MSc Dissertation. University of Oxford, U.K.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay is a second-year DPhil student investigating how classroom characteristics are related to Pakistani children’s development. She is supervised by Professor Iram Siraj and Dr Katharina Ereky-Stevens and her work is being supported by the Aga Khan University (Pakistan). Anushay received the Patrice Engle Dissertation Grant Award from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) in 2023.

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay also works as a part-time research  assistant at the Developmental Diversity Lab at UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families. Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (under review). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child and Family Factors, Emotion Recognition Accuracy, and Social Behaviour.

Presentations

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (2023, March). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child-Level Factors and Emotion Recognition Accuracy [Paper Presentation]. Society for Research in Child Development, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  4. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom.

Posters

  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Julia teaches and supervises on the MSc in Education and is involved in the Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment; Core Principles of Child Assessment, and the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing papers.

Before joining the Department of Education she worked in the Department of Experimental Psychology (2013-2023) and continues collaborations there, including co-leading the WISDOM (working in schools to deliver on mental health) Network: https://wisdom.mhid.org.uk.

Her research is concerned with child development, primarily peer relationships, bullying and mental health. She works with primary, secondary and special education schools across the UK and with children aged 4-18. She is also an advocate for public and community engagement, especially with school staff and parents.

Julia wants to support every child to achieve their potential in school.

Recently funded PI projects:

  • Feasibility trial of an anti-bullying programme for children in special schools.
  • Pupil interactions and networks in special schools.
  • Mental health in schools with diversity.
  • Special schools, mental health and bullying.
  • Teaching staff perspectives: Using VR to enhance PSHE learning.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Henry is a Swire Scholar and is currently reading for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. His doctoral research is fully funded by the Swire Charitable Trust and St Antony’s College.

Henry’s research interests lie primarily in classroom dynamics, specifically the interaction of cognitive, affective and motivational experiences in education settings. His DPhil research seeks the rapprochement between the dominant nomothetic (group-focus) approach in the field of education and psychology with the idiographic (person-focus) approach, which is mostly overlooked. Henry is also interested in advanced quantitative methods (e.g., Dynamic Structural Equation Modelling) and analysing ambulatory assessment data.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Henry undertook a placement year as a research assistant in the Child Development and Learning research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford, whilst completing his BSc in Psychology at the University of Surrey. He continued and completed his MSc in Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford.

 

Publications

Lo, H. T. F. 2022. Children’s Momentary Executive Function Fluctuation in Real-World Classrooms: An Intensive Longitudinal Study. MSc Dissertation. University of Oxford, U.K.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay is a second-year DPhil student investigating how classroom characteristics are related to Pakistani children’s development. She is supervised by Professor Iram Siraj and Dr Katharina Ereky-Stevens and her work is being supported by the Aga Khan University (Pakistan). Anushay received the Patrice Engle Dissertation Grant Award from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) in 2023.

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay also works as a part-time research  assistant at the Developmental Diversity Lab at UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families. Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (under review). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child and Family Factors, Emotion Recognition Accuracy, and Social Behaviour.

Presentations

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (2023, March). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child-Level Factors and Emotion Recognition Accuracy [Paper Presentation]. Society for Research in Child Development, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  4. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom.

Posters

  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Julia teaches and supervises on the MSc in Education and is involved in the Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment; Core Principles of Child Assessment, and the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing papers.

Before joining the Department of Education she worked in the Department of Experimental Psychology (2013-2023) and continues collaborations there, including co-leading the WISDOM (working in schools to deliver on mental health) Network: https://wisdom.mhid.org.uk.

Her research is concerned with child development, primarily peer relationships, bullying and mental health. She works with primary, secondary and special education schools across the UK and with children aged 4-18. She is also an advocate for public and community engagement, especially with school staff and parents.

Julia wants to support every child to achieve their potential in school.

Recently funded PI projects:

  • Feasibility trial of an anti-bullying programme for children in special schools.
  • Pupil interactions and networks in special schools.
  • Mental health in schools with diversity.
  • Special schools, mental health and bullying.
  • Teaching staff perspectives: Using VR to enhance PSHE learning.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Henry is a Swire Scholar and is currently reading for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. His doctoral research is fully funded by the Swire Charitable Trust and St Antony’s College.

Henry’s research interests lie primarily in classroom dynamics, specifically the interaction of cognitive, affective and motivational experiences in education settings. His DPhil research seeks the rapprochement between the dominant nomothetic (group-focus) approach in the field of education and psychology with the idiographic (person-focus) approach, which is mostly overlooked. Henry is also interested in advanced quantitative methods (e.g., Dynamic Structural Equation Modelling) and analysing ambulatory assessment data.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Henry undertook a placement year as a research assistant in the Child Development and Learning research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford, whilst completing his BSc in Psychology at the University of Surrey. He continued and completed his MSc in Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford.

 

Publications

Lo, H. T. F. 2022. Children’s Momentary Executive Function Fluctuation in Real-World Classrooms: An Intensive Longitudinal Study. MSc Dissertation. University of Oxford, U.K.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay is a second-year DPhil student investigating how classroom characteristics are related to Pakistani children’s development. She is supervised by Professor Iram Siraj and Dr Katharina Ereky-Stevens and her work is being supported by the Aga Khan University (Pakistan). Anushay received the Patrice Engle Dissertation Grant Award from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) in 2023.

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay also works as a part-time research  assistant at the Developmental Diversity Lab at UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families. Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (under review). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child and Family Factors, Emotion Recognition Accuracy, and Social Behaviour.

Presentations

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (2023, March). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child-Level Factors and Emotion Recognition Accuracy [Paper Presentation]. Society for Research in Child Development, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  4. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom.

Posters

  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Julia teaches and supervises on the MSc in Education and is involved in the Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment; Core Principles of Child Assessment, and the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing papers.

Before joining the Department of Education she worked in the Department of Experimental Psychology (2013-2023) and continues collaborations there, including co-leading the WISDOM (working in schools to deliver on mental health) Network: https://wisdom.mhid.org.uk.

Her research is concerned with child development, primarily peer relationships, bullying and mental health. She works with primary, secondary and special education schools across the UK and with children aged 4-18. She is also an advocate for public and community engagement, especially with school staff and parents.

Julia wants to support every child to achieve their potential in school.

Recently funded PI projects:

  • Feasibility trial of an anti-bullying programme for children in special schools.
  • Pupil interactions and networks in special schools.
  • Mental health in schools with diversity.
  • Special schools, mental health and bullying.
  • Teaching staff perspectives: Using VR to enhance PSHE learning.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Henry is a Swire Scholar and is currently reading for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. His doctoral research is fully funded by the Swire Charitable Trust and St Antony’s College.

Henry’s research interests lie primarily in classroom dynamics, specifically the interaction of cognitive, affective and motivational experiences in education settings. His DPhil research seeks the rapprochement between the dominant nomothetic (group-focus) approach in the field of education and psychology with the idiographic (person-focus) approach, which is mostly overlooked. Henry is also interested in advanced quantitative methods (e.g., Dynamic Structural Equation Modelling) and analysing ambulatory assessment data.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Henry undertook a placement year as a research assistant in the Child Development and Learning research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford, whilst completing his BSc in Psychology at the University of Surrey. He continued and completed his MSc in Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford.

 

Publications

Lo, H. T. F. 2022. Children’s Momentary Executive Function Fluctuation in Real-World Classrooms: An Intensive Longitudinal Study. MSc Dissertation. University of Oxford, U.K.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay is a second-year DPhil student investigating how classroom characteristics are related to Pakistani children’s development. She is supervised by Professor Iram Siraj and Dr Katharina Ereky-Stevens and her work is being supported by the Aga Khan University (Pakistan). Anushay received the Patrice Engle Dissertation Grant Award from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) in 2023.

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay also works as a part-time research  assistant at the Developmental Diversity Lab at UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families. Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (under review). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child and Family Factors, Emotion Recognition Accuracy, and Social Behaviour.

Presentations

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (2023, March). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child-Level Factors and Emotion Recognition Accuracy [Paper Presentation]. Society for Research in Child Development, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  4. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom.

Posters

  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Julia teaches and supervises on the MSc in Education and is involved in the Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment; Core Principles of Child Assessment, and the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing papers.

Before joining the Department of Education she worked in the Department of Experimental Psychology (2013-2023) and continues collaborations there, including co-leading the WISDOM (working in schools to deliver on mental health) Network: https://wisdom.mhid.org.uk.

Her research is concerned with child development, primarily peer relationships, bullying and mental health. She works with primary, secondary and special education schools across the UK and with children aged 4-18. She is also an advocate for public and community engagement, especially with school staff and parents.

Julia wants to support every child to achieve their potential in school.

Recently funded PI projects:

  • Feasibility trial of an anti-bullying programme for children in special schools.
  • Pupil interactions and networks in special schools.
  • Mental health in schools with diversity.
  • Special schools, mental health and bullying.
  • Teaching staff perspectives: Using VR to enhance PSHE learning.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Henry is a Swire Scholar and is currently reading for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. His doctoral research is fully funded by the Swire Charitable Trust and St Antony’s College.

Henry’s research interests lie primarily in classroom dynamics, specifically the interaction of cognitive, affective and motivational experiences in education settings. His DPhil research seeks the rapprochement between the dominant nomothetic (group-focus) approach in the field of education and psychology with the idiographic (person-focus) approach, which is mostly overlooked. Henry is also interested in advanced quantitative methods (e.g., Dynamic Structural Equation Modelling) and analysing ambulatory assessment data.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Henry undertook a placement year as a research assistant in the Child Development and Learning research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford, whilst completing his BSc in Psychology at the University of Surrey. He continued and completed his MSc in Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford.

 

Publications

Lo, H. T. F. 2022. Children’s Momentary Executive Function Fluctuation in Real-World Classrooms: An Intensive Longitudinal Study. MSc Dissertation. University of Oxford, U.K.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay is a second-year DPhil student investigating how classroom characteristics are related to Pakistani children’s development. She is supervised by Professor Iram Siraj and Dr Katharina Ereky-Stevens and her work is being supported by the Aga Khan University (Pakistan). Anushay received the Patrice Engle Dissertation Grant Award from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) in 2023.

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay also works as a part-time research  assistant at the Developmental Diversity Lab at UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families. Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (under review). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child and Family Factors, Emotion Recognition Accuracy, and Social Behaviour.

Presentations

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (2023, March). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child-Level Factors and Emotion Recognition Accuracy [Paper Presentation]. Society for Research in Child Development, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  4. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom.

Posters

  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Julia teaches and supervises on the MSc in Education and is involved in the Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment; Core Principles of Child Assessment, and the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing papers.

Before joining the Department of Education she worked in the Department of Experimental Psychology (2013-2023) and continues collaborations there, including co-leading the WISDOM (working in schools to deliver on mental health) Network: https://wisdom.mhid.org.uk.

Her research is concerned with child development, primarily peer relationships, bullying and mental health. She works with primary, secondary and special education schools across the UK and with children aged 4-18. She is also an advocate for public and community engagement, especially with school staff and parents.

Julia wants to support every child to achieve their potential in school.

Recently funded PI projects:

  • Feasibility trial of an anti-bullying programme for children in special schools.
  • Pupil interactions and networks in special schools.
  • Mental health in schools with diversity.
  • Special schools, mental health and bullying.
  • Teaching staff perspectives: Using VR to enhance PSHE learning.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Henry is a Swire Scholar and is currently reading for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. His doctoral research is fully funded by the Swire Charitable Trust and St Antony’s College.

Henry’s research interests lie primarily in classroom dynamics, specifically the interaction of cognitive, affective and motivational experiences in education settings. His DPhil research seeks the rapprochement between the dominant nomothetic (group-focus) approach in the field of education and psychology with the idiographic (person-focus) approach, which is mostly overlooked. Henry is also interested in advanced quantitative methods (e.g., Dynamic Structural Equation Modelling) and analysing ambulatory assessment data.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Henry undertook a placement year as a research assistant in the Child Development and Learning research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford, whilst completing his BSc in Psychology at the University of Surrey. He continued and completed his MSc in Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford.

 

Publications

Lo, H. T. F. 2022. Children’s Momentary Executive Function Fluctuation in Real-World Classrooms: An Intensive Longitudinal Study. MSc Dissertation. University of Oxford, U.K.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay is a second-year DPhil student investigating how classroom characteristics are related to Pakistani children’s development. She is supervised by Professor Iram Siraj and Dr Katharina Ereky-Stevens and her work is being supported by the Aga Khan University (Pakistan). Anushay received the Patrice Engle Dissertation Grant Award from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) in 2023.

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay also works as a part-time research  assistant at the Developmental Diversity Lab at UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families. Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (under review). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child and Family Factors, Emotion Recognition Accuracy, and Social Behaviour.

Presentations

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (2023, March). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child-Level Factors and Emotion Recognition Accuracy [Paper Presentation]. Society for Research in Child Development, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  4. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom.

Posters

  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Julia teaches and supervises on the MSc in Education and is involved in the Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment; Core Principles of Child Assessment, and the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing papers.

Before joining the Department of Education she worked in the Department of Experimental Psychology (2013-2023) and continues collaborations there, including co-leading the WISDOM (working in schools to deliver on mental health) Network: https://wisdom.mhid.org.uk.

Her research is concerned with child development, primarily peer relationships, bullying and mental health. She works with primary, secondary and special education schools across the UK and with children aged 4-18. She is also an advocate for public and community engagement, especially with school staff and parents.

Julia wants to support every child to achieve their potential in school.

Recently funded PI projects:

  • Feasibility trial of an anti-bullying programme for children in special schools.
  • Pupil interactions and networks in special schools.
  • Mental health in schools with diversity.
  • Special schools, mental health and bullying.
  • Teaching staff perspectives: Using VR to enhance PSHE learning.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Henry is a Swire Scholar and is currently reading for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. His doctoral research is fully funded by the Swire Charitable Trust and St Antony’s College.

Henry’s research interests lie primarily in classroom dynamics, specifically the interaction of cognitive, affective and motivational experiences in education settings. His DPhil research seeks the rapprochement between the dominant nomothetic (group-focus) approach in the field of education and psychology with the idiographic (person-focus) approach, which is mostly overlooked. Henry is also interested in advanced quantitative methods (e.g., Dynamic Structural Equation Modelling) and analysing ambulatory assessment data.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Henry undertook a placement year as a research assistant in the Child Development and Learning research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford, whilst completing his BSc in Psychology at the University of Surrey. He continued and completed his MSc in Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford.

 

Publications

Lo, H. T. F. 2022. Children’s Momentary Executive Function Fluctuation in Real-World Classrooms: An Intensive Longitudinal Study. MSc Dissertation. University of Oxford, U.K.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay is a second-year DPhil student investigating how classroom characteristics are related to Pakistani children’s development. She is supervised by Professor Iram Siraj and Dr Katharina Ereky-Stevens and her work is being supported by the Aga Khan University (Pakistan). Anushay received the Patrice Engle Dissertation Grant Award from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) in 2023.

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay also works as a part-time research  assistant at the Developmental Diversity Lab at UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families. Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (under review). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child and Family Factors, Emotion Recognition Accuracy, and Social Behaviour.

Presentations

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (2023, March). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child-Level Factors and Emotion Recognition Accuracy [Paper Presentation]. Society for Research in Child Development, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  4. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom.

Posters

  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Julia teaches and supervises on the MSc in Education and is involved in the Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment; Core Principles of Child Assessment, and the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing papers.

Before joining the Department of Education she worked in the Department of Experimental Psychology (2013-2023) and continues collaborations there, including co-leading the WISDOM (working in schools to deliver on mental health) Network: https://wisdom.mhid.org.uk.

Her research is concerned with child development, primarily peer relationships, bullying and mental health. She works with primary, secondary and special education schools across the UK and with children aged 4-18. She is also an advocate for public and community engagement, especially with school staff and parents.

Julia wants to support every child to achieve their potential in school.

Recently funded PI projects:

  • Feasibility trial of an anti-bullying programme for children in special schools.
  • Pupil interactions and networks in special schools.
  • Mental health in schools with diversity.
  • Special schools, mental health and bullying.
  • Teaching staff perspectives: Using VR to enhance PSHE learning.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Henry is a Swire Scholar and is currently reading for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. His doctoral research is fully funded by the Swire Charitable Trust and St Antony’s College.

Henry’s research interests lie primarily in classroom dynamics, specifically the interaction of cognitive, affective and motivational experiences in education settings. His DPhil research seeks the rapprochement between the dominant nomothetic (group-focus) approach in the field of education and psychology with the idiographic (person-focus) approach, which is mostly overlooked. Henry is also interested in advanced quantitative methods (e.g., Dynamic Structural Equation Modelling) and analysing ambulatory assessment data.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Henry undertook a placement year as a research assistant in the Child Development and Learning research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford, whilst completing his BSc in Psychology at the University of Surrey. He continued and completed his MSc in Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford.

 

Publications

Lo, H. T. F. 2022. Children’s Momentary Executive Function Fluctuation in Real-World Classrooms: An Intensive Longitudinal Study. MSc Dissertation. University of Oxford, U.K.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay is a second-year DPhil student investigating how classroom characteristics are related to Pakistani children’s development. She is supervised by Professor Iram Siraj and Dr Katharina Ereky-Stevens and her work is being supported by the Aga Khan University (Pakistan). Anushay received the Patrice Engle Dissertation Grant Award from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) in 2023.

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay also works as a part-time research  assistant at the Developmental Diversity Lab at UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families. Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (under review). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child and Family Factors, Emotion Recognition Accuracy, and Social Behaviour.

Presentations

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (2023, March). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child-Level Factors and Emotion Recognition Accuracy [Paper Presentation]. Society for Research in Child Development, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  4. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom.

Posters

  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Julia teaches and supervises on the MSc in Education and is involved in the Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment; Core Principles of Child Assessment, and the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing papers.

Before joining the Department of Education she worked in the Department of Experimental Psychology (2013-2023) and continues collaborations there, including co-leading the WISDOM (working in schools to deliver on mental health) Network: https://wisdom.mhid.org.uk.

Her research is concerned with child development, primarily peer relationships, bullying and mental health. She works with primary, secondary and special education schools across the UK and with children aged 4-18. She is also an advocate for public and community engagement, especially with school staff and parents.

Julia wants to support every child to achieve their potential in school.

Recently funded PI projects:

  • Feasibility trial of an anti-bullying programme for children in special schools.
  • Pupil interactions and networks in special schools.
  • Mental health in schools with diversity.
  • Special schools, mental health and bullying.
  • Teaching staff perspectives: Using VR to enhance PSHE learning.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Henry is a Swire Scholar and is currently reading for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. His doctoral research is fully funded by the Swire Charitable Trust and St Antony’s College.

Henry’s research interests lie primarily in classroom dynamics, specifically the interaction of cognitive, affective and motivational experiences in education settings. His DPhil research seeks the rapprochement between the dominant nomothetic (group-focus) approach in the field of education and psychology with the idiographic (person-focus) approach, which is mostly overlooked. Henry is also interested in advanced quantitative methods (e.g., Dynamic Structural Equation Modelling) and analysing ambulatory assessment data.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Henry undertook a placement year as a research assistant in the Child Development and Learning research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford, whilst completing his BSc in Psychology at the University of Surrey. He continued and completed his MSc in Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford.

 

Publications

Lo, H. T. F. 2022. Children’s Momentary Executive Function Fluctuation in Real-World Classrooms: An Intensive Longitudinal Study. MSc Dissertation. University of Oxford, U.K.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay is a second-year DPhil student investigating how classroom characteristics are related to Pakistani children’s development. She is supervised by Professor Iram Siraj and Dr Katharina Ereky-Stevens and her work is being supported by the Aga Khan University (Pakistan). Anushay received the Patrice Engle Dissertation Grant Award from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) in 2023.

