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Jim obtained a BA in Modern History and a MA in European History from University College London, followed by a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Birkbeck College London. After this, he completed a PGCE in Secondary History and a MEd in Researching Practice at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded a PhD in Education from UCL. His doctoral research focused on the relationship between academic and school history, particularly in relation to literacy in secondary history curriculum design.

Jim taught and mentored in a number of state secondary schools and sixth form colleges. He was also a part of the Ofsted History Subject Working Group which provided advice on the new inspection framework’s development and implementation. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association and acted as Associate Editor for the HA’s professional journal Teaching History.

Jim’s research interests focus on history curriculum design, particularly literacy in history education, the relationships between academic and school history, and the interplay between overview and depth in history curricula.

Publications

• Carroll, J. E. (2022). ‘Terms and conditions: using metaphor to highlight causal processes with Year 13‘. Teaching History, 187, pp.40-49.
• Carroll, J. E. (2021). ‘Retheorising national assessment of the narrative mode for historical causal explanation in England’. History Education Research Journal, 18 (2), pp.148–65.

• Carroll, J. E. (2020). ‘Whose genres? Establishing curricular goals for students’ historical writing in England’ Teaching History (HTANSW), 52 (2), pp. 17-20

• Carroll, J.E. (2019). ‘Epistemic explanations for divergent evolution in discourses regarding students’ extended historical writing in England’. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51 (1), pp.100-120
• Carroll, J. E. (2018). ‘Couching counterfactuals in knowledge when explaining the Salem witch trials with Year 13’. Teaching History, 172, pp.18-29
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From divergent evolution to witting cross-fertilisation: the need for more inter-discursive communication regarding students’ extended historical writing’. Curriculum Journal, 28 (4), pp.504-523
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From ‘double vision’ to panorama: using history of memory to bridge ‘event space’ when exploring interpretations of Nazi popularity with Year 13′. Teaching History, 168, pp.24-36
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘I feel if I say this in my essay it’s not going to be as strong’: multi-voicedness, ‘oral rehearsal’ and Year 13 students’ written arguments’. Teaching History, 167, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Grammar. Nazis. Does the grammatical ‘release the conceptual’? Teaching History, 163, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Exploring historical ‘frameworks’ as a curriculum goal: a case study examining students’ notions of historical significance when using millennia-wide time scales’. Curriculum Journal, 27 (4), pp.454-478
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘The whole point of the thing: how nominalisation might develop students’ written causal arguments’ Teaching History, 162, pp.16-24

 

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Jim obtained a BA in Modern History and a MA in European History from University College London, followed by a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Birkbeck College London. After this, he completed a PGCE in Secondary History and a MEd in Researching Practice at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded a PhD in Education from UCL. His doctoral research focused on the relationship between academic and school history, particularly in relation to literacy in secondary history curriculum design.

Jim taught and mentored in a number of state secondary schools and sixth form colleges. He was also a part of the Ofsted History Subject Working Group which provided advice on the new inspection framework’s development and implementation. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association and acted as Associate Editor for the HA’s professional journal Teaching History.

Jim’s research interests focus on history curriculum design, particularly literacy in history education, the relationships between academic and school history, and the interplay between overview and depth in history curricula.

Publications

• Carroll, J. E. (2022). ‘Terms and conditions: using metaphor to highlight causal processes with Year 13‘. Teaching History, 187, pp.40-49.
• Carroll, J. E. (2021). ‘Retheorising national assessment of the narrative mode for historical causal explanation in England’. History Education Research Journal, 18 (2), pp.148–65.

• Carroll, J. E. (2020). ‘Whose genres? Establishing curricular goals for students’ historical writing in England’ Teaching History (HTANSW), 52 (2), pp. 17-20

• Carroll, J.E. (2019). ‘Epistemic explanations for divergent evolution in discourses regarding students’ extended historical writing in England’. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51 (1), pp.100-120
• Carroll, J. E. (2018). ‘Couching counterfactuals in knowledge when explaining the Salem witch trials with Year 13’. Teaching History, 172, pp.18-29
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From divergent evolution to witting cross-fertilisation: the need for more inter-discursive communication regarding students’ extended historical writing’. Curriculum Journal, 28 (4), pp.504-523
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From ‘double vision’ to panorama: using history of memory to bridge ‘event space’ when exploring interpretations of Nazi popularity with Year 13′. Teaching History, 168, pp.24-36
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘I feel if I say this in my essay it’s not going to be as strong’: multi-voicedness, ‘oral rehearsal’ and Year 13 students’ written arguments’. Teaching History, 167, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Grammar. Nazis. Does the grammatical ‘release the conceptual’? Teaching History, 163, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Exploring historical ‘frameworks’ as a curriculum goal: a case study examining students’ notions of historical significance when using millennia-wide time scales’. Curriculum Journal, 27 (4), pp.454-478
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘The whole point of the thing: how nominalisation might develop students’ written causal arguments’ Teaching History, 162, pp.16-24

 

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Jim obtained a BA in Modern History and a MA in European History from University College London, followed by a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Birkbeck College London. After this, he completed a PGCE in Secondary History and a MEd in Researching Practice at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded a PhD in Education from UCL. His doctoral research focused on the relationship between academic and school history, particularly in relation to literacy in secondary history curriculum design.

Jim taught and mentored in a number of state secondary schools and sixth form colleges. He was also a part of the Ofsted History Subject Working Group which provided advice on the new inspection framework’s development and implementation. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association and acted as Associate Editor for the HA’s professional journal Teaching History.

Jim’s research interests focus on history curriculum design, particularly literacy in history education, the relationships between academic and school history, and the interplay between overview and depth in history curricula.

Publications

• Carroll, J. E. (2022). ‘Terms and conditions: using metaphor to highlight causal processes with Year 13‘. Teaching History, 187, pp.40-49.
• Carroll, J. E. (2021). ‘Retheorising national assessment of the narrative mode for historical causal explanation in England’. History Education Research Journal, 18 (2), pp.148–65.

• Carroll, J. E. (2020). ‘Whose genres? Establishing curricular goals for students’ historical writing in England’ Teaching History (HTANSW), 52 (2), pp. 17-20

• Carroll, J.E. (2019). ‘Epistemic explanations for divergent evolution in discourses regarding students’ extended historical writing in England’. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51 (1), pp.100-120
• Carroll, J. E. (2018). ‘Couching counterfactuals in knowledge when explaining the Salem witch trials with Year 13’. Teaching History, 172, pp.18-29
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From divergent evolution to witting cross-fertilisation: the need for more inter-discursive communication regarding students’ extended historical writing’. Curriculum Journal, 28 (4), pp.504-523
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From ‘double vision’ to panorama: using history of memory to bridge ‘event space’ when exploring interpretations of Nazi popularity with Year 13′. Teaching History, 168, pp.24-36
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘I feel if I say this in my essay it’s not going to be as strong’: multi-voicedness, ‘oral rehearsal’ and Year 13 students’ written arguments’. Teaching History, 167, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Grammar. Nazis. Does the grammatical ‘release the conceptual’? Teaching History, 163, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Exploring historical ‘frameworks’ as a curriculum goal: a case study examining students’ notions of historical significance when using millennia-wide time scales’. Curriculum Journal, 27 (4), pp.454-478
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘The whole point of the thing: how nominalisation might develop students’ written causal arguments’ Teaching History, 162, pp.16-24

 

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Jim obtained a BA in Modern History and a MA in European History from University College London, followed by a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Birkbeck College London. After this, he completed a PGCE in Secondary History and a MEd in Researching Practice at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded a PhD in Education from UCL. His doctoral research focused on the relationship between academic and school history, particularly in relation to literacy in secondary history curriculum design.

Jim taught and mentored in a number of state secondary schools and sixth form colleges. He was also a part of the Ofsted History Subject Working Group which provided advice on the new inspection framework’s development and implementation. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association and acted as Associate Editor for the HA’s professional journal Teaching History.

Jim’s research interests focus on history curriculum design, particularly literacy in history education, the relationships between academic and school history, and the interplay between overview and depth in history curricula.

Publications

• Carroll, J. E. (2022). ‘Terms and conditions: using metaphor to highlight causal processes with Year 13‘. Teaching History, 187, pp.40-49.
• Carroll, J. E. (2021). ‘Retheorising national assessment of the narrative mode for historical causal explanation in England’. History Education Research Journal, 18 (2), pp.148–65.

• Carroll, J. E. (2020). ‘Whose genres? Establishing curricular goals for students’ historical writing in England’ Teaching History (HTANSW), 52 (2), pp. 17-20

• Carroll, J.E. (2019). ‘Epistemic explanations for divergent evolution in discourses regarding students’ extended historical writing in England’. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51 (1), pp.100-120
• Carroll, J. E. (2018). ‘Couching counterfactuals in knowledge when explaining the Salem witch trials with Year 13’. Teaching History, 172, pp.18-29
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From divergent evolution to witting cross-fertilisation: the need for more inter-discursive communication regarding students’ extended historical writing’. Curriculum Journal, 28 (4), pp.504-523
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From ‘double vision’ to panorama: using history of memory to bridge ‘event space’ when exploring interpretations of Nazi popularity with Year 13′. Teaching History, 168, pp.24-36
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘I feel if I say this in my essay it’s not going to be as strong’: multi-voicedness, ‘oral rehearsal’ and Year 13 students’ written arguments’. Teaching History, 167, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Grammar. Nazis. Does the grammatical ‘release the conceptual’? Teaching History, 163, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Exploring historical ‘frameworks’ as a curriculum goal: a case study examining students’ notions of historical significance when using millennia-wide time scales’. Curriculum Journal, 27 (4), pp.454-478
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘The whole point of the thing: how nominalisation might develop students’ written causal arguments’ Teaching History, 162, pp.16-24

 

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Jim obtained a BA in Modern History and a MA in European History from University College London, followed by a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Birkbeck College London. After this, he completed a PGCE in Secondary History and a MEd in Researching Practice at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded a PhD in Education from UCL. His doctoral research focused on the relationship between academic and school history, particularly in relation to literacy in secondary history curriculum design.

Jim taught and mentored in a number of state secondary schools and sixth form colleges. He was also a part of the Ofsted History Subject Working Group which provided advice on the new inspection framework’s development and implementation. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association and acted as Associate Editor for the HA’s professional journal Teaching History.

Jim’s research interests focus on history curriculum design, particularly literacy in history education, the relationships between academic and school history, and the interplay between overview and depth in history curricula.

Publications

• Carroll, J. E. (2022). ‘Terms and conditions: using metaphor to highlight causal processes with Year 13‘. Teaching History, 187, pp.40-49.
• Carroll, J. E. (2021). ‘Retheorising national assessment of the narrative mode for historical causal explanation in England’. History Education Research Journal, 18 (2), pp.148–65.

• Carroll, J. E. (2020). ‘Whose genres? Establishing curricular goals for students’ historical writing in England’ Teaching History (HTANSW), 52 (2), pp. 17-20

• Carroll, J.E. (2019). ‘Epistemic explanations for divergent evolution in discourses regarding students’ extended historical writing in England’. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51 (1), pp.100-120
• Carroll, J. E. (2018). ‘Couching counterfactuals in knowledge when explaining the Salem witch trials with Year 13’. Teaching History, 172, pp.18-29
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From divergent evolution to witting cross-fertilisation: the need for more inter-discursive communication regarding students’ extended historical writing’. Curriculum Journal, 28 (4), pp.504-523
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From ‘double vision’ to panorama: using history of memory to bridge ‘event space’ when exploring interpretations of Nazi popularity with Year 13′. Teaching History, 168, pp.24-36
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘I feel if I say this in my essay it’s not going to be as strong’: multi-voicedness, ‘oral rehearsal’ and Year 13 students’ written arguments’. Teaching History, 167, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Grammar. Nazis. Does the grammatical ‘release the conceptual’? Teaching History, 163, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Exploring historical ‘frameworks’ as a curriculum goal: a case study examining students’ notions of historical significance when using millennia-wide time scales’. Curriculum Journal, 27 (4), pp.454-478
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘The whole point of the thing: how nominalisation might develop students’ written causal arguments’ Teaching History, 162, pp.16-24

 

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Jim obtained a BA in Modern History and a MA in European History from University College London, followed by a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Birkbeck College London. After this, he completed a PGCE in Secondary History and a MEd in Researching Practice at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded a PhD in Education from UCL. His doctoral research focused on the relationship between academic and school history, particularly in relation to literacy in secondary history curriculum design.

Jim taught and mentored in a number of state secondary schools and sixth form colleges. He was also a part of the Ofsted History Subject Working Group which provided advice on the new inspection framework’s development and implementation. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association and acted as Associate Editor for the HA’s professional journal Teaching History.

Jim’s research interests focus on history curriculum design, particularly literacy in history education, the relationships between academic and school history, and the interplay between overview and depth in history curricula.

Publications

• Carroll, J. E. (2022). ‘Terms and conditions: using metaphor to highlight causal processes with Year 13‘. Teaching History, 187, pp.40-49.
• Carroll, J. E. (2021). ‘Retheorising national assessment of the narrative mode for historical causal explanation in England’. History Education Research Journal, 18 (2), pp.148–65.

• Carroll, J. E. (2020). ‘Whose genres? Establishing curricular goals for students’ historical writing in England’ Teaching History (HTANSW), 52 (2), pp. 17-20

• Carroll, J.E. (2019). ‘Epistemic explanations for divergent evolution in discourses regarding students’ extended historical writing in England’. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51 (1), pp.100-120
• Carroll, J. E. (2018). ‘Couching counterfactuals in knowledge when explaining the Salem witch trials with Year 13’. Teaching History, 172, pp.18-29
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From divergent evolution to witting cross-fertilisation: the need for more inter-discursive communication regarding students’ extended historical writing’. Curriculum Journal, 28 (4), pp.504-523
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From ‘double vision’ to panorama: using history of memory to bridge ‘event space’ when exploring interpretations of Nazi popularity with Year 13′. Teaching History, 168, pp.24-36
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘I feel if I say this in my essay it’s not going to be as strong’: multi-voicedness, ‘oral rehearsal’ and Year 13 students’ written arguments’. Teaching History, 167, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Grammar. Nazis. Does the grammatical ‘release the conceptual’? Teaching History, 163, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Exploring historical ‘frameworks’ as a curriculum goal: a case study examining students’ notions of historical significance when using millennia-wide time scales’. Curriculum Journal, 27 (4), pp.454-478
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘The whole point of the thing: how nominalisation might develop students’ written causal arguments’ Teaching History, 162, pp.16-24

 

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Jim obtained a BA in Modern History and a MA in European History from University College London, followed by a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Birkbeck College London. After this, he completed a PGCE in Secondary History and a MEd in Researching Practice at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded a PhD in Education from UCL. His doctoral research focused on the relationship between academic and school history, particularly in relation to literacy in secondary history curriculum design.

Jim taught and mentored in a number of state secondary schools and sixth form colleges. He was also a part of the Ofsted History Subject Working Group which provided advice on the new inspection framework’s development and implementation. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association and acted as Associate Editor for the HA’s professional journal Teaching History.

Jim’s research interests focus on history curriculum design, particularly literacy in history education, the relationships between academic and school history, and the interplay between overview and depth in history curricula.

Publications

• Carroll, J. E. (2022). ‘Terms and conditions: using metaphor to highlight causal processes with Year 13‘. Teaching History, 187, pp.40-49.
• Carroll, J. E. (2021). ‘Retheorising national assessment of the narrative mode for historical causal explanation in England’. History Education Research Journal, 18 (2), pp.148–65.

• Carroll, J. E. (2020). ‘Whose genres? Establishing curricular goals for students’ historical writing in England’ Teaching History (HTANSW), 52 (2), pp. 17-20

• Carroll, J.E. (2019). ‘Epistemic explanations for divergent evolution in discourses regarding students’ extended historical writing in England’. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51 (1), pp.100-120
• Carroll, J. E. (2018). ‘Couching counterfactuals in knowledge when explaining the Salem witch trials with Year 13’. Teaching History, 172, pp.18-29
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From divergent evolution to witting cross-fertilisation: the need for more inter-discursive communication regarding students’ extended historical writing’. Curriculum Journal, 28 (4), pp.504-523
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From ‘double vision’ to panorama: using history of memory to bridge ‘event space’ when exploring interpretations of Nazi popularity with Year 13′. Teaching History, 168, pp.24-36
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘I feel if I say this in my essay it’s not going to be as strong’: multi-voicedness, ‘oral rehearsal’ and Year 13 students’ written arguments’. Teaching History, 167, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Grammar. Nazis. Does the grammatical ‘release the conceptual’? Teaching History, 163, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Exploring historical ‘frameworks’ as a curriculum goal: a case study examining students’ notions of historical significance when using millennia-wide time scales’. Curriculum Journal, 27 (4), pp.454-478
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘The whole point of the thing: how nominalisation might develop students’ written causal arguments’ Teaching History, 162, pp.16-24

 

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Jim obtained a BA in Modern History and a MA in European History from University College London, followed by a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Birkbeck College London. After this, he completed a PGCE in Secondary History and a MEd in Researching Practice at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded a PhD in Education from UCL. His doctoral research focused on the relationship between academic and school history, particularly in relation to literacy in secondary history curriculum design.

Jim taught and mentored in a number of state secondary schools and sixth form colleges. He was also a part of the Ofsted History Subject Working Group which provided advice on the new inspection framework’s development and implementation. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association and acted as Associate Editor for the HA’s professional journal Teaching History.

Jim’s research interests focus on history curriculum design, particularly literacy in history education, the relationships between academic and school history, and the interplay between overview and depth in history curricula.

Publications

• Carroll, J. E. (2022). ‘Terms and conditions: using metaphor to highlight causal processes with Year 13‘. Teaching History, 187, pp.40-49.
• Carroll, J. E. (2021). ‘Retheorising national assessment of the narrative mode for historical causal explanation in England’. History Education Research Journal, 18 (2), pp.148–65.

• Carroll, J. E. (2020). ‘Whose genres? Establishing curricular goals for students’ historical writing in England’ Teaching History (HTANSW), 52 (2), pp. 17-20

• Carroll, J.E. (2019). ‘Epistemic explanations for divergent evolution in discourses regarding students’ extended historical writing in England’. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51 (1), pp.100-120
• Carroll, J. E. (2018). ‘Couching counterfactuals in knowledge when explaining the Salem witch trials with Year 13’. Teaching History, 172, pp.18-29
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From divergent evolution to witting cross-fertilisation: the need for more inter-discursive communication regarding students’ extended historical writing’. Curriculum Journal, 28 (4), pp.504-523
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From ‘double vision’ to panorama: using history of memory to bridge ‘event space’ when exploring interpretations of Nazi popularity with Year 13′. Teaching History, 168, pp.24-36
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘I feel if I say this in my essay it’s not going to be as strong’: multi-voicedness, ‘oral rehearsal’ and Year 13 students’ written arguments’. Teaching History, 167, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Grammar. Nazis. Does the grammatical ‘release the conceptual’? Teaching History, 163, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Exploring historical ‘frameworks’ as a curriculum goal: a case study examining students’ notions of historical significance when using millennia-wide time scales’. Curriculum Journal, 27 (4), pp.454-478
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘The whole point of the thing: how nominalisation might develop students’ written causal arguments’ Teaching History, 162, pp.16-24

 

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Jim obtained a BA in Modern History and a MA in European History from University College London, followed by a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Birkbeck College London. After this, he completed a PGCE in Secondary History and a MEd in Researching Practice at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded a PhD in Education from UCL. His doctoral research focused on the relationship between academic and school history, particularly in relation to literacy in secondary history curriculum design.

Jim taught and mentored in a number of state secondary schools and sixth form colleges. He was also a part of the Ofsted History Subject Working Group which provided advice on the new inspection framework’s development and implementation. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association and acted as Associate Editor for the HA’s professional journal Teaching History.

Jim’s research interests focus on history curriculum design, particularly literacy in history education, the relationships between academic and school history, and the interplay between overview and depth in history curricula.

Publications

• Carroll, J. E. (2022). ‘Terms and conditions: using metaphor to highlight causal processes with Year 13‘. Teaching History, 187, pp.40-49.
• Carroll, J. E. (2021). ‘Retheorising national assessment of the narrative mode for historical causal explanation in England’. History Education Research Journal, 18 (2), pp.148–65.

• Carroll, J. E. (2020). ‘Whose genres? Establishing curricular goals for students’ historical writing in England’ Teaching History (HTANSW), 52 (2), pp. 17-20

• Carroll, J.E. (2019). ‘Epistemic explanations for divergent evolution in discourses regarding students’ extended historical writing in England’. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51 (1), pp.100-120
• Carroll, J. E. (2018). ‘Couching counterfactuals in knowledge when explaining the Salem witch trials with Year 13’. Teaching History, 172, pp.18-29
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From divergent evolution to witting cross-fertilisation: the need for more inter-discursive communication regarding students’ extended historical writing’. Curriculum Journal, 28 (4), pp.504-523
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From ‘double vision’ to panorama: using history of memory to bridge ‘event space’ when exploring interpretations of Nazi popularity with Year 13′. Teaching History, 168, pp.24-36
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘I feel if I say this in my essay it’s not going to be as strong’: multi-voicedness, ‘oral rehearsal’ and Year 13 students’ written arguments’. Teaching History, 167, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Grammar. Nazis. Does the grammatical ‘release the conceptual’? Teaching History, 163, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Exploring historical ‘frameworks’ as a curriculum goal: a case study examining students’ notions of historical significance when using millennia-wide time scales’. Curriculum Journal, 27 (4), pp.454-478
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘The whole point of the thing: how nominalisation might develop students’ written causal arguments’ Teaching History, 162, pp.16-24

 

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Jim obtained a BA in Modern History and a MA in European History from University College London, followed by a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Birkbeck College London. After this, he completed a PGCE in Secondary History and a MEd in Researching Practice at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded a PhD in Education from UCL. His doctoral research focused on the relationship between academic and school history, particularly in relation to literacy in secondary history curriculum design.

Jim taught and mentored in a number of state secondary schools and sixth form colleges. He was also a part of the Ofsted History Subject Working Group which provided advice on the new inspection framework’s development and implementation. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association and acted as Associate Editor for the HA’s professional journal Teaching History.

Jim’s research interests focus on history curriculum design, particularly literacy in history education, the relationships between academic and school history, and the interplay between overview and depth in history curricula.

Publications

• Carroll, J. E. (2022). ‘Terms and conditions: using metaphor to highlight causal processes with Year 13‘. Teaching History, 187, pp.40-49.
• Carroll, J. E. (2021). ‘Retheorising national assessment of the narrative mode for historical causal explanation in England’. History Education Research Journal, 18 (2), pp.148–65.

• Carroll, J. E. (2020). ‘Whose genres? Establishing curricular goals for students’ historical writing in England’ Teaching History (HTANSW), 52 (2), pp. 17-20

• Carroll, J.E. (2019). ‘Epistemic explanations for divergent evolution in discourses regarding students’ extended historical writing in England’. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51 (1), pp.100-120
• Carroll, J. E. (2018). ‘Couching counterfactuals in knowledge when explaining the Salem witch trials with Year 13’. Teaching History, 172, pp.18-29
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From divergent evolution to witting cross-fertilisation: the need for more inter-discursive communication regarding students’ extended historical writing’. Curriculum Journal, 28 (4), pp.504-523
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From ‘double vision’ to panorama: using history of memory to bridge ‘event space’ when exploring interpretations of Nazi popularity with Year 13′. Teaching History, 168, pp.24-36
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘I feel if I say this in my essay it’s not going to be as strong’: multi-voicedness, ‘oral rehearsal’ and Year 13 students’ written arguments’. Teaching History, 167, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Grammar. Nazis. Does the grammatical ‘release the conceptual’? Teaching History, 163, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Exploring historical ‘frameworks’ as a curriculum goal: a case study examining students’ notions of historical significance when using millennia-wide time scales’. Curriculum Journal, 27 (4), pp.454-478
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘The whole point of the thing: how nominalisation might develop students’ written causal arguments’ Teaching History, 162, pp.16-24

 

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Jim obtained a BA in Modern History and a MA in European History from University College London, followed by a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Birkbeck College London. After this, he completed a PGCE in Secondary History and a MEd in Researching Practice at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded a PhD in Education from UCL. His doctoral research focused on the relationship between academic and school history, particularly in relation to literacy in secondary history curriculum design.

