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Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of