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay also works as a part-time research  assistant at the Developmental Diversity Lab at UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families. Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (under review). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child and Family Factors, Emotion Recognition Accuracy, and Social Behaviour.

Presentations

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (2023, March). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child-Level Factors and Emotion Recognition Accuracy [Paper Presentation]. Society for Research in Child Development, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  4. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom.

Posters

  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Julia teaches and supervises on the MSc in Education and is involved in the Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment; Core Principles of Child Assessment, and the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing papers.

Before joining the Department of Education she worked in the Department of Experimental Psychology (2013-2023) and continues collaborations there, including co-leading the WISDOM (working in schools to deliver on mental health) Network: https://wisdom.mhid.org.uk.

Her research is concerned with child development, primarily peer relationships, bullying and mental health. She works with primary, secondary and special education schools across the UK and with children aged 4-18. She is also an advocate for public and community engagement, especially with school staff and parents.

Julia wants to support every child to achieve their potential in school.

Recently funded PI projects:

  • Feasibility trial of an anti-bullying programme for children in special schools.
  • Pupil interactions and networks in special schools.
  • Mental health in schools with diversity.
  • Special schools, mental health and bullying.
  • Teaching staff perspectives: Using VR to enhance PSHE learning.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Henry is a Swire Scholar and is currently reading for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. His doctoral research is fully funded by the Swire Charitable Trust and St Antony’s College.

Henry’s research interests lie primarily in classroom dynamics, specifically the interaction of cognitive, affective and motivational experiences in education settings. His DPhil research seeks the rapprochement between the dominant nomothetic (group-focus) approach in the field of education and psychology with the idiographic (person-focus) approach, which is mostly overlooked. Henry is also interested in advanced quantitative methods (e.g., Dynamic Structural Equation Modelling) and analysing ambulatory assessment data.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Henry undertook a placement year as a research assistant in the Child Development and Learning research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford, whilst completing his BSc in Psychology at the University of Surrey. He continued and completed his MSc in Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford.

 

Publications

Lo, H. T. F. 2022. Children’s Momentary Executive Function Fluctuation in Real-World Classrooms: An Intensive Longitudinal Study. MSc Dissertation. University of Oxford, U.K.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay is a second-year DPhil student investigating how classroom characteristics are related to Pakistani children’s development. She is supervised by Professor Iram Siraj and Dr Katharina Ereky-Stevens and her work is being supported by the Aga Khan University (Pakistan). Anushay received the Patrice Engle Dissertation Grant Award from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) in 2023.

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay also works as a part-time research  assistant at the Developmental Diversity Lab at UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families. Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (under review). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child and Family Factors, Emotion Recognition Accuracy, and Social Behaviour.

Presentations

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (2023, March). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child-Level Factors and Emotion Recognition Accuracy [Paper Presentation]. Society for Research in Child Development, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  4. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom.

Posters

  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Julia teaches and supervises on the MSc in Education and is involved in the Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment; Core Principles of Child Assessment, and the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing papers.

Before joining the Department of Education she worked in the Department of Experimental Psychology (2013-2023) and continues collaborations there, including co-leading the WISDOM (working in schools to deliver on mental health) Network: https://wisdom.mhid.org.uk.

Her research is concerned with child development, primarily peer relationships, bullying and mental health. She works with primary, secondary and special education schools across the UK and with children aged 4-18. She is also an advocate for public and community engagement, especially with school staff and parents.

Julia wants to support every child to achieve their potential in school.

Recently funded PI projects:

  • Feasibility trial of an anti-bullying programme for children in special schools.
  • Pupil interactions and networks in special schools.
  • Mental health in schools with diversity.
  • Special schools, mental health and bullying.
  • Teaching staff perspectives: Using VR to enhance PSHE learning.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Henry is a Swire Scholar and is currently reading for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. His doctoral research is fully funded by the Swire Charitable Trust and St Antony’s College.

Henry’s research interests lie primarily in classroom dynamics, specifically the interaction of cognitive, affective and motivational experiences in education settings. His DPhil research seeks the rapprochement between the dominant nomothetic (group-focus) approach in the field of education and psychology with the idiographic (person-focus) approach, which is mostly overlooked. Henry is also interested in advanced quantitative methods (e.g., Dynamic Structural Equation Modelling) and analysing ambulatory assessment data.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Henry undertook a placement year as a research assistant in the Child Development and Learning research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford, whilst completing his BSc in Psychology at the University of Surrey. He continued and completed his MSc in Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford.

 

Publications

Lo, H. T. F. 2022. Children’s Momentary Executive Function Fluctuation in Real-World Classrooms: An Intensive Longitudinal Study. MSc Dissertation. University of Oxford, U.K.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay is a second-year DPhil student investigating how classroom characteristics are related to Pakistani children’s development. She is supervised by Professor Iram Siraj and Dr Katharina Ereky-Stevens and her work is being supported by the Aga Khan University (Pakistan). Anushay received the Patrice Engle Dissertation Grant Award from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) in 2023.

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay also works as a part-time research  assistant at the Developmental Diversity Lab at UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families. Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (under review). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child and Family Factors, Emotion Recognition Accuracy, and Social Behaviour.

Presentations

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (2023, March). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child-Level Factors and Emotion Recognition Accuracy [Paper Presentation]. Society for Research in Child Development, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  4. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom.

Posters

  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Julia teaches and supervises on the MSc in Education and is involved in the Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment; Core Principles of Child Assessment, and the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing papers.

Before joining the Department of Education she worked in the Department of Experimental Psychology (2013-2023) and continues collaborations there, including co-leading the WISDOM (working in schools to deliver on mental health) Network: https://wisdom.mhid.org.uk.

Her research is concerned with child development, primarily peer relationships, bullying and mental health. She works with primary, secondary and special education schools across the UK and with children aged 4-18. She is also an advocate for public and community engagement, especially with school staff and parents.

Julia wants to support every child to achieve their potential in school.

Recently funded PI projects:

  • Feasibility trial of an anti-bullying programme for children in special schools.
  • Pupil interactions and networks in special schools.
  • Mental health in schools with diversity.
  • Special schools, mental health and bullying.
  • Teaching staff perspectives: Using VR to enhance PSHE learning.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Henry is a Swire Scholar and is currently reading for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. His doctoral research is fully funded by the Swire Charitable Trust and St Antony’s College.

Henry’s research interests lie primarily in classroom dynamics, specifically the interaction of cognitive, affective and motivational experiences in education settings. His DPhil research seeks the rapprochement between the dominant nomothetic (group-focus) approach in the field of education and psychology with the idiographic (person-focus) approach, which is mostly overlooked. Henry is also interested in advanced quantitative methods (e.g., Dynamic Structural Equation Modelling) and analysing ambulatory assessment data.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Henry undertook a placement year as a research assistant in the Child Development and Learning research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford, whilst completing his BSc in Psychology at the University of Surrey. He continued and completed his MSc in Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford.

 

Publications

Lo, H. T. F. 2022. Children’s Momentary Executive Function Fluctuation in Real-World Classrooms: An Intensive Longitudinal Study. MSc Dissertation. University of Oxford, U.K.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay is a second-year DPhil student investigating how classroom characteristics are related to Pakistani children’s development. She is supervised by Professor Iram Siraj and Dr Katharina Ereky-Stevens and her work is being supported by the Aga Khan University (Pakistan). Anushay received the Patrice Engle Dissertation Grant Award from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) in 2023.

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay also works as a part-time research  assistant at the Developmental Diversity Lab at UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families. Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (under review). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child and Family Factors, Emotion Recognition Accuracy, and Social Behaviour.

Presentations

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (2023, March). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child-Level Factors and Emotion Recognition Accuracy [Paper Presentation]. Society for Research in Child Development, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  4. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom.

Posters

  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Julia teaches and supervises on the MSc in Education and is involved in the Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment; Core Principles of Child Assessment, and the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing papers.

Before joining the Department of Education she worked in the Department of Experimental Psychology (2013-2023) and continues collaborations there, including co-leading the WISDOM (working in schools to deliver on mental health) Network: https://wisdom.mhid.org.uk.

Her research is concerned with child development, primarily peer relationships, bullying and mental health. She works with primary, secondary and special education schools across the UK and with children aged 4-18. She is also an advocate for public and community engagement, especially with school staff and parents.

Julia wants to support every child to achieve their potential in school.

Recently funded PI projects:

  • Feasibility trial of an anti-bullying programme for children in special schools.
  • Pupil interactions and networks in special schools.
  • Mental health in schools with diversity.
  • Special schools, mental health and bullying.
  • Teaching staff perspectives: Using VR to enhance PSHE learning.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Henry is a Swire Scholar and is currently reading for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. His doctoral research is fully funded by the Swire Charitable Trust and St Antony’s College.

Henry’s research interests lie primarily in classroom dynamics, specifically the interaction of cognitive, affective and motivational experiences in education settings. His DPhil research seeks the rapprochement between the dominant nomothetic (group-focus) approach in the field of education and psychology with the idiographic (person-focus) approach, which is mostly overlooked. Henry is also interested in advanced quantitative methods (e.g., Dynamic Structural Equation Modelling) and analysing ambulatory assessment data.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Henry undertook a placement year as a research assistant in the Child Development and Learning research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford, whilst completing his BSc in Psychology at the University of Surrey. He continued and completed his MSc in Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford.

 

Publications

Lo, H. T. F. 2022. Children’s Momentary Executive Function Fluctuation in Real-World Classrooms: An Intensive Longitudinal Study. MSc Dissertation. University of Oxford, U.K.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay is a second-year DPhil student investigating how classroom characteristics are related to Pakistani children’s development. She is supervised by Professor Iram Siraj and Dr Katharina Ereky-Stevens and her work is being supported by the Aga Khan University (Pakistan). Anushay received the Patrice Engle Dissertation Grant Award from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) in 2023.

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay also works as a part-time research  assistant at the Developmental Diversity Lab at UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families. Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (under review). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child and Family Factors, Emotion Recognition Accuracy, and Social Behaviour.

Presentations

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (2023, March). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child-Level Factors and Emotion Recognition Accuracy [Paper Presentation]. Society for Research in Child Development, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  4. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom.

Posters

  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Julia teaches and supervises on the MSc in Education and is involved in the Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment; Core Principles of Child Assessment, and the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing papers.

Before joining the Department of Education she worked in the Department of Experimental Psychology (2013-2023) and continues collaborations there, including co-leading the WISDOM (working in schools to deliver on mental health) Network: https://wisdom.mhid.org.uk.

Her research is concerned with child development, primarily peer relationships, bullying and mental health. She works with primary, secondary and special education schools across the UK and with children aged 4-18. She is also an advocate for public and community engagement, especially with school staff and parents.

Julia wants to support every child to achieve their potential in school.

Recently funded PI projects:

  • Feasibility trial of an anti-bullying programme for children in special schools.
  • Pupil interactions and networks in special schools.
  • Mental health in schools with diversity.
  • Special schools, mental health and bullying.
  • Teaching staff perspectives: Using VR to enhance PSHE learning.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Henry is a Swire Scholar and is currently reading for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. His doctoral research is fully funded by the Swire Charitable Trust and St Antony’s College.

Henry’s research interests lie primarily in classroom dynamics, specifically the interaction of cognitive, affective and motivational experiences in education settings. His DPhil research seeks the rapprochement between the dominant nomothetic (group-focus) approach in the field of education and psychology with the idiographic (person-focus) approach, which is mostly overlooked. Henry is also interested in advanced quantitative methods (e.g., Dynamic Structural Equation Modelling) and analysing ambulatory assessment data.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Henry undertook a placement year as a research assistant in the Child Development and Learning research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford, whilst completing his BSc in Psychology at the University of Surrey. He continued and completed his MSc in Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford.

 

Publications

Lo, H. T. F. 2022. Children’s Momentary Executive Function Fluctuation in Real-World Classrooms: An Intensive Longitudinal Study. MSc Dissertation. University of Oxford, U.K.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay is a second-year DPhil student investigating how classroom characteristics are related to Pakistani children’s development. She is supervised by Professor Iram Siraj and Dr Katharina Ereky-Stevens and her work is being supported by the Aga Khan University (Pakistan). Anushay received the Patrice Engle Dissertation Grant Award from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) in 2023.

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay also works as a part-time research  assistant at the Developmental Diversity Lab at UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families. Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (under review). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child and Family Factors, Emotion Recognition Accuracy, and Social Behaviour.

Presentations

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (2023, March). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child-Level Factors and Emotion Recognition Accuracy [Paper Presentation]. Society for Research in Child Development, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  4. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom.

Posters

  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Julia teaches and supervises on the MSc in Education and is involved in the Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment; Core Principles of Child Assessment, and the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing papers.

Before joining the Department of Education she worked in the Department of Experimental Psychology (2013-2023) and continues collaborations there, including co-leading the WISDOM (working in schools to deliver on mental health) Network: https://wisdom.mhid.org.uk.

Her research is concerned with child development, primarily peer relationships, bullying and mental health. She works with primary, secondary and special education schools across the UK and with children aged 4-18. She is also an advocate for public and community engagement, especially with school staff and parents.

Julia wants to support every child to achieve their potential in school.

Recently funded PI projects:

  • Feasibility trial of an anti-bullying programme for children in special schools.
  • Pupil interactions and networks in special schools.
  • Mental health in schools with diversity.
  • Special schools, mental health and bullying.
  • Teaching staff perspectives: Using VR to enhance PSHE learning.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Henry is a Swire Scholar and is currently reading for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. His doctoral research is fully funded by the Swire Charitable Trust and St Antony’s College.

Henry’s research interests lie primarily in classroom dynamics, specifically the interaction of cognitive, affective and motivational experiences in education settings. His DPhil research seeks the rapprochement between the dominant nomothetic (group-focus) approach in the field of education and psychology with the idiographic (person-focus) approach, which is mostly overlooked. Henry is also interested in advanced quantitative methods (e.g., Dynamic Structural Equation Modelling) and analysing ambulatory assessment data.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Henry undertook a placement year as a research assistant in the Child Development and Learning research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford, whilst completing his BSc in Psychology at the University of Surrey. He continued and completed his MSc in Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford.

 

Publications

Lo, H. T. F. 2022. Children’s Momentary Executive Function Fluctuation in Real-World Classrooms: An Intensive Longitudinal Study. MSc Dissertation. University of Oxford, U.K.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay is a second-year DPhil student investigating how classroom characteristics are related to Pakistani children’s development. She is supervised by Professor Iram Siraj and Dr Katharina Ereky-Stevens and her work is being supported by the Aga Khan University (Pakistan). Anushay received the Patrice Engle Dissertation Grant Award from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) in 2023.

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay also works as a part-time research  assistant at the Developmental Diversity Lab at UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families. Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (under review). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child and Family Factors, Emotion Recognition Accuracy, and Social Behaviour.

Presentations

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (2023, March). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child-Level Factors and Emotion Recognition Accuracy [Paper Presentation]. Society for Research in Child Development, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  4. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom.

Posters

  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Julia teaches and supervises on the MSc in Education and is involved in the Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment; Core Principles of Child Assessment, and the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing papers.

Before joining the Department of Education she worked in the Department of Experimental Psychology (2013-2023) and continues collaborations there, including co-leading the WISDOM (working in schools to deliver on mental health) Network: https://wisdom.mhid.org.uk.

Her research is concerned with child development, primarily peer relationships, bullying and mental health. She works with primary, secondary and special education schools across the UK and with children aged 4-18. She is also an advocate for public and community engagement, especially with school staff and parents.

Julia wants to support every child to achieve their potential in school.

Recently funded PI projects:

  • Feasibility trial of an anti-bullying programme for children in special schools.
  • Pupil interactions and networks in special schools.
  • Mental health in schools with diversity.
  • Special schools, mental health and bullying.
  • Teaching staff perspectives: Using VR to enhance PSHE learning.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Henry is a Swire Scholar and is currently reading for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. His doctoral research is fully funded by the Swire Charitable Trust and St Antony’s College.

Henry’s research interests lie primarily in classroom dynamics, specifically the interaction of cognitive, affective and motivational experiences in education settings. His DPhil research seeks the rapprochement between the dominant nomothetic (group-focus) approach in the field of education and psychology with the idiographic (person-focus) approach, which is mostly overlooked. Henry is also interested in advanced quantitative methods (e.g., Dynamic Structural Equation Modelling) and analysing ambulatory assessment data.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Henry undertook a placement year as a research assistant in the Child Development and Learning research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford, whilst completing his BSc in Psychology at the University of Surrey. He continued and completed his MSc in Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford.

 

Publications

Lo, H. T. F. 2022. Children’s Momentary Executive Function Fluctuation in Real-World Classrooms: An Intensive Longitudinal Study. MSc Dissertation. University of Oxford, U.K.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay is a second-year DPhil student investigating how classroom characteristics are related to Pakistani children’s development. She is supervised by Professor Iram Siraj and Dr Katharina Ereky-Stevens and her work is being supported by the Aga Khan University (Pakistan). Anushay received the Patrice Engle Dissertation Grant Award from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) in 2023.

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay also works as a part-time research  assistant at the Developmental Diversity Lab at UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families. Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (under review). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child and Family Factors, Emotion Recognition Accuracy, and Social Behaviour.

Presentations

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (2023, March). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child-Level Factors and Emotion Recognition Accuracy [Paper Presentation]. Society for Research in Child Development, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  4. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom.

Posters

  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Julia teaches and supervises on the MSc in Education and is involved in the Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment; Core Principles of Child Assessment, and the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing papers.

Before joining the Department of Education she worked in the Department of Experimental Psychology (2013-2023) and continues collaborations there, including co-leading the WISDOM (working in schools to deliver on mental health) Network: https://wisdom.mhid.org.uk.

Her research is concerned with child development, primarily peer relationships, bullying and mental health. She works with primary, secondary and special education schools across the UK and with children aged 4-18. She is also an advocate for public and community engagement, especially with school staff and parents.

Julia wants to support every child to achieve their potential in school.

Recently funded PI projects:

  • Feasibility trial of an anti-bullying programme for children in special schools.
  • Pupil interactions and networks in special schools.
  • Mental health in schools with diversity.
  • Special schools, mental health and bullying.
  • Teaching staff perspectives: Using VR to enhance PSHE learning.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Henry is a Swire Scholar and is currently reading for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. His doctoral research is fully funded by the Swire Charitable Trust and St Antony’s College.

Henry’s research interests lie primarily in classroom dynamics, specifically the interaction of cognitive, affective and motivational experiences in education settings. His DPhil research seeks the rapprochement between the dominant nomothetic (group-focus) approach in the field of education and psychology with the idiographic (person-focus) approach, which is mostly overlooked. Henry is also interested in advanced quantitative methods (e.g., Dynamic Structural Equation Modelling) and analysing ambulatory assessment data.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Henry undertook a placement year as a research assistant in the Child Development and Learning research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford, whilst completing his BSc in Psychology at the University of Surrey. He continued and completed his MSc in Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford.

 

Publications

Lo, H. T. F. 2022. Children’s Momentary Executive Function Fluctuation in Real-World Classrooms: An Intensive Longitudinal Study. MSc Dissertation. University of Oxford, U.K.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay is a second-year DPhil student investigating how classroom characteristics are related to Pakistani children’s development. She is supervised by Professor Iram Siraj and Dr Katharina Ereky-Stevens and her work is being supported by the Aga Khan University (Pakistan). Anushay received the Patrice Engle Dissertation Grant Award from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) in 2023.

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay also works as a part-time research  assistant at the Developmental Diversity Lab at UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families. Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (under review). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child and Family Factors, Emotion Recognition Accuracy, and Social Behaviour.

Presentations

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (2023, March). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child-Level Factors and Emotion Recognition Accuracy [Paper Presentation]. Society for Research in Child Development, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  4. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom.