Jim taught and mentored in a number of state secondary schools and sixth form colleges. He was also a part of the Ofsted History Subject Working Group which provided advice on the new inspection framework’s development and implementation. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association and acted as Associate Editor for the HA’s professional journal Teaching History.

Jim’s research interests focus on history curriculum design, particularly literacy in history education, the relationships between academic and school history, and the interplay between overview and depth in history curricula.

Publications

• Carroll, J. E. (2022). ‘Terms and conditions: using metaphor to highlight causal processes with Year 13‘. Teaching History, 187, pp.40-49.
• Carroll, J. E. (2021). ‘Retheorising national assessment of the narrative mode for historical causal explanation in England’. History Education Research Journal, 18 (2), pp.148–65.

• Carroll, J. E. (2020). ‘Whose genres? Establishing curricular goals for students’ historical writing in England’ Teaching History (HTANSW), 52 (2), pp. 17-20

• Carroll, J.E. (2019). ‘Epistemic explanations for divergent evolution in discourses regarding students’ extended historical writing in England’. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51 (1), pp.100-120
• Carroll, J. E. (2018). ‘Couching counterfactuals in knowledge when explaining the Salem witch trials with Year 13’. Teaching History, 172, pp.18-29
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From divergent evolution to witting cross-fertilisation: the need for more inter-discursive communication regarding students’ extended historical writing’. Curriculum Journal, 28 (4), pp.504-523
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From ‘double vision’ to panorama: using history of memory to bridge ‘event space’ when exploring interpretations of Nazi popularity with Year 13′. Teaching History, 168, pp.24-36
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘I feel if I say this in my essay it’s not going to be as strong’: multi-voicedness, ‘oral rehearsal’ and Year 13 students’ written arguments’. Teaching History, 167, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Grammar. Nazis. Does the grammatical ‘release the conceptual’? Teaching History, 163, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Exploring historical ‘frameworks’ as a curriculum goal: a case study examining students’ notions of historical significance when using millennia-wide time scales’. Curriculum Journal, 27 (4), pp.454-478
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘The whole point of the thing: how nominalisation might develop students’ written causal arguments’ Teaching History, 162, pp.16-24

 

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Jim obtained a BA in Modern History and a MA in European History from University College London, followed by a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Birkbeck College London. After this, he completed a PGCE in Secondary History and a MEd in Researching Practice at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded a PhD in Education from UCL. His doctoral research focused on the relationship between academic and school history, particularly in relation to literacy in secondary history curriculum design.

Jim taught and mentored in a number of state secondary schools and sixth form colleges. He was also a part of the Ofsted History Subject Working Group which provided advice on the new inspection framework’s development and implementation. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association and acted as Associate Editor for the HA’s professional journal Teaching History.

Jim’s research interests focus on history curriculum design, particularly literacy in history education, the relationships between academic and school history, and the interplay between overview and depth in history curricula.

Publications

• Carroll, J. E. (2022). ‘Terms and conditions: using metaphor to highlight causal processes with Year 13‘. Teaching History, 187, pp.40-49.
• Carroll, J. E. (2021). ‘Retheorising national assessment of the narrative mode for historical causal explanation in England’. History Education Research Journal, 18 (2), pp.148–65.

• Carroll, J. E. (2020). ‘Whose genres? Establishing curricular goals for students’ historical writing in England’ Teaching History (HTANSW), 52 (2), pp. 17-20

• Carroll, J.E. (2019). ‘Epistemic explanations for divergent evolution in discourses regarding students’ extended historical writing in England’. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51 (1), pp.100-120
• Carroll, J. E. (2018). ‘Couching counterfactuals in knowledge when explaining the Salem witch trials with Year 13’. Teaching History, 172, pp.18-29
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From divergent evolution to witting cross-fertilisation: the need for more inter-discursive communication regarding students’ extended historical writing’. Curriculum Journal, 28 (4), pp.504-523
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From ‘double vision’ to panorama: using history of memory to bridge ‘event space’ when exploring interpretations of Nazi popularity with Year 13′. Teaching History, 168, pp.24-36
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘I feel if I say this in my essay it’s not going to be as strong’: multi-voicedness, ‘oral rehearsal’ and Year 13 students’ written arguments’. Teaching History, 167, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Grammar. Nazis. Does the grammatical ‘release the conceptual’? Teaching History, 163, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Exploring historical ‘frameworks’ as a curriculum goal: a case study examining students’ notions of historical significance when using millennia-wide time scales’. Curriculum Journal, 27 (4), pp.454-478
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘The whole point of the thing: how nominalisation might develop students’ written causal arguments’ Teaching History, 162, pp.16-24

 

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Jim obtained a BA in Modern History and a MA in European History from University College London, followed by a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Birkbeck College London. After this, he completed a PGCE in Secondary History and a MEd in Researching Practice at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded a PhD in Education from UCL. His doctoral research focused on the relationship between academic and school history, particularly in relation to literacy in secondary history curriculum design.

Jim taught and mentored in a number of state secondary schools and sixth form colleges. He was also a part of the Ofsted History Subject Working Group which provided advice on the new inspection framework’s development and implementation. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association and acted as Associate Editor for the HA’s professional journal Teaching History.

Jim’s research interests focus on history curriculum design, particularly literacy in history education, the relationships between academic and school history, and the interplay between overview and depth in history curricula.

Publications

• Carroll, J. E. (2022). ‘Terms and conditions: using metaphor to highlight causal processes with Year 13‘. Teaching History, 187, pp.40-49.
• Carroll, J. E. (2021). ‘Retheorising national assessment of the narrative mode for historical causal explanation in England’. History Education Research Journal, 18 (2), pp.148–65.

• Carroll, J. E. (2020). ‘Whose genres? Establishing curricular goals for students’ historical writing in England’ Teaching History (HTANSW), 52 (2), pp. 17-20

• Carroll, J.E. (2019). ‘Epistemic explanations for divergent evolution in discourses regarding students’ extended historical writing in England’. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51 (1), pp.100-120
• Carroll, J. E. (2018). ‘Couching counterfactuals in knowledge when explaining the Salem witch trials with Year 13’. Teaching History, 172, pp.18-29
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From divergent evolution to witting cross-fertilisation: the need for more inter-discursive communication regarding students’ extended historical writing’. Curriculum Journal, 28 (4), pp.504-523
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From ‘double vision’ to panorama: using history of memory to bridge ‘event space’ when exploring interpretations of Nazi popularity with Year 13′. Teaching History, 168, pp.24-36
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘I feel if I say this in my essay it’s not going to be as strong’: multi-voicedness, ‘oral rehearsal’ and Year 13 students’ written arguments’. Teaching History, 167, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Grammar. Nazis. Does the grammatical ‘release the conceptual’? Teaching History, 163, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Exploring historical ‘frameworks’ as a curriculum goal: a case study examining students’ notions of historical significance when using millennia-wide time scales’. Curriculum Journal, 27 (4), pp.454-478
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘The whole point of the thing: how nominalisation might develop students’ written causal arguments’ Teaching History, 162, pp.16-24

 

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Jim obtained a BA in Modern History and a MA in European History from University College London, followed by a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Birkbeck College London. After this, he completed a PGCE in Secondary History and a MEd in Researching Practice at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded a PhD in Education from UCL. His doctoral research focused on the relationship between academic and school history, particularly in relation to literacy in secondary history curriculum design.

Jim taught and mentored in a number of state secondary schools and sixth form colleges. He was also a part of the Ofsted History Subject Working Group which provided advice on the new inspection framework’s development and implementation. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association and acted as Associate Editor for the HA’s professional journal Teaching History.

Jim’s research interests focus on history curriculum design, particularly literacy in history education, the relationships between academic and school history, and the interplay between overview and depth in history curricula.

Publications

• Carroll, J. E. (2022). ‘Terms and conditions: using metaphor to highlight causal processes with Year 13‘. Teaching History, 187, pp.40-49.
• Carroll, J. E. (2021). ‘Retheorising national assessment of the narrative mode for historical causal explanation in England’. History Education Research Journal, 18 (2), pp.148–65.

• Carroll, J. E. (2020). ‘Whose genres? Establishing curricular goals for students’ historical writing in England’ Teaching History (HTANSW), 52 (2), pp. 17-20

• Carroll, J.E. (2019). ‘Epistemic explanations for divergent evolution in discourses regarding students’ extended historical writing in England’. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51 (1), pp.100-120
• Carroll, J. E. (2018). ‘Couching counterfactuals in knowledge when explaining the Salem witch trials with Year 13’. Teaching History, 172, pp.18-29
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From divergent evolution to witting cross-fertilisation: the need for more inter-discursive communication regarding students’ extended historical writing’. Curriculum Journal, 28 (4), pp.504-523
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From ‘double vision’ to panorama: using history of memory to bridge ‘event space’ when exploring interpretations of Nazi popularity with Year 13′. Teaching History, 168, pp.24-36
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘I feel if I say this in my essay it’s not going to be as strong’: multi-voicedness, ‘oral rehearsal’ and Year 13 students’ written arguments’. Teaching History, 167, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Grammar. Nazis. Does the grammatical ‘release the conceptual’? Teaching History, 163, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Exploring historical ‘frameworks’ as a curriculum goal: a case study examining students’ notions of historical significance when using millennia-wide time scales’. Curriculum Journal, 27 (4), pp.454-478
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘The whole point of the thing: how nominalisation might develop students’ written causal arguments’ Teaching History, 162, pp.16-24

 

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Jim obtained a BA in Modern History and a MA in European History from University College London, followed by a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Birkbeck College London. After this, he completed a PGCE in Secondary History and a MEd in Researching Practice at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded a PhD in Education from UCL. His doctoral research focused on the relationship between academic and school history, particularly in relation to literacy in secondary history curriculum design.

Jim taught and mentored in a number of state secondary schools and sixth form colleges. He was also a part of the Ofsted History Subject Working Group which provided advice on the new inspection framework’s development and implementation. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association and acted as Associate Editor for the HA’s professional journal Teaching History.

Jim’s research interests focus on history curriculum design, particularly literacy in history education, the relationships between academic and school history, and the interplay between overview and depth in history curricula.

Publications

• Carroll, J. E. (2022). ‘Terms and conditions: using metaphor to highlight causal processes with Year 13‘. Teaching History, 187, pp.40-49.
• Carroll, J. E. (2021). ‘Retheorising national assessment of the narrative mode for historical causal explanation in England’. History Education Research Journal, 18 (2), pp.148–65.

• Carroll, J. E. (2020). ‘Whose genres? Establishing curricular goals for students’ historical writing in England’ Teaching History (HTANSW), 52 (2), pp. 17-20

• Carroll, J.E. (2019). ‘Epistemic explanations for divergent evolution in discourses regarding students’ extended historical writing in England’. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51 (1), pp.100-120
• Carroll, J. E. (2018). ‘Couching counterfactuals in knowledge when explaining the Salem witch trials with Year 13’. Teaching History, 172, pp.18-29
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From divergent evolution to witting cross-fertilisation: the need for more inter-discursive communication regarding students’ extended historical writing’. Curriculum Journal, 28 (4), pp.504-523
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From ‘double vision’ to panorama: using history of memory to bridge ‘event space’ when exploring interpretations of Nazi popularity with Year 13′. Teaching History, 168, pp.24-36
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘I feel if I say this in my essay it’s not going to be as strong’: multi-voicedness, ‘oral rehearsal’ and Year 13 students’ written arguments’. Teaching History, 167, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Grammar. Nazis. Does the grammatical ‘release the conceptual’? Teaching History, 163, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Exploring historical ‘frameworks’ as a curriculum goal: a case study examining students’ notions of historical significance when using millennia-wide time scales’. Curriculum Journal, 27 (4), pp.454-478
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘The whole point of the thing: how nominalisation might develop students’ written causal arguments’ Teaching History, 162, pp.16-24

 

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Jim obtained a BA in Modern History and a MA in European History from University College London, followed by a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Birkbeck College London. After this, he completed a PGCE in Secondary History and a MEd in Researching Practice at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded a PhD in Education from UCL. His doctoral research focused on the relationship between academic and school history, particularly in relation to literacy in secondary history curriculum design.

Jim taught and mentored in a number of state secondary schools and sixth form colleges. He was also a part of the Ofsted History Subject Working Group which provided advice on the new inspection framework’s development and implementation. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association and acted as Associate Editor for the HA’s professional journal Teaching History.

Jim’s research interests focus on history curriculum design, particularly literacy in history education, the relationships between academic and school history, and the interplay between overview and depth in history curricula.

Publications

• Carroll, J. E. (2022). ‘Terms and conditions: using metaphor to highlight causal processes with Year 13‘. Teaching History, 187, pp.40-49.
• Carroll, J. E. (2021). ‘Retheorising national assessment of the narrative mode for historical causal explanation in England’. History Education Research Journal, 18 (2), pp.148–65.

• Carroll, J. E. (2020). ‘Whose genres? Establishing curricular goals for students’ historical writing in England’ Teaching History (HTANSW), 52 (2), pp. 17-20

• Carroll, J.E. (2019). ‘Epistemic explanations for divergent evolution in discourses regarding students’ extended historical writing in England’. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51 (1), pp.100-120
• Carroll, J. E. (2018). ‘Couching counterfactuals in knowledge when explaining the Salem witch trials with Year 13’. Teaching History, 172, pp.18-29
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From divergent evolution to witting cross-fertilisation: the need for more inter-discursive communication regarding students’ extended historical writing’. Curriculum Journal, 28 (4), pp.504-523
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From ‘double vision’ to panorama: using history of memory to bridge ‘event space’ when exploring interpretations of Nazi popularity with Year 13′. Teaching History, 168, pp.24-36
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘I feel if I say this in my essay it’s not going to be as strong’: multi-voicedness, ‘oral rehearsal’ and Year 13 students’ written arguments’. Teaching History, 167, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Grammar. Nazis. Does the grammatical ‘release the conceptual’? Teaching History, 163, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Exploring historical ‘frameworks’ as a curriculum goal: a case study examining students’ notions of historical significance when using millennia-wide time scales’. Curriculum Journal, 27 (4), pp.454-478
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘The whole point of the thing: how nominalisation might develop students’ written causal arguments’ Teaching History, 162, pp.16-24

 

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Jim obtained a BA in Modern History and a MA in European History from University College London, followed by a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Birkbeck College London. After this, he completed a PGCE in Secondary History and a MEd in Researching Practice at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded a PhD in Education from UCL. His doctoral research focused on the relationship between academic and school history, particularly in relation to literacy in secondary history curriculum design.

Jim taught and mentored in a number of state secondary schools and sixth form colleges. He was also a part of the Ofsted History Subject Working Group which provided advice on the new inspection framework’s development and implementation. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association and acted as Associate Editor for the HA’s professional journal Teaching History.

Jim’s research interests focus on history curriculum design, particularly literacy in history education, the relationships between academic and school history, and the interplay between overview and depth in history curricula.

Publications

• Carroll, J. E. (2022). ‘Terms and conditions: using metaphor to highlight causal processes with Year 13‘. Teaching History, 187, pp.40-49.
• Carroll, J. E. (2021). ‘Retheorising national assessment of the narrative mode for historical causal explanation in England’. History Education Research Journal, 18 (2), pp.148–65.

• Carroll, J. E. (2020). ‘Whose genres? Establishing curricular goals for students’ historical writing in England’ Teaching History (HTANSW), 52 (2), pp. 17-20

• Carroll, J.E. (2019). ‘Epistemic explanations for divergent evolution in discourses regarding students’ extended historical writing in England’. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51 (1), pp.100-120
• Carroll, J. E. (2018). ‘Couching counterfactuals in knowledge when explaining the Salem witch trials with Year 13’. Teaching History, 172, pp.18-29
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From divergent evolution to witting cross-fertilisation: the need for more inter-discursive communication regarding students’ extended historical writing’. Curriculum Journal, 28 (4), pp.504-523
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From ‘double vision’ to panorama: using history of memory to bridge ‘event space’ when exploring interpretations of Nazi popularity with Year 13′. Teaching History, 168, pp.24-36
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘I feel if I say this in my essay it’s not going to be as strong’: multi-voicedness, ‘oral rehearsal’ and Year 13 students’ written arguments’. Teaching History, 167, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Grammar. Nazis. Does the grammatical ‘release the conceptual’? Teaching History, 163, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Exploring historical ‘frameworks’ as a curriculum goal: a case study examining students’ notions of historical significance when using millennia-wide time scales’. Curriculum Journal, 27 (4), pp.454-478
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘The whole point of the thing: how nominalisation might develop students’ written causal arguments’ Teaching History, 162, pp.16-24

 

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Jim obtained a BA in Modern History and a MA in European History from University College London, followed by a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Birkbeck College London. After this, he completed a PGCE in Secondary History and a MEd in Researching Practice at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded a PhD in Education from UCL. His doctoral research focused on the relationship between academic and school history, particularly in relation to literacy in secondary history curriculum design.

Jim taught and mentored in a number of state secondary schools and sixth form colleges. He was also a part of the Ofsted History Subject Working Group which provided advice on the new inspection framework’s development and implementation. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association and acted as Associate Editor for the HA’s professional journal Teaching History.

Jim’s research interests focus on history curriculum design, particularly literacy in history education, the relationships between academic and school history, and the interplay between overview and depth in history curricula.

Publications

• Carroll, J. E. (2022). ‘Terms and conditions: using metaphor to highlight causal processes with Year 13‘. Teaching History, 187, pp.40-49.
• Carroll, J. E. (2021). ‘Retheorising national assessment of the narrative mode for historical causal explanation in England’. History Education Research Journal, 18 (2), pp.148–65.

• Carroll, J. E. (2020). ‘Whose genres? Establishing curricular goals for students’ historical writing in England’ Teaching History (HTANSW), 52 (2), pp. 17-20

• Carroll, J.E. (2019). ‘Epistemic explanations for divergent evolution in discourses regarding students’ extended historical writing in England’. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51 (1), pp.100-120
• Carroll, J. E. (2018). ‘Couching counterfactuals in knowledge when explaining the Salem witch trials with Year 13’. Teaching History, 172, pp.18-29
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From divergent evolution to witting cross-fertilisation: the need for more inter-discursive communication regarding students’ extended historical writing’. Curriculum Journal, 28 (4), pp.504-523
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From ‘double vision’ to panorama: using history of memory to bridge ‘event space’ when exploring interpretations of Nazi popularity with Year 13′. Teaching History, 168, pp.24-36
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘I feel if I say this in my essay it’s not going to be as strong’: multi-voicedness, ‘oral rehearsal’ and Year 13 students’ written arguments’. Teaching History, 167, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Grammar. Nazis. Does the grammatical ‘release the conceptual’? Teaching History, 163, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Exploring historical ‘frameworks’ as a curriculum goal: a case study examining students’ notions of historical significance when using millennia-wide time scales’. Curriculum Journal, 27 (4), pp.454-478
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘The whole point of the thing: how nominalisation might develop students’ written causal arguments’ Teaching History, 162, pp.16-24

 

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Jim obtained a BA in Modern History and a MA in European History from University College London, followed by a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Birkbeck College London. After this, he completed a PGCE in Secondary History and a MEd in Researching Practice at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded a PhD in Education from UCL. His doctoral research focused on the relationship between academic and school history, particularly in relation to literacy in secondary history curriculum design.

Jim taught and mentored in a number of state secondary schools and sixth form colleges. He was also a part of the Ofsted History Subject Working Group which provided advice on the new inspection framework’s development and implementation. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association and acted as Associate Editor for the HA’s professional journal Teaching History.

Jim’s research interests focus on history curriculum design, particularly literacy in history education, the relationships between academic and school history, and the interplay between overview and depth in history curricula.

Publications

• Carroll, J. E. (2022). ‘Terms and conditions: using metaphor to highlight causal processes with Year 13‘. Teaching History, 187, pp.40-49.
• Carroll, J. E. (2021). ‘Retheorising national assessment of the narrative mode for historical causal explanation in England’. History Education Research Journal, 18 (2), pp.148–65.

• Carroll, J. E. (2020). ‘Whose genres? Establishing curricular goals for students’ historical writing in England’ Teaching History (HTANSW), 52 (2), pp. 17-20

• Carroll, J.E. (2019). ‘Epistemic explanations for divergent evolution in discourses regarding students’ extended historical writing in England’. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51 (1), pp.100-120
• Carroll, J. E. (2018). ‘Couching counterfactuals in knowledge when explaining the Salem witch trials with Year 13’. Teaching History, 172, pp.18-29
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From divergent evolution to witting cross-fertilisation: the need for more inter-discursive communication regarding students’ extended historical writing’. Curriculum Journal, 28 (4), pp.504-523
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From ‘double vision’ to panorama: using history of memory to bridge ‘event space’ when exploring interpretations of Nazi popularity with Year 13′. Teaching History, 168, pp.24-36
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘I feel if I say this in my essay it’s not going to be as strong’: multi-voicedness, ‘oral rehearsal’ and Year 13 students’ written arguments’. Teaching History, 167, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Grammar. Nazis. Does the grammatical ‘release the conceptual’? Teaching History, 163, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Exploring historical ‘frameworks’ as a curriculum goal: a case study examining students’ notions of historical significance when using millennia-wide time scales’. Curriculum Journal, 27 (4), pp.454-478
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘The whole point of the thing: how nominalisation might develop students’ written causal arguments’ Teaching History, 162, pp.16-24

 

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Jim obtained a BA in Modern History and a MA in European History from University College London, followed by a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Birkbeck College London. After this, he completed a PGCE in Secondary History and a MEd in Researching Practice at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded a PhD in Education from UCL. His doctoral research focused on the relationship between academic and school history, particularly in relation to literacy in secondary history curriculum design.

Jim taught and mentored in a number of state secondary schools and sixth form colleges. He was also a part of the Ofsted History Subject Working Group which provided advice on the new inspection framework’s development and implementation. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association and acted as Associate Editor for the HA’s professional journal Teaching History.

Jim’s research interests focus on history curriculum design, particularly literacy in history education, the relationships between academic and school history, and the interplay between overview and depth in history curricula.

Publications

• Carroll, J. E. (2022). ‘Terms and conditions: using metaphor to highlight causal processes with Year 13‘. Teaching History, 187, pp.40-49.
• Carroll, J. E. (2021). ‘Retheorising national assessment of the narrative mode for historical causal explanation in England’. History Education Research Journal, 18 (2), pp.148–65.

• Carroll, J. E. (2020). ‘Whose genres? Establishing curricular goals for students’ historical writing in England’ Teaching History (HTANSW), 52 (2), pp. 17-20

• Carroll, J.E. (2019). ‘Epistemic explanations for divergent evolution in discourses regarding students’ extended historical writing in England’. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51 (1), pp.100-120
• Carroll, J. E. (2018). ‘Couching counterfactuals in knowledge when explaining the Salem witch trials with Year 13’. Teaching History, 172, pp.18-29
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From divergent evolution to witting cross-fertilisation: the need for more inter-discursive communication regarding students’ extended historical writing’. Curriculum Journal, 28 (4), pp.504-523
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From ‘double vision’ to panorama: using history of memory to bridge ‘event space’ when exploring interpretations of Nazi popularity with Year 13′. Teaching History, 168, pp.24-36
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘I feel if I say this in my essay it’s not going to be as strong’: multi-voicedness, ‘oral rehearsal’ and Year 13 students’ written arguments’. Teaching History, 167, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Grammar. Nazis. Does the grammatical ‘release the conceptual’? Teaching History, 163, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Exploring historical ‘frameworks’ as a curriculum goal: a case study examining students’ notions of historical significance when using millennia-wide time scales’. Curriculum Journal, 27 (4), pp.454-478
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘The whole point of the thing: how nominalisation might develop students’ written causal arguments’ Teaching History, 162, pp.16-24

 

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Jim obtained a BA in Modern History and a MA in European History from University College London, followed by a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Birkbeck College London. After this, he completed a PGCE in Secondary History and a MEd in Researching Practice at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded a PhD in Education from UCL. His doctoral research focused on the relationship between academic and school history, particularly in relation to literacy in secondary history curriculum design.

Jim taught and mentored in a number of state secondary schools and sixth form colleges. He was also a part of the Ofsted History Subject Working Group which provided advice on the new inspection framework’s development and implementation. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association and acted as Associate Editor for the HA’s professional journal Teaching History.

Jim’s research interests focus on history curriculum design, particularly literacy in history education, the relationships between academic and school history, and the interplay between overview and depth in history curricula.

Publications

• Carroll, J. E. (2022). ‘Terms and conditions: using metaphor to highlight causal processes with Year 13‘. Teaching History, 187, pp.40-49.
• Carroll, J. E. (2021). ‘Retheorising national assessment of the narrative mode for historical causal explanation in England’. History Education Research Journal, 18 (2), pp.148–65.

• Carroll, J. E. (2020). ‘Whose genres? Establishing curricular goals for students’ historical writing in England’ Teaching History (HTANSW), 52 (2), pp. 17-20

• Carroll, J.E. (2019). ‘Epistemic explanations for divergent evolution in discourses regarding students’ extended historical writing in England’. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51 (1), pp.100-120
• Carroll, J. E. (2018). ‘Couching counterfactuals in knowledge when explaining the Salem witch trials with Year 13’. Teaching History, 172, pp.18-29
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From divergent evolution to witting cross-fertilisation: the need for more inter-discursive communication regarding students’ extended historical writing’. Curriculum Journal, 28 (4), pp.504-523
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From ‘double vision’ to panorama: using history of memory to bridge ‘event space’ when exploring interpretations of Nazi popularity with Year 13′. Teaching History, 168, pp.24-36
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘I feel if I say this in my essay it’s not going to be as strong’: multi-voicedness, ‘oral rehearsal’ and Year 13 students’ written arguments’. Teaching History, 167, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Grammar. Nazis. Does the grammatical ‘release the conceptual’? Teaching History, 163, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Exploring historical ‘frameworks’ as a curriculum goal: a case study examining students’ notions of historical significance when using millennia-wide time scales’. Curriculum Journal, 27 (4), pp.454-478
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘The whole point of the thing: how nominalisation might develop students’ written causal arguments’ Teaching History, 162, pp.16-24

 

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Jim obtained a BA in Modern History and a MA in European History from University College London, followed by a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Birkbeck College London. After this, he completed a PGCE in Secondary History and a MEd in Researching Practice at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded a PhD in Education from UCL. His doctoral research focused on the relationship between academic and school history, particularly in relation to literacy in secondary history curriculum design.

Jim taught and mentored in a number of state secondary schools and sixth form colleges. He was also a part of the Ofsted History Subject Working Group which provided advice on the new inspection framework’s development and implementation. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association and acted as Associate Editor for the HA’s professional journal Teaching History.

Jim’s research interests focus on history curriculum design, particularly literacy in history education, the relationships between academic and school history, and the interplay between overview and depth in history curricula.

Publications

• Carroll, J. E. (2022). ‘Terms and conditions: using metaphor to highlight causal processes with Year 13‘. Teaching History, 187, pp.40-49.
• Carroll, J. E. (2021). ‘Retheorising national assessment of the narrative mode for historical causal explanation in England’. History Education Research Journal, 18 (2), pp.148–65.

• Carroll, J. E. (2020). ‘Whose genres? Establishing curricular goals for students’ historical writing in England’ Teaching History (HTANSW), 52 (2), pp. 17-20

• Carroll, J.E. (2019). ‘Epistemic explanations for divergent evolution in discourses regarding students’ extended historical writing in England’. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51 (1), pp.100-120
• Carroll, J. E. (2018). ‘Couching counterfactuals in knowledge when explaining the Salem witch trials with Year 13’. Teaching History, 172, pp.18-29
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From divergent evolution to witting cross-fertilisation: the need for more inter-discursive communication regarding students’ extended historical writing’. Curriculum Journal, 28 (4), pp.504-523
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From ‘double vision’ to panorama: using history of memory to bridge ‘event space’ when exploring interpretations of Nazi popularity with Year 13′. Teaching History, 168, pp.24-36
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘I feel if I say this in my essay it’s not going to be as strong’: multi-voicedness, ‘oral rehearsal’ and Year 13 students’ written arguments’. Teaching History, 167, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Grammar. Nazis. Does the grammatical ‘release the conceptual’? Teaching History, 163, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Exploring historical ‘frameworks’ as a curriculum goal: a case study examining students’ notions of historical significance when using millennia-wide time scales’. Curriculum Journal, 27 (4), pp.454-478
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘The whole point of the thing: how nominalisation might develop students’ written causal arguments’ Teaching History, 162, pp.16-24

 

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Jim obtained a BA in Modern History and a MA in European History from University College London, followed by a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Birkbeck College London. After this, he completed a PGCE in Secondary History and a MEd in Researching Practice at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded a PhD in Education from UCL. His doctoral research focused on the relationship between academic and school history, particularly in relation to literacy in secondary history curriculum design.

Jim taught and mentored in a number of state secondary schools and sixth form colleges. He was also a part of the Ofsted History Subject Working Group which provided advice on the new inspection framework’s development and implementation. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association and acted as Associate Editor for the HA’s professional journal Teaching History.

Jim’s research interests focus on history curriculum design, particularly literacy in history education, the relationships between academic and school history, and the interplay between overview and depth in history curricula.

Publications

• Carroll, J. E. (2022). ‘Terms and conditions: using metaphor to highlight causal processes with Year 13‘. Teaching History, 187, pp.40-49.
• Carroll, J. E. (2021). ‘Retheorising national assessment of the narrative mode for historical causal explanation in England’. History Education Research Journal, 18 (2), pp.148–65.

• Carroll, J. E. (2020). ‘Whose genres? Establishing curricular goals for students’ historical writing in England’ Teaching History (HTANSW), 52 (2), pp. 17-20

• Carroll, J.E. (2019). ‘Epistemic explanations for divergent evolution in discourses regarding students’ extended historical writing in England’. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51 (1), pp.100-120
• Carroll, J. E. (2018). ‘Couching counterfactuals in knowledge when explaining the Salem witch trials with Year 13’. Teaching History, 172, pp.18-29
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From divergent evolution to witting cross-fertilisation: the need for more inter-discursive communication regarding students’ extended historical writing’. Curriculum Journal, 28 (4), pp.504-523
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From ‘double vision’ to panorama: using history of memory to bridge ‘event space’ when exploring interpretations of Nazi popularity with Year 13′. Teaching History, 168, pp.24-36
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘I feel if I say this in my essay it’s not going to be as strong’: multi-voicedness, ‘oral rehearsal’ and Year 13 students’ written arguments’. Teaching History, 167, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Grammar. Nazis. Does the grammatical ‘release the conceptual’? Teaching History, 163, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Exploring historical ‘frameworks’ as a curriculum goal: a case study examining students’ notions of historical significance when using millennia-wide time scales’. Curriculum Journal, 27 (4), pp.454-478
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘The whole point of the thing: how nominalisation might develop students’ written causal arguments’ Teaching History, 162, pp.16-24

 

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Jim obtained a BA in Modern History and a MA in European History from University College London, followed by a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Birkbeck College London. After this, he completed a PGCE in Secondary History and a MEd in Researching Practice at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded a PhD in Education from UCL. His doctoral research focused on the relationship between academic and school history, particularly in relation to literacy in secondary history curriculum design.

Jim taught and mentored in a number of state secondary schools and sixth form colleges. He was also a part of the Ofsted History Subject Working Group which provided advice on the new inspection framework’s development and implementation. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association and acted as Associate Editor for the HA’s professional journal Teaching History.

Jim’s research interests focus on history curriculum design, particularly literacy in history education, the relationships between academic and school history, and the interplay between overview and depth in history curricula.

Publications

• Carroll, J. E. (2022). ‘Terms and conditions: using metaphor to highlight causal processes with Year 13‘. Teaching History, 187, pp.40-49.
• Carroll, J. E. (2021). ‘Retheorising national assessment of the narrative mode for historical causal explanation in England’. History Education Research Journal, 18 (2), pp.148–65.

• Carroll, J. E. (2020). ‘Whose genres? Establishing curricular goals for students’ historical writing in England’ Teaching History (HTANSW), 52 (2), pp. 17-20

• Carroll, J.E. (2019). ‘Epistemic explanations for divergent evolution in discourses regarding students’ extended historical writing in England’. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51 (1), pp.100-120
• Carroll, J. E. (2018). ‘Couching counterfactuals in knowledge when explaining the Salem witch trials with Year 13’. Teaching History, 172, pp.18-29
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From divergent evolution to witting cross-fertilisation: the need for more inter-discursive communication regarding students’ extended historical writing’. Curriculum Journal, 28 (4), pp.504-523
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From ‘double vision’ to panorama: using history of memory to bridge ‘event space’ when exploring interpretations of Nazi popularity with Year 13′. Teaching History, 168, pp.24-36
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘I feel if I say this in my essay it’s not going to be as strong’: multi-voicedness, ‘oral rehearsal’ and Year 13 students’ written arguments’. Teaching History, 167, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Grammar. Nazis. Does the grammatical ‘release the conceptual’? Teaching History, 163, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Exploring historical ‘frameworks’ as a curriculum goal: a case study examining students’ notions of historical significance when using millennia-wide time scales’. Curriculum Journal, 27 (4), pp.454-478
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘The whole point of the thing: how nominalisation might develop students’ written causal arguments’ Teaching History, 162, pp.16-24

 

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Jim obtained a BA in Modern History and a MA in European History from University College London, followed by a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Birkbeck College London. After this, he completed a PGCE in Secondary History and a MEd in Researching Practice at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded a PhD in Education from UCL. His doctoral research focused on the relationship between academic and school history, particularly in relation to literacy in secondary history curriculum design.

Jim taught and mentored in a number of state secondary schools and sixth form colleges. He was also a part of the Ofsted History Subject Working Group which provided advice on the new inspection framework’s development and implementation. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association and acted as Associate Editor for the HA’s professional journal Teaching History.

Jim’s research interests focus on history curriculum design, particularly literacy in history education, the relationships between academic and school history, and the interplay between overview and depth in history curricula.

Publications

• Carroll, J. E. (2022). ‘Terms and conditions: using metaphor to highlight causal processes with Year 13‘. Teaching History, 187, pp.40-49.
• Carroll, J. E. (2021). ‘Retheorising national assessment of the narrative mode for historical causal explanation in England’. History Education Research Journal, 18 (2), pp.148–65.

• Carroll, J. E. (2020). ‘Whose genres? Establishing curricular goals for students’ historical writing in England’ Teaching History (HTANSW), 52 (2), pp. 17-20

• Carroll, J.E. (2019). ‘Epistemic explanations for divergent evolution in discourses regarding students’ extended historical writing in England’. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51 (1), pp.100-120
• Carroll, J. E. (2018). ‘Couching counterfactuals in knowledge when explaining the Salem witch trials with Year 13’. Teaching History, 172, pp.18-29
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From divergent evolution to witting cross-fertilisation: the need for more inter-discursive communication regarding students’ extended historical writing’. Curriculum Journal, 28 (4), pp.504-523
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From ‘double vision’ to panorama: using history of memory to bridge ‘event space’ when exploring interpretations of Nazi popularity with Year 13′. Teaching History, 168, pp.24-36
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘I feel if I say this in my essay it’s not going to be as strong’: multi-voicedness, ‘oral rehearsal’ and Year 13 students’ written arguments’. Teaching History, 167, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Grammar. Nazis. Does the grammatical ‘release the conceptual’? Teaching History, 163, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Exploring historical ‘frameworks’ as a curriculum goal: a case study examining students’ notions of historical significance when using millennia-wide time scales’. Curriculum Journal, 27 (4), pp.454-478
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘The whole point of the thing: how nominalisation might develop students’ written causal arguments’ Teaching History, 162, pp.16-24

 

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Jim obtained a BA in Modern History and a MA in European History from University College London, followed by a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Birkbeck College London. After this, he completed a PGCE in Secondary History and a MEd in Researching Practice at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded a PhD in Education from UCL. His doctoral research focused on the relationship between academic and school history, particularly in relation to literacy in secondary history curriculum design.

Jim taught and mentored in a number of state secondary schools and sixth form colleges. He was also a part of the Ofsted History Subject Working Group which provided advice on the new inspection framework’s development and implementation. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association and acted as Associate Editor for the HA’s professional journal Teaching History.

Jim’s research interests focus on history curriculum design, particularly literacy in history education, the relationships between academic and school history, and the interplay between overview and depth in history curricula.

Publications

• Carroll, J. E. (2022). ‘Terms and conditions: using metaphor to highlight causal processes with Year 13‘. Teaching History, 187, pp.40-49.
• Carroll, J. E. (2021). ‘Retheorising national assessment of the narrative mode for historical causal explanation in England’. History Education Research Journal, 18 (2), pp.148–65.

• Carroll, J. E. (2020). ‘Whose genres? Establishing curricular goals for students’ historical writing in England’ Teaching History (HTANSW), 52 (2), pp. 17-20

• Carroll, J.E. (2019). ‘Epistemic explanations for divergent evolution in discourses regarding students’ extended historical writing in England’. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51 (1), pp.100-120
• Carroll, J. E. (2018). ‘Couching counterfactuals in knowledge when explaining the Salem witch trials with Year 13’. Teaching History, 172, pp.18-29
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From divergent evolution to witting cross-fertilisation: the need for more inter-discursive communication regarding students’ extended historical writing’. Curriculum Journal, 28 (4), pp.504-523
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From ‘double vision’ to panorama: using history of memory to bridge ‘event space’ when exploring interpretations of Nazi popularity with Year 13′. Teaching History, 168, pp.24-36
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘I feel if I say this in my essay it’s not going to be as strong’: multi-voicedness, ‘oral rehearsal’ and Year 13 students’ written arguments’. Teaching History, 167, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Grammar. Nazis. Does the grammatical ‘release the conceptual’? Teaching History, 163, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Exploring historical ‘frameworks’ as a curriculum goal: a case study examining students’ notions of historical significance when using millennia-wide time scales’. Curriculum Journal, 27 (4), pp.454-478
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘The whole point of the thing: how nominalisation might develop students’ written causal arguments’ Teaching History, 162, pp.16-24

 

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Jim obtained a BA in Modern History and a MA in European History from University College London, followed by a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Birkbeck College London. After this, he completed a PGCE in Secondary History and a MEd in Researching Practice at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded a PhD in Education from UCL. His doctoral research focused on the relationship between academic and school history, particularly in relation to literacy in secondary history curriculum design.

Jim taught and mentored in a number of state secondary schools and sixth form colleges. He was also a part of the Ofsted History Subject Working Group which provided advice on the new inspection framework’s development and implementation. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association and acted as Associate Editor for the HA’s professional journal Teaching History.

Jim’s research interests focus on history curriculum design, particularly literacy in history education, the relationships between academic and school history, and the interplay between overview and depth in history curricula.

Publications

• Carroll, J. E. (2022). ‘Terms and conditions: using metaphor to highlight causal processes with Year 13‘. Teaching History, 187, pp.40-49.
• Carroll, J. E. (2021). ‘Retheorising national assessment of the narrative mode for historical causal explanation in England’. History Education Research Journal, 18 (2), pp.148–65.

• Carroll, J. E. (2020). ‘Whose genres? Establishing curricular goals for students’ historical writing in England’ Teaching History (HTANSW), 52 (2), pp. 17-20

• Carroll, J.E. (2019). ‘Epistemic explanations for divergent evolution in discourses regarding students’ extended historical writing in England’. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51 (1), pp.100-120
• Carroll, J. E. (2018). ‘Couching counterfactuals in knowledge when explaining the Salem witch trials with Year 13’. Teaching History, 172, pp.18-29
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From divergent evolution to witting cross-fertilisation: the need for more inter-discursive communication regarding students’ extended historical writing’. Curriculum Journal, 28 (4), pp.504-523
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From ‘double vision’ to panorama: using history of memory to bridge ‘event space’ when exploring interpretations of Nazi popularity with Year 13′. Teaching History, 168, pp.24-36
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘I feel if I say this in my essay it’s not going to be as strong’: multi-voicedness, ‘oral rehearsal’ and Year 13 students’ written arguments’. Teaching History, 167, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Grammar. Nazis. Does the grammatical ‘release the conceptual’? Teaching History, 163, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Exploring historical ‘frameworks’ as a curriculum goal: a case study examining students’ notions of historical significance when using millennia-wide time scales’. Curriculum Journal, 27 (4), pp.454-478
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘The whole point of the thing: how nominalisation might develop students’ written causal arguments’ Teaching History, 162, pp.16-24

 

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Jim obtained a BA in Modern History and a MA in European History from University College London, followed by a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Birkbeck College London. After this, he completed a PGCE in Secondary History and a MEd in Researching Practice at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded a PhD in Education from UCL. His doctoral research focused on the relationship between academic and school history, particularly in relation to literacy in secondary history curriculum design.

Jim taught and mentored in a number of state secondary schools and sixth form colleges. He was also a part of the Ofsted History Subject Working Group which provided advice on the new inspection framework’s development and implementation. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association and acted as Associate Editor for the HA’s professional journal Teaching History.

Jim’s research interests focus on history curriculum design, particularly literacy in history education, the relationships between academic and school history, and the interplay between overview and depth in history curricula.

Publications

• Carroll, J. E. (2022). ‘Terms and conditions: using metaphor to highlight causal processes with Year 13‘. Teaching History, 187, pp.40-49.
• Carroll, J. E. (2021). ‘Retheorising national assessment of the narrative mode for historical causal explanation in England’. History Education Research Journal, 18 (2), pp.148–65.

• Carroll, J. E. (2020). ‘Whose genres? Establishing curricular goals for students’ historical writing in England’ Teaching History (HTANSW), 52 (2), pp. 17-20

• Carroll, J.E. (2019). ‘Epistemic explanations for divergent evolution in discourses regarding students’ extended historical writing in England’. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51 (1), pp.100-120
• Carroll, J. E. (2018). ‘Couching counterfactuals in knowledge when explaining the Salem witch trials with Year 13’. Teaching History, 172, pp.18-29
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From divergent evolution to witting cross-fertilisation: the need for more inter-discursive communication regarding students’ extended historical writing’. Curriculum Journal, 28 (4), pp.504-523
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From ‘double vision’ to panorama: using history of memory to bridge ‘event space’ when exploring interpretations of Nazi popularity with Year 13′. Teaching History, 168, pp.24-36
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘I feel if I say this in my essay it’s not going to be as strong’: multi-voicedness, ‘oral rehearsal’ and Year 13 students’ written arguments’. Teaching History, 167, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Grammar. Nazis. Does the grammatical ‘release the conceptual’? Teaching History, 163, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Exploring historical ‘frameworks’ as a curriculum goal: a case study examining students’ notions of historical significance when using millennia-wide time scales’. Curriculum Journal, 27 (4), pp.454-478
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘The whole point of the thing: how nominalisation might develop students’ written causal arguments’ Teaching History, 162, pp.16-24

 

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Jim obtained a BA in Modern History and a MA in European History from University College London, followed by a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Birkbeck College London. After this, he completed a PGCE in Secondary History and a MEd in Researching Practice at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded a PhD in Education from UCL. His doctoral research focused on the relationship between academic and school history, particularly in relation to literacy in secondary history curriculum design.

Jim taught and mentored in a number of state secondary schools and sixth form colleges. He was also a part of the Ofsted History Subject Working Group which provided advice on the new inspection framework’s development and implementation. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association and acted as Associate Editor for the HA’s professional journal Teaching History.

Jim’s research interests focus on history curriculum design, particularly literacy in history education, the relationships between academic and school history, and the interplay between overview and depth in history curricula.

Publications

• Carroll, J. E. (2022). ‘Terms and conditions: using metaphor to highlight causal processes with Year 13‘. Teaching History, 187, pp.40-49.
• Carroll, J. E. (2021). ‘Retheorising national assessment of the narrative mode for historical causal explanation in England’. History Education Research Journal, 18 (2), pp.148–65.

• Carroll, J. E. (2020). ‘Whose genres? Establishing curricular goals for students’ historical writing in England’ Teaching History (HTANSW), 52 (2), pp. 17-20

• Carroll, J.E. (2019). ‘Epistemic explanations for divergent evolution in discourses regarding students’ extended historical writing in England’. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51 (1), pp.100-120
• Carroll, J. E. (2018). ‘Couching counterfactuals in knowledge when explaining the Salem witch trials with Year 13’. Teaching History, 172, pp.18-29
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From divergent evolution to witting cross-fertilisation: the need for more inter-discursive communication regarding students’ extended historical writing’. Curriculum Journal, 28 (4), pp.504-523
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From ‘double vision’ to panorama: using history of memory to bridge ‘event space’ when exploring interpretations of Nazi popularity with Year 13′. Teaching History, 168, pp.24-36
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘I feel if I say this in my essay it’s not going to be as strong’: multi-voicedness, ‘oral rehearsal’ and Year 13 students’ written arguments’. Teaching History, 167, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Grammar. Nazis. Does the grammatical ‘release the conceptual’? Teaching History, 163, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Exploring historical ‘frameworks’ as a curriculum goal: a case study examining students’ notions of historical significance when using millennia-wide time scales’. Curriculum Journal, 27 (4), pp.454-478
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘The whole point of the thing: how nominalisation might develop students’ written causal arguments’ Teaching History, 162, pp.16-24

 

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Jim obtained a BA in Modern History and a MA in European History from University College London, followed by a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Birkbeck College London. After this, he completed a PGCE in Secondary History and a MEd in Researching Practice at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded a PhD in Education from UCL. His doctoral research focused on the relationship between academic and school history, particularly in relation to literacy in secondary history curriculum design.

Jim taught and mentored in a number of state secondary schools and sixth form colleges. He was also a part of the Ofsted History Subject Working Group which provided advice on the new inspection framework’s development and implementation. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association and acted as Associate Editor for the HA’s professional journal Teaching History.

Jim’s research interests focus on history curriculum design, particularly literacy in history education, the relationships between academic and school history, and the interplay between overview and depth in history curricula.

Publications

• Carroll, J. E. (2022). ‘Terms and conditions: using metaphor to highlight causal processes with Year 13‘. Teaching History, 187, pp.40-49.
• Carroll, J. E. (2021). ‘Retheorising national assessment of the narrative mode for historical causal explanation in England’. History Education Research Journal, 18 (2), pp.148–65.

• Carroll, J. E. (2020). ‘Whose genres? Establishing curricular goals for students’ historical writing in England’ Teaching History (HTANSW), 52 (2), pp. 17-20

• Carroll, J.E. (2019). ‘Epistemic explanations for divergent evolution in discourses regarding students’ extended historical writing in England’. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51 (1), pp.100-120
• Carroll, J. E. (2018). ‘Couching counterfactuals in knowledge when explaining the Salem witch trials with Year 13’. Teaching History, 172, pp.18-29
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From divergent evolution to witting cross-fertilisation: the need for more inter-discursive communication regarding students’ extended historical writing’. Curriculum Journal, 28 (4), pp.504-523
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From ‘double vision’ to panorama: using history of memory to bridge ‘event space’ when exploring interpretations of Nazi popularity with Year 13′. Teaching History, 168, pp.24-36
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘I feel if I say this in my essay it’s not going to be as strong’: multi-voicedness, ‘oral rehearsal’ and Year 13 students’ written arguments’. Teaching History, 167, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Grammar. Nazis. Does the grammatical ‘release the conceptual’? Teaching History, 163, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Exploring historical ‘frameworks’ as a curriculum goal: a case study examining students’ notions of historical significance when using millennia-wide time scales’. Curriculum Journal, 27 (4), pp.454-478
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘The whole point of the thing: how nominalisation might develop students’ written causal arguments’ Teaching History, 162, pp.16-24

 

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Jim obtained a BA in Modern History and a MA in European History from University College London, followed by a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Birkbeck College London. After this, he completed a PGCE in Secondary History and a MEd in Researching Practice at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded a PhD in Education from UCL. His doctoral research focused on the relationship between academic and school history, particularly in relation to literacy in secondary history curriculum design.

Jim taught and mentored in a number of state secondary schools and sixth form colleges. He was also a part of the Ofsted History Subject Working Group which provided advice on the new inspection framework’s development and implementation. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association and acted as Associate Editor for the HA’s professional journal Teaching History.

Jim’s research interests focus on history curriculum design, particularly literacy in history education, the relationships between academic and school history, and the interplay between overview and depth in history curricula.