Posters

  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Julia teaches and supervises on the MSc in Education and is involved in the Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment; Core Principles of Child Assessment, and the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing papers.

Before joining the Department of Education she worked in the Department of Experimental Psychology (2013-2023) and continues collaborations there, including co-leading the WISDOM (working in schools to deliver on mental health) Network: https://wisdom.mhid.org.uk.

Her research is concerned with child development, primarily peer relationships, bullying and mental health. She works with primary, secondary and special education schools across the UK and with children aged 4-18. She is also an advocate for public and community engagement, especially with school staff and parents.

Julia wants to support every child to achieve their potential in school.

Recently funded PI projects:

  • Feasibility trial of an anti-bullying programme for children in special schools.
  • Pupil interactions and networks in special schools.
  • Mental health in schools with diversity.
  • Special schools, mental health and bullying.
  • Teaching staff perspectives: Using VR to enhance PSHE learning.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Henry is a Swire Scholar and is currently reading for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. His doctoral research is fully funded by the Swire Charitable Trust and St Antony’s College.

Henry’s research interests lie primarily in classroom dynamics, specifically the interaction of cognitive, affective and motivational experiences in education settings. His DPhil research seeks the rapprochement between the dominant nomothetic (group-focus) approach in the field of education and psychology with the idiographic (person-focus) approach, which is mostly overlooked. Henry is also interested in advanced quantitative methods (e.g., Dynamic Structural Equation Modelling) and analysing ambulatory assessment data.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Henry undertook a placement year as a research assistant in the Child Development and Learning research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford, whilst completing his BSc in Psychology at the University of Surrey. He continued and completed his MSc in Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford.

 

Publications

Lo, H. T. F. 2022. Children’s Momentary Executive Function Fluctuation in Real-World Classrooms: An Intensive Longitudinal Study. MSc Dissertation. University of Oxford, U.K.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay is a second-year DPhil student investigating how classroom characteristics are related to Pakistani children’s development. She is supervised by Professor Iram Siraj and Dr Katharina Ereky-Stevens and her work is being supported by the Aga Khan University (Pakistan). Anushay received the Patrice Engle Dissertation Grant Award from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) in 2023.

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay also works as a part-time research  assistant at the Developmental Diversity Lab at UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families. Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (under review). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child and Family Factors, Emotion Recognition Accuracy, and Social Behaviour.

Presentations

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (2023, March). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child-Level Factors and Emotion Recognition Accuracy [Paper Presentation]. Society for Research in Child Development, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  4. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom.

Posters

  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Julia teaches and supervises on the MSc in Education and is involved in the Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment; Core Principles of Child Assessment, and the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing papers.

Before joining the Department of Education she worked in the Department of Experimental Psychology (2013-2023) and continues collaborations there, including co-leading the WISDOM (working in schools to deliver on mental health) Network: https://wisdom.mhid.org.uk.

Her research is concerned with child development, primarily peer relationships, bullying and mental health. She works with primary, secondary and special education schools across the UK and with children aged 4-18. She is also an advocate for public and community engagement, especially with school staff and parents.

Julia wants to support every child to achieve their potential in school.

Recently funded PI projects:

  • Feasibility trial of an anti-bullying programme for children in special schools.
  • Pupil interactions and networks in special schools.
  • Mental health in schools with diversity.
  • Special schools, mental health and bullying.
  • Teaching staff perspectives: Using VR to enhance PSHE learning.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Henry is a Swire Scholar and is currently reading for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. His doctoral research is fully funded by the Swire Charitable Trust and St Antony’s College.

Henry’s research interests lie primarily in classroom dynamics, specifically the interaction of cognitive, affective and motivational experiences in education settings. His DPhil research seeks the rapprochement between the dominant nomothetic (group-focus) approach in the field of education and psychology with the idiographic (person-focus) approach, which is mostly overlooked. Henry is also interested in advanced quantitative methods (e.g., Dynamic Structural Equation Modelling) and analysing ambulatory assessment data.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Henry undertook a placement year as a research assistant in the Child Development and Learning research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford, whilst completing his BSc in Psychology at the University of Surrey. He continued and completed his MSc in Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford.

 

Publications

Lo, H. T. F. 2022. Children’s Momentary Executive Function Fluctuation in Real-World Classrooms: An Intensive Longitudinal Study. MSc Dissertation. University of Oxford, U.K.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay is a second-year DPhil student investigating how classroom characteristics are related to Pakistani children’s development. She is supervised by Professor Iram Siraj and Dr Katharina Ereky-Stevens and her work is being supported by the Aga Khan University (Pakistan). Anushay received the Patrice Engle Dissertation Grant Award from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) in 2023.

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay also works as a part-time research  assistant at the Developmental Diversity Lab at UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families. Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (under review). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child and Family Factors, Emotion Recognition Accuracy, and Social Behaviour.

Presentations

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (2023, March). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child-Level Factors and Emotion Recognition Accuracy [Paper Presentation]. Society for Research in Child Development, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  4. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom.

Posters

  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Julia teaches and supervises on the MSc in Education and is involved in the Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment; Core Principles of Child Assessment, and the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing papers.

Before joining the Department of Education she worked in the Department of Experimental Psychology (2013-2023) and continues collaborations there, including co-leading the WISDOM (working in schools to deliver on mental health) Network: https://wisdom.mhid.org.uk.

Her research is concerned with child development, primarily peer relationships, bullying and mental health. She works with primary, secondary and special education schools across the UK and with children aged 4-18. She is also an advocate for public and community engagement, especially with school staff and parents.

Julia wants to support every child to achieve their potential in school.

Recently funded PI projects:

  • Feasibility trial of an anti-bullying programme for children in special schools.
  • Pupil interactions and networks in special schools.
  • Mental health in schools with diversity.
  • Special schools, mental health and bullying.
  • Teaching staff perspectives: Using VR to enhance PSHE learning.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Henry is a Swire Scholar and is currently reading for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. His doctoral research is fully funded by the Swire Charitable Trust and St Antony’s College.

Henry’s research interests lie primarily in classroom dynamics, specifically the interaction of cognitive, affective and motivational experiences in education settings. His DPhil research seeks the rapprochement between the dominant nomothetic (group-focus) approach in the field of education and psychology with the idiographic (person-focus) approach, which is mostly overlooked. Henry is also interested in advanced quantitative methods (e.g., Dynamic Structural Equation Modelling) and analysing ambulatory assessment data.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Henry undertook a placement year as a research assistant in the Child Development and Learning research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford, whilst completing his BSc in Psychology at the University of Surrey. He continued and completed his MSc in Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford.

 

Publications

Lo, H. T. F. 2022. Children’s Momentary Executive Function Fluctuation in Real-World Classrooms: An Intensive Longitudinal Study. MSc Dissertation. University of Oxford, U.K.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay is a second-year DPhil student investigating how classroom characteristics are related to Pakistani children’s development. She is supervised by Professor Iram Siraj and Dr Katharina Ereky-Stevens and her work is being supported by the Aga Khan University (Pakistan). Anushay received the Patrice Engle Dissertation Grant Award from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) in 2023.

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay also works as a part-time research  assistant at the Developmental Diversity Lab at UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families. Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (under review). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child and Family Factors, Emotion Recognition Accuracy, and Social Behaviour.

Presentations

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (2023, March). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child-Level Factors and Emotion Recognition Accuracy [Paper Presentation]. Society for Research in Child Development, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  4. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom.

Posters

  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Julia teaches and supervises on the MSc in Education and is involved in the Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment; Core Principles of Child Assessment, and the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing papers.

Before joining the Department of Education she worked in the Department of Experimental Psychology (2013-2023) and continues collaborations there, including co-leading the WISDOM (working in schools to deliver on mental health) Network: https://wisdom.mhid.org.uk.

Her research is concerned with child development, primarily peer relationships, bullying and mental health. She works with primary, secondary and special education schools across the UK and with children aged 4-18. She is also an advocate for public and community engagement, especially with school staff and parents.

Julia wants to support every child to achieve their potential in school.

Recently funded PI projects:

  • Feasibility trial of an anti-bullying programme for children in special schools.
  • Pupil interactions and networks in special schools.
  • Mental health in schools with diversity.
  • Special schools, mental health and bullying.
  • Teaching staff perspectives: Using VR to enhance PSHE learning.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Henry is a Swire Scholar and is currently reading for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. His doctoral research is fully funded by the Swire Charitable Trust and St Antony’s College.

Henry’s research interests lie primarily in classroom dynamics, specifically the interaction of cognitive, affective and motivational experiences in education settings. His DPhil research seeks the rapprochement between the dominant nomothetic (group-focus) approach in the field of education and psychology with the idiographic (person-focus) approach, which is mostly overlooked. Henry is also interested in advanced quantitative methods (e.g., Dynamic Structural Equation Modelling) and analysing ambulatory assessment data.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Henry undertook a placement year as a research assistant in the Child Development and Learning research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford, whilst completing his BSc in Psychology at the University of Surrey. He continued and completed his MSc in Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford.

 

Publications

Lo, H. T. F. 2022. Children’s Momentary Executive Function Fluctuation in Real-World Classrooms: An Intensive Longitudinal Study. MSc Dissertation. University of Oxford, U.K.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay is a second-year DPhil student investigating how classroom characteristics are related to Pakistani children’s development. She is supervised by Professor Iram Siraj and Dr Katharina Ereky-Stevens and her work is being supported by the Aga Khan University (Pakistan). Anushay received the Patrice Engle Dissertation Grant Award from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) in 2023.

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay also works as a part-time research  assistant at the Developmental Diversity Lab at UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families. Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (under review). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child and Family Factors, Emotion Recognition Accuracy, and Social Behaviour.

Presentations

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (2023, March). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child-Level Factors and Emotion Recognition Accuracy [Paper Presentation]. Society for Research in Child Development, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  4. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom.

Posters

  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Julia teaches and supervises on the MSc in Education and is involved in the Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment; Core Principles of Child Assessment, and the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing papers.

Before joining the Department of Education she worked in the Department of Experimental Psychology (2013-2023) and continues collaborations there, including co-leading the WISDOM (working in schools to deliver on mental health) Network: https://wisdom.mhid.org.uk.

Her research is concerned with child development, primarily peer relationships, bullying and mental health. She works with primary, secondary and special education schools across the UK and with children aged 4-18. She is also an advocate for public and community engagement, especially with school staff and parents.

Julia wants to support every child to achieve their potential in school.

Recently funded PI projects:

  • Feasibility trial of an anti-bullying programme for children in special schools.
  • Pupil interactions and networks in special schools.
  • Mental health in schools with diversity.
  • Special schools, mental health and bullying.
  • Teaching staff perspectives: Using VR to enhance PSHE learning.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Henry is a Swire Scholar and is currently reading for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. His doctoral research is fully funded by the Swire Charitable Trust and St Antony’s College.

Henry’s research interests lie primarily in classroom dynamics, specifically the interaction of cognitive, affective and motivational experiences in education settings. His DPhil research seeks the rapprochement between the dominant nomothetic (group-focus) approach in the field of education and psychology with the idiographic (person-focus) approach, which is mostly overlooked. Henry is also interested in advanced quantitative methods (e.g., Dynamic Structural Equation Modelling) and analysing ambulatory assessment data.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Henry undertook a placement year as a research assistant in the Child Development and Learning research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford, whilst completing his BSc in Psychology at the University of Surrey. He continued and completed his MSc in Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford.

 

Publications

Lo, H. T. F. 2022. Children’s Momentary Executive Function Fluctuation in Real-World Classrooms: An Intensive Longitudinal Study. MSc Dissertation. University of Oxford, U.K.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay is a second-year DPhil student investigating how classroom characteristics are related to Pakistani children’s development. She is supervised by Professor Iram Siraj and Dr Katharina Ereky-Stevens and her work is being supported by the Aga Khan University (Pakistan). Anushay received the Patrice Engle Dissertation Grant Award from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) in 2023.

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay also works as a part-time research  assistant at the Developmental Diversity Lab at UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families. Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (under review). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child and Family Factors, Emotion Recognition Accuracy, and Social Behaviour.

Presentations

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (2023, March). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child-Level Factors and Emotion Recognition Accuracy [Paper Presentation]. Society for Research in Child Development, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  4. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom.

Posters

  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Julia teaches and supervises on the MSc in Education and is involved in the Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment; Core Principles of Child Assessment, and the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing papers.

Before joining the Department of Education she worked in the Department of Experimental Psychology (2013-2023) and continues collaborations there, including co-leading the WISDOM (working in schools to deliver on mental health) Network: https://wisdom.mhid.org.uk.

Her research is concerned with child development, primarily peer relationships, bullying and mental health. She works with primary, secondary and special education schools across the UK and with children aged 4-18. She is also an advocate for public and community engagement, especially with school staff and parents.

Julia wants to support every child to achieve their potential in school.

Recently funded PI projects:

  • Feasibility trial of an anti-bullying programme for children in special schools.
  • Pupil interactions and networks in special schools.
  • Mental health in schools with diversity.
  • Special schools, mental health and bullying.
  • Teaching staff perspectives: Using VR to enhance PSHE learning.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Henry is a Swire Scholar and is currently reading for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. His doctoral research is fully funded by the Swire Charitable Trust and St Antony’s College.

Henry’s research interests lie primarily in classroom dynamics, specifically the interaction of cognitive, affective and motivational experiences in education settings. His DPhil research seeks the rapprochement between the dominant nomothetic (group-focus) approach in the field of education and psychology with the idiographic (person-focus) approach, which is mostly overlooked. Henry is also interested in advanced quantitative methods (e.g., Dynamic Structural Equation Modelling) and analysing ambulatory assessment data.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Henry undertook a placement year as a research assistant in the Child Development and Learning research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford, whilst completing his BSc in Psychology at the University of Surrey. He continued and completed his MSc in Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford.

 

Publications

Lo, H. T. F. 2022. Children’s Momentary Executive Function Fluctuation in Real-World Classrooms: An Intensive Longitudinal Study. MSc Dissertation. University of Oxford, U.K.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay is a second-year DPhil student investigating how classroom characteristics are related to Pakistani children’s development. She is supervised by Professor Iram Siraj and Dr Katharina Ereky-Stevens and her work is being supported by the Aga Khan University (Pakistan). Anushay received the Patrice Engle Dissertation Grant Award from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) in 2023.

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay also works as a part-time research  assistant at the Developmental Diversity Lab at UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families. Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (under review). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child and Family Factors, Emotion Recognition Accuracy, and Social Behaviour.

Presentations

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (2023, March). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child-Level Factors and Emotion Recognition Accuracy [Paper Presentation]. Society for Research in Child Development, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  4. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom.

Posters

  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Julia teaches and supervises on the MSc in Education and is involved in the Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment; Core Principles of Child Assessment, and the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing papers.

Before joining the Department of Education she worked in the Department of Experimental Psychology (2013-2023) and continues collaborations there, including co-leading the WISDOM (working in schools to deliver on mental health) Network: https://wisdom.mhid.org.uk.

Her research is concerned with child development, primarily peer relationships, bullying and mental health. She works with primary, secondary and special education schools across the UK and with children aged 4-18. She is also an advocate for public and community engagement, especially with school staff and parents.

Julia wants to support every child to achieve their potential in school.

Recently funded PI projects:

  • Feasibility trial of an anti-bullying programme for children in special schools.
  • Pupil interactions and networks in special schools.
  • Mental health in schools with diversity.
  • Special schools, mental health and bullying.
  • Teaching staff perspectives: Using VR to enhance PSHE learning.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Henry is a Swire Scholar and is currently reading for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. His doctoral research is fully funded by the Swire Charitable Trust and St Antony’s College.

Henry’s research interests lie primarily in classroom dynamics, specifically the interaction of cognitive, affective and motivational experiences in education settings. His DPhil research seeks the rapprochement between the dominant nomothetic (group-focus) approach in the field of education and psychology with the idiographic (person-focus) approach, which is mostly overlooked. Henry is also interested in advanced quantitative methods (e.g., Dynamic Structural Equation Modelling) and analysing ambulatory assessment data.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Henry undertook a placement year as a research assistant in the Child Development and Learning research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford, whilst completing his BSc in Psychology at the University of Surrey. He continued and completed his MSc in Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford.

 

Publications

Lo, H. T. F. 2022. Children’s Momentary Executive Function Fluctuation in Real-World Classrooms: An Intensive Longitudinal Study. MSc Dissertation. University of Oxford, U.K.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay is a second-year DPhil student investigating how classroom characteristics are related to Pakistani children’s development. She is supervised by Professor Iram Siraj and Dr Katharina Ereky-Stevens and her work is being supported by the Aga Khan University (Pakistan). Anushay received the Patrice Engle Dissertation Grant Award from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) in 2023.

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay also works as a part-time research  assistant at the Developmental Diversity Lab at UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families. Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (under review). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child and Family Factors, Emotion Recognition Accuracy, and Social Behaviour.

Presentations

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (2023, March). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child-Level Factors and Emotion Recognition Accuracy [Paper Presentation]. Society for Research in Child Development, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  4. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom.

Posters

  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Julia teaches and supervises on the MSc in Education and is involved in the Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment; Core Principles of Child Assessment, and the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing papers.

Before joining the Department of Education she worked in the Department of Experimental Psychology (2013-2023) and continues collaborations there, including co-leading the WISDOM (working in schools to deliver on mental health) Network: https://wisdom.mhid.org.uk.

Her research is concerned with child development, primarily peer relationships, bullying and mental health. She works with primary, secondary and special education schools across the UK and with children aged 4-18. She is also an advocate for public and community engagement, especially with school staff and parents.

Julia wants to support every child to achieve their potential in school.

Recently funded PI projects:

  • Feasibility trial of an anti-bullying programme for children in special schools.
  • Pupil interactions and networks in special schools.
  • Mental health in schools with diversity.
  • Special schools, mental health and bullying.
  • Teaching staff perspectives: Using VR to enhance PSHE learning.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Henry is a Swire Scholar and is currently reading for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. His doctoral research is fully funded by the Swire Charitable Trust and St Antony’s College.

Henry’s research interests lie primarily in classroom dynamics, specifically the interaction of cognitive, affective and motivational experiences in education settings. His DPhil research seeks the rapprochement between the dominant nomothetic (group-focus) approach in the field of education and psychology with the idiographic (person-focus) approach, which is mostly overlooked. Henry is also interested in advanced quantitative methods (e.g., Dynamic Structural Equation Modelling) and analysing ambulatory assessment data.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Henry undertook a placement year as a research assistant in the Child Development and Learning research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford, whilst completing his BSc in Psychology at the University of Surrey. He continued and completed his MSc in Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford.

 

Publications

Lo, H. T. F. 2022. Children’s Momentary Executive Function Fluctuation in Real-World Classrooms: An Intensive Longitudinal Study. MSc Dissertation. University of Oxford, U.K.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay is a second-year DPhil student investigating how classroom characteristics are related to Pakistani children’s development. She is supervised by Professor Iram Siraj and Dr Katharina Ereky-Stevens and her work is being supported by the Aga Khan University (Pakistan). Anushay received the Patrice Engle Dissertation Grant Award from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) in 2023.

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay also works as a part-time research  assistant at the Developmental Diversity Lab at UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families. Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (under review). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child and Family Factors, Emotion Recognition Accuracy, and Social Behaviour.

Presentations

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (2023, March). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child-Level Factors and Emotion Recognition Accuracy [Paper Presentation]. Society for Research in Child Development, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  4. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom.

Posters

  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Julia teaches and supervises on the MSc in Education and is involved in the Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment; Core Principles of Child Assessment, and the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing papers.

Before joining the Department of Education she worked in the Department of Experimental Psychology (2013-2023) and continues collaborations there, including co-leading the WISDOM (working in schools to deliver on mental health) Network: https://wisdom.mhid.org.uk.