Publications

• Carroll, J. E. (2022). ‘Terms and conditions: using metaphor to highlight causal processes with Year 13‘. Teaching History, 187, pp.40-49.
• Carroll, J. E. (2021). ‘Retheorising national assessment of the narrative mode for historical causal explanation in England’. History Education Research Journal, 18 (2), pp.148–65.

• Carroll, J. E. (2020). ‘Whose genres? Establishing curricular goals for students’ historical writing in England’ Teaching History (HTANSW), 52 (2), pp. 17-20

• Carroll, J.E. (2019). ‘Epistemic explanations for divergent evolution in discourses regarding students’ extended historical writing in England’. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51 (1), pp.100-120
• Carroll, J. E. (2018). ‘Couching counterfactuals in knowledge when explaining the Salem witch trials with Year 13’. Teaching History, 172, pp.18-29
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From divergent evolution to witting cross-fertilisation: the need for more inter-discursive communication regarding students’ extended historical writing’. Curriculum Journal, 28 (4), pp.504-523
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From ‘double vision’ to panorama: using history of memory to bridge ‘event space’ when exploring interpretations of Nazi popularity with Year 13′. Teaching History, 168, pp.24-36
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘I feel if I say this in my essay it’s not going to be as strong’: multi-voicedness, ‘oral rehearsal’ and Year 13 students’ written arguments’. Teaching History, 167, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Grammar. Nazis. Does the grammatical ‘release the conceptual’? Teaching History, 163, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Exploring historical ‘frameworks’ as a curriculum goal: a case study examining students’ notions of historical significance when using millennia-wide time scales’. Curriculum Journal, 27 (4), pp.454-478
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘The whole point of the thing: how nominalisation might develop students’ written causal arguments’ Teaching History, 162, pp.16-24

 

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Jim obtained a BA in Modern History and a MA in European History from University College London, followed by a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Birkbeck College London. After this, he completed a PGCE in Secondary History and a MEd in Researching Practice at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded a PhD in Education from UCL. His doctoral research focused on the relationship between academic and school history, particularly in relation to literacy in secondary history curriculum design.

Jim taught and mentored in a number of state secondary schools and sixth form colleges. He was also a part of the Ofsted History Subject Working Group which provided advice on the new inspection framework’s development and implementation. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association and acted as Associate Editor for the HA’s professional journal Teaching History.

Jim’s research interests focus on history curriculum design, particularly literacy in history education, the relationships between academic and school history, and the interplay between overview and depth in history curricula.

Publications

• Carroll, J. E. (2022). ‘Terms and conditions: using metaphor to highlight causal processes with Year 13‘. Teaching History, 187, pp.40-49.
• Carroll, J. E. (2021). ‘Retheorising national assessment of the narrative mode for historical causal explanation in England’. History Education Research Journal, 18 (2), pp.148–65.

• Carroll, J. E. (2020). ‘Whose genres? Establishing curricular goals for students’ historical writing in England’ Teaching History (HTANSW), 52 (2), pp. 17-20

• Carroll, J.E. (2019). ‘Epistemic explanations for divergent evolution in discourses regarding students’ extended historical writing in England’. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51 (1), pp.100-120
• Carroll, J. E. (2018). ‘Couching counterfactuals in knowledge when explaining the Salem witch trials with Year 13’. Teaching History, 172, pp.18-29
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From divergent evolution to witting cross-fertilisation: the need for more inter-discursive communication regarding students’ extended historical writing’. Curriculum Journal, 28 (4), pp.504-523
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From ‘double vision’ to panorama: using history of memory to bridge ‘event space’ when exploring interpretations of Nazi popularity with Year 13′. Teaching History, 168, pp.24-36
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘I feel if I say this in my essay it’s not going to be as strong’: multi-voicedness, ‘oral rehearsal’ and Year 13 students’ written arguments’. Teaching History, 167, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Grammar. Nazis. Does the grammatical ‘release the conceptual’? Teaching History, 163, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Exploring historical ‘frameworks’ as a curriculum goal: a case study examining students’ notions of historical significance when using millennia-wide time scales’. Curriculum Journal, 27 (4), pp.454-478
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘The whole point of the thing: how nominalisation might develop students’ written causal arguments’ Teaching History, 162, pp.16-24

 

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Jim obtained a BA in Modern History and a MA in European History from University College London, followed by a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Birkbeck College London. After this, he completed a PGCE in Secondary History and a MEd in Researching Practice at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded a PhD in Education from UCL. His doctoral research focused on the relationship between academic and school history, particularly in relation to literacy in secondary history curriculum design.

Jim taught and mentored in a number of state secondary schools and sixth form colleges. He was also a part of the Ofsted History Subject Working Group which provided advice on the new inspection framework’s development and implementation. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association and acted as Associate Editor for the HA’s professional journal Teaching History.

Jim’s research interests focus on history curriculum design, particularly literacy in history education, the relationships between academic and school history, and the interplay between overview and depth in history curricula.

Publications

• Carroll, J. E. (2022). ‘Terms and conditions: using metaphor to highlight causal processes with Year 13‘. Teaching History, 187, pp.40-49.
• Carroll, J. E. (2021). ‘Retheorising national assessment of the narrative mode for historical causal explanation in England’. History Education Research Journal, 18 (2), pp.148–65.

• Carroll, J. E. (2020). ‘Whose genres? Establishing curricular goals for students’ historical writing in England’ Teaching History (HTANSW), 52 (2), pp. 17-20

• Carroll, J.E. (2019). ‘Epistemic explanations for divergent evolution in discourses regarding students’ extended historical writing in England’. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51 (1), pp.100-120
• Carroll, J. E. (2018). ‘Couching counterfactuals in knowledge when explaining the Salem witch trials with Year 13’. Teaching History, 172, pp.18-29
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From divergent evolution to witting cross-fertilisation: the need for more inter-discursive communication regarding students’ extended historical writing’. Curriculum Journal, 28 (4), pp.504-523
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From ‘double vision’ to panorama: using history of memory to bridge ‘event space’ when exploring interpretations of Nazi popularity with Year 13′. Teaching History, 168, pp.24-36
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘I feel if I say this in my essay it’s not going to be as strong’: multi-voicedness, ‘oral rehearsal’ and Year 13 students’ written arguments’. Teaching History, 167, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Grammar. Nazis. Does the grammatical ‘release the conceptual’? Teaching History, 163, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Exploring historical ‘frameworks’ as a curriculum goal: a case study examining students’ notions of historical significance when using millennia-wide time scales’. Curriculum Journal, 27 (4), pp.454-478
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘The whole point of the thing: how nominalisation might develop students’ written causal arguments’ Teaching History, 162, pp.16-24

 

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Jim obtained a BA in Modern History and a MA in European History from University College London, followed by a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Birkbeck College London. After this, he completed a PGCE in Secondary History and a MEd in Researching Practice at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded a PhD in Education from UCL. His doctoral research focused on the relationship between academic and school history, particularly in relation to literacy in secondary history curriculum design.

Jim taught and mentored in a number of state secondary schools and sixth form colleges. He was also a part of the Ofsted History Subject Working Group which provided advice on the new inspection framework’s development and implementation. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association and acted as Associate Editor for the HA’s professional journal Teaching History.

Jim’s research interests focus on history curriculum design, particularly literacy in history education, the relationships between academic and school history, and the interplay between overview and depth in history curricula.

Publications

• Carroll, J. E. (2022). ‘Terms and conditions: using metaphor to highlight causal processes with Year 13‘. Teaching History, 187, pp.40-49.
• Carroll, J. E. (2021). ‘Retheorising national assessment of the narrative mode for historical causal explanation in England’. History Education Research Journal, 18 (2), pp.148–65.

• Carroll, J. E. (2020). ‘Whose genres? Establishing curricular goals for students’ historical writing in England’ Teaching History (HTANSW), 52 (2), pp. 17-20

• Carroll, J.E. (2019). ‘Epistemic explanations for divergent evolution in discourses regarding students’ extended historical writing in England’. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51 (1), pp.100-120
• Carroll, J. E. (2018). ‘Couching counterfactuals in knowledge when explaining the Salem witch trials with Year 13’. Teaching History, 172, pp.18-29
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From divergent evolution to witting cross-fertilisation: the need for more inter-discursive communication regarding students’ extended historical writing’. Curriculum Journal, 28 (4), pp.504-523
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From ‘double vision’ to panorama: using history of memory to bridge ‘event space’ when exploring interpretations of Nazi popularity with Year 13′. Teaching History, 168, pp.24-36
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘I feel if I say this in my essay it’s not going to be as strong’: multi-voicedness, ‘oral rehearsal’ and Year 13 students’ written arguments’. Teaching History, 167, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Grammar. Nazis. Does the grammatical ‘release the conceptual’? Teaching History, 163, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Exploring historical ‘frameworks’ as a curriculum goal: a case study examining students’ notions of historical significance when using millennia-wide time scales’. Curriculum Journal, 27 (4), pp.454-478
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘The whole point of the thing: how nominalisation might develop students’ written causal arguments’ Teaching History, 162, pp.16-24

 

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Jim obtained a BA in Modern History and a MA in European History from University College London, followed by a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Birkbeck College London. After this, he completed a PGCE in Secondary History and a MEd in Researching Practice at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded a PhD in Education from UCL. His doctoral research focused on the relationship between academic and school history, particularly in relation to literacy in secondary history curriculum design.

Jim taught and mentored in a number of state secondary schools and sixth form colleges. He was also a part of the Ofsted History Subject Working Group which provided advice on the new inspection framework’s development and implementation. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association and acted as Associate Editor for the HA’s professional journal Teaching History.

Jim’s research interests focus on history curriculum design, particularly literacy in history education, the relationships between academic and school history, and the interplay between overview and depth in history curricula.

Publications

• Carroll, J. E. (2022). ‘Terms and conditions: using metaphor to highlight causal processes with Year 13‘. Teaching History, 187, pp.40-49.
• Carroll, J. E. (2021). ‘Retheorising national assessment of the narrative mode for historical causal explanation in England’. History Education Research Journal, 18 (2), pp.148–65.

• Carroll, J. E. (2020). ‘Whose genres? Establishing curricular goals for students’ historical writing in England’ Teaching History (HTANSW), 52 (2), pp. 17-20

• Carroll, J.E. (2019). ‘Epistemic explanations for divergent evolution in discourses regarding students’ extended historical writing in England’. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51 (1), pp.100-120
• Carroll, J. E. (2018). ‘Couching counterfactuals in knowledge when explaining the Salem witch trials with Year 13’. Teaching History, 172, pp.18-29
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From divergent evolution to witting cross-fertilisation: the need for more inter-discursive communication regarding students’ extended historical writing’. Curriculum Journal, 28 (4), pp.504-523
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From ‘double vision’ to panorama: using history of memory to bridge ‘event space’ when exploring interpretations of Nazi popularity with Year 13′. Teaching History, 168, pp.24-36
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘I feel if I say this in my essay it’s not going to be as strong’: multi-voicedness, ‘oral rehearsal’ and Year 13 students’ written arguments’. Teaching History, 167, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Grammar. Nazis. Does the grammatical ‘release the conceptual’? Teaching History, 163, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Exploring historical ‘frameworks’ as a curriculum goal: a case study examining students’ notions of historical significance when using millennia-wide time scales’. Curriculum Journal, 27 (4), pp.454-478
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘The whole point of the thing: how nominalisation might develop students’ written causal arguments’ Teaching History, 162, pp.16-24

 

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Jim obtained a BA in Modern History and a MA in European History from University College London, followed by a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Birkbeck College London. After this, he completed a PGCE in Secondary History and a MEd in Researching Practice at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded a PhD in Education from UCL. His doctoral research focused on the relationship between academic and school history, particularly in relation to literacy in secondary history curriculum design.

Jim taught and mentored in a number of state secondary schools and sixth form colleges. He was also a part of the Ofsted History Subject Working Group which provided advice on the new inspection framework’s development and implementation. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association and acted as Associate Editor for the HA’s professional journal Teaching History.

Jim’s research interests focus on history curriculum design, particularly literacy in history education, the relationships between academic and school history, and the interplay between overview and depth in history curricula.

Publications

• Carroll, J. E. (2022). ‘Terms and conditions: using metaphor to highlight causal processes with Year 13‘. Teaching History, 187, pp.40-49.
• Carroll, J. E. (2021). ‘Retheorising national assessment of the narrative mode for historical causal explanation in England’. History Education Research Journal, 18 (2), pp.148–65.

• Carroll, J. E. (2020). ‘Whose genres? Establishing curricular goals for students’ historical writing in England’ Teaching History (HTANSW), 52 (2), pp. 17-20

• Carroll, J.E. (2019). ‘Epistemic explanations for divergent evolution in discourses regarding students’ extended historical writing in England’. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51 (1), pp.100-120
• Carroll, J. E. (2018). ‘Couching counterfactuals in knowledge when explaining the Salem witch trials with Year 13’. Teaching History, 172, pp.18-29
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From divergent evolution to witting cross-fertilisation: the need for more inter-discursive communication regarding students’ extended historical writing’. Curriculum Journal, 28 (4), pp.504-523
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From ‘double vision’ to panorama: using history of memory to bridge ‘event space’ when exploring interpretations of Nazi popularity with Year 13′. Teaching History, 168, pp.24-36
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘I feel if I say this in my essay it’s not going to be as strong’: multi-voicedness, ‘oral rehearsal’ and Year 13 students’ written arguments’. Teaching History, 167, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Grammar. Nazis. Does the grammatical ‘release the conceptual’? Teaching History, 163, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Exploring historical ‘frameworks’ as a curriculum goal: a case study examining students’ notions of historical significance when using millennia-wide time scales’. Curriculum Journal, 27 (4), pp.454-478
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘The whole point of the thing: how nominalisation might develop students’ written causal arguments’ Teaching History, 162, pp.16-24

 

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Jim obtained a BA in Modern History and a MA in European History from University College London, followed by a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Birkbeck College London. After this, he completed a PGCE in Secondary History and a MEd in Researching Practice at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded a PhD in Education from UCL. His doctoral research focused on the relationship between academic and school history, particularly in relation to literacy in secondary history curriculum design.

Jim taught and mentored in a number of state secondary schools and sixth form colleges. He was also a part of the Ofsted History Subject Working Group which provided advice on the new inspection framework’s development and implementation. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association and acted as Associate Editor for the HA’s professional journal Teaching History.

Jim’s research interests focus on history curriculum design, particularly literacy in history education, the relationships between academic and school history, and the interplay between overview and depth in history curricula.

Publications

• Carroll, J. E. (2022). ‘Terms and conditions: using metaphor to highlight causal processes with Year 13‘. Teaching History, 187, pp.40-49.
• Carroll, J. E. (2021). ‘Retheorising national assessment of the narrative mode for historical causal explanation in England’. History Education Research Journal, 18 (2), pp.148–65.

• Carroll, J. E. (2020). ‘Whose genres? Establishing curricular goals for students’ historical writing in England’ Teaching History (HTANSW), 52 (2), pp. 17-20

• Carroll, J.E. (2019). ‘Epistemic explanations for divergent evolution in discourses regarding students’ extended historical writing in England’. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51 (1), pp.100-120
• Carroll, J. E. (2018). ‘Couching counterfactuals in knowledge when explaining the Salem witch trials with Year 13’. Teaching History, 172, pp.18-29
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From divergent evolution to witting cross-fertilisation: the need for more inter-discursive communication regarding students’ extended historical writing’. Curriculum Journal, 28 (4), pp.504-523
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From ‘double vision’ to panorama: using history of memory to bridge ‘event space’ when exploring interpretations of Nazi popularity with Year 13′. Teaching History, 168, pp.24-36
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘I feel if I say this in my essay it’s not going to be as strong’: multi-voicedness, ‘oral rehearsal’ and Year 13 students’ written arguments’. Teaching History, 167, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Grammar. Nazis. Does the grammatical ‘release the conceptual’? Teaching History, 163, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Exploring historical ‘frameworks’ as a curriculum goal: a case study examining students’ notions of historical significance when using millennia-wide time scales’. Curriculum Journal, 27 (4), pp.454-478
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘The whole point of the thing: how nominalisation might develop students’ written causal arguments’ Teaching History, 162, pp.16-24

 

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Jim obtained a BA in Modern History and a MA in European History from University College London, followed by a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Birkbeck College London. After this, he completed a PGCE in Secondary History and a MEd in Researching Practice at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded a PhD in Education from UCL. His doctoral research focused on the relationship between academic and school history, particularly in relation to literacy in secondary history curriculum design.

Jim taught and mentored in a number of state secondary schools and sixth form colleges. He was also a part of the Ofsted History Subject Working Group which provided advice on the new inspection framework’s development and implementation. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association and acted as Associate Editor for the HA’s professional journal Teaching History.

Jim’s research interests focus on history curriculum design, particularly literacy in history education, the relationships between academic and school history, and the interplay between overview and depth in history curricula.

Publications

• Carroll, J. E. (2022). ‘Terms and conditions: using metaphor to highlight causal processes with Year 13‘. Teaching History, 187, pp.40-49.
• Carroll, J. E. (2021). ‘Retheorising national assessment of the narrative mode for historical causal explanation in England’. History Education Research Journal, 18 (2), pp.148–65.

• Carroll, J. E. (2020). ‘Whose genres? Establishing curricular goals for students’ historical writing in England’ Teaching History (HTANSW), 52 (2), pp. 17-20

• Carroll, J.E. (2019). ‘Epistemic explanations for divergent evolution in discourses regarding students’ extended historical writing in England’. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51 (1), pp.100-120
• Carroll, J. E. (2018). ‘Couching counterfactuals in knowledge when explaining the Salem witch trials with Year 13’. Teaching History, 172, pp.18-29
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From divergent evolution to witting cross-fertilisation: the need for more inter-discursive communication regarding students’ extended historical writing’. Curriculum Journal, 28 (4), pp.504-523
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From ‘double vision’ to panorama: using history of memory to bridge ‘event space’ when exploring interpretations of Nazi popularity with Year 13′. Teaching History, 168, pp.24-36
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘I feel if I say this in my essay it’s not going to be as strong’: multi-voicedness, ‘oral rehearsal’ and Year 13 students’ written arguments’. Teaching History, 167, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Grammar. Nazis. Does the grammatical ‘release the conceptual’? Teaching History, 163, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Exploring historical ‘frameworks’ as a curriculum goal: a case study examining students’ notions of historical significance when using millennia-wide time scales’. Curriculum Journal, 27 (4), pp.454-478
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘The whole point of the thing: how nominalisation might develop students’ written causal arguments’ Teaching History, 162, pp.16-24

 

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Jim obtained a BA in Modern History and a MA in European History from University College London, followed by a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Birkbeck College London. After this, he completed a PGCE in Secondary History and a MEd in Researching Practice at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded a PhD in Education from UCL. His doctoral research focused on the relationship between academic and school history, particularly in relation to literacy in secondary history curriculum design.

Jim taught and mentored in a number of state secondary schools and sixth form colleges. He was also a part of the Ofsted History Subject Working Group which provided advice on the new inspection framework’s development and implementation. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association and acted as Associate Editor for the HA’s professional journal Teaching History.

Jim’s research interests focus on history curriculum design, particularly literacy in history education, the relationships between academic and school history, and the interplay between overview and depth in history curricula.

Publications

• Carroll, J. E. (2022). ‘Terms and conditions: using metaphor to highlight causal processes with Year 13‘. Teaching History, 187, pp.40-49.
• Carroll, J. E. (2021). ‘Retheorising national assessment of the narrative mode for historical causal explanation in England’. History Education Research Journal, 18 (2), pp.148–65.

• Carroll, J. E. (2020). ‘Whose genres? Establishing curricular goals for students’ historical writing in England’ Teaching History (HTANSW), 52 (2), pp. 17-20

• Carroll, J.E. (2019). ‘Epistemic explanations for divergent evolution in discourses regarding students’ extended historical writing in England’. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51 (1), pp.100-120
• Carroll, J. E. (2018). ‘Couching counterfactuals in knowledge when explaining the Salem witch trials with Year 13’. Teaching History, 172, pp.18-29
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From divergent evolution to witting cross-fertilisation: the need for more inter-discursive communication regarding students’ extended historical writing’. Curriculum Journal, 28 (4), pp.504-523
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From ‘double vision’ to panorama: using history of memory to bridge ‘event space’ when exploring interpretations of Nazi popularity with Year 13′. Teaching History, 168, pp.24-36
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘I feel if I say this in my essay it’s not going to be as strong’: multi-voicedness, ‘oral rehearsal’ and Year 13 students’ written arguments’. Teaching History, 167, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Grammar. Nazis. Does the grammatical ‘release the conceptual’? Teaching History, 163, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Exploring historical ‘frameworks’ as a curriculum goal: a case study examining students’ notions of historical significance when using millennia-wide time scales’. Curriculum Journal, 27 (4), pp.454-478
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘The whole point of the thing: how nominalisation might develop students’ written causal arguments’ Teaching History, 162, pp.16-24

 

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Jim obtained a BA in Modern History and a MA in European History from University College London, followed by a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Birkbeck College London. After this, he completed a PGCE in Secondary History and a MEd in Researching Practice at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded a PhD in Education from UCL. His doctoral research focused on the relationship between academic and school history, particularly in relation to literacy in secondary history curriculum design.

Jim taught and mentored in a number of state secondary schools and sixth form colleges. He was also a part of the Ofsted History Subject Working Group which provided advice on the new inspection framework’s development and implementation. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association and acted as Associate Editor for the HA’s professional journal Teaching History.

Jim’s research interests focus on history curriculum design, particularly literacy in history education, the relationships between academic and school history, and the interplay between overview and depth in history curricula.

Publications

• Carroll, J. E. (2022). ‘Terms and conditions: using metaphor to highlight causal processes with Year 13‘. Teaching History, 187, pp.40-49.
• Carroll, J. E. (2021). ‘Retheorising national assessment of the narrative mode for historical causal explanation in England’. History Education Research Journal, 18 (2), pp.148–65.

• Carroll, J. E. (2020). ‘Whose genres? Establishing curricular goals for students’ historical writing in England’ Teaching History (HTANSW), 52 (2), pp. 17-20

• Carroll, J.E. (2019). ‘Epistemic explanations for divergent evolution in discourses regarding students’ extended historical writing in England’. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51 (1), pp.100-120
• Carroll, J. E. (2018). ‘Couching counterfactuals in knowledge when explaining the Salem witch trials with Year 13’. Teaching History, 172, pp.18-29
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From divergent evolution to witting cross-fertilisation: the need for more inter-discursive communication regarding students’ extended historical writing’. Curriculum Journal, 28 (4), pp.504-523
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From ‘double vision’ to panorama: using history of memory to bridge ‘event space’ when exploring interpretations of Nazi popularity with Year 13′. Teaching History, 168, pp.24-36
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘I feel if I say this in my essay it’s not going to be as strong’: multi-voicedness, ‘oral rehearsal’ and Year 13 students’ written arguments’. Teaching History, 167, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Grammar. Nazis. Does the grammatical ‘release the conceptual’? Teaching History, 163, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Exploring historical ‘frameworks’ as a curriculum goal: a case study examining students’ notions of historical significance when using millennia-wide time scales’. Curriculum Journal, 27 (4), pp.454-478
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘The whole point of the thing: how nominalisation might develop students’ written causal arguments’ Teaching History, 162, pp.16-24

 

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Jim obtained a BA in Modern History and a MA in European History from University College London, followed by a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Birkbeck College London. After this, he completed a PGCE in Secondary History and a MEd in Researching Practice at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded a PhD in Education from UCL. His doctoral research focused on the relationship between academic and school history, particularly in relation to literacy in secondary history curriculum design.

Jim taught and mentored in a number of state secondary schools and sixth form colleges. He was also a part of the Ofsted History Subject Working Group which provided advice on the new inspection framework’s development and implementation. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association and acted as Associate Editor for the HA’s professional journal Teaching History.

Jim’s research interests focus on history curriculum design, particularly literacy in history education, the relationships between academic and school history, and the interplay between overview and depth in history curricula.

Publications

• Carroll, J. E. (2022). ‘Terms and conditions: using metaphor to highlight causal processes with Year 13‘. Teaching History, 187, pp.40-49.
• Carroll, J. E. (2021). ‘Retheorising national assessment of the narrative mode for historical causal explanation in England’. History Education Research Journal, 18 (2), pp.148–65.