Her research is concerned with child development, primarily peer relationships, bullying and mental health. She works with primary, secondary and special education schools across the UK and with children aged 4-18. She is also an advocate for public and community engagement, especially with school staff and parents.

Julia wants to support every child to achieve their potential in school.

Recently funded PI projects:

  • Feasibility trial of an anti-bullying programme for children in special schools.
  • Pupil interactions and networks in special schools.
  • Mental health in schools with diversity.
  • Special schools, mental health and bullying.
  • Teaching staff perspectives: Using VR to enhance PSHE learning.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Henry is a Swire Scholar and is currently reading for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. His doctoral research is fully funded by the Swire Charitable Trust and St Antony’s College.

Henry’s research interests lie primarily in classroom dynamics, specifically the interaction of cognitive, affective and motivational experiences in education settings. His DPhil research seeks the rapprochement between the dominant nomothetic (group-focus) approach in the field of education and psychology with the idiographic (person-focus) approach, which is mostly overlooked. Henry is also interested in advanced quantitative methods (e.g., Dynamic Structural Equation Modelling) and analysing ambulatory assessment data.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Henry undertook a placement year as a research assistant in the Child Development and Learning research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford, whilst completing his BSc in Psychology at the University of Surrey. He continued and completed his MSc in Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford.

 

Publications

Lo, H. T. F. 2022. Children’s Momentary Executive Function Fluctuation in Real-World Classrooms: An Intensive Longitudinal Study. MSc Dissertation. University of Oxford, U.K.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay is a second-year DPhil student investigating how classroom characteristics are related to Pakistani children’s development. She is supervised by Professor Iram Siraj and Dr Katharina Ereky-Stevens and her work is being supported by the Aga Khan University (Pakistan). Anushay received the Patrice Engle Dissertation Grant Award from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) in 2023.

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay also works as a part-time research  assistant at the Developmental Diversity Lab at UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families. Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (under review). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child and Family Factors, Emotion Recognition Accuracy, and Social Behaviour.

Presentations

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (2023, March). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child-Level Factors and Emotion Recognition Accuracy [Paper Presentation]. Society for Research in Child Development, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  4. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom.

Posters

  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Julia teaches and supervises on the MSc in Education and is involved in the Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment; Core Principles of Child Assessment, and the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing papers.

Before joining the Department of Education she worked in the Department of Experimental Psychology (2013-2023) and continues collaborations there, including co-leading the WISDOM (working in schools to deliver on mental health) Network: https://wisdom.mhid.org.uk.

Her research is concerned with child development, primarily peer relationships, bullying and mental health. She works with primary, secondary and special education schools across the UK and with children aged 4-18. She is also an advocate for public and community engagement, especially with school staff and parents.

Julia wants to support every child to achieve their potential in school.

Recently funded PI projects:

  • Feasibility trial of an anti-bullying programme for children in special schools.
  • Pupil interactions and networks in special schools.
  • Mental health in schools with diversity.
  • Special schools, mental health and bullying.
  • Teaching staff perspectives: Using VR to enhance PSHE learning.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Henry is a Swire Scholar and is currently reading for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. His doctoral research is fully funded by the Swire Charitable Trust and St Antony’s College.

Henry’s research interests lie primarily in classroom dynamics, specifically the interaction of cognitive, affective and motivational experiences in education settings. His DPhil research seeks the rapprochement between the dominant nomothetic (group-focus) approach in the field of education and psychology with the idiographic (person-focus) approach, which is mostly overlooked. Henry is also interested in advanced quantitative methods (e.g., Dynamic Structural Equation Modelling) and analysing ambulatory assessment data.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Henry undertook a placement year as a research assistant in the Child Development and Learning research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford, whilst completing his BSc in Psychology at the University of Surrey. He continued and completed his MSc in Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford.

 

Publications

Lo, H. T. F. 2022. Children’s Momentary Executive Function Fluctuation in Real-World Classrooms: An Intensive Longitudinal Study. MSc Dissertation. University of Oxford, U.K.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay is a second-year DPhil student investigating how classroom characteristics are related to Pakistani children’s development. She is supervised by Professor Iram Siraj and Dr Katharina Ereky-Stevens and her work is being supported by the Aga Khan University (Pakistan). Anushay received the Patrice Engle Dissertation Grant Award from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) in 2023.

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay also works as a part-time research  assistant at the Developmental Diversity Lab at UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families. Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (under review). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child and Family Factors, Emotion Recognition Accuracy, and Social Behaviour.

Presentations

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (2023, March). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child-Level Factors and Emotion Recognition Accuracy [Paper Presentation]. Society for Research in Child Development, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  4. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom.

Posters

  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Julia teaches and supervises on the MSc in Education and is involved in the Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment; Core Principles of Child Assessment, and the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing papers.

Before joining the Department of Education she worked in the Department of Experimental Psychology (2013-2023) and continues collaborations there, including co-leading the WISDOM (working in schools to deliver on mental health) Network: https://wisdom.mhid.org.uk.

Her research is concerned with child development, primarily peer relationships, bullying and mental health. She works with primary, secondary and special education schools across the UK and with children aged 4-18. She is also an advocate for public and community engagement, especially with school staff and parents.

Julia wants to support every child to achieve their potential in school.

Recently funded PI projects:

  • Feasibility trial of an anti-bullying programme for children in special schools.
  • Pupil interactions and networks in special schools.
  • Mental health in schools with diversity.
  • Special schools, mental health and bullying.
  • Teaching staff perspectives: Using VR to enhance PSHE learning.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Henry is a Swire Scholar and is currently reading for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. His doctoral research is fully funded by the Swire Charitable Trust and St Antony’s College.

Henry’s research interests lie primarily in classroom dynamics, specifically the interaction of cognitive, affective and motivational experiences in education settings. His DPhil research seeks the rapprochement between the dominant nomothetic (group-focus) approach in the field of education and psychology with the idiographic (person-focus) approach, which is mostly overlooked. Henry is also interested in advanced quantitative methods (e.g., Dynamic Structural Equation Modelling) and analysing ambulatory assessment data.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Henry undertook a placement year as a research assistant in the Child Development and Learning research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford, whilst completing his BSc in Psychology at the University of Surrey. He continued and completed his MSc in Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford.

 

Publications

Lo, H. T. F. 2022. Children’s Momentary Executive Function Fluctuation in Real-World Classrooms: An Intensive Longitudinal Study. MSc Dissertation. University of Oxford, U.K.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay is a second-year DPhil student investigating how classroom characteristics are related to Pakistani children’s development. She is supervised by Professor Iram Siraj and Dr Katharina Ereky-Stevens and her work is being supported by the Aga Khan University (Pakistan). Anushay received the Patrice Engle Dissertation Grant Award from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) in 2023.

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay also works as a part-time research  assistant at the Developmental Diversity Lab at UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families. Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (under review). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child and Family Factors, Emotion Recognition Accuracy, and Social Behaviour.

Presentations

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (2023, March). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child-Level Factors and Emotion Recognition Accuracy [Paper Presentation]. Society for Research in Child Development, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  4. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom.

Posters

  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Julia teaches and supervises on the MSc in Education and is involved in the Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment; Core Principles of Child Assessment, and the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing papers.

Before joining the Department of Education she worked in the Department of Experimental Psychology (2013-2023) and continues collaborations there, including co-leading the WISDOM (working in schools to deliver on mental health) Network: https://wisdom.mhid.org.uk.

Her research is concerned with child development, primarily peer relationships, bullying and mental health. She works with primary, secondary and special education schools across the UK and with children aged 4-18. She is also an advocate for public and community engagement, especially with school staff and parents.

Julia wants to support every child to achieve their potential in school.

Recently funded PI projects:

  • Feasibility trial of an anti-bullying programme for children in special schools.
  • Pupil interactions and networks in special schools.
  • Mental health in schools with diversity.
  • Special schools, mental health and bullying.
  • Teaching staff perspectives: Using VR to enhance PSHE learning.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Henry is a Swire Scholar and is currently reading for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. His doctoral research is fully funded by the Swire Charitable Trust and St Antony’s College.

Henry’s research interests lie primarily in classroom dynamics, specifically the interaction of cognitive, affective and motivational experiences in education settings. His DPhil research seeks the rapprochement between the dominant nomothetic (group-focus) approach in the field of education and psychology with the idiographic (person-focus) approach, which is mostly overlooked. Henry is also interested in advanced quantitative methods (e.g., Dynamic Structural Equation Modelling) and analysing ambulatory assessment data.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Henry undertook a placement year as a research assistant in the Child Development and Learning research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford, whilst completing his BSc in Psychology at the University of Surrey. He continued and completed his MSc in Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford.

 

Publications

Lo, H. T. F. 2022. Children’s Momentary Executive Function Fluctuation in Real-World Classrooms: An Intensive Longitudinal Study. MSc Dissertation. University of Oxford, U.K.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay is a second-year DPhil student investigating how classroom characteristics are related to Pakistani children’s development. She is supervised by Professor Iram Siraj and Dr Katharina Ereky-Stevens and her work is being supported by the Aga Khan University (Pakistan). Anushay received the Patrice Engle Dissertation Grant Award from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) in 2023.

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay also works as a part-time research  assistant at the Developmental Diversity Lab at UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families. Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (under review). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child and Family Factors, Emotion Recognition Accuracy, and Social Behaviour.

Presentations

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (2023, March). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child-Level Factors and Emotion Recognition Accuracy [Paper Presentation]. Society for Research in Child Development, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  4. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom.

Posters

  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Julia teaches and supervises on the MSc in Education and is involved in the Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment; Core Principles of Child Assessment, and the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing papers.

Before joining the Department of Education she worked in the Department of Experimental Psychology (2013-2023) and continues collaborations there, including co-leading the WISDOM (working in schools to deliver on mental health) Network: https://wisdom.mhid.org.uk.

Her research is concerned with child development, primarily peer relationships, bullying and mental health. She works with primary, secondary and special education schools across the UK and with children aged 4-18. She is also an advocate for public and community engagement, especially with school staff and parents.

Julia wants to support every child to achieve their potential in school.

Recently funded PI projects:

  • Feasibility trial of an anti-bullying programme for children in special schools.
  • Pupil interactions and networks in special schools.
  • Mental health in schools with diversity.
  • Special schools, mental health and bullying.
  • Teaching staff perspectives: Using VR to enhance PSHE learning.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Henry is a Swire Scholar and is currently reading for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. His doctoral research is fully funded by the Swire Charitable Trust and St Antony’s College.

Henry’s research interests lie primarily in classroom dynamics, specifically the interaction of cognitive, affective and motivational experiences in education settings. His DPhil research seeks the rapprochement between the dominant nomothetic (group-focus) approach in the field of education and psychology with the idiographic (person-focus) approach, which is mostly overlooked. Henry is also interested in advanced quantitative methods (e.g., Dynamic Structural Equation Modelling) and analysing ambulatory assessment data.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Henry undertook a placement year as a research assistant in the Child Development and Learning research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford, whilst completing his BSc in Psychology at the University of Surrey. He continued and completed his MSc in Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford.

 

Publications

Lo, H. T. F. 2022. Children’s Momentary Executive Function Fluctuation in Real-World Classrooms: An Intensive Longitudinal Study. MSc Dissertation. University of Oxford, U.K.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay is a second-year DPhil student investigating how classroom characteristics are related to Pakistani children’s development. She is supervised by Professor Iram Siraj and Dr Katharina Ereky-Stevens and her work is being supported by the Aga Khan University (Pakistan). Anushay received the Patrice Engle Dissertation Grant Award from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) in 2023.

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay also works as a part-time research  assistant at the Developmental Diversity Lab at UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families. Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (under review). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child and Family Factors, Emotion Recognition Accuracy, and Social Behaviour.

Presentations

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (2023, March). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child-Level Factors and Emotion Recognition Accuracy [Paper Presentation]. Society for Research in Child Development, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  4. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom.

Posters

  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Julia teaches and supervises on the MSc in Education and is involved in the Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment; Core Principles of Child Assessment, and the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing papers.

Before joining the Department of Education she worked in the Department of Experimental Psychology (2013-2023) and continues collaborations there, including co-leading the WISDOM (working in schools to deliver on mental health) Network: https://wisdom.mhid.org.uk.

Her research is concerned with child development, primarily peer relationships, bullying and mental health. She works with primary, secondary and special education schools across the UK and with children aged 4-18. She is also an advocate for public and community engagement, especially with school staff and parents.

Julia wants to support every child to achieve their potential in school.

Recently funded PI projects:

  • Feasibility trial of an anti-bullying programme for children in special schools.
  • Pupil interactions and networks in special schools.
  • Mental health in schools with diversity.
  • Special schools, mental health and bullying.
  • Teaching staff perspectives: Using VR to enhance PSHE learning.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Henry is a Swire Scholar and is currently reading for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. His doctoral research is fully funded by the Swire Charitable Trust and St Antony’s College.

Henry’s research interests lie primarily in classroom dynamics, specifically the interaction of cognitive, affective and motivational experiences in education settings. His DPhil research seeks the rapprochement between the dominant nomothetic (group-focus) approach in the field of education and psychology with the idiographic (person-focus) approach, which is mostly overlooked. Henry is also interested in advanced quantitative methods (e.g., Dynamic Structural Equation Modelling) and analysing ambulatory assessment data.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Henry undertook a placement year as a research assistant in the Child Development and Learning research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford, whilst completing his BSc in Psychology at the University of Surrey. He continued and completed his MSc in Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford.

 

Publications

Lo, H. T. F. 2022. Children’s Momentary Executive Function Fluctuation in Real-World Classrooms: An Intensive Longitudinal Study. MSc Dissertation. University of Oxford, U.K.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay is a second-year DPhil student investigating how classroom characteristics are related to Pakistani children’s development. She is supervised by Professor Iram Siraj and Dr Katharina Ereky-Stevens and her work is being supported by the Aga Khan University (Pakistan). Anushay received the Patrice Engle Dissertation Grant Award from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) in 2023.

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay also works as a part-time research  assistant at the Developmental Diversity Lab at UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families. Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (under review). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child and Family Factors, Emotion Recognition Accuracy, and Social Behaviour.

Presentations

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (2023, March). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child-Level Factors and Emotion Recognition Accuracy [Paper Presentation]. Society for Research in Child Development, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  4. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom.

Posters

  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Julia teaches and supervises on the MSc in Education and is involved in the Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment; Core Principles of Child Assessment, and the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing papers.

Before joining the Department of Education she worked in the Department of Experimental Psychology (2013-2023) and continues collaborations there, including co-leading the WISDOM (working in schools to deliver on mental health) Network: https://wisdom.mhid.org.uk.

Her research is concerned with child development, primarily peer relationships, bullying and mental health. She works with primary, secondary and special education schools across the UK and with children aged 4-18. She is also an advocate for public and community engagement, especially with school staff and parents.

Julia wants to support every child to achieve their potential in school.

Recently funded PI projects:

  • Feasibility trial of an anti-bullying programme for children in special schools.
  • Pupil interactions and networks in special schools.
  • Mental health in schools with diversity.
  • Special schools, mental health and bullying.
  • Teaching staff perspectives: Using VR to enhance PSHE learning.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Henry is a Swire Scholar and is currently reading for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. His doctoral research is fully funded by the Swire Charitable Trust and St Antony’s College.

Henry’s research interests lie primarily in classroom dynamics, specifically the interaction of cognitive, affective and motivational experiences in education settings. His DPhil research seeks the rapprochement between the dominant nomothetic (group-focus) approach in the field of education and psychology with the idiographic (person-focus) approach, which is mostly overlooked. Henry is also interested in advanced quantitative methods (e.g., Dynamic Structural Equation Modelling) and analysing ambulatory assessment data.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Henry undertook a placement year as a research assistant in the Child Development and Learning research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford, whilst completing his BSc in Psychology at the University of Surrey. He continued and completed his MSc in Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford.

 

Publications

Lo, H. T. F. 2022. Children’s Momentary Executive Function Fluctuation in Real-World Classrooms: An Intensive Longitudinal Study. MSc Dissertation. University of Oxford, U.K.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay is a second-year DPhil student investigating how classroom characteristics are related to Pakistani children’s development. She is supervised by Professor Iram Siraj and Dr Katharina Ereky-Stevens and her work is being supported by the Aga Khan University (Pakistan). Anushay received the Patrice Engle Dissertation Grant Award from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) in 2023.

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay also works as a part-time research  assistant at the Developmental Diversity Lab at UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families. Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (under review). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child and Family Factors, Emotion Recognition Accuracy, and Social Behaviour.

Presentations

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (2023, March). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child-Level Factors and Emotion Recognition Accuracy [Paper Presentation]. Society for Research in Child Development, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  4. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom.

Posters

  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Julia teaches and supervises on the MSc in Education and is involved in the Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment; Core Principles of Child Assessment, and the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing papers.

Before joining the Department of Education she worked in the Department of Experimental Psychology (2013-2023) and continues collaborations there, including co-leading the WISDOM (working in schools to deliver on mental health) Network: https://wisdom.mhid.org.uk.

Her research is concerned with child development, primarily peer relationships, bullying and mental health. She works with primary, secondary and special education schools across the UK and with children aged 4-18. She is also an advocate for public and community engagement, especially with school staff and parents.

Julia wants to support every child to achieve their potential in school.

Recently funded PI projects:

  • Feasibility trial of an anti-bullying programme for children in special schools.
  • Pupil interactions and networks in special schools.
  • Mental health in schools with diversity.
  • Special schools, mental health and bullying.
  • Teaching staff perspectives: Using VR to enhance PSHE learning.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Henry is a Swire Scholar and is currently reading for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. His doctoral research is fully funded by the Swire Charitable Trust and St Antony’s College.

Henry’s research interests lie primarily in classroom dynamics, specifically the interaction of cognitive, affective and motivational experiences in education settings. His DPhil research seeks the rapprochement between the dominant nomothetic (group-focus) approach in the field of education and psychology with the idiographic (person-focus) approach, which is mostly overlooked. Henry is also interested in advanced quantitative methods (e.g., Dynamic Structural Equation Modelling) and analysing ambulatory assessment data.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Henry undertook a placement year as a research assistant in the Child Development and Learning research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford, whilst completing his BSc in Psychology at the University of Surrey. He continued and completed his MSc in Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford.

 

Publications

Lo, H. T. F. 2022. Children’s Momentary Executive Function Fluctuation in Real-World Classrooms: An Intensive Longitudinal Study. MSc Dissertation. University of Oxford, U.K.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay is a second-year DPhil student investigating how classroom characteristics are related to Pakistani children’s development. She is supervised by Professor Iram Siraj and Dr Katharina Ereky-Stevens and her work is being supported by the Aga Khan University (Pakistan). Anushay received the Patrice Engle Dissertation Grant Award from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) in 2023.

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay also works as a part-time research  assistant at the Developmental Diversity Lab at UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families. Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (under review). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child and Family Factors, Emotion Recognition Accuracy, and Social Behaviour.

Presentations

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (2023, March). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child-Level Factors and Emotion Recognition Accuracy [Paper Presentation]. Society for Research in Child Development, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  4. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom.

Posters

  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Julia teaches and supervises on the MSc in Education and is involved in the Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment; Core Principles of Child Assessment, and the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing papers.

Before joining the Department of Education she worked in the Department of Experimental Psychology (2013-2023) and continues collaborations there, including co-leading the WISDOM (working in schools to deliver on mental health) Network: https://wisdom.mhid.org.uk.

Her research is concerned with child development, primarily peer relationships, bullying and mental health. She works with primary, secondary and special education schools across the UK and with children aged 4-18. She is also an advocate for public and community engagement, especially with school staff and parents.