• Carroll, J. E. (2020). ‘Whose genres? Establishing curricular goals for students’ historical writing in England’ Teaching History (HTANSW), 52 (2), pp. 17-20

• Carroll, J.E. (2019). ‘Epistemic explanations for divergent evolution in discourses regarding students’ extended historical writing in England’. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51 (1), pp.100-120
• Carroll, J. E. (2018). ‘Couching counterfactuals in knowledge when explaining the Salem witch trials with Year 13’. Teaching History, 172, pp.18-29
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From divergent evolution to witting cross-fertilisation: the need for more inter-discursive communication regarding students’ extended historical writing’. Curriculum Journal, 28 (4), pp.504-523
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From ‘double vision’ to panorama: using history of memory to bridge ‘event space’ when exploring interpretations of Nazi popularity with Year 13′. Teaching History, 168, pp.24-36
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘I feel if I say this in my essay it’s not going to be as strong’: multi-voicedness, ‘oral rehearsal’ and Year 13 students’ written arguments’. Teaching History, 167, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Grammar. Nazis. Does the grammatical ‘release the conceptual’? Teaching History, 163, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Exploring historical ‘frameworks’ as a curriculum goal: a case study examining students’ notions of historical significance when using millennia-wide time scales’. Curriculum Journal, 27 (4), pp.454-478
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘The whole point of the thing: how nominalisation might develop students’ written causal arguments’ Teaching History, 162, pp.16-24

 

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Jim obtained a BA in Modern History and a MA in European History from University College London, followed by a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Birkbeck College London. After this, he completed a PGCE in Secondary History and a MEd in Researching Practice at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded a PhD in Education from UCL. His doctoral research focused on the relationship between academic and school history, particularly in relation to literacy in secondary history curriculum design.

Jim taught and mentored in a number of state secondary schools and sixth form colleges. He was also a part of the Ofsted History Subject Working Group which provided advice on the new inspection framework’s development and implementation. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association and acted as Associate Editor for the HA’s professional journal Teaching History.

Jim’s research interests focus on history curriculum design, particularly literacy in history education, the relationships between academic and school history, and the interplay between overview and depth in history curricula.

Publications

• Carroll, J. E. (2022). ‘Terms and conditions: using metaphor to highlight causal processes with Year 13‘. Teaching History, 187, pp.40-49.
• Carroll, J. E. (2021). ‘Retheorising national assessment of the narrative mode for historical causal explanation in England’. History Education Research Journal, 18 (2), pp.148–65.

• Carroll, J. E. (2020). ‘Whose genres? Establishing curricular goals for students’ historical writing in England’ Teaching History (HTANSW), 52 (2), pp. 17-20

• Carroll, J.E. (2019). ‘Epistemic explanations for divergent evolution in discourses regarding students’ extended historical writing in England’. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51 (1), pp.100-120
• Carroll, J. E. (2018). ‘Couching counterfactuals in knowledge when explaining the Salem witch trials with Year 13’. Teaching History, 172, pp.18-29
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From divergent evolution to witting cross-fertilisation: the need for more inter-discursive communication regarding students’ extended historical writing’. Curriculum Journal, 28 (4), pp.504-523
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From ‘double vision’ to panorama: using history of memory to bridge ‘event space’ when exploring interpretations of Nazi popularity with Year 13′. Teaching History, 168, pp.24-36
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘I feel if I say this in my essay it’s not going to be as strong’: multi-voicedness, ‘oral rehearsal’ and Year 13 students’ written arguments’. Teaching History, 167, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Grammar. Nazis. Does the grammatical ‘release the conceptual’? Teaching History, 163, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Exploring historical ‘frameworks’ as a curriculum goal: a case study examining students’ notions of historical significance when using millennia-wide time scales’. Curriculum Journal, 27 (4), pp.454-478
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘The whole point of the thing: how nominalisation might develop students’ written causal arguments’ Teaching History, 162, pp.16-24

 

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Jim obtained a BA in Modern History and a MA in European History from University College London, followed by a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Birkbeck College London. After this, he completed a PGCE in Secondary History and a MEd in Researching Practice at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded a PhD in Education from UCL. His doctoral research focused on the relationship between academic and school history, particularly in relation to literacy in secondary history curriculum design.

Jim taught and mentored in a number of state secondary schools and sixth form colleges. He was also a part of the Ofsted History Subject Working Group which provided advice on the new inspection framework’s development and implementation. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association and acted as Associate Editor for the HA’s professional journal Teaching History.

Jim’s research interests focus on history curriculum design, particularly literacy in history education, the relationships between academic and school history, and the interplay between overview and depth in history curricula.

Publications

• Carroll, J. E. (2022). ‘Terms and conditions: using metaphor to highlight causal processes with Year 13‘. Teaching History, 187, pp.40-49.
• Carroll, J. E. (2021). ‘Retheorising national assessment of the narrative mode for historical causal explanation in England’. History Education Research Journal, 18 (2), pp.148–65.

• Carroll, J. E. (2020). ‘Whose genres? Establishing curricular goals for students’ historical writing in England’ Teaching History (HTANSW), 52 (2), pp. 17-20

• Carroll, J.E. (2019). ‘Epistemic explanations for divergent evolution in discourses regarding students’ extended historical writing in England’. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51 (1), pp.100-120
• Carroll, J. E. (2018). ‘Couching counterfactuals in knowledge when explaining the Salem witch trials with Year 13’. Teaching History, 172, pp.18-29
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From divergent evolution to witting cross-fertilisation: the need for more inter-discursive communication regarding students’ extended historical writing’. Curriculum Journal, 28 (4), pp.504-523
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From ‘double vision’ to panorama: using history of memory to bridge ‘event space’ when exploring interpretations of Nazi popularity with Year 13′. Teaching History, 168, pp.24-36
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘I feel if I say this in my essay it’s not going to be as strong’: multi-voicedness, ‘oral rehearsal’ and Year 13 students’ written arguments’. Teaching History, 167, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Grammar. Nazis. Does the grammatical ‘release the conceptual’? Teaching History, 163, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Exploring historical ‘frameworks’ as a curriculum goal: a case study examining students’ notions of historical significance when using millennia-wide time scales’. Curriculum Journal, 27 (4), pp.454-478
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘The whole point of the thing: how nominalisation might develop students’ written causal arguments’ Teaching History, 162, pp.16-24

 

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Jim obtained a BA in Modern History and a MA in European History from University College London, followed by a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Birkbeck College London. After this, he completed a PGCE in Secondary History and a MEd in Researching Practice at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded a PhD in Education from UCL. His doctoral research focused on the relationship between academic and school history, particularly in relation to literacy in secondary history curriculum design.

Jim taught and mentored in a number of state secondary schools and sixth form colleges. He was also a part of the Ofsted History Subject Working Group which provided advice on the new inspection framework’s development and implementation. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association and acted as Associate Editor for the HA’s professional journal Teaching History.

Jim’s research interests focus on history curriculum design, particularly literacy in history education, the relationships between academic and school history, and the interplay between overview and depth in history curricula.

Publications

• Carroll, J. E. (2022). ‘Terms and conditions: using metaphor to highlight causal processes with Year 13‘. Teaching History, 187, pp.40-49.
• Carroll, J. E. (2021). ‘Retheorising national assessment of the narrative mode for historical causal explanation in England’. History Education Research Journal, 18 (2), pp.148–65.

• Carroll, J. E. (2020). ‘Whose genres? Establishing curricular goals for students’ historical writing in England’ Teaching History (HTANSW), 52 (2), pp. 17-20

• Carroll, J.E. (2019). ‘Epistemic explanations for divergent evolution in discourses regarding students’ extended historical writing in England’. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51 (1), pp.100-120
• Carroll, J. E. (2018). ‘Couching counterfactuals in knowledge when explaining the Salem witch trials with Year 13’. Teaching History, 172, pp.18-29
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From divergent evolution to witting cross-fertilisation: the need for more inter-discursive communication regarding students’ extended historical writing’. Curriculum Journal, 28 (4), pp.504-523
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From ‘double vision’ to panorama: using history of memory to bridge ‘event space’ when exploring interpretations of Nazi popularity with Year 13′. Teaching History, 168, pp.24-36
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘I feel if I say this in my essay it’s not going to be as strong’: multi-voicedness, ‘oral rehearsal’ and Year 13 students’ written arguments’. Teaching History, 167, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Grammar. Nazis. Does the grammatical ‘release the conceptual’? Teaching History, 163, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Exploring historical ‘frameworks’ as a curriculum goal: a case study examining students’ notions of historical significance when using millennia-wide time scales’. Curriculum Journal, 27 (4), pp.454-478
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘The whole point of the thing: how nominalisation might develop students’ written causal arguments’ Teaching History, 162, pp.16-24

 

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Jim obtained a BA in Modern History and a MA in European History from University College London, followed by a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Birkbeck College London. After this, he completed a PGCE in Secondary History and a MEd in Researching Practice at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded a PhD in Education from UCL. His doctoral research focused on the relationship between academic and school history, particularly in relation to literacy in secondary history curriculum design.

Jim taught and mentored in a number of state secondary schools and sixth form colleges. He was also a part of the Ofsted History Subject Working Group which provided advice on the new inspection framework’s development and implementation. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association and acted as Associate Editor for the HA’s professional journal Teaching History.

Jim’s research interests focus on history curriculum design, particularly literacy in history education, the relationships between academic and school history, and the interplay between overview and depth in history curricula.

Publications

• Carroll, J. E. (2022). ‘Terms and conditions: using metaphor to highlight causal processes with Year 13‘. Teaching History, 187, pp.40-49.
• Carroll, J. E. (2021). ‘Retheorising national assessment of the narrative mode for historical causal explanation in England’. History Education Research Journal, 18 (2), pp.148–65.

• Carroll, J. E. (2020). ‘Whose genres? Establishing curricular goals for students’ historical writing in England’ Teaching History (HTANSW), 52 (2), pp. 17-20

• Carroll, J.E. (2019). ‘Epistemic explanations for divergent evolution in discourses regarding students’ extended historical writing in England’. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51 (1), pp.100-120
• Carroll, J. E. (2018). ‘Couching counterfactuals in knowledge when explaining the Salem witch trials with Year 13’. Teaching History, 172, pp.18-29
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From divergent evolution to witting cross-fertilisation: the need for more inter-discursive communication regarding students’ extended historical writing’. Curriculum Journal, 28 (4), pp.504-523
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From ‘double vision’ to panorama: using history of memory to bridge ‘event space’ when exploring interpretations of Nazi popularity with Year 13′. Teaching History, 168, pp.24-36
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘I feel if I say this in my essay it’s not going to be as strong’: multi-voicedness, ‘oral rehearsal’ and Year 13 students’ written arguments’. Teaching History, 167, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Grammar. Nazis. Does the grammatical ‘release the conceptual’? Teaching History, 163, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Exploring historical ‘frameworks’ as a curriculum goal: a case study examining students’ notions of historical significance when using millennia-wide time scales’. Curriculum Journal, 27 (4), pp.454-478
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘The whole point of the thing: how nominalisation might develop students’ written causal arguments’ Teaching History, 162, pp.16-24

 

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Jim obtained a BA in Modern History and a MA in European History from University College London, followed by a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Birkbeck College London. After this, he completed a PGCE in Secondary History and a MEd in Researching Practice at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded a PhD in Education from UCL. His doctoral research focused on the relationship between academic and school history, particularly in relation to literacy in secondary history curriculum design.

Jim taught and mentored in a number of state secondary schools and sixth form colleges. He was also a part of the Ofsted History Subject Working Group which provided advice on the new inspection framework’s development and implementation. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association and acted as Associate Editor for the HA’s professional journal Teaching History.

Jim’s research interests focus on history curriculum design, particularly literacy in history education, the relationships between academic and school history, and the interplay between overview and depth in history curricula.

Publications

• Carroll, J. E. (2022). ‘Terms and conditions: using metaphor to highlight causal processes with Year 13‘. Teaching History, 187, pp.40-49.
• Carroll, J. E. (2021). ‘Retheorising national assessment of the narrative mode for historical causal explanation in England’. History Education Research Journal, 18 (2), pp.148–65.

• Carroll, J. E. (2020). ‘Whose genres? Establishing curricular goals for students’ historical writing in England’ Teaching History (HTANSW), 52 (2), pp. 17-20

• Carroll, J.E. (2019). ‘Epistemic explanations for divergent evolution in discourses regarding students’ extended historical writing in England’. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51 (1), pp.100-120
• Carroll, J. E. (2018). ‘Couching counterfactuals in knowledge when explaining the Salem witch trials with Year 13’. Teaching History, 172, pp.18-29
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From divergent evolution to witting cross-fertilisation: the need for more inter-discursive communication regarding students’ extended historical writing’. Curriculum Journal, 28 (4), pp.504-523
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From ‘double vision’ to panorama: using history of memory to bridge ‘event space’ when exploring interpretations of Nazi popularity with Year 13′. Teaching History, 168, pp.24-36
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘I feel if I say this in my essay it’s not going to be as strong’: multi-voicedness, ‘oral rehearsal’ and Year 13 students’ written arguments’. Teaching History, 167, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Grammar. Nazis. Does the grammatical ‘release the conceptual’? Teaching History, 163, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Exploring historical ‘frameworks’ as a curriculum goal: a case study examining students’ notions of historical significance when using millennia-wide time scales’. Curriculum Journal, 27 (4), pp.454-478
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘The whole point of the thing: how nominalisation might develop students’ written causal arguments’ Teaching History, 162, pp.16-24

 

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Jim obtained a BA in Modern History and a MA in European History from University College London, followed by a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Birkbeck College London. After this, he completed a PGCE in Secondary History and a MEd in Researching Practice at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded a PhD in Education from UCL. His doctoral research focused on the relationship between academic and school history, particularly in relation to literacy in secondary history curriculum design.

Jim taught and mentored in a number of state secondary schools and sixth form colleges. He was also a part of the Ofsted History Subject Working Group which provided advice on the new inspection framework’s development and implementation. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association and acted as Associate Editor for the HA’s professional journal Teaching History.

Jim’s research interests focus on history curriculum design, particularly literacy in history education, the relationships between academic and school history, and the interplay between overview and depth in history curricula.

Publications

• Carroll, J. E. (2022). ‘Terms and conditions: using metaphor to highlight causal processes with Year 13‘. Teaching History, 187, pp.40-49.
• Carroll, J. E. (2021). ‘Retheorising national assessment of the narrative mode for historical causal explanation in England’. History Education Research Journal, 18 (2), pp.148–65.

• Carroll, J. E. (2020). ‘Whose genres? Establishing curricular goals for students’ historical writing in England’ Teaching History (HTANSW), 52 (2), pp. 17-20

• Carroll, J.E. (2019). ‘Epistemic explanations for divergent evolution in discourses regarding students’ extended historical writing in England’. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51 (1), pp.100-120
• Carroll, J. E. (2018). ‘Couching counterfactuals in knowledge when explaining the Salem witch trials with Year 13’. Teaching History, 172, pp.18-29
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From divergent evolution to witting cross-fertilisation: the need for more inter-discursive communication regarding students’ extended historical writing’. Curriculum Journal, 28 (4), pp.504-523
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From ‘double vision’ to panorama: using history of memory to bridge ‘event space’ when exploring interpretations of Nazi popularity with Year 13′. Teaching History, 168, pp.24-36
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘I feel if I say this in my essay it’s not going to be as strong’: multi-voicedness, ‘oral rehearsal’ and Year 13 students’ written arguments’. Teaching History, 167, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Grammar. Nazis. Does the grammatical ‘release the conceptual’? Teaching History, 163, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Exploring historical ‘frameworks’ as a curriculum goal: a case study examining students’ notions of historical significance when using millennia-wide time scales’. Curriculum Journal, 27 (4), pp.454-478
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘The whole point of the thing: how nominalisation might develop students’ written causal arguments’ Teaching History, 162, pp.16-24

 

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Jim obtained a BA in Modern History and a MA in European History from University College London, followed by a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Birkbeck College London. After this, he completed a PGCE in Secondary History and a MEd in Researching Practice at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded a PhD in Education from UCL. His doctoral research focused on the relationship between academic and school history, particularly in relation to literacy in secondary history curriculum design.

Jim taught and mentored in a number of state secondary schools and sixth form colleges. He was also a part of the Ofsted History Subject Working Group which provided advice on the new inspection framework’s development and implementation. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association and acted as Associate Editor for the HA’s professional journal Teaching History.

Jim’s research interests focus on history curriculum design, particularly literacy in history education, the relationships between academic and school history, and the interplay between overview and depth in history curricula.

Publications

• Carroll, J. E. (2022). ‘Terms and conditions: using metaphor to highlight causal processes with Year 13‘. Teaching History, 187, pp.40-49.
• Carroll, J. E. (2021). ‘Retheorising national assessment of the narrative mode for historical causal explanation in England’. History Education Research Journal, 18 (2), pp.148–65.

• Carroll, J. E. (2020). ‘Whose genres? Establishing curricular goals for students’ historical writing in England’ Teaching History (HTANSW), 52 (2), pp. 17-20

• Carroll, J.E. (2019). ‘Epistemic explanations for divergent evolution in discourses regarding students’ extended historical writing in England’. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51 (1), pp.100-120
• Carroll, J. E. (2018). ‘Couching counterfactuals in knowledge when explaining the Salem witch trials with Year 13’. Teaching History, 172, pp.18-29
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From divergent evolution to witting cross-fertilisation: the need for more inter-discursive communication regarding students’ extended historical writing’. Curriculum Journal, 28 (4), pp.504-523
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From ‘double vision’ to panorama: using history of memory to bridge ‘event space’ when exploring interpretations of Nazi popularity with Year 13′. Teaching History, 168, pp.24-36
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘I feel if I say this in my essay it’s not going to be as strong’: multi-voicedness, ‘oral rehearsal’ and Year 13 students’ written arguments’. Teaching History, 167, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Grammar. Nazis. Does the grammatical ‘release the conceptual’? Teaching History, 163, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Exploring historical ‘frameworks’ as a curriculum goal: a case study examining students’ notions of historical significance when using millennia-wide time scales’. Curriculum Journal, 27 (4), pp.454-478
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘The whole point of the thing: how nominalisation might develop students’ written causal arguments’ Teaching History, 162, pp.16-24

 

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Jim obtained a BA in Modern History and a MA in European History from University College London, followed by a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Birkbeck College London. After this, he completed a PGCE in Secondary History and a MEd in Researching Practice at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded a PhD in Education from UCL. His doctoral research focused on the relationship between academic and school history, particularly in relation to literacy in secondary history curriculum design.

Jim taught and mentored in a number of state secondary schools and sixth form colleges. He was also a part of the Ofsted History Subject Working Group which provided advice on the new inspection framework’s development and implementation. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association and acted as Associate Editor for the HA’s professional journal Teaching History.

Jim’s research interests focus on history curriculum design, particularly literacy in history education, the relationships between academic and school history, and the interplay between overview and depth in history curricula.

Publications

• Carroll, J. E. (2022). ‘Terms and conditions: using metaphor to highlight causal processes with Year 13‘. Teaching History, 187, pp.40-49.
• Carroll, J. E. (2021). ‘Retheorising national assessment of the narrative mode for historical causal explanation in England’. History Education Research Journal, 18 (2), pp.148–65.

• Carroll, J. E. (2020). ‘Whose genres? Establishing curricular goals for students’ historical writing in England’ Teaching History (HTANSW), 52 (2), pp. 17-20

• Carroll, J.E. (2019). ‘Epistemic explanations for divergent evolution in discourses regarding students’ extended historical writing in England’. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51 (1), pp.100-120
• Carroll, J. E. (2018). ‘Couching counterfactuals in knowledge when explaining the Salem witch trials with Year 13’. Teaching History, 172, pp.18-29
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From divergent evolution to witting cross-fertilisation: the need for more inter-discursive communication regarding students’ extended historical writing’. Curriculum Journal, 28 (4), pp.504-523
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From ‘double vision’ to panorama: using history of memory to bridge ‘event space’ when exploring interpretations of Nazi popularity with Year 13′. Teaching History, 168, pp.24-36
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘I feel if I say this in my essay it’s not going to be as strong’: multi-voicedness, ‘oral rehearsal’ and Year 13 students’ written arguments’. Teaching History, 167, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Grammar. Nazis. Does the grammatical ‘release the conceptual’? Teaching History, 163, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Exploring historical ‘frameworks’ as a curriculum goal: a case study examining students’ notions of historical significance when using millennia-wide time scales’. Curriculum Journal, 27 (4), pp.454-478
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘The whole point of the thing: how nominalisation might develop students’ written causal arguments’ Teaching History, 162, pp.16-24

 

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Jim obtained a BA in Modern History and a MA in European History from University College London, followed by a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Birkbeck College London. After this, he completed a PGCE in Secondary History and a MEd in Researching Practice at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded a PhD in Education from UCL. His doctoral research focused on the relationship between academic and school history, particularly in relation to literacy in secondary history curriculum design.

Jim taught and mentored in a number of state secondary schools and sixth form colleges. He was also a part of the Ofsted History Subject Working Group which provided advice on the new inspection framework’s development and implementation. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association and acted as Associate Editor for the HA’s professional journal Teaching History.

Jim’s research interests focus on history curriculum design, particularly literacy in history education, the relationships between academic and school history, and the interplay between overview and depth in history curricula.

Publications

• Carroll, J. E. (2022). ‘Terms and conditions: using metaphor to highlight causal processes with Year 13‘. Teaching History, 187, pp.40-49.
• Carroll, J. E. (2021). ‘Retheorising national assessment of the narrative mode for historical causal explanation in England’. History Education Research Journal, 18 (2), pp.148–65.

• Carroll, J. E. (2020). ‘Whose genres? Establishing curricular goals for students’ historical writing in England’ Teaching History (HTANSW), 52 (2), pp. 17-20

• Carroll, J.E. (2019). ‘Epistemic explanations for divergent evolution in discourses regarding students’ extended historical writing in England’. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51 (1), pp.100-120
• Carroll, J. E. (2018). ‘Couching counterfactuals in knowledge when explaining the Salem witch trials with Year 13’. Teaching History, 172, pp.18-29
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From divergent evolution to witting cross-fertilisation: the need for more inter-discursive communication regarding students’ extended historical writing’. Curriculum Journal, 28 (4), pp.504-523
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From ‘double vision’ to panorama: using history of memory to bridge ‘event space’ when exploring interpretations of Nazi popularity with Year 13′. Teaching History, 168, pp.24-36
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘I feel if I say this in my essay it’s not going to be as strong’: multi-voicedness, ‘oral rehearsal’ and Year 13 students’ written arguments’. Teaching History, 167, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Grammar. Nazis. Does the grammatical ‘release the conceptual’? Teaching History, 163, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Exploring historical ‘frameworks’ as a curriculum goal: a case study examining students’ notions of historical significance when using millennia-wide time scales’. Curriculum Journal, 27 (4), pp.454-478
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘The whole point of the thing: how nominalisation might develop students’ written causal arguments’ Teaching History, 162, pp.16-24

 

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Jim obtained a BA in Modern History and a MA in European History from University College London, followed by a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Birkbeck College London. After this, he completed a PGCE in Secondary History and a MEd in Researching Practice at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded a PhD in Education from UCL. His doctoral research focused on the relationship between academic and school history, particularly in relation to literacy in secondary history curriculum design.

Jim taught and mentored in a number of state secondary schools and sixth form colleges. He was also a part of the Ofsted History Subject Working Group which provided advice on the new inspection framework’s development and implementation. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association and acted as Associate Editor for the HA’s professional journal Teaching History.

Jim’s research interests focus on history curriculum design, particularly literacy in history education, the relationships between academic and school history, and the interplay between overview and depth in history curricula.

Publications

• Carroll, J. E. (2022). ‘Terms and conditions: using metaphor to highlight causal processes with Year 13‘. Teaching History, 187, pp.40-49.
• Carroll, J. E. (2021). ‘Retheorising national assessment of the narrative mode for historical causal explanation in England’. History Education Research Journal, 18 (2), pp.148–65.