Julia wants to support every child to achieve their potential in school.

Recently funded PI projects:

  • Feasibility trial of an anti-bullying programme for children in special schools.
  • Pupil interactions and networks in special schools.
  • Mental health in schools with diversity.
  • Special schools, mental health and bullying.
  • Teaching staff perspectives: Using VR to enhance PSHE learning.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Henry is a Swire Scholar and is currently reading for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. His doctoral research is fully funded by the Swire Charitable Trust and St Antony’s College.

Henry’s research interests lie primarily in classroom dynamics, specifically the interaction of cognitive, affective and motivational experiences in education settings. His DPhil research seeks the rapprochement between the dominant nomothetic (group-focus) approach in the field of education and psychology with the idiographic (person-focus) approach, which is mostly overlooked. Henry is also interested in advanced quantitative methods (e.g., Dynamic Structural Equation Modelling) and analysing ambulatory assessment data.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Henry undertook a placement year as a research assistant in the Child Development and Learning research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford, whilst completing his BSc in Psychology at the University of Surrey. He continued and completed his MSc in Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford.

 

Publications

Lo, H. T. F. 2022. Children’s Momentary Executive Function Fluctuation in Real-World Classrooms: An Intensive Longitudinal Study. MSc Dissertation. University of Oxford, U.K.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay is a second-year DPhil student investigating how classroom characteristics are related to Pakistani children’s development. She is supervised by Professor Iram Siraj and Dr Katharina Ereky-Stevens and her work is being supported by the Aga Khan University (Pakistan). Anushay received the Patrice Engle Dissertation Grant Award from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) in 2023.

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay also works as a part-time research  assistant at the Developmental Diversity Lab at UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families. Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (under review). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child and Family Factors, Emotion Recognition Accuracy, and Social Behaviour.

Presentations

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (2023, March). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child-Level Factors and Emotion Recognition Accuracy [Paper Presentation]. Society for Research in Child Development, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  4. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom.

Posters

  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Julia teaches and supervises on the MSc in Education and is involved in the Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment; Core Principles of Child Assessment, and the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing papers.

Before joining the Department of Education she worked in the Department of Experimental Psychology (2013-2023) and continues collaborations there, including co-leading the WISDOM (working in schools to deliver on mental health) Network: https://wisdom.mhid.org.uk.

Her research is concerned with child development, primarily peer relationships, bullying and mental health. She works with primary, secondary and special education schools across the UK and with children aged 4-18. She is also an advocate for public and community engagement, especially with school staff and parents.

Julia wants to support every child to achieve their potential in school.

Recently funded PI projects:

  • Feasibility trial of an anti-bullying programme for children in special schools.
  • Pupil interactions and networks in special schools.
  • Mental health in schools with diversity.
  • Special schools, mental health and bullying.
  • Teaching staff perspectives: Using VR to enhance PSHE learning.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Henry is a Swire Scholar and is currently reading for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. His doctoral research is fully funded by the Swire Charitable Trust and St Antony’s College.

Henry’s research interests lie primarily in classroom dynamics, specifically the interaction of cognitive, affective and motivational experiences in education settings. His DPhil research seeks the rapprochement between the dominant nomothetic (group-focus) approach in the field of education and psychology with the idiographic (person-focus) approach, which is mostly overlooked. Henry is also interested in advanced quantitative methods (e.g., Dynamic Structural Equation Modelling) and analysing ambulatory assessment data.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Henry undertook a placement year as a research assistant in the Child Development and Learning research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford, whilst completing his BSc in Psychology at the University of Surrey. He continued and completed his MSc in Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford.

 

Publications

Lo, H. T. F. 2022. Children’s Momentary Executive Function Fluctuation in Real-World Classrooms: An Intensive Longitudinal Study. MSc Dissertation. University of Oxford, U.K.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay is a second-year DPhil student investigating how classroom characteristics are related to Pakistani children’s development. She is supervised by Professor Iram Siraj and Dr Katharina Ereky-Stevens and her work is being supported by the Aga Khan University (Pakistan). Anushay received the Patrice Engle Dissertation Grant Award from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) in 2023.

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay also works as a part-time research  assistant at the Developmental Diversity Lab at UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families. Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (under review). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child and Family Factors, Emotion Recognition Accuracy, and Social Behaviour.

Presentations

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (2023, March). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child-Level Factors and Emotion Recognition Accuracy [Paper Presentation]. Society for Research in Child Development, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  4. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom.

Posters

  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Julia teaches and supervises on the MSc in Education and is involved in the Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment; Core Principles of Child Assessment, and the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing papers.

Before joining the Department of Education she worked in the Department of Experimental Psychology (2013-2023) and continues collaborations there, including co-leading the WISDOM (working in schools to deliver on mental health) Network: https://wisdom.mhid.org.uk.

Her research is concerned with child development, primarily peer relationships, bullying and mental health. She works with primary, secondary and special education schools across the UK and with children aged 4-18. She is also an advocate for public and community engagement, especially with school staff and parents.

Julia wants to support every child to achieve their potential in school.

Recently funded PI projects:

  • Feasibility trial of an anti-bullying programme for children in special schools.
  • Pupil interactions and networks in special schools.
  • Mental health in schools with diversity.
  • Special schools, mental health and bullying.
  • Teaching staff perspectives: Using VR to enhance PSHE learning.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Henry is a Swire Scholar and is currently reading for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. His doctoral research is fully funded by the Swire Charitable Trust and St Antony’s College.

Henry’s research interests lie primarily in classroom dynamics, specifically the interaction of cognitive, affective and motivational experiences in education settings. His DPhil research seeks the rapprochement between the dominant nomothetic (group-focus) approach in the field of education and psychology with the idiographic (person-focus) approach, which is mostly overlooked. Henry is also interested in advanced quantitative methods (e.g., Dynamic Structural Equation Modelling) and analysing ambulatory assessment data.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Henry undertook a placement year as a research assistant in the Child Development and Learning research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford, whilst completing his BSc in Psychology at the University of Surrey. He continued and completed his MSc in Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford.

 

Publications

Lo, H. T. F. 2022. Children’s Momentary Executive Function Fluctuation in Real-World Classrooms: An Intensive Longitudinal Study. MSc Dissertation. University of Oxford, U.K.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay is a second-year DPhil student investigating how classroom characteristics are related to Pakistani children’s development. She is supervised by Professor Iram Siraj and Dr Katharina Ereky-Stevens and her work is being supported by the Aga Khan University (Pakistan). Anushay received the Patrice Engle Dissertation Grant Award from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) in 2023.

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay also works as a part-time research  assistant at the Developmental Diversity Lab at UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families. Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (under review). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child and Family Factors, Emotion Recognition Accuracy, and Social Behaviour.

Presentations

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (2023, March). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child-Level Factors and Emotion Recognition Accuracy [Paper Presentation]. Society for Research in Child Development, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  4. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom.

Posters

  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Julia teaches and supervises on the MSc in Education and is involved in the Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment; Core Principles of Child Assessment, and the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing papers.

Before joining the Department of Education she worked in the Department of Experimental Psychology (2013-2023) and continues collaborations there, including co-leading the WISDOM (working in schools to deliver on mental health) Network: https://wisdom.mhid.org.uk.

Her research is concerned with child development, primarily peer relationships, bullying and mental health. She works with primary, secondary and special education schools across the UK and with children aged 4-18. She is also an advocate for public and community engagement, especially with school staff and parents.

Julia wants to support every child to achieve their potential in school.

Recently funded PI projects:

  • Feasibility trial of an anti-bullying programme for children in special schools.
  • Pupil interactions and networks in special schools.
  • Mental health in schools with diversity.
  • Special schools, mental health and bullying.
  • Teaching staff perspectives: Using VR to enhance PSHE learning.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Henry is a Swire Scholar and is currently reading for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. His doctoral research is fully funded by the Swire Charitable Trust and St Antony’s College.

Henry’s research interests lie primarily in classroom dynamics, specifically the interaction of cognitive, affective and motivational experiences in education settings. His DPhil research seeks the rapprochement between the dominant nomothetic (group-focus) approach in the field of education and psychology with the idiographic (person-focus) approach, which is mostly overlooked. Henry is also interested in advanced quantitative methods (e.g., Dynamic Structural Equation Modelling) and analysing ambulatory assessment data.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Henry undertook a placement year as a research assistant in the Child Development and Learning research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford, whilst completing his BSc in Psychology at the University of Surrey. He continued and completed his MSc in Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford.

 

Publications

Lo, H. T. F. 2022. Children’s Momentary Executive Function Fluctuation in Real-World Classrooms: An Intensive Longitudinal Study. MSc Dissertation. University of Oxford, U.K.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay is a second-year DPhil student investigating how classroom characteristics are related to Pakistani children’s development. She is supervised by Professor Iram Siraj and Dr Katharina Ereky-Stevens and her work is being supported by the Aga Khan University (Pakistan). Anushay received the Patrice Engle Dissertation Grant Award from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) in 2023.

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay also works as a part-time research  assistant at the Developmental Diversity Lab at UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families. Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (under review). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child and Family Factors, Emotion Recognition Accuracy, and Social Behaviour.

Presentations

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (2023, March). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child-Level Factors and Emotion Recognition Accuracy [Paper Presentation]. Society for Research in Child Development, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  4. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom.

Posters

  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Julia teaches and supervises on the MSc in Education and is involved in the Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment; Core Principles of Child Assessment, and the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing papers.

Before joining the Department of Education she worked in the Department of Experimental Psychology (2013-2023) and continues collaborations there, including co-leading the WISDOM (working in schools to deliver on mental health) Network: https://wisdom.mhid.org.uk.

Her research is concerned with child development, primarily peer relationships, bullying and mental health. She works with primary, secondary and special education schools across the UK and with children aged 4-18. She is also an advocate for public and community engagement, especially with school staff and parents.

Julia wants to support every child to achieve their potential in school.

Recently funded PI projects:

  • Feasibility trial of an anti-bullying programme for children in special schools.
  • Pupil interactions and networks in special schools.
  • Mental health in schools with diversity.
  • Special schools, mental health and bullying.
  • Teaching staff perspectives: Using VR to enhance PSHE learning.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Henry is a Swire Scholar and is currently reading for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. His doctoral research is fully funded by the Swire Charitable Trust and St Antony’s College.

Henry’s research interests lie primarily in classroom dynamics, specifically the interaction of cognitive, affective and motivational experiences in education settings. His DPhil research seeks the rapprochement between the dominant nomothetic (group-focus) approach in the field of education and psychology with the idiographic (person-focus) approach, which is mostly overlooked. Henry is also interested in advanced quantitative methods (e.g., Dynamic Structural Equation Modelling) and analysing ambulatory assessment data.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Henry undertook a placement year as a research assistant in the Child Development and Learning research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford, whilst completing his BSc in Psychology at the University of Surrey. He continued and completed his MSc in Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford.

 

Publications

Lo, H. T. F. 2022. Children’s Momentary Executive Function Fluctuation in Real-World Classrooms: An Intensive Longitudinal Study. MSc Dissertation. University of Oxford, U.K.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay is a second-year DPhil student investigating how classroom characteristics are related to Pakistani children’s development. She is supervised by Professor Iram Siraj and Dr Katharina Ereky-Stevens and her work is being supported by the Aga Khan University (Pakistan). Anushay received the Patrice Engle Dissertation Grant Award from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) in 2023.

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay also works as a part-time research  assistant at the Developmental Diversity Lab at UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families. Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (under review). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child and Family Factors, Emotion Recognition Accuracy, and Social Behaviour.

Presentations

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (2023, March). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child-Level Factors and Emotion Recognition Accuracy [Paper Presentation]. Society for Research in Child Development, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  4. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom.

Posters

  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Julia teaches and supervises on the MSc in Education and is involved in the Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment; Core Principles of Child Assessment, and the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing papers.

Before joining the Department of Education she worked in the Department of Experimental Psychology (2013-2023) and continues collaborations there, including co-leading the WISDOM (working in schools to deliver on mental health) Network: https://wisdom.mhid.org.uk.

Her research is concerned with child development, primarily peer relationships, bullying and mental health. She works with primary, secondary and special education schools across the UK and with children aged 4-18. She is also an advocate for public and community engagement, especially with school staff and parents.

Julia wants to support every child to achieve their potential in school.

Recently funded PI projects:

  • Feasibility trial of an anti-bullying programme for children in special schools.
  • Pupil interactions and networks in special schools.
  • Mental health in schools with diversity.
  • Special schools, mental health and bullying.
  • Teaching staff perspectives: Using VR to enhance PSHE learning.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Henry is a Swire Scholar and is currently reading for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. His doctoral research is fully funded by the Swire Charitable Trust and St Antony’s College.

Henry’s research interests lie primarily in classroom dynamics, specifically the interaction of cognitive, affective and motivational experiences in education settings. His DPhil research seeks the rapprochement between the dominant nomothetic (group-focus) approach in the field of education and psychology with the idiographic (person-focus) approach, which is mostly overlooked. Henry is also interested in advanced quantitative methods (e.g., Dynamic Structural Equation Modelling) and analysing ambulatory assessment data.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Henry undertook a placement year as a research assistant in the Child Development and Learning research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford, whilst completing his BSc in Psychology at the University of Surrey. He continued and completed his MSc in Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford.

 

Publications

Lo, H. T. F. 2022. Children’s Momentary Executive Function Fluctuation in Real-World Classrooms: An Intensive Longitudinal Study. MSc Dissertation. University of Oxford, U.K.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay is a second-year DPhil student investigating how classroom characteristics are related to Pakistani children’s development. She is supervised by Professor Iram Siraj and Dr Katharina Ereky-Stevens and her work is being supported by the Aga Khan University (Pakistan). Anushay received the Patrice Engle Dissertation Grant Award from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) in 2023.

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay also works as a part-time research  assistant at the Developmental Diversity Lab at UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families. Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (under review). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child and Family Factors, Emotion Recognition Accuracy, and Social Behaviour.

Presentations

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (2023, March). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child-Level Factors and Emotion Recognition Accuracy [Paper Presentation]. Society for Research in Child Development, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  4. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom.

Posters

  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Julia teaches and supervises on the MSc in Education and is involved in the Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment; Core Principles of Child Assessment, and the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing papers.

Before joining the Department of Education she worked in the Department of Experimental Psychology (2013-2023) and continues collaborations there, including co-leading the WISDOM (working in schools to deliver on mental health) Network: https://wisdom.mhid.org.uk.

Her research is concerned with child development, primarily peer relationships, bullying and mental health. She works with primary, secondary and special education schools across the UK and with children aged 4-18. She is also an advocate for public and community engagement, especially with school staff and parents.

Julia wants to support every child to achieve their potential in school.

Recently funded PI projects:

  • Feasibility trial of an anti-bullying programme for children in special schools.
  • Pupil interactions and networks in special schools.
  • Mental health in schools with diversity.
  • Special schools, mental health and bullying.
  • Teaching staff perspectives: Using VR to enhance PSHE learning.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Henry is a Swire Scholar and is currently reading for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. His doctoral research is fully funded by the Swire Charitable Trust and St Antony’s College.

Henry’s research interests lie primarily in classroom dynamics, specifically the interaction of cognitive, affective and motivational experiences in education settings. His DPhil research seeks the rapprochement between the dominant nomothetic (group-focus) approach in the field of education and psychology with the idiographic (person-focus) approach, which is mostly overlooked. Henry is also interested in advanced quantitative methods (e.g., Dynamic Structural Equation Modelling) and analysing ambulatory assessment data.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Henry undertook a placement year as a research assistant in the Child Development and Learning research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford, whilst completing his BSc in Psychology at the University of Surrey. He continued and completed his MSc in Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford.

 

Publications

Lo, H. T. F. 2022. Children’s Momentary Executive Function Fluctuation in Real-World Classrooms: An Intensive Longitudinal Study. MSc Dissertation. University of Oxford, U.K.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay is a second-year DPhil student investigating how classroom characteristics are related to Pakistani children’s development. She is supervised by Professor Iram Siraj and Dr Katharina Ereky-Stevens and her work is being supported by the Aga Khan University (Pakistan). Anushay received the Patrice Engle Dissertation Grant Award from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) in 2023.

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay also works as a part-time research  assistant at the Developmental Diversity Lab at UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families. Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (under review). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child and Family Factors, Emotion Recognition Accuracy, and Social Behaviour.

Presentations

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (2023, March). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child-Level Factors and Emotion Recognition Accuracy [Paper Presentation]. Society for Research in Child Development, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  4. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom.

Posters

  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Julia teaches and supervises on the MSc in Education and is involved in the Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment; Core Principles of Child Assessment, and the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing papers.

Before joining the Department of Education she worked in the Department of Experimental Psychology (2013-2023) and continues collaborations there, including co-leading the WISDOM (working in schools to deliver on mental health) Network: https://wisdom.mhid.org.uk.

Her research is concerned with child development, primarily peer relationships, bullying and mental health. She works with primary, secondary and special education schools across the UK and with children aged 4-18. She is also an advocate for public and community engagement, especially with school staff and parents.

Julia wants to support every child to achieve their potential in school.

Recently funded PI projects:

  • Feasibility trial of an anti-bullying programme for children in special schools.
  • Pupil interactions and networks in special schools.
  • Mental health in schools with diversity.
  • Special schools, mental health and bullying.
  • Teaching staff perspectives: Using VR to enhance PSHE learning.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Henry is a Swire Scholar and is currently reading for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. His doctoral research is fully funded by the Swire Charitable Trust and St Antony’s College.

Henry’s research interests lie primarily in classroom dynamics, specifically the interaction of cognitive, affective and motivational experiences in education settings. His DPhil research seeks the rapprochement between the dominant nomothetic (group-focus) approach in the field of education and psychology with the idiographic (person-focus) approach, which is mostly overlooked. Henry is also interested in advanced quantitative methods (e.g., Dynamic Structural Equation Modelling) and analysing ambulatory assessment data.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Henry undertook a placement year as a research assistant in the Child Development and Learning research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford, whilst completing his BSc in Psychology at the University of Surrey. He continued and completed his MSc in Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford.

 

Publications

Lo, H. T. F. 2022. Children’s Momentary Executive Function Fluctuation in Real-World Classrooms: An Intensive Longitudinal Study. MSc Dissertation. University of Oxford, U.K.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay is a second-year DPhil student investigating how classroom characteristics are related to Pakistani children’s development. She is supervised by Professor Iram Siraj and Dr Katharina Ereky-Stevens and her work is being supported by the Aga Khan University (Pakistan). Anushay received the Patrice Engle Dissertation Grant Award from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) in 2023.

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay also works as a part-time research  assistant at the Developmental Diversity Lab at UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families. Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (under review). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child and Family Factors, Emotion Recognition Accuracy, and Social Behaviour.

Presentations

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (2023, March). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child-Level Factors and Emotion Recognition Accuracy [Paper Presentation]. Society for Research in Child Development, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  4. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom.

Posters

  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Julia teaches and supervises on the MSc in Education and is involved in the Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment; Core Principles of Child Assessment, and the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing papers.

Before joining the Department of Education she worked in the Department of Experimental Psychology (2013-2023) and continues collaborations there, including co-leading the WISDOM (working in schools to deliver on mental health) Network: https://wisdom.mhid.org.uk.

Her research is concerned with child development, primarily peer relationships, bullying and mental health. She works with primary, secondary and special education schools across the UK and with children aged 4-18. She is also an advocate for public and community engagement, especially with school staff and parents.

Julia wants to support every child to achieve their potential in school.

Recently funded PI projects:

  • Feasibility trial of an anti-bullying programme for children in special schools.
  • Pupil interactions and networks in special schools.
  • Mental health in schools with diversity.
  • Special schools, mental health and bullying.
  • Teaching staff perspectives: Using VR to enhance PSHE learning.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Henry is a Swire Scholar and is currently reading for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. His doctoral research is fully funded by the Swire Charitable Trust and St Antony’s College.

Henry’s research interests lie primarily in classroom dynamics, specifically the interaction of cognitive, affective and motivational experiences in education settings. His DPhil research seeks the rapprochement between the dominant nomothetic (group-focus) approach in the field of education and psychology with the idiographic (person-focus) approach, which is mostly overlooked. Henry is also interested in advanced quantitative methods (e.g., Dynamic Structural Equation Modelling) and analysing ambulatory assessment data.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Henry undertook a placement year as a research assistant in the Child Development and Learning research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford, whilst completing his BSc in Psychology at the University of Surrey. He continued and completed his MSc in Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford.

 

Publications

Lo, H. T. F. 2022. Children’s Momentary Executive Function Fluctuation in Real-World Classrooms: An Intensive Longitudinal Study. MSc Dissertation. University of Oxford, U.K.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay is a second-year DPhil student investigating how classroom characteristics are related to Pakistani children’s development. She is supervised by Professor Iram Siraj and Dr Katharina Ereky-Stevens and her work is being supported by the Aga Khan University (Pakistan). Anushay received the Patrice Engle Dissertation Grant Award from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) in 2023.

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay also works as a part-time research  assistant at the Developmental Diversity Lab at UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families. Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (under review). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child and Family Factors, Emotion Recognition Accuracy, and Social Behaviour.

Presentations

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (2023, March). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child-Level Factors and Emotion Recognition Accuracy [Paper Presentation]. Society for Research in Child Development, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  4. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom.

Posters

  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Julia teaches and supervises on the MSc in Education and is involved in the Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment; Core Principles of Child Assessment, and the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing papers.

Before joining the Department of Education she worked in the Department of Experimental Psychology (2013-2023) and continues collaborations there, including co-leading the WISDOM (working in schools to deliver on mental health) Network: https://wisdom.mhid.org.uk.

Her research is concerned with child development, primarily peer relationships, bullying and mental health. She works with primary, secondary and special education schools across the UK and with children aged 4-18. She is also an advocate for public and community engagement, especially with school staff and parents.

Julia wants to support every child to achieve their potential in school.

Recently funded PI projects:

  • Feasibility trial of an anti-bullying programme for children in special schools.
  • Pupil interactions and networks in special schools.
  • Mental health in schools with diversity.
  • Special schools, mental health and bullying.
  • Teaching staff perspectives: Using VR to enhance PSHE learning.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Henry is a Swire Scholar and is currently reading for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. His doctoral research is fully funded by the Swire Charitable Trust and St Antony’s College.

Henry’s research interests lie primarily in classroom dynamics, specifically the interaction of cognitive, affective and motivational experiences in education settings. His DPhil research seeks the rapprochement between the dominant nomothetic (group-focus) approach in the field of education and psychology with the idiographic (person-focus) approach, which is mostly overlooked. Henry is also interested in advanced quantitative methods (e.g., Dynamic Structural Equation Modelling) and analysing ambulatory assessment data.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Henry undertook a placement year as a research assistant in the Child Development and Learning research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford, whilst completing his BSc in Psychology at the University of Surrey. He continued and completed his MSc in Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford.

 

Publications

Lo, H. T. F. 2022. Children’s Momentary Executive Function Fluctuation in Real-World Classrooms: An Intensive Longitudinal Study. MSc Dissertation. University of Oxford, U.K.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay is a second-year DPhil student investigating how classroom characteristics are related to Pakistani children’s development. She is supervised by Professor Iram Siraj and Dr Katharina Ereky-Stevens and her work is being supported by the Aga Khan University (Pakistan). Anushay received the Patrice Engle Dissertation Grant Award from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) in 2023.

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay also works as a part-time research  assistant at the Developmental Diversity Lab at UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families. Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (under review). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child and Family Factors, Emotion Recognition Accuracy, and Social Behaviour.

Presentations

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (2023, March). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child-Level Factors and Emotion Recognition Accuracy [Paper Presentation]. Society for Research in Child Development, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  4. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom.

Posters

  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Julia teaches and supervises on the MSc in Education and is involved in the Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment; Core Principles of Child Assessment, and the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing papers.

Before joining the Department of Education she worked in the Department of Experimental Psychology (2013-2023) and continues collaborations there, including co-leading the WISDOM (working in schools to deliver on mental health) Network: https://wisdom.mhid.org.uk.

Her research is concerned with child development, primarily peer relationships, bullying and mental health. She works with primary, secondary and special education schools across the UK and with children aged 4-18. She is also an advocate for public and community engagement, especially with school staff and parents.

Julia wants to support every child to achieve their potential in school.

Recently funded PI projects:

  • Feasibility trial of an anti-bullying programme for children in special schools.
  • Pupil interactions and networks in special schools.
  • Mental health in schools with diversity.
  • Special schools, mental health and bullying.
  • Teaching staff perspectives: Using VR to enhance PSHE learning.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Henry is a Swire Scholar and is currently reading for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. His doctoral research is fully funded by the Swire Charitable Trust and St Antony’s College.

Henry’s research interests lie primarily in classroom dynamics, specifically the interaction of cognitive, affective and motivational experiences in education settings. His DPhil research seeks the rapprochement between the dominant nomothetic (group-focus) approach in the field of education and psychology with the idiographic (person-focus) approach, which is mostly overlooked. Henry is also interested in advanced quantitative methods (e.g., Dynamic Structural Equation Modelling) and analysing ambulatory assessment data.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Henry undertook a placement year as a research assistant in the Child Development and Learning research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford, whilst completing his BSc in Psychology at the University of Surrey. He continued and completed his MSc in Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford.

 

Publications

Lo, H. T. F. 2022. Children’s Momentary Executive Function Fluctuation in Real-World Classrooms: An Intensive Longitudinal Study. MSc Dissertation. University of Oxford, U.K.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay is a second-year DPhil student investigating how classroom characteristics are related to Pakistani children’s development. She is supervised by Professor Iram Siraj and Dr Katharina Ereky-Stevens and her work is being supported by the Aga Khan University (Pakistan). Anushay received the Patrice Engle Dissertation Grant Award from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) in 2023.

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay also works as a part-time research  assistant at the Developmental Diversity Lab at UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families. Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (under review). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child and Family Factors, Emotion Recognition Accuracy, and Social Behaviour.

Presentations

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (2023, March). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child-Level Factors and Emotion Recognition Accuracy [Paper Presentation]. Society for Research in Child Development, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  4. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom.

Posters

  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Julia teaches and supervises on the MSc in Education and is involved in the Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment; Core Principles of Child Assessment, and the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing papers.

Before joining the Department of Education she worked in the Department of Experimental Psychology (2013-2023) and continues collaborations there, including co-leading the WISDOM (working in schools to deliver on mental health) Network: https://wisdom.mhid.org.uk.

Her research is concerned with child development, primarily peer relationships, bullying and mental health. She works with primary, secondary and special education schools across the UK and with children aged 4-18. She is also an advocate for public and community engagement, especially with school staff and parents.

Julia wants to support every child to achieve their potential in school.

Recently funded PI projects:

  • Feasibility trial of an anti-bullying programme for children in special schools.
  • Pupil interactions and networks in special schools.
  • Mental health in schools with diversity.
  • Special schools, mental health and bullying.
  • Teaching staff perspectives: Using VR to enhance PSHE learning.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Henry is a Swire Scholar and is currently reading for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. His doctoral research is fully funded by the Swire Charitable Trust and St Antony’s College.

Henry’s research interests lie primarily in classroom dynamics, specifically the interaction of cognitive, affective and motivational experiences in education settings. His DPhil research seeks the rapprochement between the dominant nomothetic (group-focus) approach in the field of education and psychology with the idiographic (person-focus) approach, which is mostly overlooked. Henry is also interested in advanced quantitative methods (e.g., Dynamic Structural Equation Modelling) and analysing ambulatory assessment data.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Henry undertook a placement year as a research assistant in the Child Development and Learning research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford, whilst completing his BSc in Psychology at the University of Surrey. He continued and completed his MSc in Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford.

 

Publications

Lo, H. T. F. 2022. Children’s Momentary Executive Function Fluctuation in Real-World Classrooms: An Intensive Longitudinal Study. MSc Dissertation. University of Oxford, U.K.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay is a second-year DPhil student investigating how classroom characteristics are related to Pakistani children’s development. She is supervised by Professor Iram Siraj and Dr Katharina Ereky-Stevens and her work is being supported by the Aga Khan University (Pakistan). Anushay received the Patrice Engle Dissertation Grant Award from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) in 2023.

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay also works as a part-time research  assistant at the Developmental Diversity Lab at UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families. Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (under review). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child and Family Factors, Emotion Recognition Accuracy, and Social Behaviour.

Presentations

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (2023, March). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child-Level Factors and Emotion Recognition Accuracy [Paper Presentation]. Society for Research in Child Development, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  4. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom.

Posters

  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Julia teaches and supervises on the MSc in Education and is involved in the Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment; Core Principles of Child Assessment, and the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing papers.

Before joining the Department of Education she worked in the Department of Experimental Psychology (2013-2023) and continues collaborations there, including co-leading the WISDOM (working in schools to deliver on mental health) Network: https://wisdom.mhid.org.uk.

Her research is concerned with child development, primarily peer relationships, bullying and mental health. She works with primary, secondary and special education schools across the UK and with children aged 4-18. She is also an advocate for public and community engagement, especially with school staff and parents.

Julia wants to support every child to achieve their potential in school.

Recently funded PI projects:

  • Feasibility trial of an anti-bullying programme for children in special schools.
  • Pupil interactions and networks in special schools.
  • Mental health in schools with diversity.
  • Special schools, mental health and bullying.
  • Teaching staff perspectives: Using VR to enhance PSHE learning.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Henry is a Swire Scholar and is currently reading for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. His doctoral research is fully funded by the Swire Charitable Trust and St Antony’s College.

Henry’s research interests lie primarily in classroom dynamics, specifically the interaction of cognitive, affective and motivational experiences in education settings. His DPhil research seeks the rapprochement between the dominant nomothetic (group-focus) approach in the field of education and psychology with the idiographic (person-focus) approach, which is mostly overlooked. Henry is also interested in advanced quantitative methods (e.g., Dynamic Structural Equation Modelling) and analysing ambulatory assessment data.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Henry undertook a placement year as a research assistant in the Child Development and Learning research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford, whilst completing his BSc in Psychology at the University of Surrey. He continued and completed his MSc in Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford.

 

Publications

Lo, H. T. F. 2022. Children’s Momentary Executive Function Fluctuation in Real-World Classrooms: An Intensive Longitudinal Study. MSc Dissertation. University of Oxford, U.K.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay is a second-year DPhil student investigating how classroom characteristics are related to Pakistani children’s development. She is supervised by Professor Iram Siraj and Dr Katharina Ereky-Stevens and her work is being supported by the Aga Khan University (Pakistan). Anushay received the Patrice Engle Dissertation Grant Award from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) in 2023.

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay also works as a part-time research  assistant at the Developmental Diversity Lab at UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families. Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (under review). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child and Family Factors, Emotion Recognition Accuracy, and Social Behaviour.

Presentations

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (2023, March). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child-Level Factors and Emotion Recognition Accuracy [Paper Presentation]. Society for Research in Child Development, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  4. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom.

Posters

  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Julia teaches and supervises on the MSc in Education and is involved in the Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment; Core Principles of Child Assessment, and the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing papers.

Before joining the Department of Education she worked in the Department of Experimental Psychology (2013-2023) and continues collaborations there, including co-leading the WISDOM (working in schools to deliver on mental health) Network: https://wisdom.mhid.org.uk.

Her research is concerned with child development, primarily peer relationships, bullying and mental health. She works with primary, secondary and special education schools across the UK and with children aged 4-18. She is also an advocate for public and community engagement, especially with school staff and parents.

Julia wants to support every child to achieve their potential in school.

Recently funded PI projects:

  • Feasibility trial of an anti-bullying programme for children in special schools.
  • Pupil interactions and networks in special schools.
  • Mental health in schools with diversity.
  • Special schools, mental health and bullying.
  • Teaching staff perspectives: Using VR to enhance PSHE learning.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Henry is a Swire Scholar and is currently reading for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. His doctoral research is fully funded by the Swire Charitable Trust and St Antony’s College.

Henry’s research interests lie primarily in classroom dynamics, specifically the interaction of cognitive, affective and motivational experiences in education settings. His DPhil research seeks the rapprochement between the dominant nomothetic (group-focus) approach in the field of education and psychology with the idiographic (person-focus) approach, which is mostly overlooked. Henry is also interested in advanced quantitative methods (e.g., Dynamic Structural Equation Modelling) and analysing ambulatory assessment data.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Henry undertook a placement year as a research assistant in the Child Development and Learning research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford, whilst completing his BSc in Psychology at the University of Surrey. He continued and completed his MSc in Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford.

 

Publications

Lo, H. T. F. 2022. Children’s Momentary Executive Function Fluctuation in Real-World Classrooms: An Intensive Longitudinal Study. MSc Dissertation. University of Oxford, U.K.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay is a second-year DPhil student investigating how classroom characteristics are related to Pakistani children’s development. She is supervised by Professor Iram Siraj and Dr Katharina Ereky-Stevens and her work is being supported by the Aga Khan University (Pakistan). Anushay received the Patrice Engle Dissertation Grant Award from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) in 2023.

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay also works as a part-time research  assistant at the Developmental Diversity Lab at UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families. Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (under review). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child and Family Factors, Emotion Recognition Accuracy, and Social Behaviour.

Presentations

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (2023, March). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child-Level Factors and Emotion Recognition Accuracy [Paper Presentation]. Society for Research in Child Development, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  4. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom.

Posters

  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Julia teaches and supervises on the MSc in Education and is involved in the Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment; Core Principles of Child Assessment, and the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing papers.

Before joining the Department of Education she worked in the Department of Experimental Psychology (2013-2023) and continues collaborations there, including co-leading the WISDOM (working in schools to deliver on mental health) Network: https://wisdom.mhid.org.uk.

Her research is concerned with child development, primarily peer relationships, bullying and mental health. She works with primary, secondary and special education schools across the UK and with children aged 4-18. She is also an advocate for public and community engagement, especially with school staff and parents.

Julia wants to support every child to achieve their potential in school.

Recently funded PI projects:

  • Feasibility trial of an anti-bullying programme for children in special schools.
  • Pupil interactions and networks in special schools.
  • Mental health in schools with diversity.
  • Special schools, mental health and bullying.
  • Teaching staff perspectives: Using VR to enhance PSHE learning.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Henry is a Swire Scholar and is currently reading for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. His doctoral research is fully funded by the Swire Charitable Trust and St Antony’s College.

Henry’s research interests lie primarily in classroom dynamics, specifically the interaction of cognitive, affective and motivational experiences in education settings. His DPhil research seeks the rapprochement between the dominant nomothetic (group-focus) approach in the field of education and psychology with the idiographic (person-focus) approach, which is mostly overlooked. Henry is also interested in advanced quantitative methods (e.g., Dynamic Structural Equation Modelling) and analysing ambulatory assessment data.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Henry undertook a placement year as a research assistant in the Child Development and Learning research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford, whilst completing his BSc in Psychology at the University of Surrey. He continued and completed his MSc in Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford.

 

Publications

Lo, H. T. F. 2022. Children’s Momentary Executive Function Fluctuation in Real-World Classrooms: An Intensive Longitudinal Study. MSc Dissertation. University of Oxford, U.K.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay is a second-year DPhil student investigating how classroom characteristics are related to Pakistani children’s development. She is supervised by Professor Iram Siraj and Dr Katharina Ereky-Stevens and her work is being supported by the Aga Khan University (Pakistan). Anushay received the Patrice Engle Dissertation Grant Award from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) in 2023.

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay also works as a part-time research  assistant at the Developmental Diversity Lab at UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families. Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (under review). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child and Family Factors, Emotion Recognition Accuracy, and Social Behaviour.

Presentations

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (2023, March). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child-Level Factors and Emotion Recognition Accuracy [Paper Presentation]. Society for Research in Child Development, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  4. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom.

Posters

  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Julia teaches and supervises on the MSc in Education and is involved in the Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment; Core Principles of Child Assessment, and the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing papers.

Before joining the Department of Education she worked in the Department of Experimental Psychology (2013-2023) and continues collaborations there, including co-leading the WISDOM (working in schools to deliver on mental health) Network: https://wisdom.mhid.org.uk.

Her research is concerned with child development, primarily peer relationships, bullying and mental health. She works with primary, secondary and special education schools across the UK and with children aged 4-18. She is also an advocate for public and community engagement, especially with school staff and parents.

Julia wants to support every child to achieve their potential in school.

Recently funded PI projects:

  • Feasibility trial of an anti-bullying programme for children in special schools.
  • Pupil interactions and networks in special schools.
  • Mental health in schools with diversity.
  • Special schools, mental health and bullying.
  • Teaching staff perspectives: Using VR to enhance PSHE learning.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Henry is a Swire Scholar and is currently reading for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. His doctoral research is fully funded by the Swire Charitable Trust and St Antony’s College.

Henry’s research interests lie primarily in classroom dynamics, specifically the interaction of cognitive, affective and motivational experiences in education settings. His DPhil research seeks the rapprochement between the dominant nomothetic (group-focus) approach in the field of education and psychology with the idiographic (person-focus) approach, which is mostly overlooked. Henry is also interested in advanced quantitative methods (e.g., Dynamic Structural Equation Modelling) and analysing ambulatory assessment data.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Henry undertook a placement year as a research assistant in the Child Development and Learning research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford, whilst completing his BSc in Psychology at the University of Surrey. He continued and completed his MSc in Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford.

 

Publications

Lo, H. T. F. 2022. Children’s Momentary Executive Function Fluctuation in Real-World Classrooms: An Intensive Longitudinal Study. MSc Dissertation. University of Oxford, U.K.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay is a second-year DPhil student investigating how classroom characteristics are related to Pakistani children’s development. She is supervised by Professor Iram Siraj and Dr Katharina Ereky-Stevens and her work is being supported by the Aga Khan University (Pakistan). Anushay received the Patrice Engle Dissertation Grant Award from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) in 2023.

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay also works as a part-time research  assistant at the Developmental Diversity Lab at UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families. Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (under review). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child and Family Factors, Emotion Recognition Accuracy, and Social Behaviour.

Presentations

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (2023, March). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child-Level Factors and Emotion Recognition Accuracy [Paper Presentation]. Society for Research in Child Development, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  4. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom.

Posters

  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Julia teaches and supervises on the MSc in Education and is involved in the Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment; Core Principles of Child Assessment, and the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing papers.

Before joining the Department of Education she worked in the Department of Experimental Psychology (2013-2023) and continues collaborations there, including co-leading the WISDOM (working in schools to deliver on mental health) Network: https://wisdom.mhid.org.uk.

Her research is concerned with child development, primarily peer relationships, bullying and mental health. She works with primary, secondary and special education schools across the UK and with children aged 4-18. She is also an advocate for public and community engagement, especially with school staff and parents.

Julia wants to support every child to achieve their potential in school.

Recently funded PI projects:

  • Feasibility trial of an anti-bullying programme for children in special schools.
  • Pupil interactions and networks in special schools.
  • Mental health in schools with diversity.
  • Special schools, mental health and bullying.
  • Teaching staff perspectives: Using VR to enhance PSHE learning.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Henry is a Swire Scholar and is currently reading for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. His doctoral research is fully funded by the Swire Charitable Trust and St Antony’s College.