• Carroll, J. E. (2020). ‘Whose genres? Establishing curricular goals for students’ historical writing in England’ Teaching History (HTANSW), 52 (2), pp. 17-20

• Carroll, J.E. (2019). ‘Epistemic explanations for divergent evolution in discourses regarding students’ extended historical writing in England’. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51 (1), pp.100-120
• Carroll, J. E. (2018). ‘Couching counterfactuals in knowledge when explaining the Salem witch trials with Year 13’. Teaching History, 172, pp.18-29
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From divergent evolution to witting cross-fertilisation: the need for more inter-discursive communication regarding students’ extended historical writing’. Curriculum Journal, 28 (4), pp.504-523
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From ‘double vision’ to panorama: using history of memory to bridge ‘event space’ when exploring interpretations of Nazi popularity with Year 13′. Teaching History, 168, pp.24-36
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘I feel if I say this in my essay it’s not going to be as strong’: multi-voicedness, ‘oral rehearsal’ and Year 13 students’ written arguments’. Teaching History, 167, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Grammar. Nazis. Does the grammatical ‘release the conceptual’? Teaching History, 163, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Exploring historical ‘frameworks’ as a curriculum goal: a case study examining students’ notions of historical significance when using millennia-wide time scales’. Curriculum Journal, 27 (4), pp.454-478
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘The whole point of the thing: how nominalisation might develop students’ written causal arguments’ Teaching History, 162, pp.16-24

 

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Jim obtained a BA in Modern History and a MA in European History from University College London, followed by a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Birkbeck College London. After this, he completed a PGCE in Secondary History and a MEd in Researching Practice at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded a PhD in Education from UCL. His doctoral research focused on the relationship between academic and school history, particularly in relation to literacy in secondary history curriculum design.

Jim taught and mentored in a number of state secondary schools and sixth form colleges. He was also a part of the Ofsted History Subject Working Group which provided advice on the new inspection framework’s development and implementation. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association and acted as Associate Editor for the HA’s professional journal Teaching History.

Jim’s research interests focus on history curriculum design, particularly literacy in history education, the relationships between academic and school history, and the interplay between overview and depth in history curricula.

Publications

• Carroll, J. E. (2022). ‘Terms and conditions: using metaphor to highlight causal processes with Year 13‘. Teaching History, 187, pp.40-49.
• Carroll, J. E. (2021). ‘Retheorising national assessment of the narrative mode for historical causal explanation in England’. History Education Research Journal, 18 (2), pp.148–65.

• Carroll, J. E. (2020). ‘Whose genres? Establishing curricular goals for students’ historical writing in England’ Teaching History (HTANSW), 52 (2), pp. 17-20

• Carroll, J.E. (2019). ‘Epistemic explanations for divergent evolution in discourses regarding students’ extended historical writing in England’. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51 (1), pp.100-120
• Carroll, J. E. (2018). ‘Couching counterfactuals in knowledge when explaining the Salem witch trials with Year 13’. Teaching History, 172, pp.18-29
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From divergent evolution to witting cross-fertilisation: the need for more inter-discursive communication regarding students’ extended historical writing’. Curriculum Journal, 28 (4), pp.504-523
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From ‘double vision’ to panorama: using history of memory to bridge ‘event space’ when exploring interpretations of Nazi popularity with Year 13′. Teaching History, 168, pp.24-36
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘I feel if I say this in my essay it’s not going to be as strong’: multi-voicedness, ‘oral rehearsal’ and Year 13 students’ written arguments’. Teaching History, 167, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Grammar. Nazis. Does the grammatical ‘release the conceptual’? Teaching History, 163, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Exploring historical ‘frameworks’ as a curriculum goal: a case study examining students’ notions of historical significance when using millennia-wide time scales’. Curriculum Journal, 27 (4), pp.454-478
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘The whole point of the thing: how nominalisation might develop students’ written causal arguments’ Teaching History, 162, pp.16-24

 

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Jim obtained a BA in Modern History and a MA in European History from University College London, followed by a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Birkbeck College London. After this, he completed a PGCE in Secondary History and a MEd in Researching Practice at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded a PhD in Education from UCL. His doctoral research focused on the relationship between academic and school history, particularly in relation to literacy in secondary history curriculum design.

Jim taught and mentored in a number of state secondary schools and sixth form colleges. He was also a part of the Ofsted History Subject Working Group which provided advice on the new inspection framework’s development and implementation. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association and acted as Associate Editor for the HA’s professional journal Teaching History.

Jim’s research interests focus on history curriculum design, particularly literacy in history education, the relationships between academic and school history, and the interplay between overview and depth in history curricula.

Publications

• Carroll, J. E. (2022). ‘Terms and conditions: using metaphor to highlight causal processes with Year 13‘. Teaching History, 187, pp.40-49.
• Carroll, J. E. (2021). ‘Retheorising national assessment of the narrative mode for historical causal explanation in England’. History Education Research Journal, 18 (2), pp.148–65.

• Carroll, J. E. (2020). ‘Whose genres? Establishing curricular goals for students’ historical writing in England’ Teaching History (HTANSW), 52 (2), pp. 17-20

• Carroll, J.E. (2019). ‘Epistemic explanations for divergent evolution in discourses regarding students’ extended historical writing in England’. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51 (1), pp.100-120
• Carroll, J. E. (2018). ‘Couching counterfactuals in knowledge when explaining the Salem witch trials with Year 13’. Teaching History, 172, pp.18-29
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From divergent evolution to witting cross-fertilisation: the need for more inter-discursive communication regarding students’ extended historical writing’. Curriculum Journal, 28 (4), pp.504-523
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From ‘double vision’ to panorama: using history of memory to bridge ‘event space’ when exploring interpretations of Nazi popularity with Year 13′. Teaching History, 168, pp.24-36
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘I feel if I say this in my essay it’s not going to be as strong’: multi-voicedness, ‘oral rehearsal’ and Year 13 students’ written arguments’. Teaching History, 167, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Grammar. Nazis. Does the grammatical ‘release the conceptual’? Teaching History, 163, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Exploring historical ‘frameworks’ as a curriculum goal: a case study examining students’ notions of historical significance when using millennia-wide time scales’. Curriculum Journal, 27 (4), pp.454-478
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘The whole point of the thing: how nominalisation might develop students’ written causal arguments’ Teaching History, 162, pp.16-24

 

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Jim obtained a BA in Modern History and a MA in European History from University College London, followed by a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Birkbeck College London. After this, he completed a PGCE in Secondary History and a MEd in Researching Practice at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded a PhD in Education from UCL. His doctoral research focused on the relationship between academic and school history, particularly in relation to literacy in secondary history curriculum design.

Jim taught and mentored in a number of state secondary schools and sixth form colleges. He was also a part of the Ofsted History Subject Working Group which provided advice on the new inspection framework’s development and implementation. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association and acted as Associate Editor for the HA’s professional journal Teaching History.

Jim’s research interests focus on history curriculum design, particularly literacy in history education, the relationships between academic and school history, and the interplay between overview and depth in history curricula.

Publications

• Carroll, J. E. (2022). ‘Terms and conditions: using metaphor to highlight causal processes with Year 13‘. Teaching History, 187, pp.40-49.
• Carroll, J. E. (2021). ‘Retheorising national assessment of the narrative mode for historical causal explanation in England’. History Education Research Journal, 18 (2), pp.148–65.

• Carroll, J. E. (2020). ‘Whose genres? Establishing curricular goals for students’ historical writing in England’ Teaching History (HTANSW), 52 (2), pp. 17-20

• Carroll, J.E. (2019). ‘Epistemic explanations for divergent evolution in discourses regarding students’ extended historical writing in England’. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51 (1), pp.100-120
• Carroll, J. E. (2018). ‘Couching counterfactuals in knowledge when explaining the Salem witch trials with Year 13’. Teaching History, 172, pp.18-29
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From divergent evolution to witting cross-fertilisation: the need for more inter-discursive communication regarding students’ extended historical writing’. Curriculum Journal, 28 (4), pp.504-523
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From ‘double vision’ to panorama: using history of memory to bridge ‘event space’ when exploring interpretations of Nazi popularity with Year 13′. Teaching History, 168, pp.24-36
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘I feel if I say this in my essay it’s not going to be as strong’: multi-voicedness, ‘oral rehearsal’ and Year 13 students’ written arguments’. Teaching History, 167, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Grammar. Nazis. Does the grammatical ‘release the conceptual’? Teaching History, 163, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Exploring historical ‘frameworks’ as a curriculum goal: a case study examining students’ notions of historical significance when using millennia-wide time scales’. Curriculum Journal, 27 (4), pp.454-478
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘The whole point of the thing: how nominalisation might develop students’ written causal arguments’ Teaching History, 162, pp.16-24

 

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Jim obtained a BA in Modern History and a MA in European History from University College London, followed by a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Birkbeck College London. After this, he completed a PGCE in Secondary History and a MEd in Researching Practice at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded a PhD in Education from UCL. His doctoral research focused on the relationship between academic and school history, particularly in relation to literacy in secondary history curriculum design.

Jim taught and mentored in a number of state secondary schools and sixth form colleges. He was also a part of the Ofsted History Subject Working Group which provided advice on the new inspection framework’s development and implementation. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association and acted as Associate Editor for the HA’s professional journal Teaching History.

Jim’s research interests focus on history curriculum design, particularly literacy in history education, the relationships between academic and school history, and the interplay between overview and depth in history curricula.

Publications

• Carroll, J. E. (2022). ‘Terms and conditions: using metaphor to highlight causal processes with Year 13‘. Teaching History, 187, pp.40-49.
• Carroll, J. E. (2021). ‘Retheorising national assessment of the narrative mode for historical causal explanation in England’. History Education Research Journal, 18 (2), pp.148–65.

• Carroll, J. E. (2020). ‘Whose genres? Establishing curricular goals for students’ historical writing in England’ Teaching History (HTANSW), 52 (2), pp. 17-20

• Carroll, J.E. (2019). ‘Epistemic explanations for divergent evolution in discourses regarding students’ extended historical writing in England’. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51 (1), pp.100-120
• Carroll, J. E. (2018). ‘Couching counterfactuals in knowledge when explaining the Salem witch trials with Year 13’. Teaching History, 172, pp.18-29
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From divergent evolution to witting cross-fertilisation: the need for more inter-discursive communication regarding students’ extended historical writing’. Curriculum Journal, 28 (4), pp.504-523
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From ‘double vision’ to panorama: using history of memory to bridge ‘event space’ when exploring interpretations of Nazi popularity with Year 13′. Teaching History, 168, pp.24-36
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘I feel if I say this in my essay it’s not going to be as strong’: multi-voicedness, ‘oral rehearsal’ and Year 13 students’ written arguments’. Teaching History, 167, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Grammar. Nazis. Does the grammatical ‘release the conceptual’? Teaching History, 163, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Exploring historical ‘frameworks’ as a curriculum goal: a case study examining students’ notions of historical significance when using millennia-wide time scales’. Curriculum Journal, 27 (4), pp.454-478
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘The whole point of the thing: how nominalisation might develop students’ written causal arguments’ Teaching History, 162, pp.16-24

 

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Jim obtained a BA in Modern History and a MA in European History from University College London, followed by a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Birkbeck College London. After this, he completed a PGCE in Secondary History and a MEd in Researching Practice at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded a PhD in Education from UCL. His doctoral research focused on the relationship between academic and school history, particularly in relation to literacy in secondary history curriculum design.

Jim taught and mentored in a number of state secondary schools and sixth form colleges. He was also a part of the Ofsted History Subject Working Group which provided advice on the new inspection framework’s development and implementation. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association and acted as Associate Editor for the HA’s professional journal Teaching History.

Jim’s research interests focus on history curriculum design, particularly literacy in history education, the relationships between academic and school history, and the interplay between overview and depth in history curricula.

Publications

• Carroll, J. E. (2022). ‘Terms and conditions: using metaphor to highlight causal processes with Year 13‘. Teaching History, 187, pp.40-49.
• Carroll, J. E. (2021). ‘Retheorising national assessment of the narrative mode for historical causal explanation in England’. History Education Research Journal, 18 (2), pp.148–65.

• Carroll, J. E. (2020). ‘Whose genres? Establishing curricular goals for students’ historical writing in England’ Teaching History (HTANSW), 52 (2), pp. 17-20

• Carroll, J.E. (2019). ‘Epistemic explanations for divergent evolution in discourses regarding students’ extended historical writing in England’. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51 (1), pp.100-120
• Carroll, J. E. (2018). ‘Couching counterfactuals in knowledge when explaining the Salem witch trials with Year 13’. Teaching History, 172, pp.18-29
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From divergent evolution to witting cross-fertilisation: the need for more inter-discursive communication regarding students’ extended historical writing’. Curriculum Journal, 28 (4), pp.504-523
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From ‘double vision’ to panorama: using history of memory to bridge ‘event space’ when exploring interpretations of Nazi popularity with Year 13′. Teaching History, 168, pp.24-36
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘I feel if I say this in my essay it’s not going to be as strong’: multi-voicedness, ‘oral rehearsal’ and Year 13 students’ written arguments’. Teaching History, 167, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Grammar. Nazis. Does the grammatical ‘release the conceptual’? Teaching History, 163, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Exploring historical ‘frameworks’ as a curriculum goal: a case study examining students’ notions of historical significance when using millennia-wide time scales’. Curriculum Journal, 27 (4), pp.454-478
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘The whole point of the thing: how nominalisation might develop students’ written causal arguments’ Teaching History, 162, pp.16-24

 

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Jim obtained a BA in Modern History and a MA in European History from University College London, followed by a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Birkbeck College London. After this, he completed a PGCE in Secondary History and a MEd in Researching Practice at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded a PhD in Education from UCL. His doctoral research focused on the relationship between academic and school history, particularly in relation to literacy in secondary history curriculum design.

Jim taught and mentored in a number of state secondary schools and sixth form colleges. He was also a part of the Ofsted History Subject Working Group which provided advice on the new inspection framework’s development and implementation. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association and acted as Associate Editor for the HA’s professional journal Teaching History.

Jim’s research interests focus on history curriculum design, particularly literacy in history education, the relationships between academic and school history, and the interplay between overview and depth in history curricula.

Publications

• Carroll, J. E. (2022). ‘Terms and conditions: using metaphor to highlight causal processes with Year 13‘. Teaching History, 187, pp.40-49.
• Carroll, J. E. (2021). ‘Retheorising national assessment of the narrative mode for historical causal explanation in England’. History Education Research Journal, 18 (2), pp.148–65.

• Carroll, J. E. (2020). ‘Whose genres? Establishing curricular goals for students’ historical writing in England’ Teaching History (HTANSW), 52 (2), pp. 17-20

• Carroll, J.E. (2019). ‘Epistemic explanations for divergent evolution in discourses regarding students’ extended historical writing in England’. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51 (1), pp.100-120
• Carroll, J. E. (2018). ‘Couching counterfactuals in knowledge when explaining the Salem witch trials with Year 13’. Teaching History, 172, pp.18-29
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From divergent evolution to witting cross-fertilisation: the need for more inter-discursive communication regarding students’ extended historical writing’. Curriculum Journal, 28 (4), pp.504-523
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From ‘double vision’ to panorama: using history of memory to bridge ‘event space’ when exploring interpretations of Nazi popularity with Year 13′. Teaching History, 168, pp.24-36
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘I feel if I say this in my essay it’s not going to be as strong’: multi-voicedness, ‘oral rehearsal’ and Year 13 students’ written arguments’. Teaching History, 167, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Grammar. Nazis. Does the grammatical ‘release the conceptual’? Teaching History, 163, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Exploring historical ‘frameworks’ as a curriculum goal: a case study examining students’ notions of historical significance when using millennia-wide time scales’. Curriculum Journal, 27 (4), pp.454-478
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘The whole point of the thing: how nominalisation might develop students’ written causal arguments’ Teaching History, 162, pp.16-24

 

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Jim obtained a BA in Modern History and a MA in European History from University College London, followed by a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Birkbeck College London. After this, he completed a PGCE in Secondary History and a MEd in Researching Practice at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded a PhD in Education from UCL. His doctoral research focused on the relationship between academic and school history, particularly in relation to literacy in secondary history curriculum design.

Jim taught and mentored in a number of state secondary schools and sixth form colleges. He was also a part of the Ofsted History Subject Working Group which provided advice on the new inspection framework’s development and implementation. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association and acted as Associate Editor for the HA’s professional journal Teaching History.

Jim’s research interests focus on history curriculum design, particularly literacy in history education, the relationships between academic and school history, and the interplay between overview and depth in history curricula.

Publications

• Carroll, J. E. (2022). ‘Terms and conditions: using metaphor to highlight causal processes with Year 13‘. Teaching History, 187, pp.40-49.
• Carroll, J. E. (2021). ‘Retheorising national assessment of the narrative mode for historical causal explanation in England’. History Education Research Journal, 18 (2), pp.148–65.

• Carroll, J. E. (2020). ‘Whose genres? Establishing curricular goals for students’ historical writing in England’ Teaching History (HTANSW), 52 (2), pp. 17-20

• Carroll, J.E. (2019). ‘Epistemic explanations for divergent evolution in discourses regarding students’ extended historical writing in England’. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51 (1), pp.100-120
• Carroll, J. E. (2018). ‘Couching counterfactuals in knowledge when explaining the Salem witch trials with Year 13’. Teaching History, 172, pp.18-29
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From divergent evolution to witting cross-fertilisation: the need for more inter-discursive communication regarding students’ extended historical writing’. Curriculum Journal, 28 (4), pp.504-523
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From ‘double vision’ to panorama: using history of memory to bridge ‘event space’ when exploring interpretations of Nazi popularity with Year 13′. Teaching History, 168, pp.24-36
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘I feel if I say this in my essay it’s not going to be as strong’: multi-voicedness, ‘oral rehearsal’ and Year 13 students’ written arguments’. Teaching History, 167, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Grammar. Nazis. Does the grammatical ‘release the conceptual’? Teaching History, 163, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Exploring historical ‘frameworks’ as a curriculum goal: a case study examining students’ notions of historical significance when using millennia-wide time scales’. Curriculum Journal, 27 (4), pp.454-478
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘The whole point of the thing: how nominalisation might develop students’ written causal arguments’ Teaching History, 162, pp.16-24

 

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Jim obtained a BA in Modern History and a MA in European History from University College London, followed by a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Birkbeck College London. After this, he completed a PGCE in Secondary History and a MEd in Researching Practice at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded a PhD in Education from UCL. His doctoral research focused on the relationship between academic and school history, particularly in relation to literacy in secondary history curriculum design.

Jim taught and mentored in a number of state secondary schools and sixth form colleges. He was also a part of the Ofsted History Subject Working Group which provided advice on the new inspection framework’s development and implementation. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association and acted as Associate Editor for the HA’s professional journal Teaching History.

Jim’s research interests focus on history curriculum design, particularly literacy in history education, the relationships between academic and school history, and the interplay between overview and depth in history curricula.

Publications

• Carroll, J. E. (2022). ‘Terms and conditions: using metaphor to highlight causal processes with Year 13‘. Teaching History, 187, pp.40-49.
• Carroll, J. E. (2021). ‘Retheorising national assessment of the narrative mode for historical causal explanation in England’. History Education Research Journal, 18 (2), pp.148–65.

• Carroll, J. E. (2020). ‘Whose genres? Establishing curricular goals for students’ historical writing in England’ Teaching History (HTANSW), 52 (2), pp. 17-20

• Carroll, J.E. (2019). ‘Epistemic explanations for divergent evolution in discourses regarding students’ extended historical writing in England’. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51 (1), pp.100-120
• Carroll, J. E. (2018). ‘Couching counterfactuals in knowledge when explaining the Salem witch trials with Year 13’. Teaching History, 172, pp.18-29
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From divergent evolution to witting cross-fertilisation: the need for more inter-discursive communication regarding students’ extended historical writing’. Curriculum Journal, 28 (4), pp.504-523
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From ‘double vision’ to panorama: using history of memory to bridge ‘event space’ when exploring interpretations of Nazi popularity with Year 13′. Teaching History, 168, pp.24-36
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘I feel if I say this in my essay it’s not going to be as strong’: multi-voicedness, ‘oral rehearsal’ and Year 13 students’ written arguments’. Teaching History, 167, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Grammar. Nazis. Does the grammatical ‘release the conceptual’? Teaching History, 163, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Exploring historical ‘frameworks’ as a curriculum goal: a case study examining students’ notions of historical significance when using millennia-wide time scales’. Curriculum Journal, 27 (4), pp.454-478
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘The whole point of the thing: how nominalisation might develop students’ written causal arguments’ Teaching History, 162, pp.16-24

 

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Jim obtained a BA in Modern History and a MA in European History from University College London, followed by a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Birkbeck College London. After this, he completed a PGCE in Secondary History and a MEd in Researching Practice at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded a PhD in Education from UCL. His doctoral research focused on the relationship between academic and school history, particularly in relation to literacy in secondary history curriculum design.

Jim taught and mentored in a number of state secondary schools and sixth form colleges. He was also a part of the Ofsted History Subject Working Group which provided advice on the new inspection framework’s development and implementation. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association and acted as Associate Editor for the HA’s professional journal Teaching History.

Jim’s research interests focus on history curriculum design, particularly literacy in history education, the relationships between academic and school history, and the interplay between overview and depth in history curricula.

Publications

• Carroll, J. E. (2022). ‘Terms and conditions: using metaphor to highlight causal processes with Year 13‘. Teaching History, 187, pp.40-49.
• Carroll, J. E. (2021). ‘Retheorising national assessment of the narrative mode for historical causal explanation in England’. History Education Research Journal, 18 (2), pp.148–65.

• Carroll, J. E. (2020). ‘Whose genres? Establishing curricular goals for students’ historical writing in England’ Teaching History (HTANSW), 52 (2), pp. 17-20

• Carroll, J.E. (2019). ‘Epistemic explanations for divergent evolution in discourses regarding students’ extended historical writing in England’. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51 (1), pp.100-120
• Carroll, J. E. (2018). ‘Couching counterfactuals in knowledge when explaining the Salem witch trials with Year 13’. Teaching History, 172, pp.18-29
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From divergent evolution to witting cross-fertilisation: the need for more inter-discursive communication regarding students’ extended historical writing’. Curriculum Journal, 28 (4), pp.504-523
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From ‘double vision’ to panorama: using history of memory to bridge ‘event space’ when exploring interpretations of Nazi popularity with Year 13′. Teaching History, 168, pp.24-36
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘I feel if I say this in my essay it’s not going to be as strong’: multi-voicedness, ‘oral rehearsal’ and Year 13 students’ written arguments’. Teaching History, 167, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Grammar. Nazis. Does the grammatical ‘release the conceptual’? Teaching History, 163, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Exploring historical ‘frameworks’ as a curriculum goal: a case study examining students’ notions of historical significance when using millennia-wide time scales’. Curriculum Journal, 27 (4), pp.454-478
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘The whole point of the thing: how nominalisation might develop students’ written causal arguments’ Teaching History, 162, pp.16-24

 

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Jim obtained a BA in Modern History and a MA in European History from University College London, followed by a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Birkbeck College London. After this, he completed a PGCE in Secondary History and a MEd in Researching Practice at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded a PhD in Education from UCL. His doctoral research focused on the relationship between academic and school history, particularly in relation to literacy in secondary history curriculum design.

Jim taught and mentored in a number of state secondary schools and sixth form colleges. He was also a part of the Ofsted History Subject Working Group which provided advice on the new inspection framework’s development and implementation. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association and acted as Associate Editor for the HA’s professional journal Teaching History.

Jim’s research interests focus on history curriculum design, particularly literacy in history education, the relationships between academic and school history, and the interplay between overview and depth in history curricula.

Publications

• Carroll, J. E. (2022). ‘Terms and conditions: using metaphor to highlight causal processes with Year 13‘. Teaching History, 187, pp.40-49.
• Carroll, J. E. (2021). ‘Retheorising national assessment of the narrative mode for historical causal explanation in England’. History Education Research Journal, 18 (2), pp.148–65.