Henry’s research interests lie primarily in classroom dynamics, specifically the interaction of cognitive, affective and motivational experiences in education settings. His DPhil research seeks the rapprochement between the dominant nomothetic (group-focus) approach in the field of education and psychology with the idiographic (person-focus) approach, which is mostly overlooked. Henry is also interested in advanced quantitative methods (e.g., Dynamic Structural Equation Modelling) and analysing ambulatory assessment data.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Henry undertook a placement year as a research assistant in the Child Development and Learning research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford, whilst completing his BSc in Psychology at the University of Surrey. He continued and completed his MSc in Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford.

 

Publications

Lo, H. T. F. 2022. Children’s Momentary Executive Function Fluctuation in Real-World Classrooms: An Intensive Longitudinal Study. MSc Dissertation. University of Oxford, U.K.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay is a second-year DPhil student investigating how classroom characteristics are related to Pakistani children’s development. She is supervised by Professor Iram Siraj and Dr Katharina Ereky-Stevens and her work is being supported by the Aga Khan University (Pakistan). Anushay received the Patrice Engle Dissertation Grant Award from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) in 2023.

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay also works as a part-time research  assistant at the Developmental Diversity Lab at UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families. Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (under review). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child and Family Factors, Emotion Recognition Accuracy, and Social Behaviour.

Presentations

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (2023, March). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child-Level Factors and Emotion Recognition Accuracy [Paper Presentation]. Society for Research in Child Development, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  4. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom.

Posters

  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Julia teaches and supervises on the MSc in Education and is involved in the Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment; Core Principles of Child Assessment, and the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing papers.

Before joining the Department of Education she worked in the Department of Experimental Psychology (2013-2023) and continues collaborations there, including co-leading the WISDOM (working in schools to deliver on mental health) Network: https://wisdom.mhid.org.uk.

Her research is concerned with child development, primarily peer relationships, bullying and mental health. She works with primary, secondary and special education schools across the UK and with children aged 4-18. She is also an advocate for public and community engagement, especially with school staff and parents.

Julia wants to support every child to achieve their potential in school.

Recently funded PI projects:

  • Feasibility trial of an anti-bullying programme for children in special schools.
  • Pupil interactions and networks in special schools.
  • Mental health in schools with diversity.
  • Special schools, mental health and bullying.
  • Teaching staff perspectives: Using VR to enhance PSHE learning.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Henry is a Swire Scholar and is currently reading for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. His doctoral research is fully funded by the Swire Charitable Trust and St Antony’s College.

Henry’s research interests lie primarily in classroom dynamics, specifically the interaction of cognitive, affective and motivational experiences in education settings. His DPhil research seeks the rapprochement between the dominant nomothetic (group-focus) approach in the field of education and psychology with the idiographic (person-focus) approach, which is mostly overlooked. Henry is also interested in advanced quantitative methods (e.g., Dynamic Structural Equation Modelling) and analysing ambulatory assessment data.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Henry undertook a placement year as a research assistant in the Child Development and Learning research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford, whilst completing his BSc in Psychology at the University of Surrey. He continued and completed his MSc in Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford.

 

Publications

Lo, H. T. F. 2022. Children’s Momentary Executive Function Fluctuation in Real-World Classrooms: An Intensive Longitudinal Study. MSc Dissertation. University of Oxford, U.K.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay is a second-year DPhil student investigating how classroom characteristics are related to Pakistani children’s development. She is supervised by Professor Iram Siraj and Dr Katharina Ereky-Stevens and her work is being supported by the Aga Khan University (Pakistan). Anushay received the Patrice Engle Dissertation Grant Award from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) in 2023.

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay also works as a part-time research  assistant at the Developmental Diversity Lab at UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families. Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (under review). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child and Family Factors, Emotion Recognition Accuracy, and Social Behaviour.

Presentations

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (2023, March). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child-Level Factors and Emotion Recognition Accuracy [Paper Presentation]. Society for Research in Child Development, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  4. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom.

Posters

  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Julia teaches and supervises on the MSc in Education and is involved in the Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment; Core Principles of Child Assessment, and the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing papers.

Before joining the Department of Education she worked in the Department of Experimental Psychology (2013-2023) and continues collaborations there, including co-leading the WISDOM (working in schools to deliver on mental health) Network: https://wisdom.mhid.org.uk.

Her research is concerned with child development, primarily peer relationships, bullying and mental health. She works with primary, secondary and special education schools across the UK and with children aged 4-18. She is also an advocate for public and community engagement, especially with school staff and parents.

Julia wants to support every child to achieve their potential in school.

Recently funded PI projects:

  • Feasibility trial of an anti-bullying programme for children in special schools.
  • Pupil interactions and networks in special schools.
  • Mental health in schools with diversity.
  • Special schools, mental health and bullying.
  • Teaching staff perspectives: Using VR to enhance PSHE learning.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Henry is a Swire Scholar and is currently reading for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. His doctoral research is fully funded by the Swire Charitable Trust and St Antony’s College.

Henry’s research interests lie primarily in classroom dynamics, specifically the interaction of cognitive, affective and motivational experiences in education settings. His DPhil research seeks the rapprochement between the dominant nomothetic (group-focus) approach in the field of education and psychology with the idiographic (person-focus) approach, which is mostly overlooked. Henry is also interested in advanced quantitative methods (e.g., Dynamic Structural Equation Modelling) and analysing ambulatory assessment data.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Henry undertook a placement year as a research assistant in the Child Development and Learning research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford, whilst completing his BSc in Psychology at the University of Surrey. He continued and completed his MSc in Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford.

 

Publications

Lo, H. T. F. 2022. Children’s Momentary Executive Function Fluctuation in Real-World Classrooms: An Intensive Longitudinal Study. MSc Dissertation. University of Oxford, U.K.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay is a second-year DPhil student investigating how classroom characteristics are related to Pakistani children’s development. She is supervised by Professor Iram Siraj and Dr Katharina Ereky-Stevens and her work is being supported by the Aga Khan University (Pakistan). Anushay received the Patrice Engle Dissertation Grant Award from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) in 2023.

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay also works as a part-time research  assistant at the Developmental Diversity Lab at UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families. Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (under review). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child and Family Factors, Emotion Recognition Accuracy, and Social Behaviour.

Presentations

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (2023, March). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child-Level Factors and Emotion Recognition Accuracy [Paper Presentation]. Society for Research in Child Development, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  4. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom.

Posters

  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Julia teaches and supervises on the MSc in Education and is involved in the Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment; Core Principles of Child Assessment, and the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing papers.

Before joining the Department of Education she worked in the Department of Experimental Psychology (2013-2023) and continues collaborations there, including co-leading the WISDOM (working in schools to deliver on mental health) Network: https://wisdom.mhid.org.uk.

Her research is concerned with child development, primarily peer relationships, bullying and mental health. She works with primary, secondary and special education schools across the UK and with children aged 4-18. She is also an advocate for public and community engagement, especially with school staff and parents.

Julia wants to support every child to achieve their potential in school.

Recently funded PI projects:

  • Feasibility trial of an anti-bullying programme for children in special schools.
  • Pupil interactions and networks in special schools.
  • Mental health in schools with diversity.
  • Special schools, mental health and bullying.
  • Teaching staff perspectives: Using VR to enhance PSHE learning.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Henry is a Swire Scholar and is currently reading for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. His doctoral research is fully funded by the Swire Charitable Trust and St Antony’s College.

Henry’s research interests lie primarily in classroom dynamics, specifically the interaction of cognitive, affective and motivational experiences in education settings. His DPhil research seeks the rapprochement between the dominant nomothetic (group-focus) approach in the field of education and psychology with the idiographic (person-focus) approach, which is mostly overlooked. Henry is also interested in advanced quantitative methods (e.g., Dynamic Structural Equation Modelling) and analysing ambulatory assessment data.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Henry undertook a placement year as a research assistant in the Child Development and Learning research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford, whilst completing his BSc in Psychology at the University of Surrey. He continued and completed his MSc in Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford.

 

Publications

Lo, H. T. F. 2022. Children’s Momentary Executive Function Fluctuation in Real-World Classrooms: An Intensive Longitudinal Study. MSc Dissertation. University of Oxford, U.K.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay is a second-year DPhil student investigating how classroom characteristics are related to Pakistani children’s development. She is supervised by Professor Iram Siraj and Dr Katharina Ereky-Stevens and her work is being supported by the Aga Khan University (Pakistan). Anushay received the Patrice Engle Dissertation Grant Award from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) in 2023.

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay also works as a part-time research  assistant at the Developmental Diversity Lab at UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families. Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (under review). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child and Family Factors, Emotion Recognition Accuracy, and Social Behaviour.

Presentations

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (2023, March). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child-Level Factors and Emotion Recognition Accuracy [Paper Presentation]. Society for Research in Child Development, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  4. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom.

Posters

  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Julia teaches and supervises on the MSc in Education and is involved in the Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment; Core Principles of Child Assessment, and the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing papers.

Before joining the Department of Education she worked in the Department of Experimental Psychology (2013-2023) and continues collaborations there, including co-leading the WISDOM (working in schools to deliver on mental health) Network: https://wisdom.mhid.org.uk.

Her research is concerned with child development, primarily peer relationships, bullying and mental health. She works with primary, secondary and special education schools across the UK and with children aged 4-18. She is also an advocate for public and community engagement, especially with school staff and parents.

Julia wants to support every child to achieve their potential in school.

Recently funded PI projects:

  • Feasibility trial of an anti-bullying programme for children in special schools.
  • Pupil interactions and networks in special schools.
  • Mental health in schools with diversity.
  • Special schools, mental health and bullying.
  • Teaching staff perspectives: Using VR to enhance PSHE learning.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Henry is a Swire Scholar and is currently reading for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. His doctoral research is fully funded by the Swire Charitable Trust and St Antony’s College.

Henry’s research interests lie primarily in classroom dynamics, specifically the interaction of cognitive, affective and motivational experiences in education settings. His DPhil research seeks the rapprochement between the dominant nomothetic (group-focus) approach in the field of education and psychology with the idiographic (person-focus) approach, which is mostly overlooked. Henry is also interested in advanced quantitative methods (e.g., Dynamic Structural Equation Modelling) and analysing ambulatory assessment data.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Henry undertook a placement year as a research assistant in the Child Development and Learning research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford, whilst completing his BSc in Psychology at the University of Surrey. He continued and completed his MSc in Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford.

 

Publications

Lo, H. T. F. 2022. Children’s Momentary Executive Function Fluctuation in Real-World Classrooms: An Intensive Longitudinal Study. MSc Dissertation. University of Oxford, U.K.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay is a second-year DPhil student investigating how classroom characteristics are related to Pakistani children’s development. She is supervised by Professor Iram Siraj and Dr Katharina Ereky-Stevens and her work is being supported by the Aga Khan University (Pakistan). Anushay received the Patrice Engle Dissertation Grant Award from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) in 2023.

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay also works as a part-time research  assistant at the Developmental Diversity Lab at UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families. Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (under review). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child and Family Factors, Emotion Recognition Accuracy, and Social Behaviour.

Presentations

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (2023, March). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child-Level Factors and Emotion Recognition Accuracy [Paper Presentation]. Society for Research in Child Development, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  4. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom.

Posters

  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Julia teaches and supervises on the MSc in Education and is involved in the Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment; Core Principles of Child Assessment, and the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing papers.

Before joining the Department of Education she worked in the Department of Experimental Psychology (2013-2023) and continues collaborations there, including co-leading the WISDOM (working in schools to deliver on mental health) Network: https://wisdom.mhid.org.uk.

Her research is concerned with child development, primarily peer relationships, bullying and mental health. She works with primary, secondary and special education schools across the UK and with children aged 4-18. She is also an advocate for public and community engagement, especially with school staff and parents.

Julia wants to support every child to achieve their potential in school.

Recently funded PI projects:

  • Feasibility trial of an anti-bullying programme for children in special schools.
  • Pupil interactions and networks in special schools.
  • Mental health in schools with diversity.
  • Special schools, mental health and bullying.
  • Teaching staff perspectives: Using VR to enhance PSHE learning.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Henry is a Swire Scholar and is currently reading for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. His doctoral research is fully funded by the Swire Charitable Trust and St Antony’s College.

Henry’s research interests lie primarily in classroom dynamics, specifically the interaction of cognitive, affective and motivational experiences in education settings. His DPhil research seeks the rapprochement between the dominant nomothetic (group-focus) approach in the field of education and psychology with the idiographic (person-focus) approach, which is mostly overlooked. Henry is also interested in advanced quantitative methods (e.g., Dynamic Structural Equation Modelling) and analysing ambulatory assessment data.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Henry undertook a placement year as a research assistant in the Child Development and Learning research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford, whilst completing his BSc in Psychology at the University of Surrey. He continued and completed his MSc in Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford.

 

Publications

Lo, H. T. F. 2022. Children’s Momentary Executive Function Fluctuation in Real-World Classrooms: An Intensive Longitudinal Study. MSc Dissertation. University of Oxford, U.K.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay is a second-year DPhil student investigating how classroom characteristics are related to Pakistani children’s development. She is supervised by Professor Iram Siraj and Dr Katharina Ereky-Stevens and her work is being supported by the Aga Khan University (Pakistan). Anushay received the Patrice Engle Dissertation Grant Award from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) in 2023.

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay also works as a part-time research  assistant at the Developmental Diversity Lab at UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families. Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (under review). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child and Family Factors, Emotion Recognition Accuracy, and Social Behaviour.

Presentations

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (2023, March). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child-Level Factors and Emotion Recognition Accuracy [Paper Presentation]. Society for Research in Child Development, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  4. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom.

Posters

  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Julia teaches and supervises on the MSc in Education and is involved in the Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment; Core Principles of Child Assessment, and the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing papers.

Before joining the Department of Education she worked in the Department of Experimental Psychology (2013-2023) and continues collaborations there, including co-leading the WISDOM (working in schools to deliver on mental health) Network: https://wisdom.mhid.org.uk.

Her research is concerned with child development, primarily peer relationships, bullying and mental health. She works with primary, secondary and special education schools across the UK and with children aged 4-18. She is also an advocate for public and community engagement, especially with school staff and parents.

Julia wants to support every child to achieve their potential in school.

Recently funded PI projects:

  • Feasibility trial of an anti-bullying programme for children in special schools.
  • Pupil interactions and networks in special schools.
  • Mental health in schools with diversity.
  • Special schools, mental health and bullying.
  • Teaching staff perspectives: Using VR to enhance PSHE learning.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Henry is a Swire Scholar and is currently reading for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. His doctoral research is fully funded by the Swire Charitable Trust and St Antony’s College.

Henry’s research interests lie primarily in classroom dynamics, specifically the interaction of cognitive, affective and motivational experiences in education settings. His DPhil research seeks the rapprochement between the dominant nomothetic (group-focus) approach in the field of education and psychology with the idiographic (person-focus) approach, which is mostly overlooked. Henry is also interested in advanced quantitative methods (e.g., Dynamic Structural Equation Modelling) and analysing ambulatory assessment data.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Henry undertook a placement year as a research assistant in the Child Development and Learning research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford, whilst completing his BSc in Psychology at the University of Surrey. He continued and completed his MSc in Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford.

 

Publications

Lo, H. T. F. 2022. Children’s Momentary Executive Function Fluctuation in Real-World Classrooms: An Intensive Longitudinal Study. MSc Dissertation. University of Oxford, U.K.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay is a second-year DPhil student investigating how classroom characteristics are related to Pakistani children’s development. She is supervised by Professor Iram Siraj and Dr Katharina Ereky-Stevens and her work is being supported by the Aga Khan University (Pakistan). Anushay received the Patrice Engle Dissertation Grant Award from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) in 2023.

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay also works as a part-time research  assistant at the Developmental Diversity Lab at UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families. Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (under review). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child and Family Factors, Emotion Recognition Accuracy, and Social Behaviour.

Presentations

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (2023, March). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child-Level Factors and Emotion Recognition Accuracy [Paper Presentation]. Society for Research in Child Development, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  4. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom.

Posters

  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Julia teaches and supervises on the MSc in Education and is involved in the Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment; Core Principles of Child Assessment, and the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing papers.

Before joining the Department of Education she worked in the Department of Experimental Psychology (2013-2023) and continues collaborations there, including co-leading the WISDOM (working in schools to deliver on mental health) Network: https://wisdom.mhid.org.uk.

Her research is concerned with child development, primarily peer relationships, bullying and mental health. She works with primary, secondary and special education schools across the UK and with children aged 4-18. She is also an advocate for public and community engagement, especially with school staff and parents.

Julia wants to support every child to achieve their potential in school.

Recently funded PI projects:

  • Feasibility trial of an anti-bullying programme for children in special schools.
  • Pupil interactions and networks in special schools.
  • Mental health in schools with diversity.
  • Special schools, mental health and bullying.
  • Teaching staff perspectives: Using VR to enhance PSHE learning.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Henry is a Swire Scholar and is currently reading for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. His doctoral research is fully funded by the Swire Charitable Trust and St Antony’s College.

Henry’s research interests lie primarily in classroom dynamics, specifically the interaction of cognitive, affective and motivational experiences in education settings. His DPhil research seeks the rapprochement between the dominant nomothetic (group-focus) approach in the field of education and psychology with the idiographic (person-focus) approach, which is mostly overlooked. Henry is also interested in advanced quantitative methods (e.g., Dynamic Structural Equation Modelling) and analysing ambulatory assessment data.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Henry undertook a placement year as a research assistant in the Child Development and Learning research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford, whilst completing his BSc in Psychology at the University of Surrey. He continued and completed his MSc in Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford.

 

Publications

Lo, H. T. F. 2022. Children’s Momentary Executive Function Fluctuation in Real-World Classrooms: An Intensive Longitudinal Study. MSc Dissertation. University of Oxford, U.K.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay is a second-year DPhil student investigating how classroom characteristics are related to Pakistani children’s development. She is supervised by Professor Iram Siraj and Dr Katharina Ereky-Stevens and her work is being supported by the Aga Khan University (Pakistan). Anushay received the Patrice Engle Dissertation Grant Award from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) in 2023.

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay also works as a part-time research  assistant at the Developmental Diversity Lab at UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families. Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (under review). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child and Family Factors, Emotion Recognition Accuracy, and Social Behaviour.

Presentations

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (2023, March). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child-Level Factors and Emotion Recognition Accuracy [Paper Presentation]. Society for Research in Child Development, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  4. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom.

Posters

  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Julia teaches and supervises on the MSc in Education and is involved in the Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment; Core Principles of Child Assessment, and the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing papers.

Before joining the Department of Education she worked in the Department of Experimental Psychology (2013-2023) and continues collaborations there, including co-leading the WISDOM (working in schools to deliver on mental health) Network: https://wisdom.mhid.org.uk.

Her research is concerned with child development, primarily peer relationships, bullying and mental health. She works with primary, secondary and special education schools across the UK and with children aged 4-18. She is also an advocate for public and community engagement, especially with school staff and parents.

Julia wants to support every child to achieve their potential in school.

Recently funded PI projects:

  • Feasibility trial of an anti-bullying programme for children in special schools.
  • Pupil interactions and networks in special schools.
  • Mental health in schools with diversity.
  • Special schools, mental health and bullying.
  • Teaching staff perspectives: Using VR to enhance PSHE learning.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Henry is a Swire Scholar and is currently reading for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. His doctoral research is fully funded by the Swire Charitable Trust and St Antony’s College.

Henry’s research interests lie primarily in classroom dynamics, specifically the interaction of cognitive, affective and motivational experiences in education settings. His DPhil research seeks the rapprochement between the dominant nomothetic (group-focus) approach in the field of education and psychology with the idiographic (person-focus) approach, which is mostly overlooked. Henry is also interested in advanced quantitative methods (e.g., Dynamic Structural Equation Modelling) and analysing ambulatory assessment data.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Henry undertook a placement year as a research assistant in the Child Development and Learning research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford, whilst completing his BSc in Psychology at the University of Surrey. He continued and completed his MSc in Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford.