• Carroll, J. E. (2020). ‘Whose genres? Establishing curricular goals for students’ historical writing in England’ Teaching History (HTANSW), 52 (2), pp. 17-20

• Carroll, J.E. (2019). ‘Epistemic explanations for divergent evolution in discourses regarding students’ extended historical writing in England’. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51 (1), pp.100-120
• Carroll, J. E. (2018). ‘Couching counterfactuals in knowledge when explaining the Salem witch trials with Year 13’. Teaching History, 172, pp.18-29
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From divergent evolution to witting cross-fertilisation: the need for more inter-discursive communication regarding students’ extended historical writing’. Curriculum Journal, 28 (4), pp.504-523
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From ‘double vision’ to panorama: using history of memory to bridge ‘event space’ when exploring interpretations of Nazi popularity with Year 13′. Teaching History, 168, pp.24-36
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘I feel if I say this in my essay it’s not going to be as strong’: multi-voicedness, ‘oral rehearsal’ and Year 13 students’ written arguments’. Teaching History, 167, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Grammar. Nazis. Does the grammatical ‘release the conceptual’? Teaching History, 163, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Exploring historical ‘frameworks’ as a curriculum goal: a case study examining students’ notions of historical significance when using millennia-wide time scales’. Curriculum Journal, 27 (4), pp.454-478
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘The whole point of the thing: how nominalisation might develop students’ written causal arguments’ Teaching History, 162, pp.16-24

 

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Jim obtained a BA in Modern History and a MA in European History from University College London, followed by a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Birkbeck College London. After this, he completed a PGCE in Secondary History and a MEd in Researching Practice at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded a PhD in Education from UCL. His doctoral research focused on the relationship between academic and school history, particularly in relation to literacy in secondary history curriculum design.

Jim taught and mentored in a number of state secondary schools and sixth form colleges. He was also a part of the Ofsted History Subject Working Group which provided advice on the new inspection framework’s development and implementation. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association and acted as Associate Editor for the HA’s professional journal Teaching History.

Jim’s research interests focus on history curriculum design, particularly literacy in history education, the relationships between academic and school history, and the interplay between overview and depth in history curricula.

Publications

• Carroll, J. E. (2022). ‘Terms and conditions: using metaphor to highlight causal processes with Year 13‘. Teaching History, 187, pp.40-49.
• Carroll, J. E. (2021). ‘Retheorising national assessment of the narrative mode for historical causal explanation in England’. History Education Research Journal, 18 (2), pp.148–65.

• Carroll, J. E. (2020). ‘Whose genres? Establishing curricular goals for students’ historical writing in England’ Teaching History (HTANSW), 52 (2), pp. 17-20

• Carroll, J.E. (2019). ‘Epistemic explanations for divergent evolution in discourses regarding students’ extended historical writing in England’. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51 (1), pp.100-120
• Carroll, J. E. (2018). ‘Couching counterfactuals in knowledge when explaining the Salem witch trials with Year 13’. Teaching History, 172, pp.18-29
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From divergent evolution to witting cross-fertilisation: the need for more inter-discursive communication regarding students’ extended historical writing’. Curriculum Journal, 28 (4), pp.504-523
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From ‘double vision’ to panorama: using history of memory to bridge ‘event space’ when exploring interpretations of Nazi popularity with Year 13′. Teaching History, 168, pp.24-36
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘I feel if I say this in my essay it’s not going to be as strong’: multi-voicedness, ‘oral rehearsal’ and Year 13 students’ written arguments’. Teaching History, 167, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Grammar. Nazis. Does the grammatical ‘release the conceptual’? Teaching History, 163, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Exploring historical ‘frameworks’ as a curriculum goal: a case study examining students’ notions of historical significance when using millennia-wide time scales’. Curriculum Journal, 27 (4), pp.454-478
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘The whole point of the thing: how nominalisation might develop students’ written causal arguments’ Teaching History, 162, pp.16-24

 

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Jim obtained a BA in Modern History and a MA in European History from University College London, followed by a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Birkbeck College London. After this, he completed a PGCE in Secondary History and a MEd in Researching Practice at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded a PhD in Education from UCL. His doctoral research focused on the relationship between academic and school history, particularly in relation to literacy in secondary history curriculum design.

Jim taught and mentored in a number of state secondary schools and sixth form colleges. He was also a part of the Ofsted History Subject Working Group which provided advice on the new inspection framework’s development and implementation. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association and acted as Associate Editor for the HA’s professional journal Teaching History.

Jim’s research interests focus on history curriculum design, particularly literacy in history education, the relationships between academic and school history, and the interplay between overview and depth in history curricula.

Publications

• Carroll, J. E. (2022). ‘Terms and conditions: using metaphor to highlight causal processes with Year 13‘. Teaching History, 187, pp.40-49.
• Carroll, J. E. (2021). ‘Retheorising national assessment of the narrative mode for historical causal explanation in England’. History Education Research Journal, 18 (2), pp.148–65.

• Carroll, J. E. (2020). ‘Whose genres? Establishing curricular goals for students’ historical writing in England’ Teaching History (HTANSW), 52 (2), pp. 17-20

• Carroll, J.E. (2019). ‘Epistemic explanations for divergent evolution in discourses regarding students’ extended historical writing in England’. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51 (1), pp.100-120
• Carroll, J. E. (2018). ‘Couching counterfactuals in knowledge when explaining the Salem witch trials with Year 13’. Teaching History, 172, pp.18-29
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From divergent evolution to witting cross-fertilisation: the need for more inter-discursive communication regarding students’ extended historical writing’. Curriculum Journal, 28 (4), pp.504-523
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From ‘double vision’ to panorama: using history of memory to bridge ‘event space’ when exploring interpretations of Nazi popularity with Year 13′. Teaching History, 168, pp.24-36
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘I feel if I say this in my essay it’s not going to be as strong’: multi-voicedness, ‘oral rehearsal’ and Year 13 students’ written arguments’. Teaching History, 167, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Grammar. Nazis. Does the grammatical ‘release the conceptual’? Teaching History, 163, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Exploring historical ‘frameworks’ as a curriculum goal: a case study examining students’ notions of historical significance when using millennia-wide time scales’. Curriculum Journal, 27 (4), pp.454-478
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘The whole point of the thing: how nominalisation might develop students’ written causal arguments’ Teaching History, 162, pp.16-24

 

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Jim obtained a BA in Modern History and a MA in European History from University College London, followed by a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Birkbeck College London. After this, he completed a PGCE in Secondary History and a MEd in Researching Practice at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded a PhD in Education from UCL. His doctoral research focused on the relationship between academic and school history, particularly in relation to literacy in secondary history curriculum design.

Jim taught and mentored in a number of state secondary schools and sixth form colleges. He was also a part of the Ofsted History Subject Working Group which provided advice on the new inspection framework’s development and implementation. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association and acted as Associate Editor for the HA’s professional journal Teaching History.

Jim’s research interests focus on history curriculum design, particularly literacy in history education, the relationships between academic and school history, and the interplay between overview and depth in history curricula.

Publications

• Carroll, J. E. (2022). ‘Terms and conditions: using metaphor to highlight causal processes with Year 13‘. Teaching History, 187, pp.40-49.
• Carroll, J. E. (2021). ‘Retheorising national assessment of the narrative mode for historical causal explanation in England’. History Education Research Journal, 18 (2), pp.148–65.

• Carroll, J. E. (2020). ‘Whose genres? Establishing curricular goals for students’ historical writing in England’ Teaching History (HTANSW), 52 (2), pp. 17-20

• Carroll, J.E. (2019). ‘Epistemic explanations for divergent evolution in discourses regarding students’ extended historical writing in England’. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51 (1), pp.100-120
• Carroll, J. E. (2018). ‘Couching counterfactuals in knowledge when explaining the Salem witch trials with Year 13’. Teaching History, 172, pp.18-29
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From divergent evolution to witting cross-fertilisation: the need for more inter-discursive communication regarding students’ extended historical writing’. Curriculum Journal, 28 (4), pp.504-523
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From ‘double vision’ to panorama: using history of memory to bridge ‘event space’ when exploring interpretations of Nazi popularity with Year 13′. Teaching History, 168, pp.24-36
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘I feel if I say this in my essay it’s not going to be as strong’: multi-voicedness, ‘oral rehearsal’ and Year 13 students’ written arguments’. Teaching History, 167, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Grammar. Nazis. Does the grammatical ‘release the conceptual’? Teaching History, 163, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Exploring historical ‘frameworks’ as a curriculum goal: a case study examining students’ notions of historical significance when using millennia-wide time scales’. Curriculum Journal, 27 (4), pp.454-478
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘The whole point of the thing: how nominalisation might develop students’ written causal arguments’ Teaching History, 162, pp.16-24

 

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Jim obtained a BA in Modern History and a MA in European History from University College London, followed by a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Birkbeck College London. After this, he completed a PGCE in Secondary History and a MEd in Researching Practice at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded a PhD in Education from UCL. His doctoral research focused on the relationship between academic and school history, particularly in relation to literacy in secondary history curriculum design.

Jim taught and mentored in a number of state secondary schools and sixth form colleges. He was also a part of the Ofsted History Subject Working Group which provided advice on the new inspection framework’s development and implementation. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association and acted as Associate Editor for the HA’s professional journal Teaching History.

Jim’s research interests focus on history curriculum design, particularly literacy in history education, the relationships between academic and school history, and the interplay between overview and depth in history curricula.

Publications

• Carroll, J. E. (2022). ‘Terms and conditions: using metaphor to highlight causal processes with Year 13‘. Teaching History, 187, pp.40-49.
• Carroll, J. E. (2021). ‘Retheorising national assessment of the narrative mode for historical causal explanation in England’. History Education Research Journal, 18 (2), pp.148–65.

• Carroll, J. E. (2020). ‘Whose genres? Establishing curricular goals for students’ historical writing in England’ Teaching History (HTANSW), 52 (2), pp. 17-20

• Carroll, J.E. (2019). ‘Epistemic explanations for divergent evolution in discourses regarding students’ extended historical writing in England’. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51 (1), pp.100-120
• Carroll, J. E. (2018). ‘Couching counterfactuals in knowledge when explaining the Salem witch trials with Year 13’. Teaching History, 172, pp.18-29
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From divergent evolution to witting cross-fertilisation: the need for more inter-discursive communication regarding students’ extended historical writing’. Curriculum Journal, 28 (4), pp.504-523
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From ‘double vision’ to panorama: using history of memory to bridge ‘event space’ when exploring interpretations of Nazi popularity with Year 13′. Teaching History, 168, pp.24-36
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘I feel if I say this in my essay it’s not going to be as strong’: multi-voicedness, ‘oral rehearsal’ and Year 13 students’ written arguments’. Teaching History, 167, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Grammar. Nazis. Does the grammatical ‘release the conceptual’? Teaching History, 163, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Exploring historical ‘frameworks’ as a curriculum goal: a case study examining students’ notions of historical significance when using millennia-wide time scales’. Curriculum Journal, 27 (4), pp.454-478
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘The whole point of the thing: how nominalisation might develop students’ written causal arguments’ Teaching History, 162, pp.16-24

 

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Jim obtained a BA in Modern History and a MA in European History from University College London, followed by a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Birkbeck College London. After this, he completed a PGCE in Secondary History and a MEd in Researching Practice at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded a PhD in Education from UCL. His doctoral research focused on the relationship between academic and school history, particularly in relation to literacy in secondary history curriculum design.

Jim taught and mentored in a number of state secondary schools and sixth form colleges. He was also a part of the Ofsted History Subject Working Group which provided advice on the new inspection framework’s development and implementation. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association and acted as Associate Editor for the HA’s professional journal Teaching History.

Jim’s research interests focus on history curriculum design, particularly literacy in history education, the relationships between academic and school history, and the interplay between overview and depth in history curricula.

Publications

• Carroll, J. E. (2022). ‘Terms and conditions: using metaphor to highlight causal processes with Year 13‘. Teaching History, 187, pp.40-49.
• Carroll, J. E. (2021). ‘Retheorising national assessment of the narrative mode for historical causal explanation in England’. History Education Research Journal, 18 (2), pp.148–65.

• Carroll, J. E. (2020). ‘Whose genres? Establishing curricular goals for students’ historical writing in England’ Teaching History (HTANSW), 52 (2), pp. 17-20

• Carroll, J.E. (2019). ‘Epistemic explanations for divergent evolution in discourses regarding students’ extended historical writing in England’. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51 (1), pp.100-120
• Carroll, J. E. (2018). ‘Couching counterfactuals in knowledge when explaining the Salem witch trials with Year 13’. Teaching History, 172, pp.18-29
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From divergent evolution to witting cross-fertilisation: the need for more inter-discursive communication regarding students’ extended historical writing’. Curriculum Journal, 28 (4), pp.504-523
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From ‘double vision’ to panorama: using history of memory to bridge ‘event space’ when exploring interpretations of Nazi popularity with Year 13′. Teaching History, 168, pp.24-36
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘I feel if I say this in my essay it’s not going to be as strong’: multi-voicedness, ‘oral rehearsal’ and Year 13 students’ written arguments’. Teaching History, 167, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Grammar. Nazis. Does the grammatical ‘release the conceptual’? Teaching History, 163, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Exploring historical ‘frameworks’ as a curriculum goal: a case study examining students’ notions of historical significance when using millennia-wide time scales’. Curriculum Journal, 27 (4), pp.454-478
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘The whole point of the thing: how nominalisation might develop students’ written causal arguments’ Teaching History, 162, pp.16-24

 

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Jim obtained a BA in Modern History and a MA in European History from University College London, followed by a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Birkbeck College London. After this, he completed a PGCE in Secondary History and a MEd in Researching Practice at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded a PhD in Education from UCL. His doctoral research focused on the relationship between academic and school history, particularly in relation to literacy in secondary history curriculum design.

Jim taught and mentored in a number of state secondary schools and sixth form colleges. He was also a part of the Ofsted History Subject Working Group which provided advice on the new inspection framework’s development and implementation. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association and acted as Associate Editor for the HA’s professional journal Teaching History.

Jim’s research interests focus on history curriculum design, particularly literacy in history education, the relationships between academic and school history, and the interplay between overview and depth in history curricula.

Publications

• Carroll, J. E. (2022). ‘Terms and conditions: using metaphor to highlight causal processes with Year 13‘. Teaching History, 187, pp.40-49.
• Carroll, J. E. (2021). ‘Retheorising national assessment of the narrative mode for historical causal explanation in England’. History Education Research Journal, 18 (2), pp.148–65.

• Carroll, J. E. (2020). ‘Whose genres? Establishing curricular goals for students’ historical writing in England’ Teaching History (HTANSW), 52 (2), pp. 17-20

• Carroll, J.E. (2019). ‘Epistemic explanations for divergent evolution in discourses regarding students’ extended historical writing in England’. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51 (1), pp.100-120
• Carroll, J. E. (2018). ‘Couching counterfactuals in knowledge when explaining the Salem witch trials with Year 13’. Teaching History, 172, pp.18-29
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From divergent evolution to witting cross-fertilisation: the need for more inter-discursive communication regarding students’ extended historical writing’. Curriculum Journal, 28 (4), pp.504-523
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From ‘double vision’ to panorama: using history of memory to bridge ‘event space’ when exploring interpretations of Nazi popularity with Year 13′. Teaching History, 168, pp.24-36
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘I feel if I say this in my essay it’s not going to be as strong’: multi-voicedness, ‘oral rehearsal’ and Year 13 students’ written arguments’. Teaching History, 167, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Grammar. Nazis. Does the grammatical ‘release the conceptual’? Teaching History, 163, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Exploring historical ‘frameworks’ as a curriculum goal: a case study examining students’ notions of historical significance when using millennia-wide time scales’. Curriculum Journal, 27 (4), pp.454-478
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘The whole point of the thing: how nominalisation might develop students’ written causal arguments’ Teaching History, 162, pp.16-24

 

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Jim obtained a BA in Modern History and a MA in European History from University College London, followed by a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Birkbeck College London. After this, he completed a PGCE in Secondary History and a MEd in Researching Practice at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded a PhD in Education from UCL. His doctoral research focused on the relationship between academic and school history, particularly in relation to literacy in secondary history curriculum design.

Jim taught and mentored in a number of state secondary schools and sixth form colleges. He was also a part of the Ofsted History Subject Working Group which provided advice on the new inspection framework’s development and implementation. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association and acted as Associate Editor for the HA’s professional journal Teaching History.

Jim’s research interests focus on history curriculum design, particularly literacy in history education, the relationships between academic and school history, and the interplay between overview and depth in history curricula.

Publications

• Carroll, J. E. (2022). ‘Terms and conditions: using metaphor to highlight causal processes with Year 13‘. Teaching History, 187, pp.40-49.
• Carroll, J. E. (2021). ‘Retheorising national assessment of the narrative mode for historical causal explanation in England’. History Education Research Journal, 18 (2), pp.148–65.

• Carroll, J. E. (2020). ‘Whose genres? Establishing curricular goals for students’ historical writing in England’ Teaching History (HTANSW), 52 (2), pp. 17-20

• Carroll, J.E. (2019). ‘Epistemic explanations for divergent evolution in discourses regarding students’ extended historical writing in England’. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51 (1), pp.100-120
• Carroll, J. E. (2018). ‘Couching counterfactuals in knowledge when explaining the Salem witch trials with Year 13’. Teaching History, 172, pp.18-29
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From divergent evolution to witting cross-fertilisation: the need for more inter-discursive communication regarding students’ extended historical writing’. Curriculum Journal, 28 (4), pp.504-523
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From ‘double vision’ to panorama: using history of memory to bridge ‘event space’ when exploring interpretations of Nazi popularity with Year 13′. Teaching History, 168, pp.24-36
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘I feel if I say this in my essay it’s not going to be as strong’: multi-voicedness, ‘oral rehearsal’ and Year 13 students’ written arguments’. Teaching History, 167, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Grammar. Nazis. Does the grammatical ‘release the conceptual’? Teaching History, 163, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Exploring historical ‘frameworks’ as a curriculum goal: a case study examining students’ notions of historical significance when using millennia-wide time scales’. Curriculum Journal, 27 (4), pp.454-478
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘The whole point of the thing: how nominalisation might develop students’ written causal arguments’ Teaching History, 162, pp.16-24

 

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Jim obtained a BA in Modern History and a MA in European History from University College London, followed by a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Birkbeck College London. After this, he completed a PGCE in Secondary History and a MEd in Researching Practice at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded a PhD in Education from UCL. His doctoral research focused on the relationship between academic and school history, particularly in relation to literacy in secondary history curriculum design.

Jim taught and mentored in a number of state secondary schools and sixth form colleges. He was also a part of the Ofsted History Subject Working Group which provided advice on the new inspection framework’s development and implementation. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association and acted as Associate Editor for the HA’s professional journal Teaching History.

Jim’s research interests focus on history curriculum design, particularly literacy in history education, the relationships between academic and school history, and the interplay between overview and depth in history curricula.

Publications

• Carroll, J. E. (2022). ‘Terms and conditions: using metaphor to highlight causal processes with Year 13‘. Teaching History, 187, pp.40-49.
• Carroll, J. E. (2021). ‘Retheorising national assessment of the narrative mode for historical causal explanation in England’. History Education Research Journal, 18 (2), pp.148–65.

• Carroll, J. E. (2020). ‘Whose genres? Establishing curricular goals for students’ historical writing in England’ Teaching History (HTANSW), 52 (2), pp. 17-20

• Carroll, J.E. (2019). ‘Epistemic explanations for divergent evolution in discourses regarding students’ extended historical writing in England’. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51 (1), pp.100-120
• Carroll, J. E. (2018). ‘Couching counterfactuals in knowledge when explaining the Salem witch trials with Year 13’. Teaching History, 172, pp.18-29
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From divergent evolution to witting cross-fertilisation: the need for more inter-discursive communication regarding students’ extended historical writing’. Curriculum Journal, 28 (4), pp.504-523
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From ‘double vision’ to panorama: using history of memory to bridge ‘event space’ when exploring interpretations of Nazi popularity with Year 13′. Teaching History, 168, pp.24-36
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘I feel if I say this in my essay it’s not going to be as strong’: multi-voicedness, ‘oral rehearsal’ and Year 13 students’ written arguments’. Teaching History, 167, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Grammar. Nazis. Does the grammatical ‘release the conceptual’? Teaching History, 163, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Exploring historical ‘frameworks’ as a curriculum goal: a case study examining students’ notions of historical significance when using millennia-wide time scales’. Curriculum Journal, 27 (4), pp.454-478
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘The whole point of the thing: how nominalisation might develop students’ written causal arguments’ Teaching History, 162, pp.16-24

 

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Jim obtained a BA in Modern History and a MA in European History from University College London, followed by a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Birkbeck College London. After this, he completed a PGCE in Secondary History and a MEd in Researching Practice at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded a PhD in Education from UCL. His doctoral research focused on the relationship between academic and school history, particularly in relation to literacy in secondary history curriculum design.

Jim taught and mentored in a number of state secondary schools and sixth form colleges. He was also a part of the Ofsted History Subject Working Group which provided advice on the new inspection framework’s development and implementation. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association and acted as Associate Editor for the HA’s professional journal Teaching History.

Jim’s research interests focus on history curriculum design, particularly literacy in history education, the relationships between academic and school history, and the interplay between overview and depth in history curricula.

Publications

• Carroll, J. E. (2022). ‘Terms and conditions: using metaphor to highlight causal processes with Year 13‘. Teaching History, 187, pp.40-49.
• Carroll, J. E. (2021). ‘Retheorising national assessment of the narrative mode for historical causal explanation in England’. History Education Research Journal, 18 (2), pp.148–65.

• Carroll, J. E. (2020). ‘Whose genres? Establishing curricular goals for students’ historical writing in England’ Teaching History (HTANSW), 52 (2), pp. 17-20

• Carroll, J.E. (2019). ‘Epistemic explanations for divergent evolution in discourses regarding students’ extended historical writing in England’. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51 (1), pp.100-120
• Carroll, J. E. (2018). ‘Couching counterfactuals in knowledge when explaining the Salem witch trials with Year 13’. Teaching History, 172, pp.18-29
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From divergent evolution to witting cross-fertilisation: the need for more inter-discursive communication regarding students’ extended historical writing’. Curriculum Journal, 28 (4), pp.504-523
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From ‘double vision’ to panorama: using history of memory to bridge ‘event space’ when exploring interpretations of Nazi popularity with Year 13′. Teaching History, 168, pp.24-36
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘I feel if I say this in my essay it’s not going to be as strong’: multi-voicedness, ‘oral rehearsal’ and Year 13 students’ written arguments’. Teaching History, 167, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Grammar. Nazis. Does the grammatical ‘release the conceptual’? Teaching History, 163, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Exploring historical ‘frameworks’ as a curriculum goal: a case study examining students’ notions of historical significance when using millennia-wide time scales’. Curriculum Journal, 27 (4), pp.454-478
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘The whole point of the thing: how nominalisation might develop students’ written causal arguments’ Teaching History, 162, pp.16-24

 

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Jim obtained a BA in Modern History and a MA in European History from University College London, followed by a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Birkbeck College London. After this, he completed a PGCE in Secondary History and a MEd in Researching Practice at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded a PhD in Education from UCL. His doctoral research focused on the relationship between academic and school history, particularly in relation to literacy in secondary history curriculum design.

Jim taught and mentored in a number of state secondary schools and sixth form colleges. He was also a part of the Ofsted History Subject Working Group which provided advice on the new inspection framework’s development and implementation. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association and acted as Associate Editor for the HA’s professional journal Teaching History.

Jim’s research interests focus on history curriculum design, particularly literacy in history education, the relationships between academic and school history, and the interplay between overview and depth in history curricula.

Publications

• Carroll, J. E. (2022). ‘Terms and conditions: using metaphor to highlight causal processes with Year 13‘. Teaching History, 187, pp.40-49.
• Carroll, J. E. (2021). ‘Retheorising national assessment of the narrative mode for historical causal explanation in England’. History Education Research Journal, 18 (2), pp.148–65.

• Carroll, J. E. (2020). ‘Whose genres? Establishing curricular goals for students’ historical writing in England’ Teaching History (HTANSW), 52 (2), pp. 17-20

• Carroll, J.E. (2019). ‘Epistemic explanations for divergent evolution in discourses regarding students’ extended historical writing in England’. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51 (1), pp.100-120
• Carroll, J. E. (2018). ‘Couching counterfactuals in knowledge when explaining the Salem witch trials with Year 13’. Teaching History, 172, pp.18-29
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From divergent evolution to witting cross-fertilisation: the need for more inter-discursive communication regarding students’ extended historical writing’. Curriculum Journal, 28 (4), pp.504-523
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From ‘double vision’ to panorama: using history of memory to bridge ‘event space’ when exploring interpretations of Nazi popularity with Year 13′. Teaching History, 168, pp.24-36
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘I feel if I say this in my essay it’s not going to be as strong’: multi-voicedness, ‘oral rehearsal’ and Year 13 students’ written arguments’. Teaching History, 167, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Grammar. Nazis. Does the grammatical ‘release the conceptual’? Teaching History, 163, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Exploring historical ‘frameworks’ as a curriculum goal: a case study examining students’ notions of historical significance when using millennia-wide time scales’. Curriculum Journal, 27 (4), pp.454-478
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘The whole point of the thing: how nominalisation might develop students’ written causal arguments’ Teaching History, 162, pp.16-24

 

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Jim obtained a BA in Modern History and a MA in European History from University College London, followed by a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Birkbeck College London. After this, he completed a PGCE in Secondary History and a MEd in Researching Practice at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded a PhD in Education from UCL. His doctoral research focused on the relationship between academic and school history, particularly in relation to literacy in secondary history curriculum design.

Jim taught and mentored in a number of state secondary schools and sixth form colleges. He was also a part of the Ofsted History Subject Working Group which provided advice on the new inspection framework’s development and implementation. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association and acted as Associate Editor for the HA’s professional journal Teaching History.

Jim’s research interests focus on history curriculum design, particularly literacy in history education, the relationships between academic and school history, and the interplay between overview and depth in history curricula.

Publications

• Carroll, J. E. (2022). ‘Terms and conditions: using metaphor to highlight causal processes with Year 13‘. Teaching History, 187, pp.40-49.
• Carroll, J. E. (2021). ‘Retheorising national assessment of the narrative mode for historical causal explanation in England’. History Education Research Journal, 18 (2), pp.148–65.

• Carroll, J. E. (2020). ‘Whose genres? Establishing curricular goals for students’ historical writing in England’ Teaching History (HTANSW), 52 (2), pp. 17-20

• Carroll, J.E. (2019). ‘Epistemic explanations for divergent evolution in discourses regarding students’ extended historical writing in England’. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51 (1), pp.100-120
• Carroll, J. E. (2018). ‘Couching counterfactuals in knowledge when explaining the Salem witch trials with Year 13’. Teaching History, 172, pp.18-29
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From divergent evolution to witting cross-fertilisation: the need for more inter-discursive communication regarding students’ extended historical writing’. Curriculum Journal, 28 (4), pp.504-523
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From ‘double vision’ to panorama: using history of memory to bridge ‘event space’ when exploring interpretations of Nazi popularity with Year 13′. Teaching History, 168, pp.24-36
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘I feel if I say this in my essay it’s not going to be as strong’: multi-voicedness, ‘oral rehearsal’ and Year 13 students’ written arguments’. Teaching History, 167, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Grammar. Nazis. Does the grammatical ‘release the conceptual’? Teaching History, 163, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Exploring historical ‘frameworks’ as a curriculum goal: a case study examining students’ notions of historical significance when using millennia-wide time scales’. Curriculum Journal, 27 (4), pp.454-478
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘The whole point of the thing: how nominalisation might develop students’ written causal arguments’ Teaching History, 162, pp.16-24

 

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Jim obtained a BA in Modern History and a MA in European History from University College London, followed by a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Birkbeck College London. After this, he completed a PGCE in Secondary History and a MEd in Researching Practice at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded a PhD in Education from UCL. His doctoral research focused on the relationship between academic and school history, particularly in relation to literacy in secondary history curriculum design.

Jim taught and mentored in a number of state secondary schools and sixth form colleges. He was also a part of the Ofsted History Subject Working Group which provided advice on the new inspection framework’s development and implementation. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association and acted as Associate Editor for the HA’s professional journal Teaching History.

Jim’s research interests focus on history curriculum design, particularly literacy in history education, the relationships between academic and school history, and the interplay between overview and depth in history curricula.

Publications

• Carroll, J. E. (2022). ‘Terms and conditions: using metaphor to highlight causal processes with Year 13‘. Teaching History, 187, pp.40-49.
• Carroll, J. E. (2021). ‘Retheorising national assessment of the narrative mode for historical causal explanation in England’. History Education Research Journal, 18 (2), pp.148–65.

• Carroll, J. E. (2020). ‘Whose genres? Establishing curricular goals for students’ historical writing in England’ Teaching History (HTANSW), 52 (2), pp. 17-20

• Carroll, J.E. (2019). ‘Epistemic explanations for divergent evolution in discourses regarding students’ extended historical writing in England’. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51 (1), pp.100-120
• Carroll, J. E. (2018). ‘Couching counterfactuals in knowledge when explaining the Salem witch trials with Year 13’. Teaching History, 172, pp.18-29
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From divergent evolution to witting cross-fertilisation: the need for more inter-discursive communication regarding students’ extended historical writing’. Curriculum Journal, 28 (4), pp.504-523
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From ‘double vision’ to panorama: using history of memory to bridge ‘event space’ when exploring interpretations of Nazi popularity with Year 13′. Teaching History, 168, pp.24-36
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘I feel if I say this in my essay it’s not going to be as strong’: multi-voicedness, ‘oral rehearsal’ and Year 13 students’ written arguments’. Teaching History, 167, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Grammar. Nazis. Does the grammatical ‘release the conceptual’? Teaching History, 163, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Exploring historical ‘frameworks’ as a curriculum goal: a case study examining students’ notions of historical significance when using millennia-wide time scales’. Curriculum Journal, 27 (4), pp.454-478
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘The whole point of the thing: how nominalisation might develop students’ written causal arguments’ Teaching History, 162, pp.16-24

 

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Jim obtained a BA in Modern History and a MA in European History from University College London, followed by a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Birkbeck College London. After this, he completed a PGCE in Secondary History and a MEd in Researching Practice at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded a PhD in Education from UCL. His doctoral research focused on the relationship between academic and school history, particularly in relation to literacy in secondary history curriculum design.

Jim taught and mentored in a number of state secondary schools and sixth form colleges. He was also a part of the Ofsted History Subject Working Group which provided advice on the new inspection framework’s development and implementation. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association and acted as Associate Editor for the HA’s professional journal Teaching History.

Jim’s research interests focus on history curriculum design, particularly literacy in history education, the relationships between academic and school history, and the interplay between overview and depth in history curricula.

Publications

• Carroll, J. E. (2022). ‘Terms and conditions: using metaphor to highlight causal processes with Year 13‘. Teaching History, 187, pp.40-49.
• Carroll, J. E. (2021). ‘Retheorising national assessment of the narrative mode for historical causal explanation in England’. History Education Research Journal, 18 (2), pp.148–65.

• Carroll, J. E. (2020). ‘Whose genres? Establishing curricular goals for students’ historical writing in England’ Teaching History (HTANSW), 52 (2), pp. 17-20

• Carroll, J.E. (2019). ‘Epistemic explanations for divergent evolution in discourses regarding students’ extended historical writing in England’. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51 (1), pp.100-120
• Carroll, J. E. (2018). ‘Couching counterfactuals in knowledge when explaining the Salem witch trials with Year 13’. Teaching History, 172, pp.18-29
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From divergent evolution to witting cross-fertilisation: the need for more inter-discursive communication regarding students’ extended historical writing’. Curriculum Journal, 28 (4), pp.504-523
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From ‘double vision’ to panorama: using history of memory to bridge ‘event space’ when exploring interpretations of Nazi popularity with Year 13′. Teaching History, 168, pp.24-36
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘I feel if I say this in my essay it’s not going to be as strong’: multi-voicedness, ‘oral rehearsal’ and Year 13 students’ written arguments’. Teaching History, 167, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Grammar. Nazis. Does the grammatical ‘release the conceptual’? Teaching History, 163, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Exploring historical ‘frameworks’ as a curriculum goal: a case study examining students’ notions of historical significance when using millennia-wide time scales’. Curriculum Journal, 27 (4), pp.454-478
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘The whole point of the thing: how nominalisation might develop students’ written causal arguments’ Teaching History, 162, pp.16-24

 

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Jim obtained a BA in Modern History and a MA in European History from University College London, followed by a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Birkbeck College London. After this, he completed a PGCE in Secondary History and a MEd in Researching Practice at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded a PhD in Education from UCL. His doctoral research focused on the relationship between academic and school history, particularly in relation to literacy in secondary history curriculum design.

Jim taught and mentored in a number of state secondary schools and sixth form colleges. He was also a part of the Ofsted History Subject Working Group which provided advice on the new inspection framework’s development and implementation. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association and acted as Associate Editor for the HA’s professional journal Teaching History.

Jim’s research interests focus on history curriculum design, particularly literacy in history education, the relationships between academic and school history, and the interplay between overview and depth in history curricula.

Publications

• Carroll, J. E. (2022). ‘Terms and conditions: using metaphor to highlight causal processes with Year 13‘. Teaching History, 187, pp.40-49.
• Carroll, J. E. (2021). ‘Retheorising national assessment of the narrative mode for historical causal explanation in England’. History Education Research Journal, 18 (2), pp.148–65.

• Carroll, J. E. (2020). ‘Whose genres? Establishing curricular goals for students’ historical writing in England’ Teaching History (HTANSW), 52 (2), pp. 17-20

• Carroll, J.E. (2019). ‘Epistemic explanations for divergent evolution in discourses regarding students’ extended historical writing in England’. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51 (1), pp.100-120
• Carroll, J. E. (2018). ‘Couching counterfactuals in knowledge when explaining the Salem witch trials with Year 13’. Teaching History, 172, pp.18-29
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From divergent evolution to witting cross-fertilisation: the need for more inter-discursive communication regarding students’ extended historical writing’. Curriculum Journal, 28 (4), pp.504-523
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From ‘double vision’ to panorama: using history of memory to bridge ‘event space’ when exploring interpretations of Nazi popularity with Year 13′. Teaching History, 168, pp.24-36
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘I feel if I say this in my essay it’s not going to be as strong’: multi-voicedness, ‘oral rehearsal’ and Year 13 students’ written arguments’. Teaching History, 167, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Grammar. Nazis. Does the grammatical ‘release the conceptual’? Teaching History, 163, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Exploring historical ‘frameworks’ as a curriculum goal: a case study examining students’ notions of historical significance when using millennia-wide time scales’. Curriculum Journal, 27 (4), pp.454-478
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘The whole point of the thing: how nominalisation might develop students’ written causal arguments’ Teaching History, 162, pp.16-24

 

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Jim obtained a BA in Modern History and a MA in European History from University College London, followed by a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Birkbeck College London. After this, he completed a PGCE in Secondary History and a MEd in Researching Practice at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded a PhD in Education from UCL. His doctoral research focused on the relationship between academic and school history, particularly in relation to literacy in secondary history curriculum design.

Jim taught and mentored in a number of state secondary schools and sixth form colleges. He was also a part of the Ofsted History Subject Working Group which provided advice on the new inspection framework’s development and implementation. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association and acted as Associate Editor for the HA’s professional journal Teaching History.

Jim’s research interests focus on history curriculum design, particularly literacy in history education, the relationships between academic and school history, and the interplay between overview and depth in history curricula.

Publications

• Carroll, J. E. (2022). ‘Terms and conditions: using metaphor to highlight causal processes with Year 13‘. Teaching History, 187, pp.40-49.
• Carroll, J. E. (2021). ‘Retheorising national assessment of the narrative mode for historical causal explanation in England’. History Education Research Journal, 18 (2), pp.148–65.

• Carroll, J. E. (2020). ‘Whose genres? Establishing curricular goals for students’ historical writing in England’ Teaching History (HTANSW), 52 (2), pp. 17-20

• Carroll, J.E. (2019). ‘Epistemic explanations for divergent evolution in discourses regarding students’ extended historical writing in England’. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51 (1), pp.100-120
• Carroll, J. E. (2018). ‘Couching counterfactuals in knowledge when explaining the Salem witch trials with Year 13’. Teaching History, 172, pp.18-29
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From divergent evolution to witting cross-fertilisation: the need for more inter-discursive communication regarding students’ extended historical writing’. Curriculum Journal, 28 (4), pp.504-523
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From ‘double vision’ to panorama: using history of memory to bridge ‘event space’ when exploring interpretations of Nazi popularity with Year 13′. Teaching History, 168, pp.24-36
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘I feel if I say this in my essay it’s not going to be as strong’: multi-voicedness, ‘oral rehearsal’ and Year 13 students’ written arguments’. Teaching History, 167, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Grammar. Nazis. Does the grammatical ‘release the conceptual’? Teaching History, 163, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Exploring historical ‘frameworks’ as a curriculum goal: a case study examining students’ notions of historical significance when using millennia-wide time scales’. Curriculum Journal, 27 (4), pp.454-478
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘The whole point of the thing: how nominalisation might develop students’ written causal arguments’ Teaching History, 162, pp.16-24

 

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Jim obtained a BA in Modern History and a MA in European History from University College London, followed by a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Birkbeck College London. After this, he completed a PGCE in Secondary History and a MEd in Researching Practice at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded a PhD in Education from UCL. His doctoral research focused on the relationship between academic and school history, particularly in relation to literacy in secondary history curriculum design.

Jim taught and mentored in a number of state secondary schools and sixth form colleges. He was also a part of the Ofsted History Subject Working Group which provided advice on the new inspection framework’s development and implementation. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association and acted as Associate Editor for the HA’s professional journal Teaching History.

Jim’s research interests focus on history curriculum design, particularly literacy in history education, the relationships between academic and school history, and the interplay between overview and depth in history curricula.

Publications

• Carroll, J. E. (2022). ‘Terms and conditions: using metaphor to highlight causal processes with Year 13‘. Teaching History, 187, pp.40-49.
• Carroll, J. E. (2021). ‘Retheorising national assessment of the narrative mode for historical causal explanation in England’. History Education Research Journal, 18 (2), pp.148–65.

• Carroll, J. E. (2020). ‘Whose genres? Establishing curricular goals for students’ historical writing in England’ Teaching History (HTANSW), 52 (2), pp. 17-20

• Carroll, J.E. (2019). ‘Epistemic explanations for divergent evolution in discourses regarding students’ extended historical writing in England’. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51 (1), pp.100-120
• Carroll, J. E. (2018). ‘Couching counterfactuals in knowledge when explaining the Salem witch trials with Year 13’. Teaching History, 172, pp.18-29
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From divergent evolution to witting cross-fertilisation: the need for more inter-discursive communication regarding students’ extended historical writing’. Curriculum Journal, 28 (4), pp.504-523
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From ‘double vision’ to panorama: using history of memory to bridge ‘event space’ when exploring interpretations of Nazi popularity with Year 13′. Teaching History, 168, pp.24-36
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘I feel if I say this in my essay it’s not going to be as strong’: multi-voicedness, ‘oral rehearsal’ and Year 13 students’ written arguments’. Teaching History, 167, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Grammar. Nazis. Does the grammatical ‘release the conceptual’? Teaching History, 163, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Exploring historical ‘frameworks’ as a curriculum goal: a case study examining students’ notions of historical significance when using millennia-wide time scales’. Curriculum Journal, 27 (4), pp.454-478
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘The whole point of the thing: how nominalisation might develop students’ written causal arguments’ Teaching History, 162, pp.16-24

 

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Jim obtained a BA in Modern History and a MA in European History from University College London, followed by a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Birkbeck College London. After this, he completed a PGCE in Secondary History and a MEd in Researching Practice at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded a PhD in Education from UCL. His doctoral research focused on the relationship between academic and school history, particularly in relation to literacy in secondary history curriculum design.

Jim taught and mentored in a number of state secondary schools and sixth form colleges. He was also a part of the Ofsted History Subject Working Group which provided advice on the new inspection framework’s development and implementation. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association and acted as Associate Editor for the HA’s professional journal Teaching History.

Jim’s research interests focus on history curriculum design, particularly literacy in history education, the relationships between academic and school history, and the interplay between overview and depth in history curricula.

Publications

• Carroll, J. E. (2022). ‘Terms and conditions: using metaphor to highlight causal processes with Year 13‘. Teaching History, 187, pp.40-49.
• Carroll, J. E. (2021). ‘Retheorising national assessment of the narrative mode for historical causal explanation in England’. History Education Research Journal, 18 (2), pp.148–65.

• Carroll, J. E. (2020). ‘Whose genres? Establishing curricular goals for students’ historical writing in England’ Teaching History (HTANSW), 52 (2), pp. 17-20

• Carroll, J.E. (2019). ‘Epistemic explanations for divergent evolution in discourses regarding students’ extended historical writing in England’. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51 (1), pp.100-120
• Carroll, J. E. (2018). ‘Couching counterfactuals in knowledge when explaining the Salem witch trials with Year 13’. Teaching History, 172, pp.18-29
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From divergent evolution to witting cross-fertilisation: the need for more inter-discursive communication regarding students’ extended historical writing’. Curriculum Journal, 28 (4), pp.504-523
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From ‘double vision’ to panorama: using history of memory to bridge ‘event space’ when exploring interpretations of Nazi popularity with Year 13′. Teaching History, 168, pp.24-36
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘I feel if I say this in my essay it’s not going to be as strong’: multi-voicedness, ‘oral rehearsal’ and Year 13 students’ written arguments’. Teaching History, 167, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Grammar. Nazis. Does the grammatical ‘release the conceptual’? Teaching History, 163, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Exploring historical ‘frameworks’ as a curriculum goal: a case study examining students’ notions of historical significance when using millennia-wide time scales’. Curriculum Journal, 27 (4), pp.454-478
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘The whole point of the thing: how nominalisation might develop students’ written causal arguments’ Teaching History, 162, pp.16-24

 

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Jim obtained a BA in Modern History and a MA in European History from University College London, followed by a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Birkbeck College London. After this, he completed a PGCE in Secondary History and a MEd in Researching Practice at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded a PhD in Education from UCL. His doctoral research focused on the relationship between academic and school history, particularly in relation to literacy in secondary history curriculum design.

Jim taught and mentored in a number of state secondary schools and sixth form colleges. He was also a part of the Ofsted History Subject Working Group which provided advice on the new inspection framework’s development and implementation. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association and acted as Associate Editor for the HA’s professional journal Teaching History.

Jim’s research interests focus on history curriculum design, particularly literacy in history education, the relationships between academic and school history, and the interplay between overview and depth in history curricula.

Publications

• Carroll, J. E. (2022). ‘Terms and conditions: using metaphor to highlight causal processes with Year 13‘. Teaching History, 187, pp.40-49.
• Carroll, J. E. (2021). ‘Retheorising national assessment of the narrative mode for historical causal explanation in England’. History Education Research Journal, 18 (2), pp.148–65.

• Carroll, J. E. (2020). ‘Whose genres? Establishing curricular goals for students’ historical writing in England’ Teaching History (HTANSW), 52 (2), pp. 17-20

• Carroll, J.E. (2019). ‘Epistemic explanations for divergent evolution in discourses regarding students’ extended historical writing in England’. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51 (1), pp.100-120
• Carroll, J. E. (2018). ‘Couching counterfactuals in knowledge when explaining the Salem witch trials with Year 13’. Teaching History, 172, pp.18-29
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From divergent evolution to witting cross-fertilisation: the need for more inter-discursive communication regarding students’ extended historical writing’. Curriculum Journal, 28 (4), pp.504-523
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From ‘double vision’ to panorama: using history of memory to bridge ‘event space’ when exploring interpretations of Nazi popularity with Year 13′. Teaching History, 168, pp.24-36
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘I feel if I say this in my essay it’s not going to be as strong’: multi-voicedness, ‘oral rehearsal’ and Year 13 students’ written arguments’. Teaching History, 167, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Grammar. Nazis. Does the grammatical ‘release the conceptual’? Teaching History, 163, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Exploring historical ‘frameworks’ as a curriculum goal: a case study examining students’ notions of historical significance when using millennia-wide time scales’. Curriculum Journal, 27 (4), pp.454-478
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘The whole point of the thing: how nominalisation might develop students’ written causal arguments’ Teaching History, 162, pp.16-24

 

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Jim obtained a BA in Modern History and a MA in European History from University College London, followed by a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Birkbeck College London. After this, he completed a PGCE in Secondary History and a MEd in Researching Practice at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded a PhD in Education from UCL. His doctoral research focused on the relationship between academic and school history, particularly in relation to literacy in secondary history curriculum design.

Jim taught and mentored in a number of state secondary schools and sixth form colleges. He was also a part of the Ofsted History Subject Working Group which provided advice on the new inspection framework’s development and implementation. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association and acted as Associate Editor for the HA’s professional journal Teaching History.

Jim’s research interests focus on history curriculum design, particularly literacy in history education, the relationships between academic and school history, and the interplay between overview and depth in history curricula.

Publications

• Carroll, J. E. (2022). ‘Terms and conditions: using metaphor to highlight causal processes with Year 13‘. Teaching History, 187, pp.40-49.
• Carroll, J. E. (2021). ‘Retheorising national assessment of the narrative mode for historical causal explanation in England’. History Education Research Journal, 18 (2), pp.148–65.

• Carroll, J. E. (2020). ‘Whose genres? Establishing curricular goals for students’ historical writing in England’ Teaching History (HTANSW), 52 (2), pp. 17-20

• Carroll, J.E. (2019). ‘Epistemic explanations for divergent evolution in discourses regarding students’ extended historical writing in England’. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51 (1), pp.100-120
• Carroll, J. E. (2018). ‘Couching counterfactuals in knowledge when explaining the Salem witch trials with Year 13’. Teaching History, 172, pp.18-29
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From divergent evolution to witting cross-fertilisation: the need for more inter-discursive communication regarding students’ extended historical writing’. Curriculum Journal, 28 (4), pp.504-523
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From ‘double vision’ to panorama: using history of memory to bridge ‘event space’ when exploring interpretations of Nazi popularity with Year 13′. Teaching History, 168, pp.24-36
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘I feel if I say this in my essay it’s not going to be as strong’: multi-voicedness, ‘oral rehearsal’ and Year 13 students’ written arguments’. Teaching History, 167, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Grammar. Nazis. Does the grammatical ‘release the conceptual’? Teaching History, 163, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Exploring historical ‘frameworks’ as a curriculum goal: a case study examining students’ notions of historical significance when using millennia-wide time scales’. Curriculum Journal, 27 (4), pp.454-478
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘The whole point of the thing: how nominalisation might develop students’ written causal arguments’ Teaching History, 162, pp.16-24

 

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Haoran obtained a bachelor’s degree in Education Studies at University College London. After that, she completed her master’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Columbia University.

Publications

  • Luo, H., Yang, W., & Zeng, Y. (2022). A video-based approach to investigating intentional teaching of mathematics in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching And Teacher Education114, 103716. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2022.103716
  • Yang, W., Luo, H., & Su, J. (2022). Towards inclusiveness and sustainability of robot programming in early childhood: Child engagement, learning outcomes and teacher perception. British Journal Of Educational Technology53(6), 1486-1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13266

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Jim obtained a BA in Modern History and a MA in European History from University College London, followed by a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Birkbeck College London. After this, he completed a PGCE in Secondary History and a MEd in Researching Practice at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded a PhD in Education from UCL. His doctoral research focused on the relationship between academic and school history, particularly in relation to literacy in secondary history curriculum design.

Jim taught and mentored in a number of state secondary schools and sixth form colleges. He was also a part of the Ofsted History Subject Working Group which provided advice on the new inspection framework’s development and implementation. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association and acted as Associate Editor for the HA’s professional journal Teaching History.

Jim’s research interests focus on history curriculum design, particularly literacy in history education, the relationships between academic and school history, and the interplay between overview and depth in history curricula.

Publications

• Carroll, J. E. (2022). ‘Terms and conditions: using metaphor to highlight causal processes with Year 13‘. Teaching History, 187, pp.40-49.
• Carroll, J. E. (2021). ‘Retheorising national assessment of the narrative mode for historical causal explanation in England’. History Education Research Journal, 18 (2), pp.148–65.

• Carroll, J. E. (2020). ‘Whose genres? Establishing curricular goals for students’ historical writing in England’ Teaching History (HTANSW), 52 (2), pp. 17-20

• Carroll, J.E. (2019). ‘Epistemic explanations for divergent evolution in discourses regarding students’ extended historical writing in England’. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51 (1), pp.100-120
• Carroll, J. E. (2018). ‘Couching counterfactuals in knowledge when explaining the Salem witch trials with Year 13’. Teaching History, 172, pp.18-29
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From divergent evolution to witting cross-fertilisation: the nee