 

Publications

Lo, H. T. F. 2022. Children’s Momentary Executive Function Fluctuation in Real-World Classrooms: An Intensive Longitudinal Study. MSc Dissertation. University of Oxford, U.K.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay is a second-year DPhil student investigating how classroom characteristics are related to Pakistani children’s development. She is supervised by Professor Iram Siraj and Dr Katharina Ereky-Stevens and her work is being supported by the Aga Khan University (Pakistan). Anushay received the Patrice Engle Dissertation Grant Award from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) in 2023.

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay also works as a part-time research  assistant at the Developmental Diversity Lab at UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families. Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (under review). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child and Family Factors, Emotion Recognition Accuracy, and Social Behaviour.

Presentations

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (2023, March). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child-Level Factors and Emotion Recognition Accuracy [Paper Presentation]. Society for Research in Child Development, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  4. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom.

Posters

  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Julia teaches and supervises on the MSc in Education and is involved in the Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment; Core Principles of Child Assessment, and the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing papers.

Before joining the Department of Education she worked in the Department of Experimental Psychology (2013-2023) and continues collaborations there, including co-leading the WISDOM (working in schools to deliver on mental health) Network: https://wisdom.mhid.org.uk.

Her research is concerned with child development, primarily peer relationships, bullying and mental health. She works with primary, secondary and special education schools across the UK and with children aged 4-18. She is also an advocate for public and community engagement, especially with school staff and parents.

Julia wants to support every child to achieve their potential in school.

Recently funded PI projects:

  • Feasibility trial of an anti-bullying programme for children in special schools.
  • Pupil interactions and networks in special schools.
  • Mental health in schools with diversity.
  • Special schools, mental health and bullying.
  • Teaching staff perspectives: Using VR to enhance PSHE learning.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Henry is a Swire Scholar and is currently reading for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. His doctoral research is fully funded by the Swire Charitable Trust and St Antony’s College.

Henry’s research interests lie primarily in classroom dynamics, specifically the interaction of cognitive, affective and motivational experiences in education settings. His DPhil research seeks the rapprochement between the dominant nomothetic (group-focus) approach in the field of education and psychology with the idiographic (person-focus) approach, which is mostly overlooked. Henry is also interested in advanced quantitative methods (e.g., Dynamic Structural Equation Modelling) and analysing ambulatory assessment data.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Henry undertook a placement year as a research assistant in the Child Development and Learning research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford, whilst completing his BSc in Psychology at the University of Surrey. He continued and completed his MSc in Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford.

 

Publications

Lo, H. T. F. 2022. Children’s Momentary Executive Function Fluctuation in Real-World Classrooms: An Intensive Longitudinal Study. MSc Dissertation. University of Oxford, U.K.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay is a second-year DPhil student investigating how classroom characteristics are related to Pakistani children’s development. She is supervised by Professor Iram Siraj and Dr Katharina Ereky-Stevens and her work is being supported by the Aga Khan University (Pakistan). Anushay received the Patrice Engle Dissertation Grant Award from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) in 2023.

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay also works as a part-time research  assistant at the Developmental Diversity Lab at UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families. Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (under review). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child and Family Factors, Emotion Recognition Accuracy, and Social Behaviour.

Presentations

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (2023, March). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child-Level Factors and Emotion Recognition Accuracy [Paper Presentation]. Society for Research in Child Development, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  4. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom.

Posters

  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Julia teaches and supervises on the MSc in Education and is involved in the Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment; Core Principles of Child Assessment, and the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing papers.

Before joining the Department of Education she worked in the Department of Experimental Psychology (2013-2023) and continues collaborations there, including co-leading the WISDOM (working in schools to deliver on mental health) Network: https://wisdom.mhid.org.uk.

Her research is concerned with child development, primarily peer relationships, bullying and mental health. She works with primary, secondary and special education schools across the UK and with children aged 4-18. She is also an advocate for public and community engagement, especially with school staff and parents.

Julia wants to support every child to achieve their potential in school.

Recently funded PI projects:

  • Feasibility trial of an anti-bullying programme for children in special schools.
  • Pupil interactions and networks in special schools.
  • Mental health in schools with diversity.
  • Special schools, mental health and bullying.
  • Teaching staff perspectives: Using VR to enhance PSHE learning.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Henry is a Swire Scholar and is currently reading for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. His doctoral research is fully funded by the Swire Charitable Trust and St Antony’s College.

Henry’s research interests lie primarily in classroom dynamics, specifically the interaction of cognitive, affective and motivational experiences in education settings. His DPhil research seeks the rapprochement between the dominant nomothetic (group-focus) approach in the field of education and psychology with the idiographic (person-focus) approach, which is mostly overlooked. Henry is also interested in advanced quantitative methods (e.g., Dynamic Structural Equation Modelling) and analysing ambulatory assessment data.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Henry undertook a placement year as a research assistant in the Child Development and Learning research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford, whilst completing his BSc in Psychology at the University of Surrey. He continued and completed his MSc in Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford.

 

Publications

Lo, H. T. F. 2022. Children’s Momentary Executive Function Fluctuation in Real-World Classrooms: An Intensive Longitudinal Study. MSc Dissertation. University of Oxford, U.K.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay is a second-year DPhil student investigating how classroom characteristics are related to Pakistani children’s development. She is supervised by Professor Iram Siraj and Dr Katharina Ereky-Stevens and her work is being supported by the Aga Khan University (Pakistan). Anushay received the Patrice Engle Dissertation Grant Award from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) in 2023.

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay also works as a part-time research  assistant at the Developmental Diversity Lab at UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families. Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (under review). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child and Family Factors, Emotion Recognition Accuracy, and Social Behaviour.

Presentations

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (2023, March). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child-Level Factors and Emotion Recognition Accuracy [Paper Presentation]. Society for Research in Child Development, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  4. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom.

Posters

  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Julia teaches and supervises on the MSc in Education and is involved in the Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment; Core Principles of Child Assessment, and the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing papers.

Before joining the Department of Education she worked in the Department of Experimental Psychology (2013-2023) and continues collaborations there, including co-leading the WISDOM (working in schools to deliver on mental health) Network: https://wisdom.mhid.org.uk.

Her research is concerned with child development, primarily peer relationships, bullying and mental health. She works with primary, secondary and special education schools across the UK and with children aged 4-18. She is also an advocate for public and community engagement, especially with school staff and parents.

Julia wants to support every child to achieve their potential in school.

Recently funded PI projects:

  • Feasibility trial of an anti-bullying programme for children in special schools.
  • Pupil interactions and networks in special schools.
  • Mental health in schools with diversity.
  • Special schools, mental health and bullying.
  • Teaching staff perspectives: Using VR to enhance PSHE learning.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Henry is a Swire Scholar and is currently reading for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. His doctoral research is fully funded by the Swire Charitable Trust and St Antony’s College.

Henry’s research interests lie primarily in classroom dynamics, specifically the interaction of cognitive, affective and motivational experiences in education settings. His DPhil research seeks the rapprochement between the dominant nomothetic (group-focus) approach in the field of education and psychology with the idiographic (person-focus) approach, which is mostly overlooked. Henry is also interested in advanced quantitative methods (e.g., Dynamic Structural Equation Modelling) and analysing ambulatory assessment data.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Henry undertook a placement year as a research assistant in the Child Development and Learning research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford, whilst completing his BSc in Psychology at the University of Surrey. He continued and completed his MSc in Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford.

 

Publications

Lo, H. T. F. 2022. Children’s Momentary Executive Function Fluctuation in Real-World Classrooms: An Intensive Longitudinal Study. MSc Dissertation. University of Oxford, U.K.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay is a second-year DPhil student investigating how classroom characteristics are related to Pakistani children’s development. She is supervised by Professor Iram Siraj and Dr Katharina Ereky-Stevens and her work is being supported by the Aga Khan University (Pakistan). Anushay received the Patrice Engle Dissertation Grant Award from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) in 2023.

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay also works as a part-time research  assistant at the Developmental Diversity Lab at UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families. Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (under review). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child and Family Factors, Emotion Recognition Accuracy, and Social Behaviour.

Presentations

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (2023, March). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child-Level Factors and Emotion Recognition Accuracy [Paper Presentation]. Society for Research in Child Development, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  4. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom.

Posters

  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Julia teaches and supervises on the MSc in Education and is involved in the Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment; Core Principles of Child Assessment, and the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing papers.

Before joining the Department of Education she worked in the Department of Experimental Psychology (2013-2023) and continues collaborations there, including co-leading the WISDOM (working in schools to deliver on mental health) Network: https://wisdom.mhid.org.uk.

Her research is concerned with child development, primarily peer relationships, bullying and mental health. She works with primary, secondary and special education schools across the UK and with children aged 4-18. She is also an advocate for public and community engagement, especially with school staff and parents.

Julia wants to support every child to achieve their potential in school.

Recently funded PI projects:

  • Feasibility trial of an anti-bullying programme for children in special schools.
  • Pupil interactions and networks in special schools.
  • Mental health in schools with diversity.
  • Special schools, mental health and bullying.
  • Teaching staff perspectives: Using VR to enhance PSHE learning.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Henry is a Swire Scholar and is currently reading for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. His doctoral research is fully funded by the Swire Charitable Trust and St Antony’s College.

Henry’s research interests lie primarily in classroom dynamics, specifically the interaction of cognitive, affective and motivational experiences in education settings. His DPhil research seeks the rapprochement between the dominant nomothetic (group-focus) approach in the field of education and psychology with the idiographic (person-focus) approach, which is mostly overlooked. Henry is also interested in advanced quantitative methods (e.g., Dynamic Structural Equation Modelling) and analysing ambulatory assessment data.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Henry undertook a placement year as a research assistant in the Child Development and Learning research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford, whilst completing his BSc in Psychology at the University of Surrey. He continued and completed his MSc in Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford.

 

Publications

Lo, H. T. F. 2022. Children’s Momentary Executive Function Fluctuation in Real-World Classrooms: An Intensive Longitudinal Study. MSc Dissertation. University of Oxford, U.K.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay is a second-year DPhil student investigating how classroom characteristics are related to Pakistani children’s development. She is supervised by Professor Iram Siraj and Dr Katharina Ereky-Stevens and her work is being supported by the Aga Khan University (Pakistan). Anushay received the Patrice Engle Dissertation Grant Award from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) in 2023.

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay also works as a part-time research  assistant at the Developmental Diversity Lab at UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families. Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (under review). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child and Family Factors, Emotion Recognition Accuracy, and Social Behaviour.

Presentations

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (2023, March). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child-Level Factors and Emotion Recognition Accuracy [Paper Presentation]. Society for Research in Child Development, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  4. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom.

Posters

  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Julia teaches and supervises on the MSc in Education and is involved in the Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment; Core Principles of Child Assessment, and the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing papers.

Before joining the Department of Education she worked in the Department of Experimental Psychology (2013-2023) and continues collaborations there, including co-leading the WISDOM (working in schools to deliver on mental health) Network: https://wisdom.mhid.org.uk.

Her research is concerned with child development, primarily peer relationships, bullying and mental health. She works with primary, secondary and special education schools across the UK and with children aged 4-18. She is also an advocate for public and community engagement, especially with school staff and parents.

Julia wants to support every child to achieve their potential in school.

Recently funded PI projects:

  • Feasibility trial of an anti-bullying programme for children in special schools.
  • Pupil interactions and networks in special schools.
  • Mental health in schools with diversity.
  • Special schools, mental health and bullying.
  • Teaching staff perspectives: Using VR to enhance PSHE learning.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Henry is a Swire Scholar and is currently reading for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. His doctoral research is fully funded by the Swire Charitable Trust and St Antony’s College.

Henry’s research interests lie primarily in classroom dynamics, specifically the interaction of cognitive, affective and motivational experiences in education settings. His DPhil research seeks the rapprochement between the dominant nomothetic (group-focus) approach in the field of education and psychology with the idiographic (person-focus) approach, which is mostly overlooked. Henry is also interested in advanced quantitative methods (e.g., Dynamic Structural Equation Modelling) and analysing ambulatory assessment data.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Henry undertook a placement year as a research assistant in the Child Development and Learning research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford, whilst completing his BSc in Psychology at the University of Surrey. He continued and completed his MSc in Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford.

 

Publications

Lo, H. T. F. 2022. Children’s Momentary Executive Function Fluctuation in Real-World Classrooms: An Intensive Longitudinal Study. MSc Dissertation. University of Oxford, U.K.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay is a second-year DPhil student investigating how classroom characteristics are related to Pakistani children’s development. She is supervised by Professor Iram Siraj and Dr Katharina Ereky-Stevens and her work is being supported by the Aga Khan University (Pakistan). Anushay received the Patrice Engle Dissertation Grant Award from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) in 2023.

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay also works as a part-time research  assistant at the Developmental Diversity Lab at UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families. Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (under review). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child and Family Factors, Emotion Recognition Accuracy, and Social Behaviour.

Presentations

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (2023, March). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child-Level Factors and Emotion Recognition Accuracy [Paper Presentation]. Society for Research in Child Development, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  4. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom.

Posters

  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Julia teaches and supervises on the MSc in Education and is involved in the Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment; Core Principles of Child Assessment, and the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing papers.

Before joining the Department of Education she worked in the Department of Experimental Psychology (2013-2023) and continues collaborations there, including co-leading the WISDOM (working in schools to deliver on mental health) Network: https://wisdom.mhid.org.uk.

Her research is concerned with child development, primarily peer relationships, bullying and mental health. She works with primary, secondary and special education schools across the UK and with children aged 4-18. She is also an advocate for public and community engagement, especially with school staff and parents.

Julia wants to support every child to achieve their potential in school.

Recently funded PI projects:

  • Feasibility trial of an anti-bullying programme for children in special schools.
  • Pupil interactions and networks in special schools.
  • Mental health in schools with diversity.
  • Special schools, mental health and bullying.
  • Teaching staff perspectives: Using VR to enhance PSHE learning.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Henry is a Swire Scholar and is currently reading for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. His doctoral research is fully funded by the Swire Charitable Trust and St Antony’s College.

Henry’s research interests lie primarily in classroom dynamics, specifically the interaction of cognitive, affective and motivational experiences in education settings. His DPhil research seeks the rapprochement between the dominant nomothetic (group-focus) approach in the field of education and psychology with the idiographic (person-focus) approach, which is mostly overlooked. Henry is also interested in advanced quantitative methods (e.g., Dynamic Structural Equation Modelling) and analysing ambulatory assessment data.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Henry undertook a placement year as a research assistant in the Child Development and Learning research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford, whilst completing his BSc in Psychology at the University of Surrey. He continued and completed his MSc in Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford.

 

Publications

Lo, H. T. F. 2022. Children’s Momentary Executive Function Fluctuation in Real-World Classrooms: An Intensive Longitudinal Study. MSc Dissertation. University of Oxford, U.K.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay is a second-year DPhil student investigating how classroom characteristics are related to Pakistani children’s development. She is supervised by Professor Iram Siraj and Dr Katharina Ereky-Stevens and her work is being supported by the Aga Khan University (Pakistan). Anushay received the Patrice Engle Dissertation Grant Award from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) in 2023.

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay also works as a part-time research  assistant at the Developmental Diversity Lab at UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families. Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (under review). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child and Family Factors, Emotion Recognition Accuracy, and Social Behaviour.

Presentations

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (2023, March). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child-Level Factors and Emotion Recognition Accuracy [Paper Presentation]. Society for Research in Child Development, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  4. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom.

Posters

  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Julia teaches and supervises on the MSc in Education and is involved in the Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment; Core Principles of Child Assessment, and the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing papers.

Before joining the Department of Education she worked in the Department of Experimental Psychology (2013-2023) and continues collaborations there, including co-leading the WISDOM (working in schools to deliver on mental health) Network: https://wisdom.mhid.org.uk.

Her research is concerned with child development, primarily peer relationships, bullying and mental health. She works with primary, secondary and special education schools across the UK and with children aged 4-18. She is also an advocate for public and community engagement, especially with school staff and parents.

Julia wants to support every child to achieve their potential in school.

Recently funded PI projects:

  • Feasibility trial of an anti-bullying programme for children in special schools.
  • Pupil interactions and networks in special schools.
  • Mental health in schools with diversity.
  • Special schools, mental health and bullying.
  • Teaching staff perspectives: Using VR to enhance PSHE learning.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Henry is a Swire Scholar and is currently reading for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. His doctoral research is fully funded by the Swire Charitable Trust and St Antony’s College.

Henry’s research interests lie primarily in classroom dynamics, specifically the interaction of cognitive, affective and motivational experiences in education settings. His DPhil research seeks the rapprochement between the dominant nomothetic (group-focus) approach in the field of education and psychology with the idiographic (person-focus) approach, which is mostly overlooked. Henry is also interested in advanced quantitative methods (e.g., Dynamic Structural Equation Modelling) and analysing ambulatory assessment data.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Henry undertook a placement year as a research assistant in the Child Development and Learning research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford, whilst completing his BSc in Psychology at the University of Surrey. He continued and completed his MSc in Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford.

 

Publications

Lo, H. T. F. 2022. Children’s Momentary Executive Function Fluctuation in Real-World Classrooms: An Intensive Longitudinal Study. MSc Dissertation. University of Oxford, U.K.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Anushay is a second-year DPhil student investigating how classroom characteristics are related to Pakistani children’s development. She is supervised by Professor Iram Siraj and Dr Katharina Ereky-Stevens and her work is being supported by the Aga Khan University (Pakistan). Anushay received the Patrice Engle Dissertation Grant Award from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) in 2023.

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay also works as a part-time research  assistant at the Developmental Diversity Lab at UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families. Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (under review). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child and Family Factors, Emotion Recognition Accuracy, and Social Behaviour.

Presentations

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (2023, March). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child-Level Factors and Emotion Recognition Accuracy [Paper Presentation]. Society for Research in Child Development, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  4. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom.

Posters

  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Julia teaches and supervises on the MSc in Education and is involved in the Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment; Core Principles of Child Assessment, and the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing papers.

Before joining the Department of Education she worked in the Department of Experimental Psychology (2013-2023) and continues collaborations there, including co-leading the WISDOM (working in schools to deliver on mental health) Network: https://wisdom.mhid.org.uk.

Her research is concerned with child development, primarily peer relationships, bullying and mental health. She works with primary, secondary and special education schools across the UK and with children aged 4-18. She is also an advocate for public and community engagement, especially with school staff and parents.

Julia wants to support every child to achieve their potential in school.

Recently funded PI projects:

  • Feasibility trial of an anti-bullying programme for children in special schools.
  • Pupil interactions and networks in special schools.
  • Mental health in schools with diversity.
  • Special schools, mental health and bullying.
  • Teaching staff perspectives: Using VR to enhance PSHE learning.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Henry is a Swire Scholar and is currently reading for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. His doctoral research is fully funded by the Swire Charitable Trust and St Antony’s College.

Henry’s research interests lie primarily in classroom dynamics, specifically the interaction of cognitive, affective and motivational experiences in education settings. His DPhil research seeks the rapprochement between the dominant nomothetic (group-focus) approach in the field of education and psychology with the idiographic (person-focus) approach, which is mostly overlooked. Henry is also interested in advanced quantitative methods (e.g., Dynamic Structural Equation Modelling) and analysing ambulatory assessment data.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Henry undertook a placement year as a research assistant in the Child Development and Learning research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford, whilst completing his BSc in Psychology at the University of Surrey. He continued and completed his MSc in Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford.

 

Publications

Lo, H. T. F. 2022. Children’s Momentary Executive Function Fluctuation in Real-World Classrooms: An Intensive Longitudinal Study. MSc Dissertation. University of Oxford, U.K.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: