Department of Education

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Pinar is a post-doctoral researcher within the Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project at the Department of Education. As part of the wider team, Pinar is currently investigating the aspects of learning apps that support joint media engagement between parents and children and creative learning in early and middle childhood. Pinar is also contributing to a development of a game-based language intervention focused on the vocabulary acquisition of emerging bilingual and monolingual children in England.

Before joining the team, Pinar was a doctoral student and a researcher at the Department of Education. Supervised by Prof. Edward Melhuish, her thesis examined the factors contributing to bilingual language and identity development of ethnic minority children growing up in first generation immigrant households in the UK. During her doctoral studies, Pinar took up two significant research roles at the Department.  She coordinated a survey research including 300 Turkish families in the UK and led a qualitative study on the cultural experiences of ethnic minority children in England. Before joining the team, Pinar collaborated with a group of researchers at the Department for a report to the Pro-Vice-Chancellor of the University on a new education policy aiming to establish university-sponsored specialist schools in England.

Publications

Kolancali, P. (submitted for publication). The Effects of Immigration on the Language and Literacy Practices of Turkish Parents in England. Journal of Family Issues.

Broekhuizen, M. L., Guerra, R. & Kolancali, P. (in preparation). Acculturation orientations of Turkish immigrant parents across Europe. Journal of Social Issues. This paper is prepared at the request of the Journal of Social Issues for a special issue.

Baird, J., Kolancali, P., Melhuish, E., Mutton, T., Sammons, P., Skilling, K., & Stylianides, G. Specialist Mathematics Schools in England: A Review and Implications for Oxford. This paper was prepared at the request of Professor Martin Williams, Pro Vice-Chancellor (Education) at the University of Oxford, by a Working Group established at the Department of Education.

Kolancali, P. (2019) Factors related to bilingual language skills of Turkish-English Speaking Children. In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 55-70. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Kolancali, P., & Melhuish, E. (2019). How do home and school experiences of Turkish children in the UK interact with their language attitudes and preferences? In G. Pastori, V. Pagani, & A. S. Sarcinelli (Eds.) Children’s Views on Inclusion at School. ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.4. pp 76-83. https://staging-isotis-pw.framework.pt/site/assets/files/1191/d2_4_technical-report-on-the-child-interview-study.pdf

Kolancali, P., & Melhuish, E. (2019) How do family characteristics and migration shape the home learning environment of Turkish children in the UK? In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 98-102. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Broekhuizen, M. L., Guerra, R. & Kolancali, P. (2019) Acculturation orientations, intergroup relations and well-being of Turkish and Maghrebian immigrant parents across Europe (Integrative Report D2.5). In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 122-127. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Jim McKinley is an associate professor of Applied Linguistics in Higher Education at UCL Institute of Education, and a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He has been an associate of the EMI Oxford research group since arriving in the UK in 2016. Originally from the US, he later taught and studied in Australia and New Zealand, and also taught for many years on Japan’s oldest EMI program at Sophia University (2005-2016).

At Oxford, Jim regularly collaborates with Dr. Heath Rose as well as Prof. Victoria Murphy, has published with several DPhil students, and supervises dissertations on the MSc ALSLA and MSc ALLT programs.

Jim’s research mainly explores implications of globalisation for L2 writing, language education, and teaching in higher education. As principal investigator on the British Academy-funded project ‘Exploring the teaching-research nexus in higher education’ (2018), he continues to research and publish on the bifurcation of teaching and research in higher education and TESOL in the UK and internationally. Jim is a co-editor-in-chief of the journal System and series co-editor (with Dr Heath Rose) of Cambridge Elements: Language Teaching.

For further information, visit www.researchgate.net/profile/Jim-Mckinley.

 

Publications

Rose, H., McKinley, J., & Galloway, N. (2020). Global Englishes and Language Teaching: A systematic review of pedagogical research. Language Teaching. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0261444820000518

McKinley, J., McIntosh, S., Milligan, L. O., Mikolajewska, A. (2020). Eyes on the enterprise: Problematising the concept of a teaching-research nexus in UK higher education. Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00595-2

Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2020). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2020). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics. Routledge.

Rose, H., McKinley, J. & Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J. (2020). Data Collection in Applied Linguistics Research. Bloomsbury.

Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J., & McKinley, J. (2019). Language and the development of intercultural competence in an ‘internationalised’ university: Staff and student perspectives. Teaching in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/13562517.2019.1686698

McIntosh, S. McKinley, J., Milligan, L., & Mikolajewska, A. (2019). Whose values? Whose time? Issues of (in)visibility in academic practice in UK universities. Studies in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1637846

McKinley, J. (2019). Evolving the teaching-research nexus. TESOL Quarterly, 53(3), 875-884.

McKinley, J., Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J. (2019). Developing intercultural competence in the third space: postgraduate studies in the UK. Language and Intercultural Communication, 19(1), 9-22.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (2018). Conceptualizations of language errors, standards, norms and nativeness in English for research publication purposes. Journal of Second Language Writing, 42, 1-11.

McKinley, J. (2018). Integrating appraisal theory with possible selves in understanding university EFL writing. System, 78, 27-37.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2018). Japan’s English medium instruction initiatives and the globalization of higher education. Higher Education, 75(1), 111-129.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2017). The prevalence of pedagogy-related research in applied linguistics: Extending the debate. Applied Linguistics, 38(4), 599-604.

McKinley, J., & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2017). Doing Research in Applied Linguistics: Realities, Dilemmas and Solutions. Routledge.

McKinley, J. (2015). Critical argument and writer identity: Social constructivism as a theoretical framework for EFL academic writing. Critical Inquiry in Language Studies, 12(3), 184-207.

 

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Sarah is a Research Assistant at the Department of Education working with Professor Charles Hulme and Dr Gillian West.

Sarah completed her MSc in Social Cognition: Research and Applications at UCL. Her dissertation project was supervised by Dr Anne Schlottmann and investigated the development of a sense of fairness in children aged 4 to 7 years.

She is currently assisting on the Nuffield Early Language Intervention (NELI) trial for Reception children, working directly with schools as well as supporting the development and delivery of professional online training courses for school staff.

Andrew is currently working on the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools and will primarily be carrying out qualitative analysis of teacher interview data from schools who have had attachment and trauma training and a systematic review of recent literature.

Andrew has a background as a teacher and senior leader in a special school, and as a teacher trainer, particularly focused around inclusive education. Andrew’s area of research interest is around the influence of young people’s adoptive identity on educational experience and outcomes. Andrew’s research has included analysis of data from a range of sources including the Wales Adoption Cohort Study and Understanding Society, he is currently completing his doctoral thesis at Cardiff University.

 

Publications

Brown, A., Waters, C. S., & Shelton, K. H. (2017). A systematic review of the school performance and behavioural and emotional adjustments of children adopted from care. Adoption & Fostering, 41(4), 346-368.

Brown, A., Waters, C. S., & Shelton, K. H. (2019). The educational aspirations and psychological well-being of adopted young people in the UK. Adoption & Fostering, 43(1), 46-59.

Adam is a researcher in the Department’s Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance. He is currently a co-investigator on the ‘Unlocking the potential of AI for English law’ project.

This project is funded by the Industrial Strategy Challenge Fund’s (ICSF) Next Generation Services Research Programme and UK Research and Innovation (UKRI), run by researchers in the Oxford departments and faculties of Law, Economics, Computer Science, Education and the Said Business School, in 2019 and 2020.

Pinar is a post-doctoral researcher within the Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project at the Department of Education. As part of the wider team, Pinar is currently investigating the aspects of learning apps that support joint media engagement between parents and children and creative learning in early and middle childhood. Pinar is also contributing to a development of a game-based language intervention focused on the vocabulary acquisition of emerging bilingual and monolingual children in England.

Before joining the team, Pinar was a doctoral student and a researcher at the Department of Education. Supervised by Prof. Edward Melhuish, her thesis examined the factors contributing to bilingual language and identity development of ethnic minority children growing up in first generation immigrant households in the UK. During her doctoral studies, Pinar took up two significant research roles at the Department.  She coordinated a survey research including 300 Turkish families in the UK and led a qualitative study on the cultural experiences of ethnic minority children in England. Before joining the team, Pinar collaborated with a group of researchers at the Department for a report to the Pro-Vice-Chancellor of the University on a new education policy aiming to establish university-sponsored specialist schools in England.

Publications

Kolancali, P. (submitted for publication). The Effects of Immigration on the Language and Literacy Practices of Turkish Parents in England. Journal of Family Issues.

Broekhuizen, M. L., Guerra, R. & Kolancali, P. (in preparation). Acculturation orientations of Turkish immigrant parents across Europe. Journal of Social Issues. This paper is prepared at the request of the Journal of Social Issues for a special issue.

Baird, J., Kolancali, P., Melhuish, E., Mutton, T., Sammons, P., Skilling, K., & Stylianides, G. Specialist Mathematics Schools in England: A Review and Implications for Oxford. This paper was prepared at the request of Professor Martin Williams, Pro Vice-Chancellor (Education) at the University of Oxford, by a Working Group established at the Department of Education.

Kolancali, P. (2019) Factors related to bilingual language skills of Turkish-English Speaking Children. In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 55-70. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Kolancali, P., & Melhuish, E. (2019). How do home and school experiences of Turkish children in the UK interact with their language attitudes and preferences? In G. Pastori, V. Pagani, & A. S. Sarcinelli (Eds.) Children’s Views on Inclusion at School. ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.4. pp 76-83. https://staging-isotis-pw.framework.pt/site/assets/files/1191/d2_4_technical-report-on-the-child-interview-study.pdf

Kolancali, P., & Melhuish, E. (2019) How do family characteristics and migration shape the home learning environment of Turkish children in the UK? In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 98-102. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Broekhuizen, M. L., Guerra, R. & Kolancali, P. (2019) Acculturation orientations, intergroup relations and well-being of Turkish and Maghrebian immigrant parents across Europe (Integrative Report D2.5). In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 122-127. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Jim McKinley is an associate professor of Applied Linguistics in Higher Education at UCL Institute of Education, and a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He has been an associate of the EMI Oxford research group since arriving in the UK in 2016. Originally from the US, he later taught and studied in Australia and New Zealand, and also taught for many years on Japan’s oldest EMI program at Sophia University (2005-2016).

At Oxford, Jim regularly collaborates with Dr. Heath Rose as well as Prof. Victoria Murphy, has published with several DPhil students, and supervises dissertations on the MSc ALSLA and MSc ALLT programs.

Jim’s research mainly explores implications of globalisation for L2 writing, language education, and teaching in higher education. As principal investigator on the British Academy-funded project ‘Exploring the teaching-research nexus in higher education’ (2018), he continues to research and publish on the bifurcation of teaching and research in higher education and TESOL in the UK and internationally. Jim is a co-editor-in-chief of the journal System and series co-editor (with Dr Heath Rose) of Cambridge Elements: Language Teaching.

For further information, visit www.researchgate.net/profile/Jim-Mckinley.

 

Publications

Rose, H., McKinley, J., & Galloway, N. (2020). Global Englishes and Language Teaching: A systematic review of pedagogical research. Language Teaching. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0261444820000518

McKinley, J., McIntosh, S., Milligan, L. O., Mikolajewska, A. (2020). Eyes on the enterprise: Problematising the concept of a teaching-research nexus in UK higher education. Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00595-2

Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2020). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2020). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics. Routledge.

Rose, H., McKinley, J. & Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J. (2020). Data Collection in Applied Linguistics Research. Bloomsbury.

Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J., & McKinley, J. (2019). Language and the development of intercultural competence in an ‘internationalised’ university: Staff and student perspectives. Teaching in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/13562517.2019.1686698

McIntosh, S. McKinley, J., Milligan, L., & Mikolajewska, A. (2019). Whose values? Whose time? Issues of (in)visibility in academic practice in UK universities. Studies in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1637846

McKinley, J. (2019). Evolving the teaching-research nexus. TESOL Quarterly, 53(3), 875-884.

McKinley, J., Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J. (2019). Developing intercultural competence in the third space: postgraduate studies in the UK. Language and Intercultural Communication, 19(1), 9-22.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (2018). Conceptualizations of language errors, standards, norms and nativeness in English for research publication purposes. Journal of Second Language Writing, 42, 1-11.

McKinley, J. (2018). Integrating appraisal theory with possible selves in understanding university EFL writing. System, 78, 27-37.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2018). Japan’s English medium instruction initiatives and the globalization of higher education. Higher Education, 75(1), 111-129.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2017). The prevalence of pedagogy-related research in applied linguistics: Extending the debate. Applied Linguistics, 38(4), 599-604.

McKinley, J., & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2017). Doing Research in Applied Linguistics: Realities, Dilemmas and Solutions. Routledge.

McKinley, J. (2015). Critical argument and writer identity: Social constructivism as a theoretical framework for EFL academic writing. Critical Inquiry in Language Studies, 12(3), 184-207.

 

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Sarah is a Research Assistant at the Department of Education working with Professor Charles Hulme and Dr Gillian West.

Sarah completed her MSc in Social Cognition: Research and Applications at UCL. Her dissertation project was supervised by Dr Anne Schlottmann and investigated the development of a sense of fairness in children aged 4 to 7 years.

She is currently assisting on the Nuffield Early Language Intervention (NELI) trial for Reception children, working directly with schools as well as supporting the development and delivery of professional online training courses for school staff.

Andrew is currently working on the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools and will primarily be carrying out qualitative analysis of teacher interview data from schools who have had attachment and trauma training and a systematic review of recent literature.

Andrew has a background as a teacher and senior leader in a special school, and as a teacher trainer, particularly focused around inclusive education. Andrew’s area of research interest is around the influence of young people’s adoptive identity on educational experience and outcomes. Andrew’s research has included analysis of data from a range of sources including the Wales Adoption Cohort Study and Understanding Society, he is currently completing his doctoral thesis at Cardiff University.

 

Publications

Brown, A., Waters, C. S., & Shelton, K. H. (2017). A systematic review of the school performance and behavioural and emotional adjustments of children adopted from care. Adoption & Fostering, 41(4), 346-368.

Brown, A., Waters, C. S., & Shelton, K. H. (2019). The educational aspirations and psychological well-being of adopted young people in the UK. Adoption & Fostering, 43(1), 46-59.

Adam is a researcher in the Department’s Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance. He is currently a co-investigator on the ‘Unlocking the potential of AI for English law’ project.

This project is funded by the Industrial Strategy Challenge Fund’s (ICSF) Next Generation Services Research Programme and UK Research and Innovation (UKRI), run by researchers in the Oxford departments and faculties of Law, Economics, Computer Science, Education and the Said Business School, in 2019 and 2020.

Pinar is a post-doctoral researcher within the Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project at the Department of Education. As part of the wider team, Pinar is currently investigating the aspects of learning apps that support joint media engagement between parents and children and creative learning in early and middle childhood. Pinar is also contributing to a development of a game-based language intervention focused on the vocabulary acquisition of emerging bilingual and monolingual children in England.

Before joining the team, Pinar was a doctoral student and a researcher at the Department of Education. Supervised by Prof. Edward Melhuish, her thesis examined the factors contributing to bilingual language and identity development of ethnic minority children growing up in first generation immigrant households in the UK. During her doctoral studies, Pinar took up two significant research roles at the Department.  She coordinated a survey research including 300 Turkish families in the UK and led a qualitative study on the cultural experiences of ethnic minority children in England. Before joining the team, Pinar collaborated with a group of researchers at the Department for a report to the Pro-Vice-Chancellor of the University on a new education policy aiming to establish university-sponsored specialist schools in England.

Publications

Kolancali, P. (submitted for publication). The Effects of Immigration on the Language and Literacy Practices of Turkish Parents in England. Journal of Family Issues.

Broekhuizen, M. L., Guerra, R. & Kolancali, P. (in preparation). Acculturation orientations of Turkish immigrant parents across Europe. Journal of Social Issues. This paper is prepared at the request of the Journal of Social Issues for a special issue.

Baird, J., Kolancali, P., Melhuish, E., Mutton, T., Sammons, P., Skilling, K., & Stylianides, G. Specialist Mathematics Schools in England: A Review and Implications for Oxford. This paper was prepared at the request of Professor Martin Williams, Pro Vice-Chancellor (Education) at the University of Oxford, by a Working Group established at the Department of Education.

Kolancali, P. (2019) Factors related to bilingual language skills of Turkish-English Speaking Children. In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 55-70. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Kolancali, P., & Melhuish, E. (2019). How do home and school experiences of Turkish children in the UK interact with their language attitudes and preferences? In G. Pastori, V. Pagani, & A. S. Sarcinelli (Eds.) Children’s Views on Inclusion at School. ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.4. pp 76-83. https://staging-isotis-pw.framework.pt/site/assets/files/1191/d2_4_technical-report-on-the-child-interview-study.pdf

Kolancali, P., & Melhuish, E. (2019) How do family characteristics and migration shape the home learning environment of Turkish children in the UK? In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 98-102. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Broekhuizen, M. L., Guerra, R. & Kolancali, P. (2019) Acculturation orientations, intergroup relations and well-being of Turkish and Maghrebian immigrant parents across Europe (Integrative Report D2.5). In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 122-127. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Jim McKinley is an associate professor of Applied Linguistics in Higher Education at UCL Institute of Education, and a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He has been an associate of the EMI Oxford research group since arriving in the UK in 2016. Originally from the US, he later taught and studied in Australia and New Zealand, and also taught for many years on Japan’s oldest EMI program at Sophia University (2005-2016).

At Oxford, Jim regularly collaborates with Dr. Heath Rose as well as Prof. Victoria Murphy, has published with several DPhil students, and supervises dissertations on the MSc ALSLA and MSc ALLT programs.

Jim’s research mainly explores implications of globalisation for L2 writing, language education, and teaching in higher education. As principal investigator on the British Academy-funded project ‘Exploring the teaching-research nexus in higher education’ (2018), he continues to research and publish on the bifurcation of teaching and research in higher education and TESOL in the UK and internationally. Jim is a co-editor-in-chief of the journal System and series co-editor (with Dr Heath Rose) of Cambridge Elements: Language Teaching.

For further information, visit www.researchgate.net/profile/Jim-Mckinley.

 

Publications

Rose, H., McKinley, J., & Galloway, N. (2020). Global Englishes and Language Teaching: A systematic review of pedagogical research. Language Teaching. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0261444820000518

McKinley, J., McIntosh, S., Milligan, L. O., Mikolajewska, A. (2020). Eyes on the enterprise: Problematising the concept of a teaching-research nexus in UK higher education. Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00595-2

Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2020). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2020). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics. Routledge.

Rose, H., McKinley, J. & Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J. (2020). Data Collection in Applied Linguistics Research. Bloomsbury.

Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J., & McKinley, J. (2019). Language and the development of intercultural competence in an ‘internationalised’ university: Staff and student perspectives. Teaching in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/13562517.2019.1686698

McIntosh, S. McKinley, J., Milligan, L., & Mikolajewska, A. (2019). Whose values? Whose time? Issues of (in)visibility in academic practice in UK universities. Studies in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1637846

McKinley, J. (2019). Evolving the teaching-research nexus. TESOL Quarterly, 53(3), 875-884.

McKinley, J., Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J. (2019). Developing intercultural competence in the third space: postgraduate studies in the UK. Language and Intercultural Communication, 19(1), 9-22.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (2018). Conceptualizations of language errors, standards, norms and nativeness in English for research publication purposes. Journal of Second Language Writing, 42, 1-11.

McKinley, J. (2018). Integrating appraisal theory with possible selves in understanding university EFL writing. System, 78, 27-37.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2018). Japan’s English medium instruction initiatives and the globalization of higher education. Higher Education, 75(1), 111-129.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2017). The prevalence of pedagogy-related research in applied linguistics: Extending the debate. Applied Linguistics, 38(4), 599-604.

McKinley, J., & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2017). Doing Research in Applied Linguistics: Realities, Dilemmas and Solutions. Routledge.

McKinley, J. (2015). Critical argument and writer identity: Social constructivism as a theoretical framework for EFL academic writing. Critical Inquiry in Language Studies, 12(3), 184-207.

 

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Sarah is a Research Assistant at the Department of Education working with Professor Charles Hulme and Dr Gillian West.

Sarah completed her MSc in Social Cognition: Research and Applications at UCL. Her dissertation project was supervised by Dr Anne Schlottmann and investigated the development of a sense of fairness in children aged 4 to 7 years.

She is currently assisting on the Nuffield Early Language Intervention (NELI) trial for Reception children, working directly with schools as well as supporting the development and delivery of professional online training courses for school staff.

Andrew is currently working on the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools and will primarily be carrying out qualitative analysis of teacher interview data from schools who have had attachment and trauma training and a systematic review of recent literature.

Andrew has a background as a teacher and senior leader in a special school, and as a teacher trainer, particularly focused around inclusive education. Andrew’s area of research interest is around the influence of young people’s adoptive identity on educational experience and outcomes. Andrew’s research has included analysis of data from a range of sources including the Wales Adoption Cohort Study and Understanding Society, he is currently completing his doctoral thesis at Cardiff University.

 

Publications

Brown, A., Waters, C. S., & Shelton, K. H. (2017). A systematic review of the school performance and behavioural and emotional adjustments of children adopted from care. Adoption & Fostering, 41(4), 346-368.

Brown, A., Waters, C. S., & Shelton, K. H. (2019). The educational aspirations and psychological well-being of adopted young people in the UK. Adoption & Fostering, 43(1), 46-59.

Adam is a researcher in the Department’s Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance. He is currently a co-investigator on the ‘Unlocking the potential of AI for English law’ project.

This project is funded by the Industrial Strategy Challenge Fund’s (ICSF) Next Generation Services Research Programme and UK Research and Innovation (UKRI), run by researchers in the Oxford departments and faculties of Law, Economics, Computer Science, Education and the Said Business School, in 2019 and 2020.

Pinar is a post-doctoral researcher within the Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project at the Department of Education. As part of the wider team, Pinar is currently investigating the aspects of learning apps that support joint media engagement between parents and children and creative learning in early and middle childhood. Pinar is also contributing to a development of a game-based language intervention focused on the vocabulary acquisition of emerging bilingual and monolingual children in England.

Before joining the team, Pinar was a doctoral student and a researcher at the Department of Education. Supervised by Prof. Edward Melhuish, her thesis examined the factors contributing to bilingual language and identity development of ethnic minority children growing up in first generation immigrant households in the UK. During her doctoral studies, Pinar took up two significant research roles at the Department.  She coordinated a survey research including 300 Turkish families in the UK and led a qualitative study on the cultural experiences of ethnic minority children in England. Before joining the team, Pinar collaborated with a group of researchers at the Department for a report to the Pro-Vice-Chancellor of the University on a new education policy aiming to establish university-sponsored specialist schools in England.

Publications

Kolancali, P. (submitted for publication). The Effects of Immigration on the Language and Literacy Practices of Turkish Parents in England. Journal of Family Issues.

Broekhuizen, M. L., Guerra, R. & Kolancali, P. (in preparation). Acculturation orientations of Turkish immigrant parents across Europe. Journal of Social Issues. This paper is prepared at the request of the Journal of Social Issues for a special issue.

Baird, J., Kolancali, P., Melhuish, E., Mutton, T., Sammons, P., Skilling, K., & Stylianides, G. Specialist Mathematics Schools in England: A Review and Implications for Oxford. This paper was prepared at the request of Professor Martin Williams, Pro Vice-Chancellor (Education) at the University of Oxford, by a Working Group established at the Department of Education.

Kolancali, P. (2019) Factors related to bilingual language skills of Turkish-English Speaking Children. In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 55-70. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Kolancali, P., & Melhuish, E. (2019). How do home and school experiences of Turkish children in the UK interact with their language attitudes and preferences? In G. Pastori, V. Pagani, & A. S. Sarcinelli (Eds.) Children’s Views on Inclusion at School. ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.4. pp 76-83. https://staging-isotis-pw.framework.pt/site/assets/files/1191/d2_4_technical-report-on-the-child-interview-study.pdf

Kolancali, P., & Melhuish, E. (2019) How do family characteristics and migration shape the home learning environment of Turkish children in the UK? In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 98-102. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Broekhuizen, M. L., Guerra, R. & Kolancali, P. (2019) Acculturation orientations, intergroup relations and well-being of Turkish and Maghrebian immigrant parents across Europe (Integrative Report D2.5). In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 122-127. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Jim McKinley is an associate professor of Applied Linguistics in Higher Education at UCL Institute of Education, and a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He has been an associate of the EMI Oxford research group since arriving in the UK in 2016. Originally from the US, he later taught and studied in Australia and New Zealand, and also taught for many years on Japan’s oldest EMI program at Sophia University (2005-2016).

At Oxford, Jim regularly collaborates with Dr. Heath Rose as well as Prof. Victoria Murphy, has published with several DPhil students, and supervises dissertations on the MSc ALSLA and MSc ALLT programs.

Jim’s research mainly explores implications of globalisation for L2 writing, language education, and teaching in higher education. As principal investigator on the British Academy-funded project ‘Exploring the teaching-research nexus in higher education’ (2018), he continues to research and publish on the bifurcation of teaching and research in higher education and TESOL in the UK and internationally. Jim is a co-editor-in-chief of the journal System and series co-editor (with Dr Heath Rose) of Cambridge Elements: Language Teaching.

For further information, visit www.researchgate.net/profile/Jim-Mckinley.

 

Publications

Rose, H., McKinley, J., & Galloway, N. (2020). Global Englishes and Language Teaching: A systematic review of pedagogical research. Language Teaching. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0261444820000518

McKinley, J., McIntosh, S., Milligan, L. O., Mikolajewska, A. (2020). Eyes on the enterprise: Problematising the concept of a teaching-research nexus in UK higher education. Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00595-2

Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2020). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2020). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics. Routledge.

Rose, H., McKinley, J. & Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J. (2020). Data Collection in Applied Linguistics Research. Bloomsbury.

Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J., & McKinley, J. (2019). Language and the development of intercultural competence in an ‘internationalised’ university: Staff and student perspectives. Teaching in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/13562517.2019.1686698

McIntosh, S. McKinley, J., Milligan, L., & Mikolajewska, A. (2019). Whose values? Whose time? Issues of (in)visibility in academic practice in UK universities. Studies in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1637846

McKinley, J. (2019). Evolving the teaching-research nexus. TESOL Quarterly, 53(3), 875-884.

McKinley, J., Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J. (2019). Developing intercultural competence in the third space: postgraduate studies in the UK. Language and Intercultural Communication, 19(1), 9-22.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (2018). Conceptualizations of language errors, standards, norms and nativeness in English for research publication purposes. Journal of Second Language Writing, 42, 1-11.

McKinley, J. (2018). Integrating appraisal theory with possible selves in understanding university EFL writing. System, 78, 27-37.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2018). Japan’s English medium instruction initiatives and the globalization of higher education. Higher Education, 75(1), 111-129.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2017). The prevalence of pedagogy-related research in applied linguistics: Extending the debate. Applied Linguistics, 38(4), 599-604.

McKinley, J., & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2017). Doing Research in Applied Linguistics: Realities, Dilemmas and Solutions. Routledge.

McKinley, J. (2015). Critical argument and writer identity: Social constructivism as a theoretical framework for EFL academic writing. Critical Inquiry in Language Studies, 12(3), 184-207.

 

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Sarah is a Research Assistant at the Department of Education working with Professor Charles Hulme and Dr Gillian West.

Sarah completed her MSc in Social Cognition: Research and Applications at UCL. Her dissertation project was supervised by Dr Anne Schlottmann and investigated the development of a sense of fairness in children aged 4 to 7 years.

She is currently assisting on the Nuffield Early Language Intervention (NELI) trial for Reception children, working directly with schools as well as supporting the development and delivery of professional online training courses for school staff.

Andrew is currently working on the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools and will primarily be carrying out qualitative analysis of teacher interview data from schools who have had attachment and trauma training and a systematic review of recent literature.

Andrew has a background as a teacher and senior leader in a special school, and as a teacher trainer, particularly focused around inclusive education. Andrew’s area of research interest is around the influence of young people’s adoptive identity on educational experience and outcomes. Andrew’s research has included analysis of data from a range of sources including the Wales Adoption Cohort Study and Understanding Society, he is currently completing his doctoral thesis at Cardiff University.

 

Publications

Brown, A., Waters, C. S., & Shelton, K. H. (2017). A systematic review of the school performance and behavioural and emotional adjustments of children adopted from care. Adoption & Fostering, 41(4), 346-368.

Brown, A., Waters, C. S., & Shelton, K. H. (2019). The educational aspirations and psychological well-being of adopted young people in the UK. Adoption & Fostering, 43(1), 46-59.

Adam is a researcher in the Department’s Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance. He is currently a co-investigator on the ‘Unlocking the potential of AI for English law’ project.

This project is funded by the Industrial Strategy Challenge Fund’s (ICSF) Next Generation Services Research Programme and UK Research and Innovation (UKRI), run by researchers in the Oxford departments and faculties of Law, Economics, Computer Science, Education and the Said Business School, in 2019 and 2020.

Pinar is a post-doctoral researcher within the Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project at the Department of Education. As part of the wider team, Pinar is currently investigating the aspects of learning apps that support joint media engagement between parents and children and creative learning in early and middle childhood. Pinar is also contributing to a development of a game-based language intervention focused on the vocabulary acquisition of emerging bilingual and monolingual children in England.

Before joining the team, Pinar was a doctoral student and a researcher at the Department of Education. Supervised by Prof. Edward Melhuish, her thesis examined the factors contributing to bilingual language and identity development of ethnic minority children growing up in first generation immigrant households in the UK. During her doctoral studies, Pinar took up two significant research roles at the Department.  She coordinated a survey research including 300 Turkish families in the UK and led a qualitative study on the cultural experiences of ethnic minority children in England. Before joining the team, Pinar collaborated with a group of researchers at the Department for a report to the Pro-Vice-Chancellor of the University on a new education policy aiming to establish university-sponsored specialist schools in England.

Publications

Kolancali, P. (submitted for publication). The Effects of Immigration on the Language and Literacy Practices of Turkish Parents in England. Journal of Family Issues.

Broekhuizen, M. L., Guerra, R. & Kolancali, P. (in preparation). Acculturation orientations of Turkish immigrant parents across Europe. Journal of Social Issues. This paper is prepared at the request of the Journal of Social Issues for a special issue.

Baird, J., Kolancali, P., Melhuish, E., Mutton, T., Sammons, P., Skilling, K., & Stylianides, G. Specialist Mathematics Schools in England: A Review and Implications for Oxford. This paper was prepared at the request of Professor Martin Williams, Pro Vice-Chancellor (Education) at the University of Oxford, by a Working Group established at the Department of Education.

Kolancali, P. (2019) Factors related to bilingual language skills of Turkish-English Speaking Children. In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 55-70. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Kolancali, P., & Melhuish, E. (2019). How do home and school experiences of Turkish children in the UK interact with their language attitudes and preferences? In G. Pastori, V. Pagani, & A. S. Sarcinelli (Eds.) Children’s Views on Inclusion at School. ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.4. pp 76-83. https://staging-isotis-pw.framework.pt/site/assets/files/1191/d2_4_technical-report-on-the-child-interview-study.pdf

Kolancali, P., & Melhuish, E. (2019) How do family characteristics and migration shape the home learning environment of Turkish children in the UK? In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 98-102. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Broekhuizen, M. L., Guerra, R. & Kolancali, P. (2019) Acculturation orientations, intergroup relations and well-being of Turkish and Maghrebian immigrant parents across Europe (Integrative Report D2.5). In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 122-127. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Jim McKinley is an associate professor of Applied Linguistics in Higher Education at UCL Institute of Education, and a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He has been an associate of the EMI Oxford research group since arriving in the UK in 2016. Originally from the US, he later taught and studied in Australia and New Zealand, and also taught for many years on Japan’s oldest EMI program at Sophia University (2005-2016).

At Oxford, Jim regularly collaborates with Dr. Heath Rose as well as Prof. Victoria Murphy, has published with several DPhil students, and supervises dissertations on the MSc ALSLA and MSc ALLT programs.

Jim’s research mainly explores implications of globalisation for L2 writing, language education, and teaching in higher education. As principal investigator on the British Academy-funded project ‘Exploring the teaching-research nexus in higher education’ (2018), he continues to research and publish on the bifurcation of teaching and research in higher education and TESOL in the UK and internationally. Jim is a co-editor-in-chief of the journal System and series co-editor (with Dr Heath Rose) of Cambridge Elements: Language Teaching.

For further information, visit www.researchgate.net/profile/Jim-Mckinley.

 

Publications

Rose, H., McKinley, J., & Galloway, N. (2020). Global Englishes and Language Teaching: A systematic review of pedagogical research. Language Teaching. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0261444820000518

McKinley, J., McIntosh, S., Milligan, L. O., Mikolajewska, A. (2020). Eyes on the enterprise: Problematising the concept of a teaching-research nexus in UK higher education. Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00595-2

Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2020). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2020). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics. Routledge.

Rose, H., McKinley, J. & Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J. (2020). Data Collection in Applied Linguistics Research. Bloomsbury.

Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J., & McKinley, J. (2019). Language and the development of intercultural competence in an ‘internationalised’ university: Staff and student perspectives. Teaching in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/13562517.2019.1686698

McIntosh, S. McKinley, J., Milligan, L., & Mikolajewska, A. (2019). Whose values? Whose time? Issues of (in)visibility in academic practice in UK universities. Studies in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1637846

McKinley, J. (2019). Evolving the teaching-research nexus. TESOL Quarterly, 53(3), 875-884.

McKinley, J., Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J. (2019). Developing intercultural competence in the third space: postgraduate studies in the UK. Language and Intercultural Communication, 19(1), 9-22.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (2018). Conceptualizations of language errors, standards, norms and nativeness in English for research publication purposes. Journal of Second Language Writing, 42, 1-11.

McKinley, J. (2018). Integrating appraisal theory with possible selves in understanding university EFL writing. System, 78, 27-37.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2018). Japan’s English medium instruction initiatives and the globalization of higher education. Higher Education, 75(1), 111-129.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2017). The prevalence of pedagogy-related research in applied linguistics: Extending the debate. Applied Linguistics, 38(4), 599-604.

McKinley, J., & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2017). Doing Research in Applied Linguistics: Realities, Dilemmas and Solutions. Routledge.

McKinley, J. (2015). Critical argument and writer identity: Social constructivism as a theoretical framework for EFL academic writing. Critical Inquiry in Language Studies, 12(3), 184-207.

 

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Sarah is a Research Assistant at the Department of Education working with Professor Charles Hulme and Dr Gillian West.

Sarah completed her MSc in Social Cognition: Research and Applications at UCL. Her dissertation project was supervised by Dr Anne Schlottmann and investigated the development of a sense of fairness in children aged 4 to 7 years.

She is currently assisting on the Nuffield Early Language Intervention (NELI) trial for Reception children, working directly with schools as well as supporting the development and delivery of professional online training courses for school staff.

Andrew is currently working on the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools and will primarily be carrying out qualitative analysis of teacher interview data from schools who have had attachment and trauma training and a systematic review of recent literature.

Andrew has a background as a teacher and senior leader in a special school, and as a teacher trainer, particularly focused around inclusive education. Andrew’s area of research interest is around the influence of young people’s adoptive identity on educational experience and outcomes. Andrew’s research has included analysis of data from a range of sources including the Wales Adoption Cohort Study and Understanding Society, he is currently completing his doctoral thesis at Cardiff University.

 

Publications

Brown, A., Waters, C. S., & Shelton, K. H. (2017). A systematic review of the school performance and behavioural and emotional adjustments of children adopted from care. Adoption & Fostering, 41(4), 346-368.

Brown, A., Waters, C. S., & Shelton, K. H. (2019). The educational aspirations and psychological well-being of adopted young people in the UK. Adoption & Fostering, 43(1), 46-59.

Adam is a researcher in the Department’s Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance. He is currently a co-investigator on the ‘Unlocking the potential of AI for English law’ project.

This project is funded by the Industrial Strategy Challenge Fund’s (ICSF) Next Generation Services Research Programme and UK Research and Innovation (UKRI), run by researchers in the Oxford departments and faculties of Law, Economics, Computer Science, Education and the Said Business School, in 2019 and 2020.

Pinar is a post-doctoral researcher within the Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project at the Department of Education. As part of the wider team, Pinar is currently investigating the aspects of learning apps that support joint media engagement between parents and children and creative learning in early and middle childhood. Pinar is also contributing to a development of a game-based language intervention focused on the vocabulary acquisition of emerging bilingual and monolingual children in England.

Before joining the team, Pinar was a doctoral student and a researcher at the Department of Education. Supervised by Prof. Edward Melhuish, her thesis examined the factors contributing to bilingual language and identity development of ethnic minority children growing up in first generation immigrant households in the UK. During her doctoral studies, Pinar took up two significant research roles at the Department.  She coordinated a survey research including 300 Turkish families in the UK and led a qualitative study on the cultural experiences of ethnic minority children in England. Before joining the team, Pinar collaborated with a group of researchers at the Department for a report to the Pro-Vice-Chancellor of the University on a new education policy aiming to establish university-sponsored specialist schools in England.

Publications

Kolancali, P. (submitted for publication). The Effects of Immigration on the Language and Literacy Practices of Turkish Parents in England. Journal of Family Issues.

Broekhuizen, M. L., Guerra, R. & Kolancali, P. (in preparation). Acculturation orientations of Turkish immigrant parents across Europe. Journal of Social Issues. This paper is prepared at the request of the Journal of Social Issues for a special issue.

Baird, J., Kolancali, P., Melhuish, E., Mutton, T., Sammons, P., Skilling, K., & Stylianides, G. Specialist Mathematics Schools in England: A Review and Implications for Oxford. This paper was prepared at the request of Professor Martin Williams, Pro Vice-Chancellor (Education) at the University of Oxford, by a Working Group established at the Department of Education.

Kolancali, P. (2019) Factors related to bilingual language skills of Turkish-English Speaking Children. In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 55-70. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Kolancali, P., & Melhuish, E. (2019). How do home and school experiences of Turkish children in the UK interact with their language attitudes and preferences? In G. Pastori, V. Pagani, & A. S. Sarcinelli (Eds.) Children’s Views on Inclusion at School. ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.4. pp 76-83. https://staging-isotis-pw.framework.pt/site/assets/files/1191/d2_4_technical-report-on-the-child-interview-study.pdf

Kolancali, P., & Melhuish, E. (2019) How do family characteristics and migration shape the home learning environment of Turkish children in the UK? In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 98-102. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Broekhuizen, M. L., Guerra, R. & Kolancali, P. (2019) Acculturation orientations, intergroup relations and well-being of Turkish and Maghrebian immigrant parents across Europe (Integrative Report D2.5). In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 122-127. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Jim McKinley is an associate professor of Applied Linguistics in Higher Education at UCL Institute of Education, and a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He has been an associate of the EMI Oxford research group since arriving in the UK in 2016. Originally from the US, he later taught and studied in Australia and New Zealand, and also taught for many years on Japan’s oldest EMI program at Sophia University (2005-2016).

At Oxford, Jim regularly collaborates with Dr. Heath Rose as well as Prof. Victoria Murphy, has published with several DPhil students, and supervises dissertations on the MSc ALSLA and MSc ALLT programs.

Jim’s research mainly explores implications of globalisation for L2 writing, language education, and teaching in higher education. As principal investigator on the British Academy-funded project ‘Exploring the teaching-research nexus in higher education’ (2018), he continues to research and publish on the bifurcation of teaching and research in higher education and TESOL in the UK and internationally. Jim is a co-editor-in-chief of the journal System and series co-editor (with Dr Heath Rose) of Cambridge Elements: Language Teaching.

For further information, visit www.researchgate.net/profile/Jim-Mckinley.

 

Publications

Rose, H., McKinley, J., & Galloway, N. (2020). Global Englishes and Language Teaching: A systematic review of pedagogical research. Language Teaching. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0261444820000518

McKinley, J., McIntosh, S., Milligan, L. O., Mikolajewska, A. (2020). Eyes on the enterprise: Problematising the concept of a teaching-research nexus in UK higher education. Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00595-2

Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2020). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2020). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics. Routledge.

Rose, H., McKinley, J. & Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J. (2020). Data Collection in Applied Linguistics Research. Bloomsbury.

Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J., & McKinley, J. (2019). Language and the development of intercultural competence in an ‘internationalised’ university: Staff and student perspectives. Teaching in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/13562517.2019.1686698

McIntosh, S. McKinley, J., Milligan, L., & Mikolajewska, A. (2019). Whose values? Whose time? Issues of (in)visibility in academic practice in UK universities. Studies in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1637846

McKinley, J. (2019). Evolving the teaching-research nexus. TESOL Quarterly, 53(3), 875-884.

McKinley, J., Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J. (2019). Developing intercultural competence in the third space: postgraduate studies in the UK. Language and Intercultural Communication, 19(1), 9-22.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (2018). Conceptualizations of language errors, standards, norms and nativeness in English for research publication purposes. Journal of Second Language Writing, 42, 1-11.

McKinley, J. (2018). Integrating appraisal theory with possible selves in understanding university EFL writing. System, 78, 27-37.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2018). Japan’s English medium instruction initiatives and the globalization of higher education. Higher Education, 75(1), 111-129.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2017). The prevalence of pedagogy-related research in applied linguistics: Extending the debate. Applied Linguistics, 38(4), 599-604.

McKinley, J., & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2017). Doing Research in Applied Linguistics: Realities, Dilemmas and Solutions. Routledge.

McKinley, J. (2015). Critical argument and writer identity: Social constructivism as a theoretical framework for EFL academic writing. Critical Inquiry in Language Studies, 12(3), 184-207.

 

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Sarah is a Research Assistant at the Department of Education working with Professor Charles Hulme and Dr Gillian West.

Sarah completed her MSc in Social Cognition: Research and Applications at UCL. Her dissertation project was supervised by Dr Anne Schlottmann and investigated the development of a sense of fairness in children aged 4 to 7 years.

She is currently assisting on the Nuffield Early Language Intervention (NELI) trial for Reception children, working directly with schools as well as supporting the development and delivery of professional online training courses for school staff.

Andrew is currently working on the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools and will primarily be carrying out qualitative analysis of teacher interview data from schools who have had attachment and trauma training and a systematic review of recent literature.

Andrew has a background as a teacher and senior leader in a special school, and as a teacher trainer, particularly focused around inclusive education. Andrew’s area of research interest is around the influence of young people’s adoptive identity on educational experience and outcomes. Andrew’s research has included analysis of data from a range of sources including the Wales Adoption Cohort Study and Understanding Society, he is currently completing his doctoral thesis at Cardiff University.

 

Publications

Brown, A., Waters, C. S., & Shelton, K. H. (2017). A systematic review of the school performance and behavioural and emotional adjustments of children adopted from care. Adoption & Fostering, 41(4), 346-368.

Brown, A., Waters, C. S., & Shelton, K. H. (2019). The educational aspirations and psychological well-being of adopted young people in the UK. Adoption & Fostering, 43(1), 46-59.

Adam is a researcher in the Department’s Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance. He is currently a co-investigator on the ‘Unlocking the potential of AI for English law’ project.

This project is funded by the Industrial Strategy Challenge Fund’s (ICSF) Next Generation Services Research Programme and UK Research and Innovation (UKRI), run by researchers in the Oxford departments and faculties of Law, Economics, Computer Science, Education and the Said Business School, in 2019 and 2020.

Pinar is a post-doctoral researcher within the Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project at the Department of Education. As part of the wider team, Pinar is currently investigating the aspects of learning apps that support joint media engagement between parents and children and creative learning in early and middle childhood. Pinar is also contributing to a development of a game-based language intervention focused on the vocabulary acquisition of emerging bilingual and monolingual children in England.

Before joining the team, Pinar was a doctoral student and a researcher at the Department of Education. Supervised by Prof. Edward Melhuish, her thesis examined the factors contributing to bilingual language and identity development of ethnic minority children growing up in first generation immigrant households in the UK. During her doctoral studies, Pinar took up two significant research roles at the Department.  She coordinated a survey research including 300 Turkish families in the UK and led a qualitative study on the cultural experiences of ethnic minority children in England. Before joining the team, Pinar collaborated with a group of researchers at the Department for a report to the Pro-Vice-Chancellor of the University on a new education policy aiming to establish university-sponsored specialist schools in England.

Publications

Kolancali, P. (submitted for publication). The Effects of Immigration on the Language and Literacy Practices of Turkish Parents in England. Journal of Family Issues.

Broekhuizen, M. L., Guerra, R. & Kolancali, P. (in preparation). Acculturation orientations of Turkish immigrant parents across Europe. Journal of Social Issues. This paper is prepared at the request of the Journal of Social Issues for a special issue.

Baird, J., Kolancali, P., Melhuish, E., Mutton, T., Sammons, P., Skilling, K., & Stylianides, G. Specialist Mathematics Schools in England: A Review and Implications for Oxford. This paper was prepared at the request of Professor Martin Williams, Pro Vice-Chancellor (Education) at the University of Oxford, by a Working Group established at the Department of Education.

Kolancali, P. (2019) Factors related to bilingual language skills of Turkish-English Speaking Children. In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 55-70. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Kolancali, P., & Melhuish, E. (2019). How do home and school experiences of Turkish children in the UK interact with their language attitudes and preferences? In G. Pastori, V. Pagani, & A. S. Sarcinelli (Eds.) Children’s Views on Inclusion at School. ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.4. pp 76-83. https://staging-isotis-pw.framework.pt/site/assets/files/1191/d2_4_technical-report-on-the-child-interview-study.pdf

Kolancali, P., & Melhuish, E. (2019) How do family characteristics and migration shape the home learning environment of Turkish children in the UK? In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 98-102. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Broekhuizen, M. L., Guerra, R. & Kolancali, P. (2019) Acculturation orientations, intergroup relations and well-being of Turkish and Maghrebian immigrant parents across Europe (Integrative Report D2.5). In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 122-127. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Jim McKinley is an associate professor of Applied Linguistics in Higher Education at UCL Institute of Education, and a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He has been an associate of the EMI Oxford research group since arriving in the UK in 2016. Originally from the US, he later taught and studied in Australia and New Zealand, and also taught for many years on Japan’s oldest EMI program at Sophia University (2005-2016).

At Oxford, Jim regularly collaborates with Dr. Heath Rose as well as Prof. Victoria Murphy, has published with several DPhil students, and supervises dissertations on the MSc ALSLA and MSc ALLT programs.

Jim’s research mainly explores implications of globalisation for L2 writing, language education, and teaching in higher education. As principal investigator on the British Academy-funded project ‘Exploring the teaching-research nexus in higher education’ (2018), he continues to research and publish on the bifurcation of teaching and research in higher education and TESOL in the UK and internationally. Jim is a co-editor-in-chief of the journal System and series co-editor (with Dr Heath Rose) of Cambridge Elements: Language Teaching.

For further information, visit www.researchgate.net/profile/Jim-Mckinley.

 

Publications

Rose, H., McKinley, J., & Galloway, N. (2020). Global Englishes and Language Teaching: A systematic review of pedagogical research. Language Teaching. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0261444820000518

McKinley, J., McIntosh, S., Milligan, L. O., Mikolajewska, A. (2020). Eyes on the enterprise: Problematising the concept of a teaching-research nexus in UK higher education. Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00595-2

Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2020). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2020). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics. Routledge.

Rose, H., McKinley, J. & Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J. (2020). Data Collection in Applied Linguistics Research. Bloomsbury.

Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J., & McKinley, J. (2019). Language and the development of intercultural competence in an ‘internationalised’ university: Staff and student perspectives. Teaching in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/13562517.2019.1686698

McIntosh, S. McKinley, J., Milligan, L., & Mikolajewska, A. (2019). Whose values? Whose time? Issues of (in)visibility in academic practice in UK universities. Studies in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1637846

McKinley, J. (2019). Evolving the teaching-research nexus. TESOL Quarterly, 53(3), 875-884.

McKinley, J., Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J. (2019). Developing intercultural competence in the third space: postgraduate studies in the UK. Language and Intercultural Communication, 19(1), 9-22.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (2018). Conceptualizations of language errors, standards, norms and nativeness in English for research publication purposes. Journal of Second Language Writing, 42, 1-11.

McKinley, J. (2018). Integrating appraisal theory with possible selves in understanding university EFL writing. System, 78, 27-37.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2018). Japan’s English medium instruction initiatives and the globalization of higher education. Higher Education, 75(1), 111-129.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2017). The prevalence of pedagogy-related research in applied linguistics: Extending the debate. Applied Linguistics, 38(4), 599-604.

McKinley, J., & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2017). Doing Research in Applied Linguistics: Realities, Dilemmas and Solutions. Routledge.

McKinley, J. (2015). Critical argument and writer identity: Social constructivism as a theoretical framework for EFL academic writing. Critical Inquiry in Language Studies, 12(3), 184-207.

 

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Sarah is a Research Assistant at the Department of Education working with Professor Charles Hulme and Dr Gillian West.

Sarah completed her MSc in Social Cognition: Research and Applications at UCL. Her dissertation project was supervised by Dr Anne Schlottmann and investigated the development of a sense of fairness in children aged 4 to 7 years.

She is currently assisting on the Nuffield Early Language Intervention (NELI) trial for Reception children, working directly with schools as well as supporting the development and delivery of professional online training courses for school staff.

Andrew is currently working on the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools and will primarily be carrying out qualitative analysis of teacher interview data from schools who have had attachment and trauma training and a systematic review of recent literature.

Andrew has a background as a teacher and senior leader in a special school, and as a teacher trainer, particularly focused around inclusive education. Andrew’s area of research interest is around the influence of young people’s adoptive identity on educational experience and outcomes. Andrew’s research has included analysis of data from a range of sources including the Wales Adoption Cohort Study and Understanding Society, he is currently completing his doctoral thesis at Cardiff University.

 

Publications

Brown, A., Waters, C. S., & Shelton, K. H. (2017). A systematic review of the school performance and behavioural and emotional adjustments of children adopted from care. Adoption & Fostering, 41(4), 346-368.

Brown, A., Waters, C. S., & Shelton, K. H. (2019). The educational aspirations and psychological well-being of adopted young people in the UK. Adoption & Fostering, 43(1), 46-59.

Adam is a researcher in the Department’s Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance. He is currently a co-investigator on the ‘Unlocking the potential of AI for English law’ project.

This project is funded by the Industrial Strategy Challenge Fund’s (ICSF) Next Generation Services Research Programme and UK Research and Innovation (UKRI), run by researchers in the Oxford departments and faculties of Law, Economics, Computer Science, Education and the Said Business School, in 2019 and 2020.

Pinar is a post-doctoral researcher within the Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project at the Department of Education. As part of the wider team, Pinar is currently investigating the aspects of learning apps that support joint media engagement between parents and children and creative learning in early and middle childhood. Pinar is also contributing to a development of a game-based language intervention focused on the vocabulary acquisition of emerging bilingual and monolingual children in England.

Before joining the team, Pinar was a doctoral student and a researcher at the Department of Education. Supervised by Prof. Edward Melhuish, her thesis examined the factors contributing to bilingual language and identity development of ethnic minority children growing up in first generation immigrant households in the UK. During her doctoral studies, Pinar took up two significant research roles at the Department.  She coordinated a survey research including 300 Turkish families in the UK and led a qualitative study on the cultural experiences of ethnic minority children in England. Before joining the team, Pinar collaborated with a group of researchers at the Department for a report to the Pro-Vice-Chancellor of the University on a new education policy aiming to establish university-sponsored specialist schools in England.

Publications

Kolancali, P. (submitted for publication). The Effects of Immigration on the Language and Literacy Practices of Turkish Parents in England. Journal of Family Issues.

Broekhuizen, M. L., Guerra, R. & Kolancali, P. (in preparation). Acculturation orientations of Turkish immigrant parents across Europe. Journal of Social Issues. This paper is prepared at the request of the Journal of Social Issues for a special issue.

Baird, J., Kolancali, P., Melhuish, E., Mutton, T., Sammons, P., Skilling, K., & Stylianides, G. Specialist Mathematics Schools in England: A Review and Implications for Oxford. This paper was prepared at the request of Professor Martin Williams, Pro Vice-Chancellor (Education) at the University of Oxford, by a Working Group established at the Department of Education.

Kolancali, P. (2019) Factors related to bilingual language skills of Turkish-English Speaking Children. In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 55-70. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Kolancali, P., & Melhuish, E. (2019). How do home and school experiences of Turkish children in the UK interact with their language attitudes and preferences? In G. Pastori, V. Pagani, & A. S. Sarcinelli (Eds.) Children’s Views on Inclusion at School. ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.4. pp 76-83. https://staging-isotis-pw.framework.pt/site/assets/files/1191/d2_4_technical-report-on-the-child-interview-study.pdf

Kolancali, P., & Melhuish, E. (2019) How do family characteristics and migration shape the home learning environment of Turkish children in the UK? In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 98-102. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Broekhuizen, M. L., Guerra, R. & Kolancali, P. (2019) Acculturation orientations, intergroup relations and well-being of Turkish and Maghrebian immigrant parents across Europe (Integrative Report D2.5). In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 122-127. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Jim McKinley is an associate professor of Applied Linguistics in Higher Education at UCL Institute of Education, and a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He has been an associate of the EMI Oxford research group since arriving in the UK in 2016. Originally from the US, he later taught and studied in Australia and New Zealand, and also taught for many years on Japan’s oldest EMI program at Sophia University (2005-2016).

At Oxford, Jim regularly collaborates with Dr. Heath Rose as well as Prof. Victoria Murphy, has published with several DPhil students, and supervises dissertations on the MSc ALSLA and MSc ALLT programs.

Jim’s research mainly explores implications of globalisation for L2 writing, language education, and teaching in higher education. As principal investigator on the British Academy-funded project ‘Exploring the teaching-research nexus in higher education’ (2018), he continues to research and publish on the bifurcation of teaching and research in higher education and TESOL in the UK and internationally. Jim is a co-editor-in-chief of the journal System and series co-editor (with Dr Heath Rose) of Cambridge Elements: Language Teaching.

For further information, visit www.researchgate.net/profile/Jim-Mckinley.

 

Publications

Rose, H., McKinley, J., & Galloway, N. (2020). Global Englishes and Language Teaching: A systematic review of pedagogical research. Language Teaching. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0261444820000518

McKinley, J., McIntosh, S., Milligan, L. O., Mikolajewska, A. (2020). Eyes on the enterprise: Problematising the concept of a teaching-research nexus in UK higher education. Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00595-2

Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2020). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2020). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics. Routledge.

Rose, H., McKinley, J. & Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J. (2020). Data Collection in Applied Linguistics Research. Bloomsbury.

Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J., & McKinley, J. (2019). Language and the development of intercultural competence in an ‘internationalised’ university: Staff and student perspectives. Teaching in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/13562517.2019.1686698

McIntosh, S. McKinley, J., Milligan, L., & Mikolajewska, A. (2019). Whose values? Whose time? Issues of (in)visibility in academic practice in UK universities. Studies in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1637846

McKinley, J. (2019). Evolving the teaching-research nexus. TESOL Quarterly, 53(3), 875-884.

McKinley, J., Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J. (2019). Developing intercultural competence in the third space: postgraduate studies in the UK. Language and Intercultural Communication, 19(1), 9-22.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (2018). Conceptualizations of language errors, standards, norms and nativeness in English for research publication purposes. Journal of Second Language Writing, 42, 1-11.

McKinley, J. (2018). Integrating appraisal theory with possible selves in understanding university EFL writing. System, 78, 27-37.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2018). Japan’s English medium instruction initiatives and the globalization of higher education. Higher Education, 75(1), 111-129.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2017). The prevalence of pedagogy-related research in applied linguistics: Extending the debate. Applied Linguistics, 38(4), 599-604.

McKinley, J., & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2017). Doing Research in Applied Linguistics: Realities, Dilemmas and Solutions. Routledge.

McKinley, J. (2015). Critical argument and writer identity: Social constructivism as a theoretical framework for EFL academic writing. Critical Inquiry in Language Studies, 12(3), 184-207.

 

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Sarah is a Research Assistant at the Department of Education working with Professor Charles Hulme and Dr Gillian West.

Sarah completed her MSc in Social Cognition: Research and Applications at UCL. Her dissertation project was supervised by Dr Anne Schlottmann and investigated the development of a sense of fairness in children aged 4 to 7 years.

She is currently assisting on the Nuffield Early Language Intervention (NELI) trial for Reception children, working directly with schools as well as supporting the development and delivery of professional online training courses for school staff.

Andrew is currently working on the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools and will primarily be carrying out qualitative analysis of teacher interview data from schools who have had attachment and trauma training and a systematic review of recent literature.

Andrew has a background as a teacher and senior leader in a special school, and as a teacher trainer, particularly focused around inclusive education. Andrew’s area of research interest is around the influence of young people’s adoptive identity on educational experience and outcomes. Andrew’s research has included analysis of data from a range of sources including the Wales Adoption Cohort Study and Understanding Society, he is currently completing his doctoral thesis at Cardiff University.

 

Publications

Brown, A., Waters, C. S., & Shelton, K. H. (2017). A systematic review of the school performance and behavioural and emotional adjustments of children adopted from care. Adoption & Fostering, 41(4), 346-368.

Brown, A., Waters, C. S., & Shelton, K. H. (2019). The educational aspirations and psychological well-being of adopted young people in the UK. Adoption & Fostering, 43(1), 46-59.

Adam is a researcher in the Department’s Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance. He is currently a co-investigator on the ‘Unlocking the potential of AI for English law’ project.

This project is funded by the Industrial Strategy Challenge Fund’s (ICSF) Next Generation Services Research Programme and UK Research and Innovation (UKRI), run by researchers in the Oxford departments and faculties of Law, Economics, Computer Science, Education and the Said Business School, in 2019 and 2020.

Pinar is a post-doctoral researcher within the Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project at the Department of Education. As part of the wider team, Pinar is currently investigating the aspects of learning apps that support joint media engagement between parents and children and creative learning in early and middle childhood. Pinar is also contributing to a development of a game-based language intervention focused on the vocabulary acquisition of emerging bilingual and monolingual children in England.

Before joining the team, Pinar was a doctoral student and a researcher at the Department of Education. Supervised by Prof. Edward Melhuish, her thesis examined the factors contributing to bilingual language and identity development of ethnic minority children growing up in first generation immigrant households in the UK. During her doctoral studies, Pinar took up two significant research roles at the Department.  She coordinated a survey research including 300 Turkish families in the UK and led a qualitative study on the cultural experiences of ethnic minority children in England. Before joining the team, Pinar collaborated with a group of researchers at the Department for a report to the Pro-Vice-Chancellor of the University on a new education policy aiming to establish university-sponsored specialist schools in England.

Publications

Kolancali, P. (submitted for publication). The Effects of Immigration on the Language and Literacy Practices of Turkish Parents in England. Journal of Family Issues.

Broekhuizen, M. L., Guerra, R. & Kolancali, P. (in preparation). Acculturation orientations of Turkish immigrant parents across Europe. Journal of Social Issues. This paper is prepared at the request of the Journal of Social Issues for a special issue.

Baird, J., Kolancali, P., Melhuish, E., Mutton, T., Sammons, P., Skilling, K., & Stylianides, G. Specialist Mathematics Schools in England: A Review and Implications for Oxford. This paper was prepared at the request of Professor Martin Williams, Pro Vice-Chancellor (Education) at the University of Oxford, by a Working Group established at the Department of Education.

Kolancali, P. (2019) Factors related to bilingual language skills of Turkish-English Speaking Children. In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 55-70. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Kolancali, P., & Melhuish, E. (2019). How do home and school experiences of Turkish children in the UK interact with their language attitudes and preferences? In G. Pastori, V. Pagani, & A. S. Sarcinelli (Eds.) Children’s Views on Inclusion at School. ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.4. pp 76-83. https://staging-isotis-pw.framework.pt/site/assets/files/1191/d2_4_technical-report-on-the-child-interview-study.pdf

Kolancali, P., & Melhuish, E. (2019) How do family characteristics and migration shape the home learning environment of Turkish children in the UK? In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 98-102. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Broekhuizen, M. L., Guerra, R. & Kolancali, P. (2019) Acculturation orientations, intergroup relations and well-being of Turkish and Maghrebian immigrant parents across Europe (Integrative Report D2.5). In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 122-127. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Jim McKinley is an associate professor of Applied Linguistics in Higher Education at UCL Institute of Education, and a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He has been an associate of the EMI Oxford research group since arriving in the UK in 2016. Originally from the US, he later taught and studied in Australia and New Zealand, and also taught for many years on Japan’s oldest EMI program at Sophia University (2005-2016).

At Oxford, Jim regularly collaborates with Dr. Heath Rose as well as Prof. Victoria Murphy, has published with several DPhil students, and supervises dissertations on the MSc ALSLA and MSc ALLT programs.

Jim’s research mainly explores implications of globalisation for L2 writing, language education, and teaching in higher education. As principal investigator on the British Academy-funded project ‘Exploring the teaching-research nexus in higher education’ (2018), he continues to research and publish on the bifurcation of teaching and research in higher education and TESOL in the UK and internationally. Jim is a co-editor-in-chief of the journal System and series co-editor (with Dr Heath Rose) of Cambridge Elements: Language Teaching.

For further information, visit www.researchgate.net/profile/Jim-Mckinley.

 

Publications

Rose, H., McKinley, J., & Galloway, N. (2020). Global Englishes and Language Teaching: A systematic review of pedagogical research. Language Teaching. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0261444820000518

McKinley, J., McIntosh, S., Milligan, L. O., Mikolajewska, A. (2020). Eyes on the enterprise: Problematising the concept of a teaching-research nexus in UK higher education. Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00595-2

Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2020). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2020). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics. Routledge.

Rose, H., McKinley, J. & Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J. (2020). Data Collection in Applied Linguistics Research. Bloomsbury.

Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J., & McKinley, J. (2019). Language and the development of intercultural competence in an ‘internationalised’ university: Staff and student perspectives. Teaching in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/13562517.2019.1686698

McIntosh, S. McKinley, J., Milligan, L., & Mikolajewska, A. (2019). Whose values? Whose time? Issues of (in)visibility in academic practice in UK universities. Studies in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1637846

McKinley, J. (2019). Evolving the teaching-research nexus. TESOL Quarterly, 53(3), 875-884.

McKinley, J., Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J. (2019). Developing intercultural competence in the third space: postgraduate studies in the UK. Language and Intercultural Communication, 19(1), 9-22.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (2018). Conceptualizations of language errors, standards, norms and nativeness in English for research publication purposes. Journal of Second Language Writing, 42, 1-11.

McKinley, J. (2018). Integrating appraisal theory with possible selves in understanding university EFL writing. System, 78, 27-37.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2018). Japan’s English medium instruction initiatives and the globalization of higher education. Higher Education, 75(1), 111-129.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2017). The prevalence of pedagogy-related research in applied linguistics: Extending the debate. Applied Linguistics, 38(4), 599-604.

McKinley, J., & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2017). Doing Research in Applied Linguistics: Realities, Dilemmas and Solutions. Routledge.

McKinley, J. (2015). Critical argument and writer identity: Social constructivism as a theoretical framework for EFL academic writing. Critical Inquiry in Language Studies, 12(3), 184-207.

 

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Sarah is a Research Assistant at the Department of Education working with Professor Charles Hulme and Dr Gillian West.

Sarah completed her MSc in Social Cognition: Research and Applications at UCL. Her dissertation project was supervised by Dr Anne Schlottmann and investigated the development of a sense of fairness in children aged 4 to 7 years.

She is currently assisting on the Nuffield Early Language Intervention (NELI) trial for Reception children, working directly with schools as well as supporting the development and delivery of professional online training courses for school staff.

Andrew is currently working on the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools and will primarily be carrying out qualitative analysis of teacher interview data from schools who have had attachment and trauma training and a systematic review of recent literature.

Andrew has a background as a teacher and senior leader in a special school, and as a teacher trainer, particularly focused around inclusive education. Andrew’s area of research interest is around the influence of young people’s adoptive identity on educational experience and outcomes. Andrew’s research has included analysis of data from a range of sources including the Wales Adoption Cohort Study and Understanding Society, he is currently completing his doctoral thesis at Cardiff University.

 

Publications

Brown, A., Waters, C. S., & Shelton, K. H. (2017). A systematic review of the school performance and behavioural and emotional adjustments of children adopted from care. Adoption & Fostering, 41(4), 346-368.

Brown, A., Waters, C. S., & Shelton, K. H. (2019). The educational aspirations and psychological well-being of adopted young people in the UK. Adoption & Fostering, 43(1), 46-59.

Adam is a researcher in the Department’s Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance. He is currently a co-investigator on the ‘Unlocking the potential of AI for English law’ project.

This project is funded by the Industrial Strategy Challenge Fund’s (ICSF) Next Generation Services Research Programme and UK Research and Innovation (UKRI), run by researchers in the Oxford departments and faculties of Law, Economics, Computer Science, Education and the Said Business School, in 2019 and 2020.

Pinar is a post-doctoral researcher within the Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project at the Department of Education. As part of the wider team, Pinar is currently investigating the aspects of learning apps that support joint media engagement between parents and children and creative learning in early and middle childhood. Pinar is also contributing to a development of a game-based language intervention focused on the vocabulary acquisition of emerging bilingual and monolingual children in England.

Before joining the team, Pinar was a doctoral student and a researcher at the Department of Education. Supervised by Prof. Edward Melhuish, her thesis examined the factors contributing to bilingual language and identity development of ethnic minority children growing up in first generation immigrant households in the UK. During her doctoral studies, Pinar took up two significant research roles at the Department.  She coordinated a survey research including 300 Turkish families in the UK and led a qualitative study on the cultural experiences of ethnic minority children in England. Before joining the team, Pinar collaborated with a group of researchers at the Department for a report to the Pro-Vice-Chancellor of the University on a new education policy aiming to establish university-sponsored specialist schools in England.

Publications

Kolancali, P. (submitted for publication). The Effects of Immigration on the Language and Literacy Practices of Turkish Parents in England. Journal of Family Issues.

Broekhuizen, M. L., Guerra, R. & Kolancali, P. (in preparation). Acculturation orientations of Turkish immigrant parents across Europe. Journal of Social Issues. This paper is prepared at the request of the Journal of Social Issues for a special issue.

Baird, J., Kolancali, P., Melhuish, E., Mutton, T., Sammons, P., Skilling, K., & Stylianides, G. Specialist Mathematics Schools in England: A Review and Implications for Oxford. This paper was prepared at the request of Professor Martin Williams, Pro Vice-Chancellor (Education) at the University of Oxford, by a Working Group established at the Department of Education.

Kolancali, P. (2019) Factors related to bilingual language skills of Turkish-English Speaking Children. In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 55-70. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Kolancali, P., & Melhuish, E. (2019). How do home and school experiences of Turkish children in the UK interact with their language attitudes and preferences? In G. Pastori, V. Pagani, & A. S. Sarcinelli (Eds.) Children’s Views on Inclusion at School. ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.4. pp 76-83. https://staging-isotis-pw.framework.pt/site/assets/files/1191/d2_4_technical-report-on-the-child-interview-study.pdf

Kolancali, P., & Melhuish, E. (2019) How do family characteristics and migration shape the home learning environment of Turkish children in the UK? In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 98-102. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Broekhuizen, M. L., Guerra, R. & Kolancali, P. (2019) Acculturation orientations, intergroup relations and well-being of Turkish and Maghrebian immigrant parents across Europe (Integrative Report D2.5). In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 122-127. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Jim McKinley is an associate professor of Applied Linguistics in Higher Education at UCL Institute of Education, and a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He has been an associate of the EMI Oxford research group since arriving in the UK in 2016. Originally from the US, he later taught and studied in Australia and New Zealand, and also taught for many years on Japan’s oldest EMI program at Sophia University (2005-2016).

At Oxford, Jim regularly collaborates with Dr. Heath Rose as well as Prof. Victoria Murphy, has published with several DPhil students, and supervises dissertations on the MSc ALSLA and MSc ALLT programs.

Jim’s research mainly explores implications of globalisation for L2 writing, language education, and teaching in higher education. As principal investigator on the British Academy-funded project ‘Exploring the teaching-research nexus in higher education’ (2018), he continues to research and publish on the bifurcation of teaching and research in higher education and TESOL in the UK and internationally. Jim is a co-editor-in-chief of the journal System and series co-editor (with Dr Heath Rose) of Cambridge Elements: Language Teaching.

For further information, visit www.researchgate.net/profile/Jim-Mckinley.

 

Publications

Rose, H., McKinley, J., & Galloway, N. (2020). Global Englishes and Language Teaching: A systematic review of pedagogical research. Language Teaching. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0261444820000518

McKinley, J., McIntosh, S., Milligan, L. O., Mikolajewska, A. (2020). Eyes on the enterprise: Problematising the concept of a teaching-research nexus in UK higher education. Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00595-2

Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2020). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2020). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics. Routledge.

Rose, H., McKinley, J. & Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J. (2020). Data Collection in Applied Linguistics Research. Bloomsbury.

Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J., & McKinley, J. (2019). Language and the development of intercultural competence in an ‘internationalised’ university: Staff and student perspectives. Teaching in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/13562517.2019.1686698

McIntosh, S. McKinley, J., Milligan, L., & Mikolajewska, A. (2019). Whose values? Whose time? Issues of (in)visibility in academic practice in UK universities. Studies in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1637846

McKinley, J. (2019). Evolving the teaching-research nexus. TESOL Quarterly, 53(3), 875-884.

McKinley, J., Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J. (2019). Developing intercultural competence in the third space: postgraduate studies in the UK. Language and Intercultural Communication, 19(1), 9-22.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (2018). Conceptualizations of language errors, standards, norms and nativeness in English for research publication purposes. Journal of Second Language Writing, 42, 1-11.

McKinley, J. (2018). Integrating appraisal theory with possible selves in understanding university EFL writing. System, 78, 27-37.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2018). Japan’s English medium instruction initiatives and the globalization of higher education. Higher Education, 75(1), 111-129.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2017). The prevalence of pedagogy-related research in applied linguistics: Extending the debate. Applied Linguistics, 38(4), 599-604.

McKinley, J., & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2017). Doing Research in Applied Linguistics: Realities, Dilemmas and Solutions. Routledge.

McKinley, J. (2015). Critical argument and writer identity: Social constructivism as a theoretical framework for EFL academic writing. Critical Inquiry in Language Studies, 12(3), 184-207.

 

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Sarah is a Research Assistant at the Department of Education working with Professor Charles Hulme and Dr Gillian West.

Sarah completed her MSc in Social Cognition: Research and Applications at UCL. Her dissertation project was supervised by Dr Anne Schlottmann and investigated the development of a sense of fairness in children aged 4 to 7 years.

She is currently assisting on the Nuffield Early Language Intervention (NELI) trial for Reception children, working directly with schools as well as supporting the development and delivery of professional online training courses for school staff.

Andrew is currently working on the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools and will primarily be carrying out qualitative analysis of teacher interview data from schools who have had attachment and trauma training and a systematic review of recent literature.

Andrew has a background as a teacher and senior leader in a special school, and as a teacher trainer, particularly focused around inclusive education. Andrew’s area of research interest is around the influence of young people’s adoptive identity on educational experience and outcomes. Andrew’s research has included analysis of data from a range of sources including the Wales Adoption Cohort Study and Understanding Society, he is currently completing his doctoral thesis at Cardiff University.

 

Publications

Brown, A., Waters, C. S., & Shelton, K. H. (2017). A systematic review of the school performance and behavioural and emotional adjustments of children adopted from care. Adoption & Fostering, 41(4), 346-368.

Brown, A., Waters, C. S., & Shelton, K. H. (2019). The educational aspirations and psychological well-being of adopted young people in the UK. Adoption & Fostering, 43(1), 46-59.

Adam is a researcher in the Department’s Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance. He is currently a co-investigator on the ‘Unlocking the potential of AI for English law’ project.

This project is funded by the Industrial Strategy Challenge Fund’s (ICSF) Next Generation Services Research Programme and UK Research and Innovation (UKRI), run by researchers in the Oxford departments and faculties of Law, Economics, Computer Science, Education and the Said Business School, in 2019 and 2020.

Pinar is a post-doctoral researcher within the Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project at the Department of Education. As part of the wider team, Pinar is currently investigating the aspects of learning apps that support joint media engagement between parents and children and creative learning in early and middle childhood. Pinar is also contributing to a development of a game-based language intervention focused on the vocabulary acquisition of emerging bilingual and monolingual children in England.

Before joining the team, Pinar was a doctoral student and a researcher at the Department of Education. Supervised by Prof. Edward Melhuish, her thesis examined the factors contributing to bilingual language and identity development of ethnic minority children growing up in first generation immigrant households in the UK. During her doctoral studies, Pinar took up two significant research roles at the Department.  She coordinated a survey research including 300 Turkish families in the UK and led a qualitative study on the cultural experiences of ethnic minority children in England. Before joining the team, Pinar collaborated with a group of researchers at the Department for a report to the Pro-Vice-Chancellor of the University on a new education policy aiming to establish university-sponsored specialist schools in England.

Publications

Kolancali, P. (submitted for publication). The Effects of Immigration on the Language and Literacy Practices of Turkish Parents in England. Journal of Family Issues.

Broekhuizen, M. L., Guerra, R. & Kolancali, P. (in preparation). Acculturation orientations of Turkish immigrant parents across Europe. Journal of Social Issues. This paper is prepared at the request of the Journal of Social Issues for a special issue.

Baird, J., Kolancali, P., Melhuish, E., Mutton, T., Sammons, P., Skilling, K., & Stylianides, G. Specialist Mathematics Schools in England: A Review and Implications for Oxford. This paper was prepared at the request of Professor Martin Williams, Pro Vice-Chancellor (Education) at the University of Oxford, by a Working Group established at the Department of Education.

Kolancali, P. (2019) Factors related to bilingual language skills of Turkish-English Speaking Children. In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 55-70. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Kolancali, P., & Melhuish, E. (2019). How do home and school experiences of Turkish children in the UK interact with their language attitudes and preferences? In G. Pastori, V. Pagani, & A. S. Sarcinelli (Eds.) Children’s Views on Inclusion at School. ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.4. pp 76-83. https://staging-isotis-pw.framework.pt/site/assets/files/1191/d2_4_technical-report-on-the-child-interview-study.pdf

Kolancali, P., & Melhuish, E. (2019) How do family characteristics and migration shape the home learning environment of Turkish children in the UK? In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 98-102. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Broekhuizen, M. L., Guerra, R. & Kolancali, P. (2019) Acculturation orientations, intergroup relations and well-being of Turkish and Maghrebian immigrant parents across Europe (Integrative Report D2.5). In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 122-127. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Jim McKinley is an associate professor of Applied Linguistics in Higher Education at UCL Institute of Education, and a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He has been an associate of the EMI Oxford research group since arriving in the UK in 2016. Originally from the US, he later taught and studied in Australia and New Zealand, and also taught for many years on Japan’s oldest EMI program at Sophia University (2005-2016).

At Oxford, Jim regularly collaborates with Dr. Heath Rose as well as Prof. Victoria Murphy, has published with several DPhil students, and supervises dissertations on the MSc ALSLA and MSc ALLT programs.

Jim’s research mainly explores implications of globalisation for L2 writing, language education, and teaching in higher education. As principal investigator on the British Academy-funded project ‘Exploring the teaching-research nexus in higher education’ (2018), he continues to research and publish on the bifurcation of teaching and research in higher education and TESOL in the UK and internationally. Jim is a co-editor-in-chief of the journal System and series co-editor (with Dr Heath Rose) of Cambridge Elements: Language Teaching.

For further information, visit www.researchgate.net/profile/Jim-Mckinley.

 

Publications

Rose, H., McKinley, J., & Galloway, N. (2020). Global Englishes and Language Teaching: A systematic review of pedagogical research. Language Teaching. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0261444820000518

McKinley, J., McIntosh, S., Milligan, L. O., Mikolajewska, A. (2020). Eyes on the enterprise: Problematising the concept of a teaching-research nexus in UK higher education. Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00595-2

Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2020). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2020). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics. Routledge.

Rose, H., McKinley, J. & Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J. (2020). Data Collection in Applied Linguistics Research. Bloomsbury.

Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J., & McKinley, J. (2019). Language and the development of intercultural competence in an ‘internationalised’ university: Staff and student perspectives. Teaching in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/13562517.2019.1686698

McIntosh, S. McKinley, J., Milligan, L., & Mikolajewska, A. (2019). Whose values? Whose time? Issues of (in)visibility in academic practice in UK universities. Studies in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1637846

McKinley, J. (2019). Evolving the teaching-research nexus. TESOL Quarterly, 53(3), 875-884.

McKinley, J., Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J. (2019). Developing intercultural competence in the third space: postgraduate studies in the UK. Language and Intercultural Communication, 19(1), 9-22.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (2018). Conceptualizations of language errors, standards, norms and nativeness in English for research publication purposes. Journal of Second Language Writing, 42, 1-11.

McKinley, J. (2018). Integrating appraisal theory with possible selves in understanding university EFL writing. System, 78, 27-37.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2018). Japan’s English medium instruction initiatives and the globalization of higher education. Higher Education, 75(1), 111-129.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2017). The prevalence of pedagogy-related research in applied linguistics: Extending the debate. Applied Linguistics, 38(4), 599-604.

McKinley, J., & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2017). Doing Research in Applied Linguistics: Realities, Dilemmas and Solutions. Routledge.

McKinley, J. (2015). Critical argument and writer identity: Social constructivism as a theoretical framework for EFL academic writing. Critical Inquiry in Language Studies, 12(3), 184-207.

 

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Sarah is a Research Assistant at the Department of Education working with Professor Charles Hulme and Dr Gillian West.

Sarah completed her MSc in Social Cognition: Research and Applications at UCL. Her dissertation project was supervised by Dr Anne Schlottmann and investigated the development of a sense of fairness in children aged 4 to 7 years.

She is currently assisting on the Nuffield Early Language Intervention (NELI) trial for Reception children, working directly with schools as well as supporting the development and delivery of professional online training courses for school staff.

Andrew is currently working on the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools and will primarily be carrying out qualitative analysis of teacher interview data from schools who have had attachment and trauma training and a systematic review of recent literature.

Andrew has a background as a teacher and senior leader in a special school, and as a teacher trainer, particularly focused around inclusive education. Andrew’s area of research interest is around the influence of young people’s adoptive identity on educational experience and outcomes. Andrew’s research has included analysis of data from a range of sources including the Wales Adoption Cohort Study and Understanding Society, he is currently completing his doctoral thesis at Cardiff University.

 

Publications

Brown, A., Waters, C. S., & Shelton, K. H. (2017). A systematic review of the school performance and behavioural and emotional adjustments of children adopted from care. Adoption & Fostering, 41(4), 346-368.

Brown, A., Waters, C. S., & Shelton, K. H. (2019). The educational aspirations and psychological well-being of adopted young people in the UK. Adoption & Fostering, 43(1), 46-59.

Adam is a researcher in the Department’s Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance. He is currently a co-investigator on the ‘Unlocking the potential of AI for English law’ project.

This project is funded by the Industrial Strategy Challenge Fund’s (ICSF) Next Generation Services Research Programme and UK Research and Innovation (UKRI), run by researchers in the Oxford departments and faculties of Law, Economics, Computer Science, Education and the Said Business School, in 2019 and 2020.

Pinar is a post-doctoral researcher within the Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project at the Department of Education. As part of the wider team, Pinar is currently investigating the aspects of learning apps that support joint media engagement between parents and children and creative learning in early and middle childhood. Pinar is also contributing to a development of a game-based language intervention focused on the vocabulary acquisition of emerging bilingual and monolingual children in England.

Before joining the team, Pinar was a doctoral student and a researcher at the Department of Education. Supervised by Prof. Edward Melhuish, her thesis examined the factors contributing to bilingual language and identity development of ethnic minority children growing up in first generation immigrant households in the UK. During her doctoral studies, Pinar took up two significant research roles at the Department.  She coordinated a survey research including 300 Turkish families in the UK and led a qualitative study on the cultural experiences of ethnic minority children in England. Before joining the team, Pinar collaborated with a group of researchers at the Department for a report to the Pro-Vice-Chancellor of the University on a new education policy aiming to establish university-sponsored specialist schools in England.

Publications

Kolancali, P. (submitted for publication). The Effects of Immigration on the Language and Literacy Practices of Turkish Parents in England. Journal of Family Issues.

Broekhuizen, M. L., Guerra, R. & Kolancali, P. (in preparation). Acculturation orientations of Turkish immigrant parents across Europe. Journal of Social Issues. This paper is prepared at the request of the Journal of Social Issues for a special issue.

Baird, J., Kolancali, P., Melhuish, E., Mutton, T., Sammons, P., Skilling, K., & Stylianides, G. Specialist Mathematics Schools in England: A Review and Implications for Oxford. This paper was prepared at the request of Professor Martin Williams, Pro Vice-Chancellor (Education) at the University of Oxford, by a Working Group established at the Department of Education.

Kolancali, P. (2019) Factors related to bilingual language skills of Turkish-English Speaking Children. In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 55-70. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Kolancali, P., & Melhuish, E. (2019). How do home and school experiences of Turkish children in the UK interact with their language attitudes and preferences? In G. Pastori, V. Pagani, & A. S. Sarcinelli (Eds.) Children’s Views on Inclusion at School. ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.4. pp 76-83. https://staging-isotis-pw.framework.pt/site/assets/files/1191/d2_4_technical-report-on-the-child-interview-study.pdf

Kolancali, P., & Melhuish, E. (2019) How do family characteristics and migration shape the home learning environment of Turkish children in the UK? In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 98-102. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Broekhuizen, M. L., Guerra, R. & Kolancali, P. (2019) Acculturation orientations, intergroup relations and well-being of Turkish and Maghrebian immigrant parents across Europe (Integrative Report D2.5). In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 122-127. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Jim McKinley is an associate professor of Applied Linguistics in Higher Education at UCL Institute of Education, and a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He has been an associate of the EMI Oxford research group since arriving in the UK in 2016. Originally from the US, he later taught and studied in Australia and New Zealand, and also taught for many years on Japan’s oldest EMI program at Sophia University (2005-2016).

At Oxford, Jim regularly collaborates with Dr. Heath Rose as well as Prof. Victoria Murphy, has published with several DPhil students, and supervises dissertations on the MSc ALSLA and MSc ALLT programs.

Jim’s research mainly explores implications of globalisation for L2 writing, language education, and teaching in higher education. As principal investigator on the British Academy-funded project ‘Exploring the teaching-research nexus in higher education’ (2018), he continues to research and publish on the bifurcation of teaching and research in higher education and TESOL in the UK and internationally. Jim is a co-editor-in-chief of the journal System and series co-editor (with Dr Heath Rose) of Cambridge Elements: Language Teaching.

For further information, visit www.researchgate.net/profile/Jim-Mckinley.

 

Publications

Rose, H., McKinley, J., & Galloway, N. (2020). Global Englishes and Language Teaching: A systematic review of pedagogical research. Language Teaching. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0261444820000518

McKinley, J., McIntosh, S., Milligan, L. O., Mikolajewska, A. (2020). Eyes on the enterprise: Problematising the concept of a teaching-research nexus in UK higher education. Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00595-2

Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2020). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2020). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics. Routledge.

Rose, H., McKinley, J. & Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J. (2020). Data Collection in Applied Linguistics Research. Bloomsbury.

Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J., & McKinley, J. (2019). Language and the development of intercultural competence in an ‘internationalised’ university: Staff and student perspectives. Teaching in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/13562517.2019.1686698

McIntosh, S. McKinley, J., Milligan, L., & Mikolajewska, A. (2019). Whose values? Whose time? Issues of (in)visibility in academic practice in UK universities. Studies in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1637846

McKinley, J. (2019). Evolving the teaching-research nexus. TESOL Quarterly, 53(3), 875-884.

McKinley, J., Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J. (2019). Developing intercultural competence in the third space: postgraduate studies in the UK. Language and Intercultural Communication, 19(1), 9-22.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (2018). Conceptualizations of language errors, standards, norms and nativeness in English for research publication purposes. Journal of Second Language Writing, 42, 1-11.

McKinley, J. (2018). Integrating appraisal theory with possible selves in understanding university EFL writing. System, 78, 27-37.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2018). Japan’s English medium instruction initiatives and the globalization of higher education. Higher Education, 75(1), 111-129.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2017). The prevalence of pedagogy-related research in applied linguistics: Extending the debate. Applied Linguistics, 38(4), 599-604.

McKinley, J., & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2017). Doing Research in Applied Linguistics: Realities, Dilemmas and Solutions. Routledge.

McKinley, J. (2015). Critical argument and writer identity: Social constructivism as a theoretical framework for EFL academic writing. Critical Inquiry in Language Studies, 12(3), 184-207.

 

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Sarah is a Research Assistant at the Department of Education working with Professor Charles Hulme and Dr Gillian West.

Sarah completed her MSc in Social Cognition: Research and Applications at UCL. Her dissertation project was supervised by Dr Anne Schlottmann and investigated the development of a sense of fairness in children aged 4 to 7 years.

She is currently assisting on the Nuffield Early Language Intervention (NELI) trial for Reception children, working directly with schools as well as supporting the development and delivery of professional online training courses for school staff.

Andrew is currently working on the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools and will primarily be carrying out qualitative analysis of teacher interview data from schools who have had attachment and trauma training and a systematic review of recent literature.

Andrew has a background as a teacher and senior leader in a special school, and as a teacher trainer, particularly focused around inclusive education. Andrew’s area of research interest is around the influence of young people’s adoptive identity on educational experience and outcomes. Andrew’s research has included analysis of data from a range of sources including the Wales Adoption Cohort Study and Understanding Society, he is currently completing his doctoral thesis at Cardiff University.

 

Publications

Brown, A., Waters, C. S., & Shelton, K. H. (2017). A systematic review of the school performance and behavioural and emotional adjustments of children adopted from care. Adoption & Fostering, 41(4), 346-368.

Brown, A., Waters, C. S., & Shelton, K. H. (2019). The educational aspirations and psychological well-being of adopted young people in the UK. Adoption & Fostering, 43(1), 46-59.

Adam is a researcher in the Department’s Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance. He is currently a co-investigator on the ‘Unlocking the potential of AI for English law’ project.

This project is funded by the Industrial Strategy Challenge Fund’s (ICSF) Next Generation Services Research Programme and UK Research and Innovation (UKRI), run by researchers in the Oxford departments and faculties of Law, Economics, Computer Science, Education and the Said Business School, in 2019 and 2020.

Pinar is a post-doctoral researcher within the Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project at the Department of Education. As part of the wider team, Pinar is currently investigating the aspects of learning apps that support joint media engagement between parents and children and creative learning in early and middle childhood. Pinar is also contributing to a development of a game-based language intervention focused on the vocabulary acquisition of emerging bilingual and monolingual children in England.

Before joining the team, Pinar was a doctoral student and a researcher at the Department of Education. Supervised by Prof. Edward Melhuish, her thesis examined the factors contributing to bilingual language and identity development of ethnic minority children growing up in first generation immigrant households in the UK. During her doctoral studies, Pinar took up two significant research roles at the Department.  She coordinated a survey research including 300 Turkish families in the UK and led a qualitative study on the cultural experiences of ethnic minority children in England. Before joining the team, Pinar collaborated with a group of researchers at the Department for a report to the Pro-Vice-Chancellor of the University on a new education policy aiming to establish university-sponsored specialist schools in England.

Publications

Kolancali, P. (submitted for publication). The Effects of Immigration on the Language and Literacy Practices of Turkish Parents in England. Journal of Family Issues.

Broekhuizen, M. L., Guerra, R. & Kolancali, P. (in preparation). Acculturation orientations of Turkish immigrant parents across Europe. Journal of Social Issues. This paper is prepared at the request of the Journal of Social Issues for a special issue.

Baird, J., Kolancali, P., Melhuish, E., Mutton, T., Sammons, P., Skilling, K., & Stylianides, G. Specialist Mathematics Schools in England: A Review and Implications for Oxford. This paper was prepared at the request of Professor Martin Williams, Pro Vice-Chancellor (Education) at the University of Oxford, by a Working Group established at the Department of Education.

Kolancali, P. (2019) Factors related to bilingual language skills of Turkish-English Speaking Children. In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 55-70. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Kolancali, P., & Melhuish, E. (2019). How do home and school experiences of Turkish children in the UK interact with their language attitudes and preferences? In G. Pastori, V. Pagani, & A. S. Sarcinelli (Eds.) Children’s Views on Inclusion at School. ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.4. pp 76-83. https://staging-isotis-pw.framework.pt/site/assets/files/1191/d2_4_technical-report-on-the-child-interview-study.pdf

Kolancali, P., & Melhuish, E. (2019) How do family characteristics and migration shape the home learning environment of Turkish children in the UK? In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 98-102. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Broekhuizen, M. L., Guerra, R. & Kolancali, P. (2019) Acculturation orientations, intergroup relations and well-being of Turkish and Maghrebian immigrant parents across Europe (Integrative Report D2.5). In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 122-127. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Jim McKinley is an associate professor of Applied Linguistics in Higher Education at UCL Institute of Education, and a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He has been an associate of the EMI Oxford research group since arriving in the UK in 2016. Originally from the US, he later taught and studied in Australia and New Zealand, and also taught for many years on Japan’s oldest EMI program at Sophia University (2005-2016).

At Oxford, Jim regularly collaborates with Dr. Heath Rose as well as Prof. Victoria Murphy, has published with several DPhil students, and supervises dissertations on the MSc ALSLA and MSc ALLT programs.

Jim’s research mainly explores implications of globalisation for L2 writing, language education, and teaching in higher education. As principal investigator on the British Academy-funded project ‘Exploring the teaching-research nexus in higher education’ (2018), he continues to research and publish on the bifurcation of teaching and research in higher education and TESOL in the UK and internationally. Jim is a co-editor-in-chief of the journal System and series co-editor (with Dr Heath Rose) of Cambridge Elements: Language Teaching.

For further information, visit www.researchgate.net/profile/Jim-Mckinley.

 

Publications

Rose, H., McKinley, J., & Galloway, N. (2020). Global Englishes and Language Teaching: A systematic review of pedagogical research. Language Teaching. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0261444820000518

McKinley, J., McIntosh, S., Milligan, L. O., Mikolajewska, A. (2020). Eyes on the enterprise: Problematising the concept of a teaching-research nexus in UK higher education. Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00595-2

Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2020). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2020). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics. Routledge.

Rose, H., McKinley, J. & Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J. (2020). Data Collection in Applied Linguistics Research. Bloomsbury.

Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J., & McKinley, J. (2019). Language and the development of intercultural competence in an ‘internationalised’ university: Staff and student perspectives. Teaching in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/13562517.2019.1686698

McIntosh, S. McKinley, J., Milligan, L., & Mikolajewska, A. (2019). Whose values? Whose time? Issues of (in)visibility in academic practice in UK universities. Studies in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1637846

McKinley, J. (2019). Evolving the teaching-research nexus. TESOL Quarterly, 53(3), 875-884.

McKinley, J., Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J. (2019). Developing intercultural competence in the third space: postgraduate studies in the UK. Language and Intercultural Communication, 19(1), 9-22.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (2018). Conceptualizations of language errors, standards, norms and nativeness in English for research publication purposes. Journal of Second Language Writing, 42, 1-11.

McKinley, J. (2018). Integrating appraisal theory with possible selves in understanding university EFL writing. System, 78, 27-37.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2018). Japan’s English medium instruction initiatives and the globalization of higher education. Higher Education, 75(1), 111-129.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2017). The prevalence of pedagogy-related research in applied linguistics: Extending the debate. Applied Linguistics, 38(4), 599-604.

McKinley, J., & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2017). Doing Research in Applied Linguistics: Realities, Dilemmas and Solutions. Routledge.

McKinley, J. (2015). Critical argument and writer identity: Social constructivism as a theoretical framework for EFL academic writing. Critical Inquiry in Language Studies, 12(3), 184-207.

 

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Sarah is a Research Assistant at the Department of Education working with Professor Charles Hulme and Dr Gillian West.

Sarah completed her MSc in Social Cognition: Research and Applications at UCL. Her dissertation project was supervised by Dr Anne Schlottmann and investigated the development of a sense of fairness in children aged 4 to 7 years.

She is currently assisting on the Nuffield Early Language Intervention (NELI) trial for Reception children, working directly with schools as well as supporting the development and delivery of professional online training courses for school staff.

Andrew is currently working on the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools and will primarily be carrying out qualitative analysis of teacher interview data from schools who have had attachment and trauma training and a systematic review of recent literature.

Andrew has a background as a teacher and senior leader in a special school, and as a teacher trainer, particularly focused around inclusive education. Andrew’s area of research interest is around the influence of young people’s adoptive identity on educational experience and outcomes. Andrew’s research has included analysis of data from a range of sources including the Wales Adoption Cohort Study and Understanding Society, he is currently completing his doctoral thesis at Cardiff University.

 

Publications

Brown, A., Waters, C. S., & Shelton, K. H. (2017). A systematic review of the school performance and behavioural and emotional adjustments of children adopted from care. Adoption & Fostering, 41(4), 346-368.

Brown, A., Waters, C. S., & Shelton, K. H. (2019). The educational aspirations and psychological well-being of adopted young people in the UK. Adoption & Fostering, 43(1), 46-59.

Adam is a researcher in the Department’s Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance. He is currently a co-investigator on the ‘Unlocking the potential of AI for English law’ project.

This project is funded by the Industrial Strategy Challenge Fund’s (ICSF) Next Generation Services Research Programme and UK Research and Innovation (UKRI), run by researchers in the Oxford departments and faculties of Law, Economics, Computer Science, Education and the Said Business School, in 2019 and 2020.

Pinar is a post-doctoral researcher within the Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project at the Department of Education. As part of the wider team, Pinar is currently investigating the aspects of learning apps that support joint media engagement between parents and children and creative learning in early and middle childhood. Pinar is also contributing to a development of a game-based language intervention focused on the vocabulary acquisition of emerging bilingual and monolingual children in England.

Before joining the team, Pinar was a doctoral student and a researcher at the Department of Education. Supervised by Prof. Edward Melhuish, her thesis examined the factors contributing to bilingual language and identity development of ethnic minority children growing up in first generation immigrant households in the UK. During her doctoral studies, Pinar took up two significant research roles at the Department.  She coordinated a survey research including 300 Turkish families in the UK and led a qualitative study on the cultural experiences of ethnic minority children in England. Before joining the team, Pinar collaborated with a group of researchers at the Department for a report to the Pro-Vice-Chancellor of the University on a new education policy aiming to establish university-sponsored specialist schools in England.

Publications

Kolancali, P. (submitted for publication). The Effects of Immigration on the Language and Literacy Practices of Turkish Parents in England. Journal of Family Issues.

Broekhuizen, M. L., Guerra, R. & Kolancali, P. (in preparation). Acculturation orientations of Turkish immigrant parents across Europe. Journal of Social Issues. This paper is prepared at the request of the Journal of Social Issues for a special issue.

Baird, J., Kolancali, P., Melhuish, E., Mutton, T., Sammons, P., Skilling, K., & Stylianides, G. Specialist Mathematics Schools in England: A Review and Implications for Oxford. This paper was prepared at the request of Professor Martin Williams, Pro Vice-Chancellor (Education) at the University of Oxford, by a Working Group established at the Department of Education.

Kolancali, P. (2019) Factors related to bilingual language skills of Turkish-English Speaking Children. In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 55-70. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Kolancali, P., & Melhuish, E. (2019). How do home and school experiences of Turkish children in the UK interact with their language attitudes and preferences? In G. Pastori, V. Pagani, & A. S. Sarcinelli (Eds.) Children’s Views on Inclusion at School. ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.4. pp 76-83. https://staging-isotis-pw.framework.pt/site/assets/files/1191/d2_4_technical-report-on-the-child-interview-study.pdf

Kolancali, P., & Melhuish, E. (2019) How do family characteristics and migration shape the home learning environment of Turkish children in the UK? In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 98-102. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Broekhuizen, M. L., Guerra, R. & Kolancali, P. (2019) Acculturation orientations, intergroup relations and well-being of Turkish and Maghrebian immigrant parents across Europe (Integrative Report D2.5). In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 122-127. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Jim McKinley is an associate professor of Applied Linguistics in Higher Education at UCL Institute of Education, and a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He has been an associate of the EMI Oxford research group since arriving in the UK in 2016. Originally from the US, he later taught and studied in Australia and New Zealand, and also taught for many years on Japan’s oldest EMI program at Sophia University (2005-2016).

At Oxford, Jim regularly collaborates with Dr. Heath Rose as well as Prof. Victoria Murphy, has published with several DPhil students, and supervises dissertations on the MSc ALSLA and MSc ALLT programs.

Jim’s research mainly explores implications of globalisation for L2 writing, language education, and teaching in higher education. As principal investigator on the British Academy-funded project ‘Exploring the teaching-research nexus in higher education’ (2018), he continues to research and publish on the bifurcation of teaching and research in higher education and TESOL in the UK and internationally. Jim is a co-editor-in-chief of the journal System and series co-editor (with Dr Heath Rose) of Cambridge Elements: Language Teaching.

For further information, visit www.researchgate.net/profile/Jim-Mckinley.

 

Publications

Rose, H., McKinley, J., & Galloway, N. (2020). Global Englishes and Language Teaching: A systematic review of pedagogical research. Language Teaching. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0261444820000518

McKinley, J., McIntosh, S., Milligan, L. O., Mikolajewska, A. (2020). Eyes on the enterprise: Problematising the concept of a teaching-research nexus in UK higher education. Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00595-2

Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2020). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2020). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics. Routledge.

Rose, H., McKinley, J. & Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J. (2020). Data Collection in Applied Linguistics Research. Bloomsbury.

Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J., & McKinley, J. (2019). Language and the development of intercultural competence in an ‘internationalised’ university: Staff and student perspectives. Teaching in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/13562517.2019.1686698

McIntosh, S. McKinley, J., Milligan, L., & Mikolajewska, A. (2019). Whose values? Whose time? Issues of (in)visibility in academic practice in UK universities. Studies in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1637846

McKinley, J. (2019). Evolving the teaching-research nexus. TESOL Quarterly, 53(3), 875-884.

McKinley, J., Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J. (2019). Developing intercultural competence in the third space: postgraduate studies in the UK. Language and Intercultural Communication, 19(1), 9-22.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (2018). Conceptualizations of language errors, standards, norms and nativeness in English for research publication purposes. Journal of Second Language Writing, 42, 1-11.

McKinley, J. (2018). Integrating appraisal theory with possible selves in understanding university EFL writing. System, 78, 27-37.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2018). Japan’s English medium instruction initiatives and the globalization of higher education. Higher Education, 75(1), 111-129.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2017). The prevalence of pedagogy-related research in applied linguistics: Extending the debate. Applied Linguistics, 38(4), 599-604.

McKinley, J., & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2017). Doing Research in Applied Linguistics: Realities, Dilemmas and Solutions. Routledge.

McKinley, J. (2015). Critical argument and writer identity: Social constructivism as a theoretical framework for EFL academic writing. Critical Inquiry in Language Studies, 12(3), 184-207.

 

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Sarah is a Research Assistant at the Department of Education working with Professor Charles Hulme and Dr Gillian West.

Sarah completed her MSc in Social Cognition: Research and Applications at UCL. Her dissertation project was supervised by Dr Anne Schlottmann and investigated the development of a sense of fairness in children aged 4 to 7 years.

She is currently assisting on the Nuffield Early Language Intervention (NELI) trial for Reception children, working directly with schools as well as supporting the development and delivery of professional online training courses for school staff.

Andrew is currently working on the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools and will primarily be carrying out qualitative analysis of teacher interview data from schools who have had attachment and trauma training and a systematic review of recent literature.

Andrew has a background as a teacher and senior leader in a special school, and as a teacher trainer, particularly focused around inclusive education. Andrew’s area of research interest is around the influence of young people’s adoptive identity on educational experience and outcomes. Andrew’s research has included analysis of data from a range of sources including the Wales Adoption Cohort Study and Understanding Society, he is currently completing his doctoral thesis at Cardiff University.

 

Publications

Brown, A., Waters, C. S., & Shelton, K. H. (2017). A systematic review of the school performance and behavioural and emotional adjustments of children adopted from care. Adoption & Fostering, 41(4), 346-368.

Brown, A., Waters, C. S., & Shelton, K. H. (2019). The educational aspirations and psychological well-being of adopted young people in the UK. Adoption & Fostering, 43(1), 46-59.

Adam is a researcher in the Department’s Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance. He is currently a co-investigator on the ‘Unlocking the potential of AI for English law’ project.

This project is funded by the Industrial Strategy Challenge Fund’s (ICSF) Next Generation Services Research Programme and UK Research and Innovation (UKRI), run by researchers in the Oxford departments and faculties of Law, Economics, Computer Science, Education and the Said Business School, in 2019 and 2020.

Pinar is a post-doctoral researcher within the Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project at the Department of Education. As part of the wider team, Pinar is currently investigating the aspects of learning apps that support joint media engagement between parents and children and creative learning in early and middle childhood. Pinar is also contributing to a development of a game-based language intervention focused on the vocabulary acquisition of emerging bilingual and monolingual children in England.

Before joining the team, Pinar was a doctoral student and a researcher at the Department of Education. Supervised by Prof. Edward Melhuish, her thesis examined the factors contributing to bilingual language and identity development of ethnic minority children growing up in first generation immigrant households in the UK. During her doctoral studies, Pinar took up two significant research roles at the Department.  She coordinated a survey research including 300 Turkish families in the UK and led a qualitative study on the cultural experiences of ethnic minority children in England. Before joining the team, Pinar collaborated with a group of researchers at the Department for a report to the Pro-Vice-Chancellor of the University on a new education policy aiming to establish university-sponsored specialist schools in England.

Publications

Kolancali, P. (submitted for publication). The Effects of Immigration on the Language and Literacy Practices of Turkish Parents in England. Journal of Family Issues.

Broekhuizen, M. L., Guerra, R. & Kolancali, P. (in preparation). Acculturation orientations of Turkish immigrant parents across Europe. Journal of Social Issues. This paper is prepared at the request of the Journal of Social Issues for a special issue.

Baird, J., Kolancali, P., Melhuish, E., Mutton, T., Sammons, P., Skilling, K., & Stylianides, G. Specialist Mathematics Schools in England: A Review and Implications for Oxford. This paper was prepared at the request of Professor Martin Williams, Pro Vice-Chancellor (Education) at the University of Oxford, by a Working Group established at the Department of Education.

Kolancali, P. (2019) Factors related to bilingual language skills of Turkish-English Speaking Children. In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 55-70. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Kolancali, P., & Melhuish, E. (2019). How do home and school experiences of Turkish children in the UK interact with their language attitudes and preferences? In G. Pastori, V. Pagani, & A. S. Sarcinelli (Eds.) Children’s Views on Inclusion at School. ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.4. pp 76-83. https://staging-isotis-pw.framework.pt/site/assets/files/1191/d2_4_technical-report-on-the-child-interview-study.pdf

Kolancali, P., & Melhuish, E. (2019) How do family characteristics and migration shape the home learning environment of Turkish children in the UK? In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 98-102. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Broekhuizen, M. L., Guerra, R. & Kolancali, P. (2019) Acculturation orientations, intergroup relations and well-being of Turkish and Maghrebian immigrant parents across Europe (Integrative Report D2.5). In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 122-127. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Jim McKinley is an associate professor of Applied Linguistics in Higher Education at UCL Institute of Education, and a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He has been an associate of the EMI Oxford research group since arriving in the UK in 2016. Originally from the US, he later taught and studied in Australia and New Zealand, and also taught for many years on Japan’s oldest EMI program at Sophia University (2005-2016).

At Oxford, Jim regularly collaborates with Dr. Heath Rose as well as Prof. Victoria Murphy, has published with several DPhil students, and supervises dissertations on the MSc ALSLA and MSc ALLT programs.

Jim’s research mainly explores implications of globalisation for L2 writing, language education, and teaching in higher education. As principal investigator on the British Academy-funded project ‘Exploring the teaching-research nexus in higher education’ (2018), he continues to research and publish on the bifurcation of teaching and research in higher education and TESOL in the UK and internationally. Jim is a co-editor-in-chief of the journal System and series co-editor (with Dr Heath Rose) of Cambridge Elements: Language Teaching.

For further information, visit www.researchgate.net/profile/Jim-Mckinley.

 

Publications

Rose, H., McKinley, J., & Galloway, N. (2020). Global Englishes and Language Teaching: A systematic review of pedagogical research. Language Teaching. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0261444820000518

McKinley, J., McIntosh, S., Milligan, L. O., Mikolajewska, A. (2020). Eyes on the enterprise: Problematising the concept of a teaching-research nexus in UK higher education. Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00595-2

Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2020). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2020). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics. Routledge.

Rose, H., McKinley, J. & Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J. (2020). Data Collection in Applied Linguistics Research. Bloomsbury.

Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J., & McKinley, J. (2019). Language and the development of intercultural competence in an ‘internationalised’ university: Staff and student perspectives. Teaching in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/13562517.2019.1686698

McIntosh, S. McKinley, J., Milligan, L., & Mikolajewska, A. (2019). Whose values? Whose time? Issues of (in)visibility in academic practice in UK universities. Studies in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1637846

McKinley, J. (2019). Evolving the teaching-research nexus. TESOL Quarterly, 53(3), 875-884.

McKinley, J., Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J. (2019). Developing intercultural competence in the third space: postgraduate studies in the UK. Language and Intercultural Communication, 19(1), 9-22.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (2018). Conceptualizations of language errors, standards, norms and nativeness in English for research publication purposes. Journal of Second Language Writing, 42, 1-11.

McKinley, J. (2018). Integrating appraisal theory with possible selves in understanding university EFL writing. System, 78, 27-37.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2018). Japan’s English medium instruction initiatives and the globalization of higher education. Higher Education, 75(1), 111-129.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2017). The prevalence of pedagogy-related research in applied linguistics: Extending the debate. Applied Linguistics, 38(4), 599-604.

McKinley, J., & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2017). Doing Research in Applied Linguistics: Realities, Dilemmas and Solutions. Routledge.

McKinley, J. (2015). Critical argument and writer identity: Social constructivism as a theoretical framework for EFL academic writing. Critical Inquiry in Language Studies, 12(3), 184-207.

 

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Sarah is a Research Assistant at the Department of Education working with Professor Charles Hulme and Dr Gillian West.

Sarah completed her MSc in Social Cognition: Research and Applications at UCL. Her dissertation project was supervised by Dr Anne Schlottmann and investigated the development of a sense of fairness in children aged 4 to 7 years.

She is currently assisting on the Nuffield Early Language Intervention (NELI) trial for Reception children, working directly with schools as well as supporting the development and delivery of professional online training courses for school staff.

Andrew is currently working on the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools and will primarily be carrying out qualitative analysis of teacher interview data from schools who have had attachment and trauma training and a systematic review of recent literature.

Andrew has a background as a teacher and senior leader in a special school, and as a teacher trainer, particularly focused around inclusive education. Andrew’s area of research interest is around the influence of young people’s adoptive identity on educational experience and outcomes. Andrew’s research has included analysis of data from a range of sources including the Wales Adoption Cohort Study and Understanding Society, he is currently completing his doctoral thesis at Cardiff University.

 

Publications

Brown, A., Waters, C. S., & Shelton, K. H. (2017). A systematic review of the school performance and behavioural and emotional adjustments of children adopted from care. Adoption & Fostering, 41(4), 346-368.

Brown, A., Waters, C. S., & Shelton, K. H. (2019). The educational aspirations and psychological well-being of adopted young people in the UK. Adoption & Fostering, 43(1), 46-59.

Adam is a researcher in the Department’s Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance. He is currently a co-investigator on the ‘Unlocking the potential of AI for English law’ project.

This project is funded by the Industrial Strategy Challenge Fund’s (ICSF) Next Generation Services Research Programme and UK Research and Innovation (UKRI), run by researchers in the Oxford departments and faculties of Law, Economics, Computer Science, Education and the Said Business School, in 2019 and 2020.

Pinar is a post-doctoral researcher within the Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project at the Department of Education. As part of the wider team, Pinar is currently investigating the aspects of learning apps that support joint media engagement between parents and children and creative learning in early and middle childhood. Pinar is also contributing to a development of a game-based language intervention focused on the vocabulary acquisition of emerging bilingual and monolingual children in England.

Before joining the team, Pinar was a doctoral student and a researcher at the Department of Education. Supervised by Prof. Edward Melhuish, her thesis examined the factors contributing to bilingual language and identity development of ethnic minority children growing up in first generation immigrant households in the UK. During her doctoral studies, Pinar took up two significant research roles at the Department.  She coordinated a survey research including 300 Turkish families in the UK and led a qualitative study on the cultural experiences of ethnic minority children in England. Before joining the team, Pinar collaborated with a group of researchers at the Department for a report to the Pro-Vice-Chancellor of the University on a new education policy aiming to establish university-sponsored specialist schools in England.

Publications

Kolancali, P. (submitted for publication). The Effects of Immigration on the Language and Literacy Practices of Turkish Parents in England. Journal of Family Issues.

Broekhuizen, M. L., Guerra, R. & Kolancali, P. (in preparation). Acculturation orientations of Turkish immigrant parents across Europe. Journal of Social Issues. This paper is prepared at the request of the Journal of Social Issues for a special issue.

Baird, J., Kolancali, P., Melhuish, E., Mutton, T., Sammons, P., Skilling, K., & Stylianides, G. Specialist Mathematics Schools in England: A Review and Implications for Oxford. This paper was prepared at the request of Professor Martin Williams, Pro Vice-Chancellor (Education) at the University of Oxford, by a Working Group established at the Department of Education.

Kolancali, P. (2019) Factors related to bilingual language skills of Turkish-English Speaking Children. In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 55-70. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Kolancali, P., & Melhuish, E. (2019). How do home and school experiences of Turkish children in the UK interact with their language attitudes and preferences? In G. Pastori, V. Pagani, & A. S. Sarcinelli (Eds.) Children’s Views on Inclusion at School. ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.4. pp 76-83. https://staging-isotis-pw.framework.pt/site/assets/files/1191/d2_4_technical-report-on-the-child-interview-study.pdf

Kolancali, P., & Melhuish, E. (2019) How do family characteristics and migration shape the home learning environment of Turkish children in the UK? In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 98-102. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Broekhuizen, M. L., Guerra, R. & Kolancali, P. (2019) Acculturation orientations, intergroup relations and well-being of Turkish and Maghrebian immigrant parents across Europe (Integrative Report D2.5). In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 122-127. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Jim McKinley is an associate professor of Applied Linguistics in Higher Education at UCL Institute of Education, and a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He has been an associate of the EMI Oxford research group since arriving in the UK in 2016. Originally from the US, he later taught and studied in Australia and New Zealand, and also taught for many years on Japan’s oldest EMI program at Sophia University (2005-2016).

At Oxford, Jim regularly collaborates with Dr. Heath Rose as well as Prof. Victoria Murphy, has published with several DPhil students, and supervises dissertations on the MSc ALSLA and MSc ALLT programs.

Jim’s research mainly explores implications of globalisation for L2 writing, language education, and teaching in higher education. As principal investigator on the British Academy-funded project ‘Exploring the teaching-research nexus in higher education’ (2018), he continues to research and publish on the bifurcation of teaching and research in higher education and TESOL in the UK and internationally. Jim is a co-editor-in-chief of the journal System and series co-editor (with Dr Heath Rose) of Cambridge Elements: Language Teaching.

For further information, visit www.researchgate.net/profile/Jim-Mckinley.

 

Publications

Rose, H., McKinley, J., & Galloway, N. (2020). Global Englishes and Language Teaching: A systematic review of pedagogical research. Language Teaching. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0261444820000518

McKinley, J., McIntosh, S., Milligan, L. O., Mikolajewska, A. (2020). Eyes on the enterprise: Problematising the concept of a teaching-research nexus in UK higher education. Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00595-2

Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2020). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2020). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics. Routledge.

Rose, H., McKinley, J. & Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J. (2020). Data Collection in Applied Linguistics Research. Bloomsbury.

Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J., & McKinley, J. (2019). Language and the development of intercultural competence in an ‘internationalised’ university: Staff and student perspectives. Teaching in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/13562517.2019.1686698

McIntosh, S. McKinley, J., Milligan, L., & Mikolajewska, A. (2019). Whose values? Whose time? Issues of (in)visibility in academic practice in UK universities. Studies in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1637846

McKinley, J. (2019). Evolving the teaching-research nexus. TESOL Quarterly, 53(3), 875-884.

McKinley, J., Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J. (2019). Developing intercultural competence in the third space: postgraduate studies in the UK. Language and Intercultural Communication, 19(1), 9-22.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (2018). Conceptualizations of language errors, standards, norms and nativeness in English for research publication purposes. Journal of Second Language Writing, 42, 1-11.

McKinley, J. (2018). Integrating appraisal theory with possible selves in understanding university EFL writing. System, 78, 27-37.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2018). Japan’s English medium instruction initiatives and the globalization of higher education. Higher Education, 75(1), 111-129.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2017). The prevalence of pedagogy-related research in applied linguistics: Extending the debate. Applied Linguistics, 38(4), 599-604.

McKinley, J., & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2017). Doing Research in Applied Linguistics: Realities, Dilemmas and Solutions. Routledge.

McKinley, J. (2015). Critical argument and writer identity: Social constructivism as a theoretical framework for EFL academic writing. Critical Inquiry in Language Studies, 12(3), 184-207.

 

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Sarah is a Research Assistant at the Department of Education working with Professor Charles Hulme and Dr Gillian West.

Sarah completed her MSc in Social Cognition: Research and Applications at UCL. Her dissertation project was supervised by Dr Anne Schlottmann and investigated the development of a sense of fairness in children aged 4 to 7 years.

She is currently assisting on the Nuffield Early Language Intervention (NELI) trial for Reception children, working directly with schools as well as supporting the development and delivery of professional online training courses for school staff.

Andrew is currently working on the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools and will primarily be carrying out qualitative analysis of teacher interview data from schools who have had attachment and trauma training and a systematic review of recent literature.

Andrew has a background as a teacher and senior leader in a special school, and as a teacher trainer, particularly focused around inclusive education. Andrew’s area of research interest is around the influence of young people’s adoptive identity on educational experience and outcomes. Andrew’s research has included analysis of data from a range of sources including the Wales Adoption Cohort Study and Understanding Society, he is currently completing his doctoral thesis at Cardiff University.

 

Publications

Brown, A., Waters, C. S., & Shelton, K. H. (2017). A systematic review of the school performance and behavioural and emotional adjustments of children adopted from care. Adoption & Fostering, 41(4), 346-368.

Brown, A., Waters, C. S., & Shelton, K. H. (2019). The educational aspirations and psychological well-being of adopted young people in the UK. Adoption & Fostering, 43(1), 46-59.

Adam is a researcher in the Department’s Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance. He is currently a co-investigator on the ‘Unlocking the potential of AI for English law’ project.

This project is funded by the Industrial Strategy Challenge Fund’s (ICSF) Next Generation Services Research Programme and UK Research and Innovation (UKRI), run by researchers in the Oxford departments and faculties of Law, Economics, Computer Science, Education and the Said Business School, in 2019 and 2020.

Pinar is a post-doctoral researcher within the Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project at the Department of Education. As part of the wider team, Pinar is currently investigating the aspects of learning apps that support joint media engagement between parents and children and creative learning in early and middle childhood. Pinar is also contributing to a development of a game-based language intervention focused on the vocabulary acquisition of emerging bilingual and monolingual children in England.

Before joining the team, Pinar was a doctoral student and a researcher at the Department of Education. Supervised by Prof. Edward Melhuish, her thesis examined the factors contributing to bilingual language and identity development of ethnic minority children growing up in first generation immigrant households in the UK. During her doctoral studies, Pinar took up two significant research roles at the Department.  She coordinated a survey research including 300 Turkish families in the UK and led a qualitative study on the cultural experiences of ethnic minority children in England. Before joining the team, Pinar collaborated with a group of researchers at the Department for a report to the Pro-Vice-Chancellor of the University on a new education policy aiming to establish university-sponsored specialist schools in England.

Publications

Kolancali, P. (submitted for publication). The Effects of Immigration on the Language and Literacy Practices of Turkish Parents in England. Journal of Family Issues.

Broekhuizen, M. L., Guerra, R. & Kolancali, P. (in preparation). Acculturation orientations of Turkish immigrant parents across Europe. Journal of Social Issues. This paper is prepared at the request of the Journal of Social Issues for a special issue.

Baird, J., Kolancali, P., Melhuish, E., Mutton, T., Sammons, P., Skilling, K., & Stylianides, G. Specialist Mathematics Schools in England: A Review and Implications for Oxford. This paper was prepared at the request of Professor Martin Williams, Pro Vice-Chancellor (Education) at the University of Oxford, by a Working Group established at the Department of Education.

Kolancali, P. (2019) Factors related to bilingual language skills of Turkish-English Speaking Children. In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 55-70. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Kolancali, P., & Melhuish, E. (2019). How do home and school experiences of Turkish children in the UK interact with their language attitudes and preferences? In G. Pastori, V. Pagani, & A. S. Sarcinelli (Eds.) Children’s Views on Inclusion at School. ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.4. pp 76-83. https://staging-isotis-pw.framework.pt/site/assets/files/1191/d2_4_technical-report-on-the-child-interview-study.pdf

Kolancali, P., & Melhuish, E. (2019) How do family characteristics and migration shape the home learning environment of Turkish children in the UK? In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 98-102. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Broekhuizen, M. L., Guerra, R. & Kolancali, P. (2019) Acculturation orientations, intergroup relations and well-being of Turkish and Maghrebian immigrant parents across Europe (Integrative Report D2.5). In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 122-127. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Jim McKinley is an associate professor of Applied Linguistics in Higher Education at UCL Institute of Education, and a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He has been an associate of the EMI Oxford research group since arriving in the UK in 2016. Originally from the US, he later taught and studied in Australia and New Zealand, and also taught for many years on Japan’s oldest EMI program at Sophia University (2005-2016).

At Oxford, Jim regularly collaborates with Dr. Heath Rose as well as Prof. Victoria Murphy, has published with several DPhil students, and supervises dissertations on the MSc ALSLA and MSc ALLT programs.

Jim’s research mainly explores implications of globalisation for L2 writing, language education, and teaching in higher education. As principal investigator on the British Academy-funded project ‘Exploring the teaching-research nexus in higher education’ (2018), he continues to research and publish on the bifurcation of teaching and research in higher education and TESOL in the UK and internationally. Jim is a co-editor-in-chief of the journal System and series co-editor (with Dr Heath Rose) of Cambridge Elements: Language Teaching.

For further information, visit www.researchgate.net/profile/Jim-Mckinley.

 

Publications

Rose, H., McKinley, J., & Galloway, N. (2020). Global Englishes and Language Teaching: A systematic review of pedagogical research. Language Teaching. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0261444820000518

McKinley, J., McIntosh, S., Milligan, L. O., Mikolajewska, A. (2020). Eyes on the enterprise: Problematising the concept of a teaching-research nexus in UK higher education. Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00595-2

Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2020). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2020). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics. Routledge.

Rose, H., McKinley, J. & Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J. (2020). Data Collection in Applied Linguistics Research. Bloomsbury.

Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J., & McKinley, J. (2019). Language and the development of intercultural competence in an ‘internationalised’ university: Staff and student perspectives. Teaching in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/13562517.2019.1686698

McIntosh, S. McKinley, J., Milligan, L., & Mikolajewska, A. (2019). Whose values? Whose time? Issues of (in)visibility in academic practice in UK universities. Studies in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1637846

McKinley, J. (2019). Evolving the teaching-research nexus. TESOL Quarterly, 53(3), 875-884.

McKinley, J., Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J. (2019). Developing intercultural competence in the third space: postgraduate studies in the UK. Language and Intercultural Communication, 19(1), 9-22.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (2018). Conceptualizations of language errors, standards, norms and nativeness in English for research publication purposes. Journal of Second Language Writing, 42, 1-11.

McKinley, J. (2018). Integrating appraisal theory with possible selves in understanding university EFL writing. System, 78, 27-37.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2018). Japan’s English medium instruction initiatives and the globalization of higher education. Higher Education, 75(1), 111-129.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2017). The prevalence of pedagogy-related research in applied linguistics: Extending the debate. Applied Linguistics, 38(4), 599-604.

McKinley, J., & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2017). Doing Research in Applied Linguistics: Realities, Dilemmas and Solutions. Routledge.

McKinley, J. (2015). Critical argument and writer identity: Social constructivism as a theoretical framework for EFL academic writing. Critical Inquiry in Language Studies, 12(3), 184-207.

 

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Sarah is a Research Assistant at the Department of Education working with Professor Charles Hulme and Dr Gillian West.

Sarah completed her MSc in Social Cognition: Research and Applications at UCL. Her dissertation project was supervised by Dr Anne Schlottmann and investigated the development of a sense of fairness in children aged 4 to 7 years.

She is currently assisting on the Nuffield Early Language Intervention (NELI) trial for Reception children, working directly with schools as well as supporting the development and delivery of professional online training courses for school staff.

Andrew is currently working on the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools and will primarily be carrying out qualitative analysis of teacher interview data from schools who have had attachment and trauma training and a systematic review of recent literature.

Andrew has a background as a teacher and senior leader in a special school, and as a teacher trainer, particularly focused around inclusive education. Andrew’s area of research interest is around the influence of young people’s adoptive identity on educational experience and outcomes. Andrew’s research has included analysis of data from a range of sources including the Wales Adoption Cohort Study and Understanding Society, he is currently completing his doctoral thesis at Cardiff University.

 

Publications

Brown, A., Waters, C. S., & Shelton, K. H. (2017). A systematic review of the school performance and behavioural and emotional adjustments of children adopted from care. Adoption & Fostering, 41(4), 346-368.

Brown, A., Waters, C. S., & Shelton, K. H. (2019). The educational aspirations and psychological well-being of adopted young people in the UK. Adoption & Fostering, 43(1), 46-59.

Adam is a researcher in the Department’s Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance. He is currently a co-investigator on the ‘Unlocking the potential of AI for English law’ project.

This project is funded by the Industrial Strategy Challenge Fund’s (ICSF) Next Generation Services Research Programme and UK Research and Innovation (UKRI), run by researchers in the Oxford departments and faculties of Law, Economics, Computer Science, Education and the Said Business School, in 2019 and 2020.

Pinar is a post-doctoral researcher within the Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project at the Department of Education. As part of the wider team, Pinar is currently investigating the aspects of learning apps that support joint media engagement between parents and children and creative learning in early and middle childhood. Pinar is also contributing to a development of a game-based language intervention focused on the vocabulary acquisition of emerging bilingual and monolingual children in England.

Before joining the team, Pinar was a doctoral student and a researcher at the Department of Education. Supervised by Prof. Edward Melhuish, her thesis examined the factors contributing to bilingual language and identity development of ethnic minority children growing up in first generation immigrant households in the UK. During her doctoral studies, Pinar took up two significant research roles at the Department.  She coordinated a survey research including 300 Turkish families in the UK and led a qualitative study on the cultural experiences of ethnic minority children in England. Before joining the team, Pinar collaborated with a group of researchers at the Department for a report to the Pro-Vice-Chancellor of the University on a new education policy aiming to establish university-sponsored specialist schools in England.

Publications

Kolancali, P. (submitted for publication). The Effects of Immigration on the Language and Literacy Practices of Turkish Parents in England. Journal of Family Issues.

Broekhuizen, M. L., Guerra, R. & Kolancali, P. (in preparation). Acculturation orientations of Turkish immigrant parents across Europe. Journal of Social Issues. This paper is prepared at the request of the Journal of Social Issues for a special issue.

Baird, J., Kolancali, P., Melhuish, E., Mutton, T., Sammons, P., Skilling, K., & Stylianides, G. Specialist Mathematics Schools in England: A Review and Implications for Oxford. This paper was prepared at the request of Professor Martin Williams, Pro Vice-Chancellor (Education) at the University of Oxford, by a Working Group established at the Department of Education.

Kolancali, P. (2019) Factors related to bilingual language skills of Turkish-English Speaking Children. In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 55-70. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Kolancali, P., & Melhuish, E. (2019). How do home and school experiences of Turkish children in the UK interact with their language attitudes and preferences? In G. Pastori, V. Pagani, & A. S. Sarcinelli (Eds.) Children’s Views on Inclusion at School. ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.4. pp 76-83. https://staging-isotis-pw.framework.pt/site/assets/files/1191/d2_4_technical-report-on-the-child-interview-study.pdf

Kolancali, P., & Melhuish, E. (2019) How do family characteristics and migration shape the home learning environment of Turkish children in the UK? In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 98-102. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Broekhuizen, M. L., Guerra, R. & Kolancali, P. (2019) Acculturation orientations, intergroup relations and well-being of Turkish and Maghrebian immigrant parents across Europe (Integrative Report D2.5). In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 122-127. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Jim McKinley is an associate professor of Applied Linguistics in Higher Education at UCL Institute of Education, and a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He has been an associate of the EMI Oxford research group since arriving in the UK in 2016. Originally from the US, he later taught and studied in Australia and New Zealand, and also taught for many years on Japan’s oldest EMI program at Sophia University (2005-2016).

At Oxford, Jim regularly collaborates with Dr. Heath Rose as well as Prof. Victoria Murphy, has published with several DPhil students, and supervises dissertations on the MSc ALSLA and MSc ALLT programs.

Jim’s research mainly explores implications of globalisation for L2 writing, language education, and teaching in higher education. As principal investigator on the British Academy-funded project ‘Exploring the teaching-research nexus in higher education’ (2018), he continues to research and publish on the bifurcation of teaching and research in higher education and TESOL in the UK and internationally. Jim is a co-editor-in-chief of the journal System and series co-editor (with Dr Heath Rose) of Cambridge Elements: Language Teaching.

For further information, visit www.researchgate.net/profile/Jim-Mckinley.

 

Publications

Rose, H., McKinley, J., & Galloway, N. (2020). Global Englishes and Language Teaching: A systematic review of pedagogical research. Language Teaching. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0261444820000518

McKinley, J., McIntosh, S., Milligan, L. O., Mikolajewska, A. (2020). Eyes on the enterprise: Problematising the concept of a teaching-research nexus in UK higher education. Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00595-2

Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2020). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2020). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics. Routledge.

Rose, H., McKinley, J. & Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J. (2020). Data Collection in Applied Linguistics Research. Bloomsbury.

Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J., & McKinley, J. (2019). Language and the development of intercultural competence in an ‘internationalised’ university: Staff and student perspectives. Teaching in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/13562517.2019.1686698

McIntosh, S. McKinley, J., Milligan, L., & Mikolajewska, A. (2019). Whose values? Whose time? Issues of (in)visibility in academic practice in UK universities. Studies in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1637846

McKinley, J. (2019). Evolving the teaching-research nexus. TESOL Quarterly, 53(3), 875-884.

McKinley, J., Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J. (2019). Developing intercultural competence in the third space: postgraduate studies in the UK. Language and Intercultural Communication, 19(1), 9-22.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (2018). Conceptualizations of language errors, standards, norms and nativeness in English for research publication purposes. Journal of Second Language Writing, 42, 1-11.

McKinley, J. (2018). Integrating appraisal theory with possible selves in understanding university EFL writing. System, 78, 27-37.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2018). Japan’s English medium instruction initiatives and the globalization of higher education. Higher Education, 75(1), 111-129.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2017). The prevalence of pedagogy-related research in applied linguistics: Extending the debate. Applied Linguistics, 38(4), 599-604.

McKinley, J., & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2017). Doing Research in Applied Linguistics: Realities, Dilemmas and Solutions. Routledge.

McKinley, J. (2015). Critical argument and writer identity: Social constructivism as a theoretical framework for EFL academic writing. Critical Inquiry in Language Studies, 12(3), 184-207.

 

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Sarah is a Research Assistant at the Department of Education working with Professor Charles Hulme and Dr Gillian West.

Sarah completed her MSc in Social Cognition: Research and Applications at UCL. Her dissertation project was supervised by Dr Anne Schlottmann and investigated the development of a sense of fairness in children aged 4 to 7 years.

She is currently assisting on the Nuffield Early Language Intervention (NELI) trial for Reception children, working directly with schools as well as supporting the development and delivery of professional online training courses for school staff.

Andrew is currently working on the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools and will primarily be carrying out qualitative analysis of teacher interview data from schools who have had attachment and trauma training and a systematic review of recent literature.

Andrew has a background as a teacher and senior leader in a special school, and as a teacher trainer, particularly focused around inclusive education. Andrew’s area of research interest is around the influence of young people’s adoptive identity on educational experience and outcomes. Andrew’s research has included analysis of data from a range of sources including the Wales Adoption Cohort Study and Understanding Society, he is currently completing his doctoral thesis at Cardiff University.

 

Publications

Brown, A., Waters, C. S., & Shelton, K. H. (2017). A systematic review of the school performance and behavioural and emotional adjustments of children adopted from care. Adoption & Fostering, 41(4), 346-368.

Brown, A., Waters, C. S., & Shelton, K. H. (2019). The educational aspirations and psychological well-being of adopted young people in the UK. Adoption & Fostering, 43(1), 46-59.

Adam is a researcher in the Department’s Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance. He is currently a co-investigator on the ‘Unlocking the potential of AI for English law’ project.

This project is funded by the Industrial Strategy Challenge Fund’s (ICSF) Next Generation Services Research Programme and UK Research and Innovation (UKRI), run by researchers in the Oxford departments and faculties of Law, Economics, Computer Science, Education and the Said Business School, in 2019 and 2020.

Pinar is a post-doctoral researcher within the Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project at the Department of Education. As part of the wider team, Pinar is currently investigating the aspects of learning apps that support joint media engagement between parents and children and creative learning in early and middle childhood. Pinar is also contributing to a development of a game-based language intervention focused on the vocabulary acquisition of emerging bilingual and monolingual children in England.

Before joining the team, Pinar was a doctoral student and a researcher at the Department of Education. Supervised by Prof. Edward Melhuish, her thesis examined the factors contributing to bilingual language and identity development of ethnic minority children growing up in first generation immigrant households in the UK. During her doctoral studies, Pinar took up two significant research roles at the Department.  She coordinated a survey research including 300 Turkish families in the UK and led a qualitative study on the cultural experiences of ethnic minority children in England. Before joining the team, Pinar collaborated with a group of researchers at the Department for a report to the Pro-Vice-Chancellor of the University on a new education policy aiming to establish university-sponsored specialist schools in England.

Publications

Kolancali, P. (submitted for publication). The Effects of Immigration on the Language and Literacy Practices of Turkish Parents in England. Journal of Family Issues.

Broekhuizen, M. L., Guerra, R. & Kolancali, P. (in preparation). Acculturation orientations of Turkish immigrant parents across Europe. Journal of Social Issues. This paper is prepared at the request of the Journal of Social Issues for a special issue.

Baird, J., Kolancali, P., Melhuish, E., Mutton, T., Sammons, P., Skilling, K., & Stylianides, G. Specialist Mathematics Schools in England: A Review and Implications for Oxford. This paper was prepared at the request of Professor Martin Williams, Pro Vice-Chancellor (Education) at the University of Oxford, by a Working Group established at the Department of Education.

Kolancali, P. (2019) Factors related to bilingual language skills of Turkish-English Speaking Children. In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 55-70. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Kolancali, P., & Melhuish, E. (2019). How do home and school experiences of Turkish children in the UK interact with their language attitudes and preferences? In G. Pastori, V. Pagani, & A. S. Sarcinelli (Eds.) Children’s Views on Inclusion at School. ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.4. pp 76-83. https://staging-isotis-pw.framework.pt/site/assets/files/1191/d2_4_technical-report-on-the-child-interview-study.pdf

Kolancali, P., & Melhuish, E. (2019) How do family characteristics and migration shape the home learning environment of Turkish children in the UK? In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 98-102. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Broekhuizen, M. L., Guerra, R. & Kolancali, P. (2019) Acculturation orientations, intergroup relations and well-being of Turkish and Maghrebian immigrant parents across Europe (Integrative Report D2.5). In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 122-127. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Jim McKinley is an associate professor of Applied Linguistics in Higher Education at UCL Institute of Education, and a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He has been an associate of the EMI Oxford research group since arriving in the UK in 2016. Originally from the US, he later taught and studied in Australia and New Zealand, and also taught for many years on Japan’s oldest EMI program at Sophia University (2005-2016).

At Oxford, Jim regularly collaborates with Dr. Heath Rose as well as Prof. Victoria Murphy, has published with several DPhil students, and supervises dissertations on the MSc ALSLA and MSc ALLT programs.

Jim’s research mainly explores implications of globalisation for L2 writing, language education, and teaching in higher education. As principal investigator on the British Academy-funded project ‘Exploring the teaching-research nexus in higher education’ (2018), he continues to research and publish on the bifurcation of teaching and research in higher education and TESOL in the UK and internationally. Jim is a co-editor-in-chief of the journal System and series co-editor (with Dr Heath Rose) of Cambridge Elements: Language Teaching.

For further information, visit www.researchgate.net/profile/Jim-Mckinley.

 

Publications

Rose, H., McKinley, J., & Galloway, N. (2020). Global Englishes and Language Teaching: A systematic review of pedagogical research. Language Teaching. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0261444820000518

McKinley, J., McIntosh, S., Milligan, L. O., Mikolajewska, A. (2020). Eyes on the enterprise: Problematising the concept of a teaching-research nexus in UK higher education. Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00595-2

Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2020). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2020). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics. Routledge.

Rose, H., McKinley, J. & Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J. (2020). Data Collection in Applied Linguistics Research. Bloomsbury.

Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J., & McKinley, J. (2019). Language and the development of intercultural competence in an ‘internationalised’ university: Staff and student perspectives. Teaching in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/13562517.2019.1686698

McIntosh, S. McKinley, J., Milligan, L., & Mikolajewska, A. (2019). Whose values? Whose time? Issues of (in)visibility in academic practice in UK universities. Studies in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1637846

McKinley, J. (2019). Evolving the teaching-research nexus. TESOL Quarterly, 53(3), 875-884.

McKinley, J., Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J. (2019). Developing intercultural competence in the third space: postgraduate studies in the UK. Language and Intercultural Communication, 19(1), 9-22.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (2018). Conceptualizations of language errors, standards, norms and nativeness in English for research publication purposes. Journal of Second Language Writing, 42, 1-11.

McKinley, J. (2018). Integrating appraisal theory with possible selves in understanding university EFL writing. System, 78, 27-37.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2018). Japan’s English medium instruction initiatives and the globalization of higher education. Higher Education, 75(1), 111-129.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2017). The prevalence of pedagogy-related research in applied linguistics: Extending the debate. Applied Linguistics, 38(4), 599-604.

McKinley, J., & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2017). Doing Research in Applied Linguistics: Realities, Dilemmas and Solutions. Routledge.

McKinley, J. (2015). Critical argument and writer identity: Social constructivism as a theoretical framework for EFL academic writing. Critical Inquiry in Language Studies, 12(3), 184-207.

 

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Sarah is a Research Assistant at the Department of Education working with Professor Charles Hulme and Dr Gillian West.

Sarah completed her MSc in Social Cognition: Research and Applications at UCL. Her dissertation project was supervised by Dr Anne Schlottmann and investigated the development of a sense of fairness in children aged 4 to 7 years.

She is currently assisting on the Nuffield Early Language Intervention (NELI) trial for Reception children, working directly with schools as well as supporting the development and delivery of professional online training courses for school staff.

Andrew is currently working on the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools and will primarily be carrying out qualitative analysis of teacher interview data from schools who have had attachment and trauma training and a systematic review of recent literature.

Andrew has a background as a teacher and senior leader in a special school, and as a teacher trainer, particularly focused around inclusive education. Andrew’s area of research interest is around the influence of young people’s adoptive identity on educational experience and outcomes. Andrew’s research has included analysis of data from a range of sources including the Wales Adoption Cohort Study and Understanding Society, he is currently completing his doctoral thesis at Cardiff University.

 

Publications

Brown, A., Waters, C. S., & Shelton, K. H. (2017). A systematic review of the school performance and behavioural and emotional adjustments of children adopted from care. Adoption & Fostering, 41(4), 346-368.

Brown, A., Waters, C. S., & Shelton, K. H. (2019). The educational aspirations and psychological well-being of adopted young people in the UK. Adoption & Fostering, 43(1), 46-59.

Adam is a researcher in the Department’s Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance. He is currently a co-investigator on the ‘Unlocking the potential of AI for English law’ project.

This project is funded by the Industrial Strategy Challenge Fund’s (ICSF) Next Generation Services Research Programme and UK Research and Innovation (UKRI), run by researchers in the Oxford departments and faculties of Law, Economics, Computer Science, Education and the Said Business School, in 2019 and 2020.

Pinar is a post-doctoral researcher within the Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project at the Department of Education. As part of the wider team, Pinar is currently investigating the aspects of learning apps that support joint media engagement between parents and children and creative learning in early and middle childhood. Pinar is also contributing to a development of a game-based language intervention focused on the vocabulary acquisition of emerging bilingual and monolingual children in England.

Before joining the team, Pinar was a doctoral student and a researcher at the Department of Education. Supervised by Prof. Edward Melhuish, her thesis examined the factors contributing to bilingual language and identity development of ethnic minority children growing up in first generation immigrant households in the UK. During her doctoral studies, Pinar took up two significant research roles at the Department.  She coordinated a survey research including 300 Turkish families in the UK and led a qualitative study on the cultural experiences of ethnic minority children in England. Before joining the team, Pinar collaborated with a group of researchers at the Department for a report to the Pro-Vice-Chancellor of the University on a new education policy aiming to establish university-sponsored specialist schools in England.

Publications

Kolancali, P. (submitted for publication). The Effects of Immigration on the Language and Literacy Practices of Turkish Parents in England. Journal of Family Issues.

Broekhuizen, M. L., Guerra, R. & Kolancali, P. (in preparation). Acculturation orientations of Turkish immigrant parents across Europe. Journal of Social Issues. This paper is prepared at the request of the Journal of Social Issues for a special issue.

Baird, J., Kolancali, P., Melhuish, E., Mutton, T., Sammons, P., Skilling, K., & Stylianides, G. Specialist Mathematics Schools in England: A Review and Implications for Oxford. This paper was prepared at the request of Professor Martin Williams, Pro Vice-Chancellor (Education) at the University of Oxford, by a Working Group established at the Department of Education.

Kolancali, P. (2019) Factors related to bilingual language skills of Turkish-English Speaking Children. In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 55-70. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Kolancali, P., & Melhuish, E. (2019). How do home and school experiences of Turkish children in the UK interact with their language attitudes and preferences? In G. Pastori, V. Pagani, & A. S. Sarcinelli (Eds.) Children’s Views on Inclusion at School. ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.4. pp 76-83. https://staging-isotis-pw.framework.pt/site/assets/files/1191/d2_4_technical-report-on-the-child-interview-study.pdf

Kolancali, P., & Melhuish, E. (2019) How do family characteristics and migration shape the home learning environment of Turkish children in the UK? In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 98-102. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Broekhuizen, M. L., Guerra, R. & Kolancali, P. (2019) Acculturation orientations, intergroup relations and well-being of Turkish and Maghrebian immigrant parents across Europe (Integrative Report D2.5). In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 122-127. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Jim McKinley is an associate professor of Applied Linguistics in Higher Education at UCL Institute of Education, and a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He has been an associate of the EMI Oxford research group since arriving in the UK in 2016. Originally from the US, he later taught and studied in Australia and New Zealand, and also taught for many years on Japan’s oldest EMI program at Sophia University (2005-2016).

At Oxford, Jim regularly collaborates with Dr. Heath Rose as well as Prof. Victoria Murphy, has published with several DPhil students, and supervises dissertations on the MSc ALSLA and MSc ALLT programs.

Jim’s research mainly explores implications of globalisation for L2 writing, language education, and teaching in higher education. As principal investigator on the British Academy-funded project ‘Exploring the teaching-research nexus in higher education’ (2018), he continues to research and publish on the bifurcation of teaching and research in higher education and TESOL in the UK and internationally. Jim is a co-editor-in-chief of the journal System and series co-editor (with Dr Heath Rose) of Cambridge Elements: Language Teaching.

For further information, visit www.researchgate.net/profile/Jim-Mckinley.

 

Publications

Rose, H., McKinley, J., & Galloway, N. (2020). Global Englishes and Language Teaching: A systematic review of pedagogical research. Language Teaching. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0261444820000518

McKinley, J., McIntosh, S., Milligan, L. O., Mikolajewska, A. (2020). Eyes on the enterprise: Problematising the concept of a teaching-research nexus in UK higher education. Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00595-2

Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2020). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2020). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics. Routledge.

Rose, H., McKinley, J. & Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J. (2020). Data Collection in Applied Linguistics Research. Bloomsbury.

Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J., & McKinley, J. (2019). Language and the development of intercultural competence in an ‘internationalised’ university: Staff and student perspectives. Teaching in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/13562517.2019.1686698

McIntosh, S. McKinley, J., Milligan, L., & Mikolajewska, A. (2019). Whose values? Whose time? Issues of (in)visibility in academic practice in UK universities. Studies in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1637846

McKinley, J. (2019). Evolving the teaching-research nexus. TESOL Quarterly, 53(3), 875-884.

McKinley, J., Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J. (2019). Developing intercultural competence in the third space: postgraduate studies in the UK. Language and Intercultural Communication, 19(1), 9-22.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (2018). Conceptualizations of language errors, standards, norms and nativeness in English for research publication purposes. Journal of Second Language Writing, 42, 1-11.

McKinley, J. (2018). Integrating appraisal theory with possible selves in understanding university EFL writing. System, 78, 27-37.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2018). Japan’s English medium instruction initiatives and the globalization of higher education. Higher Education, 75(1), 111-129.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2017). The prevalence of pedagogy-related research in applied linguistics: Extending the debate. Applied Linguistics, 38(4), 599-604.

McKinley, J., & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2017). Doing Research in Applied Linguistics: Realities, Dilemmas and Solutions. Routledge.

McKinley, J. (2015). Critical argument and writer identity: Social constructivism as a theoretical framework for EFL academic writing. Critical Inquiry in Language Studies, 12(3), 184-207.

 

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Sarah is a Research Assistant at the Department of Education working with Professor Charles Hulme and Dr Gillian West.

Sarah completed her MSc in Social Cognition: Research and Applications at UCL. Her dissertation project was supervised by Dr Anne Schlottmann and investigated the development of a sense of fairness in children aged 4 to 7 years.

She is currently assisting on the Nuffield Early Language Intervention (NELI) trial for Reception children, working directly with schools as well as supporting the development and delivery of professional online training courses for school staff.

Andrew is currently working on the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools and will primarily be carrying out qualitative analysis of teacher interview data from schools who have had attachment and trauma training and a systematic review of recent literature.

Andrew has a background as a teacher and senior leader in a special school, and as a teacher trainer, particularly focused around inclusive education. Andrew’s area of research interest is around the influence of young people’s adoptive identity on educational experience and outcomes. Andrew’s research has included analysis of data from a range of sources including the Wales Adoption Cohort Study and Understanding Society, he is currently completing his doctoral thesis at Cardiff University.

 

Publications

Brown, A., Waters, C. S., & Shelton, K. H. (2017). A systematic review of the school performance and behavioural and emotional adjustments of children adopted from care. Adoption & Fostering, 41(4), 346-368.

Brown, A., Waters, C. S., & Shelton, K. H. (2019). The educational aspirations and psychological well-being of adopted young people in the UK. Adoption & Fostering, 43(1), 46-59.

Adam is a researcher in the Department’s Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance. He is currently a co-investigator on the ‘Unlocking the potential of AI for English law’ project.

This project is funded by the Industrial Strategy Challenge Fund’s (ICSF) Next Generation Services Research Programme and UK Research and Innovation (UKRI), run by researchers in the Oxford departments and faculties of Law, Economics, Computer Science, Education and the Said Business School, in 2019 and 2020.

Pinar is a post-doctoral researcher within the Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project at the Department of Education. As part of the wider team, Pinar is currently investigating the aspects of learning apps that support joint media engagement between parents and children and creative learning in early and middle childhood. Pinar is also contributing to a development of a game-based language intervention focused on the vocabulary acquisition of emerging bilingual and monolingual children in England.

Before joining the team, Pinar was a doctoral student and a researcher at the Department of Education. Supervised by Prof. Edward Melhuish, her thesis examined the factors contributing to bilingual language and identity development of ethnic minority children growing up in first generation immigrant households in the UK. During her doctoral studies, Pinar took up two significant research roles at the Department.  She coordinated a survey research including 300 Turkish families in the UK and led a qualitative study on the cultural experiences of ethnic minority children in England. Before joining the team, Pinar collaborated with a group of researchers at the Department for a report to the Pro-Vice-Chancellor of the University on a new education policy aiming to establish university-sponsored specialist schools in England.

Publications

Kolancali, P. (submitted for publication). The Effects of Immigration on the Language and Literacy Practices of Turkish Parents in England. Journal of Family Issues.

Broekhuizen, M. L., Guerra, R. & Kolancali, P. (in preparation). Acculturation orientations of Turkish immigrant parents across Europe. Journal of Social Issues. This paper is prepared at the request of the Journal of Social Issues for a special issue.

Baird, J., Kolancali, P., Melhuish, E., Mutton, T., Sammons, P., Skilling, K., & Stylianides, G. Specialist Mathematics Schools in England: A Review and Implications for Oxford. This paper was prepared at the request of Professor Martin Williams, Pro Vice-Chancellor (Education) at the University of Oxford, by a Working Group established at the Department of Education.

Kolancali, P. (2019) Factors related to bilingual language skills of Turkish-English Speaking Children. In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 55-70. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Kolancali, P., & Melhuish, E. (2019). How do home and school experiences of Turkish children in the UK interact with their language attitudes and preferences? In G. Pastori, V. Pagani, & A. S. Sarcinelli (Eds.) Children’s Views on Inclusion at School. ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.4. pp 76-83. https://staging-isotis-pw.framework.pt/site/assets/files/1191/d2_4_technical-report-on-the-child-interview-study.pdf

Kolancali, P., & Melhuish, E. (2019) How do family characteristics and migration shape the home learning environment of Turkish children in the UK? In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 98-102. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Broekhuizen, M. L., Guerra, R. & Kolancali, P. (2019) Acculturation orientations, intergroup relations and well-being of Turkish and Maghrebian immigrant parents across Europe (Integrative Report D2.5). In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 122-127. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Jim McKinley is an associate professor of Applied Linguistics in Higher Education at UCL Institute of Education, and a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He has been an associate of the EMI Oxford research group since arriving in the UK in 2016. Originally from the US, he later taught and studied in Australia and New Zealand, and also taught for many years on Japan’s oldest EMI program at Sophia University (2005-2016).

At Oxford, Jim regularly collaborates with Dr. Heath Rose as well as Prof. Victoria Murphy, has published with several DPhil students, and supervises dissertations on the MSc ALSLA and MSc ALLT programs.

Jim’s research mainly explores implications of globalisation for L2 writing, language education, and teaching in higher education. As principal investigator on the British Academy-funded project ‘Exploring the teaching-research nexus in higher education’ (2018), he continues to research and publish on the bifurcation of teaching and research in higher education and TESOL in the UK and internationally. Jim is a co-editor-in-chief of the journal System and series co-editor (with Dr Heath Rose) of Cambridge Elements: Language Teaching.

For further information, visit www.researchgate.net/profile/Jim-Mckinley.

 

Publications

Rose, H., McKinley, J., & Galloway, N. (2020). Global Englishes and Language Teaching: A systematic review of pedagogical research. Language Teaching. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0261444820000518

McKinley, J., McIntosh, S., Milligan, L. O., Mikolajewska, A. (2020). Eyes on the enterprise: Problematising the concept of a teaching-research nexus in UK higher education. Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00595-2

Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2020). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2020). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics. Routledge.

Rose, H., McKinley, J. & Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J. (2020). Data Collection in Applied Linguistics Research. Bloomsbury.

Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J., & McKinley, J. (2019). Language and the development of intercultural competence in an ‘internationalised’ university: Staff and student perspectives. Teaching in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/13562517.2019.1686698

McIntosh, S. McKinley, J., Milligan, L., & Mikolajewska, A. (2019). Whose values? Whose time? Issues of (in)visibility in academic practice in UK universities. Studies in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1637846

McKinley, J. (2019). Evolving the teaching-research nexus. TESOL Quarterly, 53(3), 875-884.

McKinley, J., Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J. (2019). Developing intercultural competence in the third space: postgraduate studies in the UK. Language and Intercultural Communication, 19(1), 9-22.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (2018). Conceptualizations of language errors, standards, norms and nativeness in English for research publication purposes. Journal of Second Language Writing, 42, 1-11.

McKinley, J. (2018). Integrating appraisal theory with possible selves in understanding university EFL writing. System, 78, 27-37.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2018). Japan’s English medium instruction initiatives and the globalization of higher education. Higher Education, 75(1), 111-129.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2017). The prevalence of pedagogy-related research in applied linguistics: Extending the debate. Applied Linguistics, 38(4), 599-604.

McKinley, J., & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2017). Doing Research in Applied Linguistics: Realities, Dilemmas and Solutions. Routledge.

McKinley, J. (2015). Critical argument and writer identity: Social constructivism as a theoretical framework for EFL academic writing. Critical Inquiry in Language Studies, 12(3), 184-207.

 

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Sarah is a Research Assistant at the Department of Education working with Professor Charles Hulme and Dr Gillian West.

Sarah completed her MSc in Social Cognition: Research and Applications at UCL. Her dissertation project was supervised by Dr Anne Schlottmann and investigated the development of a sense of fairness in children aged 4 to 7 years.

She is currently assisting on the Nuffield Early Language Intervention (NELI) trial for Reception children, working directly with schools as well as supporting the development and delivery of professional online training courses for school staff.

Andrew is currently working on the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools and will primarily be carrying out qualitative analysis of teacher interview data from schools who have had attachment and trauma training and a systematic review of recent literature.

Andrew has a background as a teacher and senior leader in a special school, and as a teacher trainer, particularly focused around inclusive education. Andrew’s area of research interest is around the influence of young people’s adoptive identity on educational experience and outcomes. Andrew’s research has included analysis of data from a range of sources including the Wales Adoption Cohort Study and Understanding Society, he is currently completing his doctoral thesis at Cardiff University.

 

Publications

Brown, A., Waters, C. S., & Shelton, K. H. (2017). A systematic review of the school performance and behavioural and emotional adjustments of children adopted from care. Adoption & Fostering, 41(4), 346-368.

Brown, A., Waters, C. S., & Shelton, K. H. (2019). The educational aspirations and psychological well-being of adopted young people in the UK. Adoption & Fostering, 43(1), 46-59.

Adam is a researcher in the Department’s Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance. He is currently a co-investigator on the ‘Unlocking the potential of AI for English law’ project.

This project is funded by the Industrial Strategy Challenge Fund’s (ICSF) Next Generation Services Research Programme and UK Research and Innovation (UKRI), run by researchers in the Oxford departments and faculties of Law, Economics, Computer Science, Education and the Said Business School, in 2019 and 2020.

Pinar is a post-doctoral researcher within the Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project at the Department of Education. As part of the wider team, Pinar is currently investigating the aspects of learning apps that support joint media engagement between parents and children and creative learning in early and middle childhood. Pinar is also contributing to a development of a game-based language intervention focused on the vocabulary acquisition of emerging bilingual and monolingual children in England.

Before joining the team, Pinar was a doctoral student and a researcher at the Department of Education. Supervised by Prof. Edward Melhuish, her thesis examined the factors contributing to bilingual language and identity development of ethnic minority children growing up in first generation immigrant households in the UK. During her doctoral studies, Pinar took up two significant research roles at the Department.  She coordinated a survey research including 300 Turkish families in the UK and led a qualitative study on the cultural experiences of ethnic minority children in England. Before joining the team, Pinar collaborated with a group of researchers at the Department for a report to the Pro-Vice-Chancellor of the University on a new education policy aiming to establish university-sponsored specialist schools in England.

Publications

Kolancali, P. (submitted for publication). The Effects of Immigration on the Language and Literacy Practices of Turkish Parents in England. Journal of Family Issues.

Broekhuizen, M. L., Guerra, R. & Kolancali, P. (in preparation). Acculturation orientations of Turkish immigrant parents across Europe. Journal of Social Issues. This paper is prepared at the request of the Journal of Social Issues for a special issue.

Baird, J., Kolancali, P., Melhuish, E., Mutton, T., Sammons, P., Skilling, K., & Stylianides, G. Specialist Mathematics Schools in England: A Review and Implications for Oxford. This paper was prepared at the request of Professor Martin Williams, Pro Vice-Chancellor (Education) at the University of Oxford, by a Working Group established at the Department of Education.

Kolancali, P. (2019) Factors related to bilingual language skills of Turkish-English Speaking Children. In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 55-70. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Kolancali, P., & Melhuish, E. (2019). How do home and school experiences of Turkish children in the UK interact with their language attitudes and preferences? In G. Pastori, V. Pagani, & A. S. Sarcinelli (Eds.) Children’s Views on Inclusion at School. ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.4. pp 76-83. https://staging-isotis-pw.framework.pt/site/assets/files/1191/d2_4_technical-report-on-the-child-interview-study.pdf

Kolancali, P., & Melhuish, E. (2019) How do family characteristics and migration shape the home learning environment of Turkish children in the UK? In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 98-102. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Broekhuizen, M. L., Guerra, R. & Kolancali, P. (2019) Acculturation orientations, intergroup relations and well-being of Turkish and Maghrebian immigrant parents across Europe (Integrative Report D2.5). In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 122-127. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Jim McKinley is an associate professor of Applied Linguistics in Higher Education at UCL Institute of Education, and a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He has been an associate of the EMI Oxford research group since arriving in the UK in 2016. Originally from the US, he later taught and studied in Australia and New Zealand, and also taught for many years on Japan’s oldest EMI program at Sophia University (2005-2016).

At Oxford, Jim regularly collaborates with Dr. Heath Rose as well as Prof. Victoria Murphy, has published with several DPhil students, and supervises dissertations on the MSc ALSLA and MSc ALLT programs.

Jim’s research mainly explores implications of globalisation for L2 writing, language education, and teaching in higher education. As principal investigator on the British Academy-funded project ‘Exploring the teaching-research nexus in higher education’ (2018), he continues to research and publish on the bifurcation of teaching and research in higher education and TESOL in the UK and internationally. Jim is a co-editor-in-chief of the journal System and series co-editor (with Dr Heath Rose) of Cambridge Elements: Language Teaching.

For further information, visit www.researchgate.net/profile/Jim-Mckinley.

 

Publications

Rose, H., McKinley, J., & Galloway, N. (2020). Global Englishes and Language Teaching: A systematic review of pedagogical research. Language Teaching. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0261444820000518

McKinley, J., McIntosh, S., Milligan, L. O., Mikolajewska, A. (2020). Eyes on the enterprise: Problematising the concept of a teaching-research nexus in UK higher education. Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00595-2

Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2020). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2020). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics. Routledge.

Rose, H., McKinley, J. & Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J. (2020). Data Collection in Applied Linguistics Research. Bloomsbury.

Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J., & McKinley, J. (2019). Language and the development of intercultural competence in an ‘internationalised’ university: Staff and student perspectives. Teaching in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/13562517.2019.1686698

McIntosh, S. McKinley, J., Milligan, L., & Mikolajewska, A. (2019). Whose values? Whose time? Issues of (in)visibility in academic practice in UK universities. Studies in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1637846

McKinley, J. (2019). Evolving the teaching-research nexus. TESOL Quarterly, 53(3), 875-884.

McKinley, J., Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J. (2019). Developing intercultural competence in the third space: postgraduate studies in the UK. Language and Intercultural Communication, 19(1), 9-22.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (2018). Conceptualizations of language errors, standards, norms and nativeness in English for research publication purposes. Journal of Second Language Writing, 42, 1-11.

McKinley, J. (2018). Integrating appraisal theory with possible selves in understanding university EFL writing. System, 78, 27-37.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2018). Japan’s English medium instruction initiatives and the globalization of higher education. Higher Education, 75(1), 111-129.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2017). The prevalence of pedagogy-related research in applied linguistics: Extending the debate. Applied Linguistics, 38(4), 599-604.

McKinley, J., & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2017). Doing Research in Applied Linguistics: Realities, Dilemmas and Solutions. Routledge.

McKinley, J. (2015). Critical argument and writer identity: Social constructivism as a theoretical framework for EFL academic writing. Critical Inquiry in Language Studies, 12(3), 184-207.

 

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Sarah is a Research Assistant at the Department of Education working with Professor Charles Hulme and Dr Gillian West.

Sarah completed her MSc in Social Cognition: Research and Applications at UCL. Her dissertation project was supervised by Dr Anne Schlottmann and investigated the development of a sense of fairness in children aged 4 to 7 years.

She is currently assisting on the Nuffield Early Language Intervention (NELI) trial for Reception children, working directly with schools as well as supporting the development and delivery of professional online training courses for school staff.

Andrew is currently working on the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools and will primarily be carrying out qualitative analysis of teacher interview data from schools who have had attachment and trauma training and a systematic review of recent literature.

Andrew has a background as a teacher and senior leader in a special school, and as a teacher trainer, particularly focused around inclusive education. Andrew’s area of research interest is around the influence of young people’s adoptive identity on educational experience and outcomes. Andrew’s research has included analysis of data from a range of sources including the Wales Adoption Cohort Study and Understanding Society, he is currently completing his doctoral thesis at Cardiff University.

 

Publications

Brown, A., Waters, C. S., & Shelton, K. H. (2017). A systematic review of the school performance and behavioural and emotional adjustments of children adopted from care. Adoption & Fostering, 41(4), 346-368.

Brown, A., Waters, C. S., & Shelton, K. H. (2019). The educational aspirations and psychological well-being of adopted young people in the UK. Adoption & Fostering, 43(1), 46-59.

Adam is a researcher in the Department’s Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance. He is currently a co-investigator on the ‘Unlocking the potential of AI for English law’ project.

This project is funded by the Industrial Strategy Challenge Fund’s (ICSF) Next Generation Services Research Programme and UK Research and Innovation (UKRI), run by researchers in the Oxford departments and faculties of Law, Economics, Computer Science, Education and the Said Business School, in 2019 and 2020.

Pinar is a post-doctoral researcher within the Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project at the Department of Education. As part of the wider team, Pinar is currently investigating the aspects of learning apps that support joint media engagement between parents and children and creative learning in early and middle childhood. Pinar is also contributing to a development of a game-based language intervention focused on the vocabulary acquisition of emerging bilingual and monolingual children in England.

Before joining the team, Pinar was a doctoral student and a researcher at the Department of Education. Supervised by Prof. Edward Melhuish, her thesis examined the factors contributing to bilingual language and identity development of ethnic minority children growing up in first generation immigrant households in the UK. During her doctoral studies, Pinar took up two significant research roles at the Department.  She coordinated a survey research including 300 Turkish families in the UK and led a qualitative study on the cultural experiences of ethnic minority children in England. Before joining the team, Pinar collaborated with a group of researchers at the Department for a report to the Pro-Vice-Chancellor of the University on a new education policy aiming to establish university-sponsored specialist schools in England.

Publications

Kolancali, P. (submitted for publication). The Effects of Immigration on the Language and Literacy Practices of Turkish Parents in England. Journal of Family Issues.

Broekhuizen, M. L., Guerra, R. & Kolancali, P. (in preparation). Acculturation orientations of Turkish immigrant parents across Europe. Journal of Social Issues. This paper is prepared at the request of the Journal of Social Issues for a special issue.

Baird, J., Kolancali, P., Melhuish, E., Mutton, T., Sammons, P., Skilling, K., & Stylianides, G. Specialist Mathematics Schools in England: A Review and Implications for Oxford. This paper was prepared at the request of Professor Martin Williams, Pro Vice-Chancellor (Education) at the University of Oxford, by a Working Group established at the Department of Education.

Kolancali, P. (2019) Factors related to bilingual language skills of Turkish-English Speaking Children. In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 55-70. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Kolancali, P., & Melhuish, E. (2019). How do home and school experiences of Turkish children in the UK interact with their language attitudes and preferences? In G. Pastori, V. Pagani, & A. S. Sarcinelli (Eds.) Children’s Views on Inclusion at School. ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.4. pp 76-83. https://staging-isotis-pw.framework.pt/site/assets/files/1191/d2_4_technical-report-on-the-child-interview-study.pdf

Kolancali, P., & Melhuish, E. (2019) How do family characteristics and migration shape the home learning environment of Turkish children in the UK? In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 98-102. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Broekhuizen, M. L., Guerra, R. & Kolancali, P. (2019) Acculturation orientations, intergroup relations and well-being of Turkish and Maghrebian immigrant parents across Europe (Integrative Report D2.5). In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 122-127. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Jim McKinley is an associate professor of Applied Linguistics in Higher Education at UCL Institute of Education, and a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He has been an associate of the EMI Oxford research group since arriving in the UK in 2016. Originally from the US, he later taught and studied in Australia and New Zealand, and also taught for many years on Japan’s oldest EMI program at Sophia University (2005-2016).

At Oxford, Jim regularly collaborates with Dr. Heath Rose as well as Prof. Victoria Murphy, has published with several DPhil students, and supervises dissertations on the MSc ALSLA and MSc ALLT programs.

Jim’s research mainly explores implications of globalisation for L2 writing, language education, and teaching in higher education. As principal investigator on the British Academy-funded project ‘Exploring the teaching-research nexus in higher education’ (2018), he continues to research and publish on the bifurcation of teaching and research in higher education and TESOL in the UK and internationally. Jim is a co-editor-in-chief of the journal System and series co-editor (with Dr Heath Rose) of Cambridge Elements: Language Teaching.

For further information, visit www.researchgate.net/profile/Jim-Mckinley.

 

Publications

Rose, H., McKinley, J., & Galloway, N. (2020). Global Englishes and Language Teaching: A systematic review of pedagogical research. Language Teaching. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0261444820000518

McKinley, J., McIntosh, S., Milligan, L. O., Mikolajewska, A. (2020). Eyes on the enterprise: Problematising the concept of a teaching-research nexus in UK higher education. Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00595-2

Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2020). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2020). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics. Routledge.

Rose, H., McKinley, J. & Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J. (2020). Data Collection in Applied Linguistics Research. Bloomsbury.

Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J., & McKinley, J. (2019). Language and the development of intercultural competence in an ‘internationalised’ university: Staff and student perspectives. Teaching in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/13562517.2019.1686698

McIntosh, S. McKinley, J., Milligan, L., & Mikolajewska, A. (2019). Whose values? Whose time? Issues of (in)visibility in academic practice in UK universities. Studies in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1637846

McKinley, J. (2019). Evolving the teaching-research nexus. TESOL Quarterly, 53(3), 875-884.

McKinley, J., Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J. (2019). Developing intercultural competence in the third space: postgraduate studies in the UK. Language and Intercultural Communication, 19(1), 9-22.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (2018). Conceptualizations of language errors, standards, norms and nativeness in English for research publication purposes. Journal of Second Language Writing, 42, 1-11.

McKinley, J. (2018). Integrating appraisal theory with possible selves in understanding university EFL writing. System, 78, 27-37.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2018). Japan’s English medium instruction initiatives and the globalization of higher education. Higher Education, 75(1), 111-129.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2017). The prevalence of pedagogy-related research in applied linguistics: Extending the debate. Applied Linguistics, 38(4), 599-604.

McKinley, J., & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2017). Doing Research in Applied Linguistics: Realities, Dilemmas and Solutions. Routledge.

McKinley, J. (2015). Critical argument and writer identity: Social constructivism as a theoretical framework for EFL academic writing. Critical Inquiry in Language Studies, 12(3), 184-207.

 

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Sarah is a Research Assistant at the Department of Education working with Professor Charles Hulme and Dr Gillian West.

Sarah completed her MSc in Social Cognition: Research and Applications at UCL. Her dissertation project was supervised by Dr Anne Schlottmann and investigated the development of a sense of fairness in children aged 4 to 7 years.

She is currently assisting on the Nuffield Early Language Intervention (NELI) trial for Reception children, working directly with schools as well as supporting the development and delivery of professional online training courses for school staff.

Andrew is currently working on the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools and will primarily be carrying out qualitative analysis of teacher interview data from schools who have had attachment and trauma training and a systematic review of recent literature.

Andrew has a background as a teacher and senior leader in a special school, and as a teacher trainer, particularly focused around inclusive education. Andrew’s area of research interest is around the influence of young people’s adoptive identity on educational experience and outcomes. Andrew’s research has included analysis of data from a range of sources including the Wales Adoption Cohort Study and Understanding Society, he is currently completing his doctoral thesis at Cardiff University.

 

Publications

Brown, A., Waters, C. S., & Shelton, K. H. (2017). A systematic review of the school performance and behavioural and emotional adjustments of children adopted from care. Adoption & Fostering, 41(4), 346-368.

Brown, A., Waters, C. S., & Shelton, K. H. (2019). The educational aspirations and psychological well-being of adopted young people in the UK. Adoption & Fostering, 43(1), 46-59.

Adam is a researcher in the Department’s Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance. He is currently a co-investigator on the ‘Unlocking the potential of AI for English law’ project.

This project is funded by the Industrial Strategy Challenge Fund’s (ICSF) Next Generation Services Research Programme and UK Research and Innovation (UKRI), run by researchers in the Oxford departments and faculties of Law, Economics, Computer Science, Education and the Said Business School, in 2019 and 2020.

Pinar is a post-doctoral researcher within the Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project at the Department of Education. As part of the wider team, Pinar is currently investigating the aspects of learning apps that support joint media engagement between parents and children and creative learning in early and middle childhood. Pinar is also contributing to a development of a game-based language intervention focused on the vocabulary acquisition of emerging bilingual and monolingual children in England.

Before joining the team, Pinar was a doctoral student and a researcher at the Department of Education. Supervised by Prof. Edward Melhuish, her thesis examined the factors contributing to bilingual language and identity development of ethnic minority children growing up in first generation immigrant households in the UK. During her doctoral studies, Pinar took up two significant research roles at the Department.  She coordinated a survey research including 300 Turkish families in the UK and led a qualitative study on the cultural experiences of ethnic minority children in England. Before joining the team, Pinar collaborated with a group of researchers at the Department for a report to the Pro-Vice-Chancellor of the University on a new education policy aiming to establish university-sponsored specialist schools in England.

Publications

Kolancali, P. (submitted for publication). The Effects of Immigration on the Language and Literacy Practices of Turkish Parents in England. Journal of Family Issues.

Broekhuizen, M. L., Guerra, R. & Kolancali, P. (in preparation). Acculturation orientations of Turkish immigrant parents across Europe. Journal of Social Issues. This paper is prepared at the request of the Journal of Social Issues for a special issue.

Baird, J., Kolancali, P., Melhuish, E., Mutton, T., Sammons, P., Skilling, K., & Stylianides, G. Specialist Mathematics Schools in England: A Review and Implications for Oxford. This paper was prepared at the request of Professor Martin Williams, Pro Vice-Chancellor (Education) at the University of Oxford, by a Working Group established at the Department of Education.

Kolancali, P. (2019) Factors related to bilingual language skills of Turkish-English Speaking Children. In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 55-70. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Kolancali, P., & Melhuish, E. (2019). How do home and school experiences of Turkish children in the UK interact with their language attitudes and preferences? In G. Pastori, V. Pagani, & A. S. Sarcinelli (Eds.) Children’s Views on Inclusion at School. ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.4. pp 76-83. https://staging-isotis-pw.framework.pt/site/assets/files/1191/d2_4_technical-report-on-the-child-interview-study.pdf

Kolancali, P., & Melhuish, E. (2019) How do family characteristics and migration shape the home learning environment of Turkish children in the UK? In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 98-102. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Broekhuizen, M. L., Guerra, R. & Kolancali, P. (2019) Acculturation orientations, intergroup relations and well-being of Turkish and Maghrebian immigrant parents across Europe (Integrative Report D2.5). In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 122-127. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Jim McKinley is an associate professor of Applied Linguistics in Higher Education at UCL Institute of Education, and a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He has been an associate of the EMI Oxford research group since arriving in the UK in 2016. Originally from the US, he later taught and studied in Australia and New Zealand, and also taught for many years on Japan’s oldest EMI program at Sophia University (2005-2016).

At Oxford, Jim regularly collaborates with Dr. Heath Rose as well as Prof. Victoria Murphy, has published with several DPhil students, and supervises dissertations on the MSc ALSLA and MSc ALLT programs.

Jim’s research mainly explores implications of globalisation for L2 writing, language education, and teaching in higher education. As principal investigator on the British Academy-funded project ‘Exploring the teaching-research nexus in higher education’ (2018), he continues to research and publish on the bifurcation of teaching and research in higher education and TESOL in the UK and internationally. Jim is a co-editor-in-chief of the journal System and series co-editor (with Dr Heath Rose) of Cambridge Elements: Language Teaching.

For further information, visit www.researchgate.net/profile/Jim-Mckinley.

 

Publications

Rose, H., McKinley, J., & Galloway, N. (2020). Global Englishes and Language Teaching: A systematic review of pedagogical research. Language Teaching. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0261444820000518

McKinley, J., McIntosh, S., Milligan, L. O., Mikolajewska, A. (2020). Eyes on the enterprise: Problematising the concept of a teaching-research nexus in UK higher education. Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00595-2

Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2020). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2020). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics. Routledge.

Rose, H., McKinley, J. & Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J. (2020). Data Collection in Applied Linguistics Research. Bloomsbury.

Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J., & McKinley, J. (2019). Language and the development of intercultural competence in an ‘internationalised’ university: Staff and student perspectives. Teaching in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/13562517.2019.1686698

McIntosh, S. McKinley, J., Milligan, L., & Mikolajewska, A. (2019). Whose values? Whose time? Issues of (in)visibility in academic practice in UK universities. Studies in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1637846

McKinley, J. (2019). Evolving the teaching-research nexus. TESOL Quarterly, 53(3), 875-884.

McKinley, J., Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J. (2019). Developing intercultural competence in the third space: postgraduate studies in the UK. Language and Intercultural Communication, 19(1), 9-22.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (2018). Conceptualizations of language errors, standards, norms and nativeness in English for research publication purposes. Journal of Second Language Writing, 42, 1-11.

McKinley, J. (2018). Integrating appraisal theory with possible selves in understanding university EFL writing. System, 78, 27-37.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2018). Japan’s English medium instruction initiatives and the globalization of higher education. Higher Education, 75(1), 111-129.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2017). The prevalence of pedagogy-related research in applied linguistics: Extending the debate. Applied Linguistics, 38(4), 599-604.

McKinley, J., & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2017). Doing Research in Applied Linguistics: Realities, Dilemmas and Solutions. Routledge.

McKinley, J. (2015). Critical argument and writer identity: Social constructivism as a theoretical framework for EFL academic writing. Critical Inquiry in Language Studies, 12(3), 184-207.

 

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Sarah is a Research Assistant at the Department of Education working with Professor Charles Hulme and Dr Gillian West.

Sarah completed her MSc in Social Cognition: Research and Applications at UCL. Her dissertation project was supervised by Dr Anne Schlottmann and investigated the development of a sense of fairness in children aged 4 to 7 years.

She is currently assisting on the Nuffield Early Language Intervention (NELI) trial for Reception children, working directly with schools as well as supporting the development and delivery of professional online training courses for school staff.

Andrew is currently working on the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools and will primarily be carrying out qualitative analysis of teacher interview data from schools who have had attachment and trauma training and a systematic review of recent literature.

Andrew has a background as a teacher and senior leader in a special school, and as a teacher trainer, particularly focused around inclusive education. Andrew’s area of research interest is around the influence of young people’s adoptive identity on educational experience and outcomes. Andrew’s research has included analysis of data from a range of sources including the Wales Adoption Cohort Study and Understanding Society, he is currently completing his doctoral thesis at Cardiff University.

 

Publications

Brown, A., Waters, C. S., & Shelton, K. H. (2017). A systematic review of the school performance and behavioural and emotional adjustments of children adopted from care. Adoption & Fostering, 41(4), 346-368.

Brown, A., Waters, C. S., & Shelton, K. H. (2019). The educational aspirations and psychological well-being of adopted young people in the UK. Adoption & Fostering, 43(1), 46-59.

Adam is a researcher in the Department’s Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance. He is currently a co-investigator on the ‘Unlocking the potential of AI for English law’ project.

This project is funded by the Industrial Strategy Challenge Fund’s (ICSF) Next Generation Services Research Programme and UK Research and Innovation (UKRI), run by researchers in the Oxford departments and faculties of Law, Economics, Computer Science, Education and the Said Business School, in 2019 and 2020.

Pinar is a post-doctoral researcher within the Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project at the Department of Education. As part of the wider team, Pinar is currently investigating the aspects of learning apps that support joint media engagement between parents and children and creative learning in early and middle childhood. Pinar is also contributing to a development of a game-based language intervention focused on the vocabulary acquisition of emerging bilingual and monolingual children in England.

Before joining the team, Pinar was a doctoral student and a researcher at the Department of Education. Supervised by Prof. Edward Melhuish, her thesis examined the factors contributing to bilingual language and identity development of ethnic minority children growing up in first generation immigrant households in the UK. During her doctoral studies, Pinar took up two significant research roles at the Department.  She coordinated a survey research including 300 Turkish families in the UK and led a qualitative study on the cultural experiences of ethnic minority children in England. Before joining the team, Pinar collaborated with a group of researchers at the Department for a report to the Pro-Vice-Chancellor of the University on a new education policy aiming to establish university-sponsored specialist schools in England.

Publications

Kolancali, P. (submitted for publication). The Effects of Immigration on the Language and Literacy Practices of Turkish Parents in England. Journal of Family Issues.

Broekhuizen, M. L., Guerra, R. & Kolancali, P. (in preparation). Acculturation orientations of Turkish immigrant parents across Europe. Journal of Social Issues. This paper is prepared at the request of the Journal of Social Issues for a special issue.

Baird, J., Kolancali, P., Melhuish, E., Mutton, T., Sammons, P., Skilling, K., & Stylianides, G. Specialist Mathematics Schools in England: A Review and Implications for Oxford. This paper was prepared at the request of Professor Martin Williams, Pro Vice-Chancellor (Education) at the University of Oxford, by a Working Group established at the Department of Education.

Kolancali, P. (2019) Factors related to bilingual language skills of Turkish-English Speaking Children. In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 55-70. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Kolancali, P., & Melhuish, E. (2019). How do home and school experiences of Turkish children in the UK interact with their language attitudes and preferences? In G. Pastori, V. Pagani, & A. S. Sarcinelli (Eds.) Children’s Views on Inclusion at School. ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.4. pp 76-83. https://staging-isotis-pw.framework.pt/site/assets/files/1191/d2_4_technical-report-on-the-child-interview-study.pdf

Kolancali, P., & Melhuish, E. (2019) How do family characteristics and migration shape the home learning environment of Turkish children in the UK? In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 98-102. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Broekhuizen, M. L., Guerra, R. & Kolancali, P. (2019) Acculturation orientations, intergroup relations and well-being of Turkish and Maghrebian immigrant parents across Europe (Integrative Report D2.5). In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 122-127. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Jim McKinley is an associate professor of Applied Linguistics in Higher Education at UCL Institute of Education, and a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He has been an associate of the EMI Oxford research group since arriving in the UK in 2016. Originally from the US, he later taught and studied in Australia and New Zealand, and also taught for many years on Japan’s oldest EMI program at Sophia University (2005-2016).

At Oxford, Jim regularly collaborates with Dr. Heath Rose as well as Prof. Victoria Murphy, has published with several DPhil students, and supervises dissertations on the MSc ALSLA and MSc ALLT programs.

Jim’s research mainly explores implications of globalisation for L2 writing, language education, and teaching in higher education. As principal investigator on the British Academy-funded project ‘Exploring the teaching-research nexus in higher education’ (2018), he continues to research and publish on the bifurcation of teaching and research in higher education and TESOL in the UK and internationally. Jim is a co-editor-in-chief of the journal System and series co-editor (with Dr Heath Rose) of Cambridge Elements: Language Teaching.

For further information, visit www.researchgate.net/profile/Jim-Mckinley.

 

Publications

Rose, H., McKinley, J., & Galloway, N. (2020). Global Englishes and Language Teaching: A systematic review of pedagogical research. Language Teaching. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0261444820000518

McKinley, J., McIntosh, S., Milligan, L. O., Mikolajewska, A. (2020). Eyes on the enterprise: Problematising the concept of a teaching-research nexus in UK higher education. Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00595-2

Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2020). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2020). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics. Routledge.

Rose, H., McKinley, J. & Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J. (2020). Data Collection in Applied Linguistics Research. Bloomsbury.

Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J., & McKinley, J. (2019). Language and the development of intercultural competence in an ‘internationalised’ university: Staff and student perspectives. Teaching in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/13562517.2019.1686698

McIntosh, S. McKinley, J., Milligan, L., & Mikolajewska, A. (2019). Whose values? Whose time? Issues of (in)visibility in academic practice in UK universities. Studies in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1637846

McKinley, J. (2019). Evolving the teaching-research nexus. TESOL Quarterly, 53(3), 875-884.

McKinley, J., Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J. (2019). Developing intercultural competence in the third space: postgraduate studies in the UK. Language and Intercultural Communication, 19(1), 9-22.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (2018). Conceptualizations of language errors, standards, norms and nativeness in English for research publication purposes. Journal of Second Language Writing, 42, 1-11.

McKinley, J. (2018). Integrating appraisal theory with possible selves in understanding university EFL writing. System, 78, 27-37.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2018). Japan’s English medium instruction initiatives and the globalization of higher education. Higher Education, 75(1), 111-129.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2017). The prevalence of pedagogy-related research in applied linguistics: Extending the debate. Applied Linguistics, 38(4), 599-604.

McKinley, J., & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2017). Doing Research in Applied Linguistics: Realities, Dilemmas and Solutions. Routledge.

McKinley, J. (2015). Critical argument and writer identity: Social constructivism as a theoretical framework for EFL academic writing. Critical Inquiry in Language Studies, 12(3), 184-207.

 

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Sarah is a Research Assistant at the Department of Education working with Professor Charles Hulme and Dr Gillian West.

Sarah completed her MSc in Social Cognition: Research and Applications at UCL. Her dissertation project was supervised by Dr Anne Schlottmann and investigated the development of a sense of fairness in children aged 4 to 7 years.

She is currently assisting on the Nuffield Early Language Intervention (NELI) trial for Reception children, working directly with schools as well as supporting the development and delivery of professional online training courses for school staff.

Andrew is currently working on the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools and will primarily be carrying out qualitative analysis of teacher interview data from schools who have had attachment and trauma training and a systematic review of recent literature.

Andrew has a background as a teacher and senior leader in a special school, and as a teacher trainer, particularly focused around inclusive education. Andrew’s area of research interest is around the influence of young people’s adoptive identity on educational experience and outcomes. Andrew’s research has included analysis of data from a range of sources including the Wales Adoption Cohort Study and Understanding Society, he is currently completing his doctoral thesis at Cardiff University.

 

Publications

Brown, A., Waters, C. S., & Shelton, K. H. (2017). A systematic review of the school performance and behavioural and emotional adjustments of children adopted from care. Adoption & Fostering, 41(4), 346-368.

Brown, A., Waters, C. S., & Shelton, K. H. (2019). The educational aspirations and psychological well-being of adopted young people in the UK. Adoption & Fostering, 43(1), 46-59.

Adam is a researcher in the Department’s Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance. He is currently a co-investigator on the ‘Unlocking the potential of AI for English law’ project.

This project is funded by the Industrial Strategy Challenge Fund’s (ICSF) Next Generation Services Research Programme and UK Research and Innovation (UKRI), run by researchers in the Oxford departments and faculties of Law, Economics, Computer Science, Education and the Said Business School, in 2019 and 2020.

Pinar is a post-doctoral researcher within the Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project at the Department of Education. As part of the wider team, Pinar is currently investigating the aspects of learning apps that support joint media engagement between parents and children and creative learning in early and middle childhood. Pinar is also contributing to a development of a game-based language intervention focused on the vocabulary acquisition of emerging bilingual and monolingual children in England.

Before joining the team, Pinar was a doctoral student and a researcher at the Department of Education. Supervised by Prof. Edward Melhuish, her thesis examined the factors contributing to bilingual language and identity development of ethnic minority children growing up in first generation immigrant households in the UK. During her doctoral studies, Pinar took up two significant research roles at the Department.  She coordinated a survey research including 300 Turkish families in the UK and led a qualitative study on the cultural experiences of ethnic minority children in England. Before joining the team, Pinar collaborated with a group of researchers at the Department for a report to the Pro-Vice-Chancellor of the University on a new education policy aiming to establish university-sponsored specialist schools in England.

Publications

Kolancali, P. (submitted for publication). The Effects of Immigration on the Language and Literacy Practices of Turkish Parents in England. Journal of Family Issues.

Broekhuizen, M. L., Guerra, R. & Kolancali, P. (in preparation). Acculturation orientations of Turkish immigrant parents across Europe. Journal of Social Issues. This paper is prepared at the request of the Journal of Social Issues for a special issue.

Baird, J., Kolancali, P., Melhuish, E., Mutton, T., Sammons, P., Skilling, K., & Stylianides, G. Specialist Mathematics Schools in England: A Review and Implications for Oxford. This paper was prepared at the request of Professor Martin Williams, Pro Vice-Chancellor (Education) at the University of Oxford, by a Working Group established at the Department of Education.

Kolancali, P. (2019) Factors related to bilingual language skills of Turkish-English Speaking Children. In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 55-70. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Kolancali, P., & Melhuish, E. (2019). How do home and school experiences of Turkish children in the UK interact with their language attitudes and preferences? In G. Pastori, V. Pagani, & A. S. Sarcinelli (Eds.) Children’s Views on Inclusion at School. ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.4. pp 76-83. https://staging-isotis-pw.framework.pt/site/assets/files/1191/d2_4_technical-report-on-the-child-interview-study.pdf

Kolancali, P., & Melhuish, E. (2019) How do family characteristics and migration shape the home learning environment of Turkish children in the UK? In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 98-102. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Broekhuizen, M. L., Guerra, R. & Kolancali, P. (2019) Acculturation orientations, intergroup relations and well-being of Turkish and Maghrebian immigrant parents across Europe (Integrative Report D2.5). In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 122-127. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Jim McKinley is an associate professor of Applied Linguistics in Higher Education at UCL Institute of Education, and a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He has been an associate of the EMI Oxford research group since arriving in the UK in 2016. Originally from the US, he later taught and studied in Australia and New Zealand, and also taught for many years on Japan’s oldest EMI program at Sophia University (2005-2016).

At Oxford, Jim regularly collaborates with Dr. Heath Rose as well as Prof. Victoria Murphy, has published with several DPhil students, and supervises dissertations on the MSc ALSLA and MSc ALLT programs.

Jim’s research mainly explores implications of globalisation for L2 writing, language education, and teaching in higher education. As principal investigator on the British Academy-funded project ‘Exploring the teaching-research nexus in higher education’ (2018), he continues to research and publish on the bifurcation of teaching and research in higher education and TESOL in the UK and internationally. Jim is a co-editor-in-chief of the journal System and series co-editor (with Dr Heath Rose) of Cambridge Elements: Language Teaching.

For further information, visit www.researchgate.net/profile/Jim-Mckinley.

 

Publications

Rose, H., McKinley, J., & Galloway, N. (2020). Global Englishes and Language Teaching: A systematic review of pedagogical research. Language Teaching. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0261444820000518

McKinley, J., McIntosh, S., Milligan, L. O., Mikolajewska, A. (2020). Eyes on the enterprise: Problematising the concept of a teaching-research nexus in UK higher education. Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00595-2

Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2020). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2020). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics. Routledge.

Rose, H., McKinley, J. & Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J. (2020). Data Collection in Applied Linguistics Research. Bloomsbury.

Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J., & McKinley, J. (2019). Language and the development of intercultural competence in an ‘internationalised’ university: Staff and student perspectives. Teaching in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/13562517.2019.1686698

McIntosh, S. McKinley, J., Milligan, L., & Mikolajewska, A. (2019). Whose values? Whose time? Issues of (in)visibility in academic practice in UK universities. Studies in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1637846

McKinley, J. (2019). Evolving the teaching-research nexus. TESOL Quarterly, 53(3), 875-884.

McKinley, J., Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J. (2019). Developing intercultural competence in the third space: postgraduate studies in the UK. Language and Intercultural Communication, 19(1), 9-22.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (2018). Conceptualizations of language errors, standards, norms and nativeness in English for research publication purposes. Journal of Second Language Writing, 42, 1-11.

McKinley, J. (2018). Integrating appraisal theory with possible selves in understanding university EFL writing. System, 78, 27-37.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2018). Japan’s English medium instruction initiatives and the globalization of higher education. Higher Education, 75(1), 111-129.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2017). The prevalence of pedagogy-related research in applied linguistics: Extending the debate. Applied Linguistics, 38(4), 599-604.

McKinley, J., & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2017). Doing Research in Applied Linguistics: Realities, Dilemmas and Solutions. Routledge.

McKinley, J. (2015). Critical argument and writer identity: Social constructivism as a theoretical framework for EFL academic writing. Critical Inquiry in Language Studies, 12(3), 184-207.

 

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Sarah is a Research Assistant at the Department of Education working with Professor Charles Hulme and Dr Gillian West.

Sarah completed her MSc in Social Cognition: Research and Applications at UCL. Her dissertation project was supervised by Dr Anne Schlottmann and investigated the development of a sense of fairness in children aged 4 to 7 years.

She is currently assisting on the Nuffield Early Language Intervention (NELI) trial for Reception children, working directly with schools as well as supporting the development and delivery of professional online training courses for school staff.

Andrew is currently working on the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools and will primarily be carrying out qualitative analysis of teacher interview data from schools who have had attachment and trauma training and a systematic review of recent literature.

Andrew has a background as a teacher and senior leader in a special school, and as a teacher trainer, particularly focused around inclusive education. Andrew’s area of research interest is around the influence of young people’s adoptive identity on educational experience and outcomes. Andrew’s research has included analysis of data from a range of sources including the Wales Adoption Cohort Study and Understanding Society, he is currently completing his doctoral thesis at Cardiff University.

 

Publications

Brown, A., Waters, C. S., & Shelton, K. H. (2017). A systematic review of the school performance and behavioural and emotional adjustments of children adopted from care. Adoption & Fostering, 41(4), 346-368.

Brown, A., Waters, C. S., & Shelton, K. H. (2019). The educational aspirations and psychological well-being of adopted young people in the UK. Adoption & Fostering, 43(1), 46-59.

Adam is a researcher in the Department’s Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance. He is currently a co-investigator on the ‘Unlocking the potential of AI for English law’ project.

This project is funded by the Industrial Strategy Challenge Fund’s (ICSF) Next Generation Services Research Programme and UK Research and Innovation (UKRI), run by researchers in the Oxford departments and faculties of Law, Economics, Computer Science, Education and the Said Business School, in 2019 and 2020.

Pinar is a post-doctoral researcher within the Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project at the Department of Education. As part of the wider team, Pinar is currently investigating the aspects of learning apps that support joint media engagement between parents and children and creative learning in early and middle childhood. Pinar is also contributing to a development of a game-based language intervention focused on the vocabulary acquisition of emerging bilingual and monolingual children in England.

Before joining the team, Pinar was a doctoral student and a researcher at the Department of Education. Supervised by Prof. Edward Melhuish, her thesis examined the factors contributing to bilingual language and identity development of ethnic minority children growing up in first generation immigrant households in the UK. During her doctoral studies, Pinar took up two significant research roles at the Department.  She coordinated a survey research including 300 Turkish families in the UK and led a qualitative study on the cultural experiences of ethnic minority children in England. Before joining the team, Pinar collaborated with a group of researchers at the Department for a report to the Pro-Vice-Chancellor of the University on a new education policy aiming to establish university-sponsored specialist schools in England.

Publications

Kolancali, P. (submitted for publication). The Effects of Immigration on the Language and Literacy Practices of Turkish Parents in England. Journal of Family Issues.

Broekhuizen, M. L., Guerra, R. & Kolancali, P. (in preparation). Acculturation orientations of Turkish immigrant parents across Europe. Journal of Social Issues. This paper is prepared at the request of the Journal of Social Issues for a special issue.

Baird, J., Kolancali, P., Melhuish, E., Mutton, T., Sammons, P., Skilling, K., & Stylianides, G. Specialist Mathematics Schools in England: A Review and Implications for Oxford. This paper was prepared at the request of Professor Martin Williams, Pro Vice-Chancellor (Education) at the University of Oxford, by a Working Group established at the Department of Education.

Kolancali, P. (2019) Factors related to bilingual language skills of Turkish-English Speaking Children. In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 55-70. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Kolancali, P., & Melhuish, E. (2019). How do home and school experiences of Turkish children in the UK interact with their language attitudes and preferences? In G. Pastori, V. Pagani, & A. S. Sarcinelli (Eds.) Children’s Views on Inclusion at School. ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.4. pp 76-83. https://staging-isotis-pw.framework.pt/site/assets/files/1191/d2_4_technical-report-on-the-child-interview-study.pdf

Kolancali, P., & Melhuish, E. (2019) How do family characteristics and migration shape the home learning environment of Turkish children in the UK? In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 98-102. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Broekhuizen, M. L., Guerra, R. & Kolancali, P. (2019) Acculturation orientations, intergroup relations and well-being of Turkish and Maghrebian immigrant parents across Europe (Integrative Report D2.5). In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 122-127. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Jim McKinley is an associate professor of Applied Linguistics in Higher Education at UCL Institute of Education, and a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He has been an associate of the EMI Oxford research group since arriving in the UK in 2016. Originally from the US, he later taught and studied in Australia and New Zealand, and also taught for many years on Japan’s oldest EMI program at Sophia University (2005-2016).

At Oxford, Jim regularly collaborates with Dr. Heath Rose as well as Prof. Victoria Murphy, has published with several DPhil students, and supervises dissertations on the MSc ALSLA and MSc ALLT programs.

Jim’s research mainly explores implications of globalisation for L2 writing, language education, and teaching in higher education. As principal investigator on the British Academy-funded project ‘Exploring the teaching-research nexus in higher education’ (2018), he continues to research and publish on the bifurcation of teaching and research in higher education and TESOL in the UK and internationally. Jim is a co-editor-in-chief of the journal System and series co-editor (with Dr Heath Rose) of Cambridge Elements: Language Teaching.

For further information, visit www.researchgate.net/profile/Jim-Mckinley.

 

Publications

Rose, H., McKinley, J., & Galloway, N. (2020). Global Englishes and Language Teaching: A systematic review of pedagogical research. Language Teaching. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0261444820000518

McKinley, J., McIntosh, S., Milligan, L. O., Mikolajewska, A. (2020). Eyes on the enterprise: Problematising the concept of a teaching-research nexus in UK higher education. Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00595-2

Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2020). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2020). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics. Routledge.

Rose, H., McKinley, J. & Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J. (2020). Data Collection in Applied Linguistics Research. Bloomsbury.

Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J., & McKinley, J. (2019). Language and the development of intercultural competence in an ‘internationalised’ university: Staff and student perspectives. Teaching in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/13562517.2019.1686698

McIntosh, S. McKinley, J., Milligan, L., & Mikolajewska, A. (2019). Whose values? Whose time? Issues of (in)visibility in academic practice in UK universities. Studies in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1637846

McKinley, J. (2019). Evolving the teaching-research nexus. TESOL Quarterly, 53(3), 875-884.

McKinley, J., Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J. (2019). Developing intercultural competence in the third space: postgraduate studies in the UK. Language and Intercultural Communication, 19(1), 9-22.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (2018). Conceptualizations of language errors, standards, norms and nativeness in English for research publication purposes. Journal of Second Language Writing, 42, 1-11.

McKinley, J. (2018). Integrating appraisal theory with possible selves in understanding university EFL writing. System, 78, 27-37.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2018). Japan’s English medium instruction initiatives and the globalization of higher education. Higher Education, 75(1), 111-129.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2017). The prevalence of pedagogy-related research in applied linguistics: Extending the debate. Applied Linguistics, 38(4), 599-604.

McKinley, J., & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2017). Doing Research in Applied Linguistics: Realities, Dilemmas and Solutions. Routledge.

McKinley, J. (2015). Critical argument and writer identity: Social constructivism as a theoretical framework for EFL academic writing. Critical Inquiry in Language Studies, 12(3), 184-207.

 

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Sarah is a Research Assistant at the Department of Education working with Professor Charles Hulme and Dr Gillian West.

Sarah completed her MSc in Social Cognition: Research and Applications at UCL. Her dissertation project was supervised by Dr Anne Schlottmann and investigated the development of a sense of fairness in children aged 4 to 7 years.

She is currently assisting on the Nuffield Early Language Intervention (NELI) trial for Reception children, working directly with schools as well as supporting the development and delivery of professional online training courses for school staff.

Andrew is currently working on the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools and will primarily be carrying out qualitative analysis of teacher interview data from schools who have had attachment and trauma training and a systematic review of recent literature.

Andrew has a background as a teacher and senior leader in a special school, and as a teacher trainer, particularly focused around inclusive education. Andrew’s area of research interest is around the influence of young people’s adoptive identity on educational experience and outcomes. Andrew’s research has included analysis of data from a range of sources including the Wales Adoption Cohort Study and Understanding Society, he is currently completing his doctoral thesis at Cardiff University.

 

Publications

Brown, A., Waters, C. S., & Shelton, K. H. (2017). A systematic review of the school performance and behavioural and emotional adjustments of children adopted from care. Adoption & Fostering, 41(4), 346-368.

Brown, A., Waters, C. S., & Shelton, K. H. (2019). The educational aspirations and psychological well-being of adopted young people in the UK. Adoption & Fostering, 43(1), 46-59.

Adam is a researcher in the Department’s Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance. He is currently a co-investigator on the ‘Unlocking the potential of AI for English law’ project.

This project is funded by the Industrial Strategy Challenge Fund’s (ICSF) Next Generation Services Research Programme and UK Research and Innovation (UKRI), run by researchers in the Oxford departments and faculties of Law, Economics, Computer Science, Education and the Said Business School, in 2019 and 2020.

Pinar is a post-doctoral researcher within the Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project at the Department of Education. As part of the wider team, Pinar is currently investigating the aspects of learning apps that support joint media engagement between parents and children and creative learning in early and middle childhood. Pinar is also contributing to a development of a game-based language intervention focused on the vocabulary acquisition of emerging bilingual and monolingual children in England.

Before joining the team, Pinar was a doctoral student and a researcher at the Department of Education. Supervised by Prof. Edward Melhuish, her thesis examined the factors contributing to bilingual language and identity development of ethnic minority children growing up in first generation immigrant households in the UK. During her doctoral studies, Pinar took up two significant research roles at the Department.  She coordinated a survey research including 300 Turkish families in the UK and led a qualitative study on the cultural experiences of ethnic minority children in England. Before joining the team, Pinar collaborated with a group of researchers at the Department for a report to the Pro-Vice-Chancellor of the University on a new education policy aiming to establish university-sponsored specialist schools in England.

Publications

Kolancali, P. (submitted for publication). The Effects of Immigration on the Language and Literacy Practices of Turkish Parents in England. Journal of Family Issues.

Broekhuizen, M. L., Guerra, R. & Kolancali, P. (in preparation). Acculturation orientations of Turkish immigrant parents across Europe. Journal of Social Issues. This paper is prepared at the request of the Journal of Social Issues for a special issue.

Baird, J., Kolancali, P., Melhuish, E., Mutton, T., Sammons, P., Skilling, K., & Stylianides, G. Specialist Mathematics Schools in England: A Review and Implications for Oxford. This paper was prepared at the request of Professor Martin Williams, Pro Vice-Chancellor (Education) at the University of Oxford, by a Working Group established at the Department of Education.

Kolancali, P. (2019) Factors related to bilingual language skills of Turkish-English Speaking Children. In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 55-70. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Kolancali, P., & Melhuish, E. (2019). How do home and school experiences of Turkish children in the UK interact with their language attitudes and preferences? In G. Pastori, V. Pagani, & A. S. Sarcinelli (Eds.) Children’s Views on Inclusion at School. ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.4. pp 76-83. https://staging-isotis-pw.framework.pt/site/assets/files/1191/d2_4_technical-report-on-the-child-interview-study.pdf

Kolancali, P., & Melhuish, E. (2019) How do family characteristics and migration shape the home learning environment of Turkish children in the UK? In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 98-102. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Broekhuizen, M. L., Guerra, R. & Kolancali, P. (2019) Acculturation orientations, intergroup relations and well-being of Turkish and Maghrebian immigrant parents across Europe (Integrative Report D2.5). In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 122-127. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Jim McKinley is an associate professor of Applied Linguistics in Higher Education at UCL Institute of Education, and a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He has been an associate of the EMI Oxford research group since arriving in the UK in 2016. Originally from the US, he later taught and studied in Australia and New Zealand, and also taught for many years on Japan’s oldest EMI program at Sophia University (2005-2016).

At Oxford, Jim regularly collaborates with Dr. Heath Rose as well as Prof. Victoria Murphy, has published with several DPhil students, and supervises dissertations on the MSc ALSLA and MSc ALLT programs.

Jim’s research mainly explores implications of globalisation for L2 writing, language education, and teaching in higher education. As principal investigator on the British Academy-funded project ‘Exploring the teaching-research nexus in higher education’ (2018), he continues to research and publish on the bifurcation of teaching and research in higher education and TESOL in the UK and internationally. Jim is a co-editor-in-chief of the journal System and series co-editor (with Dr Heath Rose) of Cambridge Elements: Language Teaching.

For further information, visit www.researchgate.net/profile/Jim-Mckinley.

 

Publications

Rose, H., McKinley, J., & Galloway, N. (2020). Global Englishes and Language Teaching: A systematic review of pedagogical research. Language Teaching. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0261444820000518

McKinley, J., McIntosh, S., Milligan, L. O., Mikolajewska, A. (2020). Eyes on the enterprise: Problematising the concept of a teaching-research nexus in UK higher education. Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00595-2

Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2020). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2020). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics. Routledge.

Rose, H., McKinley, J. & Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J. (2020). Data Collection in Applied Linguistics Research. Bloomsbury.

Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J., & McKinley, J. (2019). Language and the development of intercultural competence in an ‘internationalised’ university: Staff and student perspectives. Teaching in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/13562517.2019.1686698

McIntosh, S. McKinley, J., Milligan, L., & Mikolajewska, A. (2019). Whose values? Whose time? Issues of (in)visibility in academic practice in UK universities. Studies in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1637846

McKinley, J. (2019). Evolving the teaching-research nexus. TESOL Quarterly, 53(3), 875-884.

McKinley, J., Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J. (2019). Developing intercultural competence in the third space: postgraduate studies in the UK. Language and Intercultural Communication, 19(1), 9-22.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (2018). Conceptualizations of language errors, standards, norms and nativeness in English for research publication purposes. Journal of Second Language Writing, 42, 1-11.

McKinley, J. (2018). Integrating appraisal theory with possible selves in understanding university EFL writing. System, 78, 27-37.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2018). Japan’s English medium instruction initiatives and the globalization of higher education. Higher Education, 75(1), 111-129.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2017). The prevalence of pedagogy-related research in applied linguistics: Extending the debate. Applied Linguistics, 38(4), 599-604.

McKinley, J., & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2017). Doing Research in Applied Linguistics: Realities, Dilemmas and Solutions. Routledge.

McKinley, J. (2015). Critical argument and writer identity: Social constructivism as a theoretical framework for EFL academic writing. Critical Inquiry in Language Studies, 12(3), 184-207.

 

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Sarah is a Research Assistant at the Department of Education working with Professor Charles Hulme and Dr Gillian West.

Sarah completed her MSc in Social Cognition: Research and Applications at UCL. Her dissertation project was supervised by Dr Anne Schlottmann and investigated the development of a sense of fairness in children aged 4 to 7 years.

She is currently assisting on the Nuffield Early Language Intervention (NELI) trial for Reception children, working directly with schools as well as supporting the development and delivery of professional online training courses for school staff.

Andrew is currently working on the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools and will primarily be carrying out qualitative analysis of teacher interview data from schools who have had attachment and trauma training and a systematic review of recent literature.

Andrew has a background as a teacher and senior leader in a special school, and as a teacher trainer, particularly focused around inclusive education. Andrew’s area of research interest is around the influence of young people’s adoptive identity on educational experience and outcomes. Andrew’s research has included analysis of data from a range of sources including the Wales Adoption Cohort Study and Understanding Society, he is currently completing his doctoral thesis at Cardiff University.

 

Publications

Brown, A., Waters, C. S., & Shelton, K. H. (2017). A systematic review of the school performance and behavioural and emotional adjustments of children adopted from care. Adoption & Fostering, 41(4), 346-368.

Brown, A., Waters, C. S., & Shelton, K. H. (2019). The educational aspirations and psychological well-being of adopted young people in the UK. Adoption & Fostering, 43(1), 46-59.

Adam is a researcher in the Department’s Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance. He is currently a co-investigator on the ‘Unlocking the potential of AI for English law’ project.

This project is funded by the Industrial Strategy Challenge Fund’s (ICSF) Next Generation Services Research Programme and UK Research and Innovation (UKRI), run by researchers in the Oxford departments and faculties of Law, Economics, Computer Science, Education and the Said Business School, in 2019 and 2020.

Pinar is a post-doctoral researcher within the Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project at the Department of Education. As part of the wider team, Pinar is currently investigating the aspects of learning apps that support joint media engagement between parents and children and creative learning in early and middle childhood. Pinar is also contributing to a development of a game-based language intervention focused on the vocabulary acquisition of emerging bilingual and monolingual children in England.

Before joining the team, Pinar was a doctoral student and a researcher at the Department of Education. Supervised by Prof. Edward Melhuish, her thesis examined the factors contributing to bilingual language and identity development of ethnic minority children growing up in first generation immigrant households in the UK. During her doctoral studies, Pinar took up two significant research roles at the Department.  She coordinated a survey research including 300 Turkish families in the UK and led a qualitative study on the cultural experiences of ethnic minority children in England. Before joining the team, Pinar collaborated with a group of researchers at the Department for a report to the Pro-Vice-Chancellor of the University on a new education policy aiming to establish university-sponsored specialist schools in England.

Publications

Kolancali, P. (submitted for publication). The Effects of Immigration on the Language and Literacy Practices of Turkish Parents in England. Journal of Family Issues.

Broekhuizen, M. L., Guerra, R. & Kolancali, P. (in preparation). Acculturation orientations of Turkish immigrant parents across Europe. Journal of Social Issues. This paper is prepared at the request of the Journal of Social Issues for a special issue.

Baird, J., Kolancali, P., Melhuish, E., Mutton, T., Sammons, P., Skilling, K., & Stylianides, G. Specialist Mathematics Schools in England: A Review and Implications for Oxford. This paper was prepared at the request of Professor Martin Williams, Pro Vice-Chancellor (Education) at the University of Oxford, by a Working Group established at the Department of Education.

Kolancali, P. (2019) Factors related to bilingual language skills of Turkish-English Speaking Children. In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 55-70. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Kolancali, P., & Melhuish, E. (2019). How do home and school experiences of Turkish children in the UK interact with their language attitudes and preferences? In G. Pastori, V. Pagani, & A. S. Sarcinelli (Eds.) Children’s Views on Inclusion at School. ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.4. pp 76-83. https://staging-isotis-pw.framework.pt/site/assets/files/1191/d2_4_technical-report-on-the-child-interview-study.pdf

Kolancali, P., & Melhuish, E. (2019) How do family characteristics and migration shape the home learning environment of Turkish children in the UK? In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 98-102. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Broekhuizen, M. L., Guerra, R. & Kolancali, P. (2019) Acculturation orientations, intergroup relations and well-being of Turkish and Maghrebian immigrant parents across Europe (Integrative Report D2.5). In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 122-127. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Jim McKinley is an associate professor of Applied Linguistics in Higher Education at UCL Institute of Education, and a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He has been an associate of the EMI Oxford research group since arriving in the UK in 2016. Originally from the US, he later taught and studied in Australia and New Zealand, and also taught for many years on Japan’s oldest EMI program at Sophia University (2005-2016).

At Oxford, Jim regularly collaborates with Dr. Heath Rose as well as Prof. Victoria Murphy, has published with several DPhil students, and supervises dissertations on the MSc ALSLA and MSc ALLT programs.

Jim’s research mainly explores implications of globalisation for L2 writing, language education, and teaching in higher education. As principal investigator on the British Academy-funded project ‘Exploring the teaching-research nexus in higher education’ (2018), he continues to research and publish on the bifurcation of teaching and research in higher education and TESOL in the UK and internationally. Jim is a co-editor-in-chief of the journal System and series co-editor (with Dr Heath Rose) of Cambridge Elements: Language Teaching.

For further information, visit www.researchgate.net/profile/Jim-Mckinley.

 

Publications

Rose, H., McKinley, J., & Galloway, N. (2020). Global Englishes and Language Teaching: A systematic review of pedagogical research. Language Teaching. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0261444820000518

McKinley, J., McIntosh, S., Milligan, L. O., Mikolajewska, A. (2020). Eyes on the enterprise: Problematising the concept of a teaching-research nexus in UK higher education. Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00595-2

Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2020). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2020). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics. Routledge.

Rose, H., McKinley, J. & Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J. (2020). Data Collection in Applied Linguistics Research. Bloomsbury.

Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J., & McKinley, J. (2019). Language and the development of intercultural competence in an ‘internationalised’ university: Staff and student perspectives. Teaching in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/13562517.2019.1686698

McIntosh, S. McKinley, J., Milligan, L., & Mikolajewska, A. (2019). Whose values? Whose time? Issues of (in)visibility in academic practice in UK universities. Studies in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1637846

McKinley, J. (2019). Evolving the teaching-research nexus. TESOL Quarterly, 53(3), 875-884.

McKinley, J., Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J. (2019). Developing intercultural competence in the third space: postgraduate studies in the UK. Language and Intercultural Communication, 19(1), 9-22.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (2018). Conceptualizations of language errors, standards, norms and nativeness in English for research publication purposes. Journal of Second Language Writing, 42, 1-11.

McKinley, J. (2018). Integrating appraisal theory with possible selves in understanding university EFL writing. System, 78, 27-37.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2018). Japan’s English medium instruction initiatives and the globalization of higher education. Higher Education, 75(1), 111-129.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2017). The prevalence of pedagogy-related research in applied linguistics: Extending the debate. Applied Linguistics, 38(4), 599-604.

McKinley, J., & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2017). Doing Research in Applied Linguistics: Realities, Dilemmas and Solutions. Routledge.

McKinley, J. (2015). Critical argument and writer identity: Social constructivism as a theoretical framework for EFL academic writing. Critical Inquiry in Language Studies, 12(3), 184-207.

 

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Sarah is a Research Assistant at the Department of Education working with Professor Charles Hulme and Dr Gillian West.

Sarah completed her MSc in Social Cognition: Research and Applications at UCL. Her dissertation project was supervised by Dr Anne Schlottmann and investigated the development of a sense of fairness in children aged 4 to 7 years.

She is currently assisting on the Nuffield Early Language Intervention (NELI) trial for Reception children, working directly with schools as well as supporting the development and delivery of professional online training courses for school staff.

Andrew is currently working on the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools and will primarily be carrying out qualitative analysis of teacher interview data from schools who have had attachment and trauma training and a systematic review of recent literature.

Andrew has a background as a teacher and senior leader in a special school, and as a teacher trainer, particularly focused around inclusive education. Andrew’s area of research interest is around the influence of young people’s adoptive identity on educational experience and outcomes. Andrew’s research has included analysis of data from a range of sources including the Wales Adoption Cohort Study and Understanding Society, he is currently completing his doctoral thesis at Cardiff University.

 

Publications

Brown, A., Waters, C. S., & Shelton, K. H. (2017). A systematic review of the school performance and behavioural and emotional adjustments of children adopted from care. Adoption & Fostering, 41(4), 346-368.

Brown, A., Waters, C. S., & Shelton, K. H. (2019). The educational aspirations and psychological well-being of adopted young people in the UK. Adoption & Fostering, 43(1), 46-59.

Adam is a researcher in the Department’s Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance. He is currently a co-investigator on the ‘Unlocking the potential of AI for English law’ project.

This project is funded by the Industrial Strategy Challenge Fund’s (ICSF) Next Generation Services Research Programme and UK Research and Innovation (UKRI), run by researchers in the Oxford departments and faculties of Law, Economics, Computer Science, Education and the Said Business School, in 2019 and 2020.

Pinar is a post-doctoral researcher within the Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project at the Department of Education. As part of the wider team, Pinar is currently investigating the aspects of learning apps that support joint media engagement between parents and children and creative learning in early and middle childhood. Pinar is also contributing to a development of a game-based language intervention focused on the vocabulary acquisition of emerging bilingual and monolingual children in England.

Before joining the team, Pinar was a doctoral student and a researcher at the Department of Education. Supervised by Prof. Edward Melhuish, her thesis examined the factors contributing to bilingual language and identity development of ethnic minority children growing up in first generation immigrant households in the UK. During her doctoral studies, Pinar took up two significant research roles at the Department.  She coordinated a survey research including 300 Turkish families in the UK and led a qualitative study on the cultural experiences of ethnic minority children in England. Before joining the team, Pinar collaborated with a group of researchers at the Department for a report to the Pro-Vice-Chancellor of the University on a new education policy aiming to establish university-sponsored specialist schools in England.

Publications

Kolancali, P. (submitted for publication). The Effects of Immigration on the Language and Literacy Practices of Turkish Parents in England. Journal of Family Issues.

Broekhuizen, M. L., Guerra, R. & Kolancali, P. (in preparation). Acculturation orientations of Turkish immigrant parents across Europe. Journal of Social Issues. This paper is prepared at the request of the Journal of Social Issues for a special issue.

Baird, J., Kolancali, P., Melhuish, E., Mutton, T., Sammons, P., Skilling, K., & Stylianides, G. Specialist Mathematics Schools in England: A Review and Implications for Oxford. This paper was prepared at the request of Professor Martin Williams, Pro Vice-Chancellor (Education) at the University of Oxford, by a Working Group established at the Department of Education.

Kolancali, P. (2019) Factors related to bilingual language skills of Turkish-English Speaking Children. In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 55-70. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Kolancali, P., & Melhuish, E. (2019). How do home and school experiences of Turkish children in the UK interact with their language attitudes and preferences? In G. Pastori, V. Pagani, & A. S. Sarcinelli (Eds.) Children’s Views on Inclusion at School. ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.4. pp 76-83. https://staging-isotis-pw.framework.pt/site/assets/files/1191/d2_4_technical-report-on-the-child-interview-study.pdf

Kolancali, P., & Melhuish, E. (2019) How do family characteristics and migration shape the home learning environment of Turkish children in the UK? In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 98-102. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Broekhuizen, M. L., Guerra, R. & Kolancali, P. (2019) Acculturation orientations, intergroup relations and well-being of Turkish and Maghrebian immigrant parents across Europe (Integrative Report D2.5). In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 122-127. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Jim McKinley is an associate professor of Applied Linguistics in Higher Education at UCL Institute of Education, and a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He has been an associate of the EMI Oxford research group since arriving in the UK in 2016. Originally from the US, he later taught and studied in Australia and New Zealand, and also taught for many years on Japan’s oldest EMI program at Sophia University (2005-2016).

At Oxford, Jim regularly collaborates with Dr. Heath Rose as well as Prof. Victoria Murphy, has published with several DPhil students, and supervises dissertations on the MSc ALSLA and MSc ALLT programs.

Jim’s research mainly explores implications of globalisation for L2 writing, language education, and teaching in higher education. As principal investigator on the British Academy-funded project ‘Exploring the teaching-research nexus in higher education’ (2018), he continues to research and publish on the bifurcation of teaching and research in higher education and TESOL in the UK and internationally. Jim is a co-editor-in-chief of the journal System and series co-editor (with Dr Heath Rose) of Cambridge Elements: Language Teaching.

For further information, visit www.researchgate.net/profile/Jim-Mckinley.

 

Publications

Rose, H., McKinley, J., & Galloway, N. (2020). Global Englishes and Language Teaching: A systematic review of pedagogical research. Language Teaching. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0261444820000518

McKinley, J., McIntosh, S., Milligan, L. O., Mikolajewska, A. (2020). Eyes on the enterprise: Problematising the concept of a teaching-research nexus in UK higher education. Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00595-2

Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2020). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2020). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics. Routledge.

Rose, H., McKinley, J. & Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J. (2020). Data Collection in Applied Linguistics Research. Bloomsbury.

Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J., & McKinley, J. (2019). Language and the development of intercultural competence in an ‘internationalised’ university: Staff and student perspectives. Teaching in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/13562517.2019.1686698

McIntosh, S. McKinley, J., Milligan, L., & Mikolajewska, A. (2019). Whose values? Whose time? Issues of (in)visibility in academic practice in UK universities. Studies in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1637846

McKinley, J. (2019). Evolving the teaching-research nexus. TESOL Quarterly, 53(3), 875-884.

McKinley, J., Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J. (2019). Developing intercultural competence in the third space: postgraduate studies in the UK. Language and Intercultural Communication, 19(1), 9-22.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (2018). Conceptualizations of language errors, standards, norms and nativeness in English for research publication purposes. Journal of Second Language Writing, 42, 1-11.

McKinley, J. (2018). Integrating appraisal theory with possible selves in understanding university EFL writing. System, 78, 27-37.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2018). Japan’s English medium instruction initiatives and the globalization of higher education. Higher Education, 75(1), 111-129.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2017). The prevalence of pedagogy-related research in applied linguistics: Extending the debate. Applied Linguistics, 38(4), 599-604.

McKinley, J., & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2017). Doing Research in Applied Linguistics: Realities, Dilemmas and Solutions. Routledge.

McKinley, J. (2015). Critical argument and writer identity: Social constructivism as a theoretical framework for EFL academic writing. Critical Inquiry in Language Studies, 12(3), 184-207.

 

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Sarah is a Research Assistant at the Department of Education working with Professor Charles Hulme and Dr Gillian West.

Sarah completed her MSc in Social Cognition: Research and Applications at UCL. Her dissertation project was supervised by Dr Anne Schlottmann and investigated the development of a sense of fairness in children aged 4 to 7 years.

She is currently assisting on the Nuffield Early Language Intervention (NELI) trial for Reception children, working directly with schools as well as supporting the development and delivery of professional online training courses for school staff.

Andrew is currently working on the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools and will primarily be carrying out qualitative analysis of teacher interview data from schools who have had attachment and trauma training and a systematic review of recent literature.

Andrew has a background as a teacher and senior leader in a special school, and as a teacher trainer, particularly focused around inclusive education. Andrew’s area of research interest is around the influence of young people’s adoptive identity on educational experience and outcomes. Andrew’s research has included analysis of data from a range of sources including the Wales Adoption Cohort Study and Understanding Society, he is currently completing his doctoral thesis at Cardiff University.

 

Publications

Brown, A., Waters, C. S., & Shelton, K. H. (2017). A systematic review of the school performance and behavioural and emotional adjustments of children adopted from care. Adoption & Fostering, 41(4), 346-368.

Brown, A., Waters, C. S., & Shelton, K. H. (2019). The educational aspirations and psychological well-being of adopted young people in the UK. Adoption & Fostering, 43(1), 46-59.

Adam is a researcher in the Department’s Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance. He is currently a co-investigator on the ‘Unlocking the potential of AI for English law’ project.

This project is funded by the Industrial Strategy Challenge Fund’s (ICSF) Next Generation Services Research Programme and UK Research and Innovation (UKRI), run by researchers in the Oxford departments and faculties of Law, Economics, Computer Science, Education and the Said Business School, in 2019 and 2020.

Pinar is a post-doctoral researcher within the Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project at the Department of Education. As part of the wider team, Pinar is currently investigating the aspects of learning apps that support joint media engagement between parents and children and creative learning in early and middle childhood. Pinar is also contributing to a development of a game-based language intervention focused on the vocabulary acquisition of emerging bilingual and monolingual children in England.

Before joining the team, Pinar was a doctoral student and a researcher at the Department of Education. Supervised by Prof. Edward Melhuish, her thesis examined the factors contributing to bilingual language and identity development of ethnic minority children growing up in first generation immigrant households in the UK. During her doctoral studies, Pinar took up two significant research roles at the Department.  She coordinated a survey research including 300 Turkish families in the UK and led a qualitative study on the cultural experiences of ethnic minority children in England. Before joining the team, Pinar collaborated with a group of researchers at the Department for a report to the Pro-Vice-Chancellor of the University on a new education policy aiming to establish university-sponsored specialist schools in England.

Publications

Kolancali, P. (submitted for publication). The Effects of Immigration on the Language and Literacy Practices of Turkish Parents in England. Journal of Family Issues.

Broekhuizen, M. L., Guerra, R. & Kolancali, P. (in preparation). Acculturation orientations of Turkish immigrant parents across Europe. Journal of Social Issues. This paper is prepared at the request of the Journal of Social Issues for a special issue.

Baird, J., Kolancali, P., Melhuish, E., Mutton, T., Sammons, P., Skilling, K., & Stylianides, G. Specialist Mathematics Schools in England: A Review and Implications for Oxford. This paper was prepared at the request of Professor Martin Williams, Pro Vice-Chancellor (Education) at the University of Oxford, by a Working Group established at the Department of Education.

Kolancali, P. (2019) Factors related to bilingual language skills of Turkish-English Speaking Children. In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 55-70. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Kolancali, P., & Melhuish, E. (2019). How do home and school experiences of Turkish children in the UK interact with their language attitudes and preferences? In G. Pastori, V. Pagani, & A. S. Sarcinelli (Eds.) Children’s Views on Inclusion at School. ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.4. pp 76-83. https://staging-isotis-pw.framework.pt/site/assets/files/1191/d2_4_technical-report-on-the-child-interview-study.pdf

Kolancali, P., & Melhuish, E. (2019) How do family characteristics and migration shape the home learning environment of Turkish children in the UK? In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 98-102. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Broekhuizen, M. L., Guerra, R. & Kolancali, P. (2019) Acculturation orientations, intergroup relations and well-being of Turkish and Maghrebian immigrant parents across Europe (Integrative Report D2.5). In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 122-127. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Jim McKinley is an associate professor of Applied Linguistics in Higher Education at UCL Institute of Education, and a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He has been an associate of the EMI Oxford research group since arriving in the UK in 2016. Originally from the US, he later taught and studied in Australia and New Zealand, and also taught for many years on Japan’s oldest EMI program at Sophia University (2005-2016).

At Oxford, Jim regularly collaborates with Dr. Heath Rose as well as Prof. Victoria Murphy, has published with several DPhil students, and supervises dissertations on the MSc ALSLA and MSc ALLT programs.

Jim’s research mainly explores implications of globalisation for L2 writing, language education, and teaching in higher education. As principal investigator on the British Academy-funded project ‘Exploring the teaching-research nexus in higher education’ (2018), he continues to research and publish on the bifurcation of teaching and research in higher education and TESOL in the UK and internationally. Jim is a co-editor-in-chief of the journal System and series co-editor (with Dr Heath Rose) of Cambridge Elements: Language Teaching.

For further information, visit www.researchgate.net/profile/Jim-Mckinley.

 

Publications

Rose, H., McKinley, J., & Galloway, N. (2020). Global Englishes and Language Teaching: A systematic review of pedagogical research. Language Teaching. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0261444820000518

McKinley, J., McIntosh, S., Milligan, L. O., Mikolajewska, A. (2020). Eyes on the enterprise: Problematising the concept of a teaching-research nexus in UK higher education. Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00595-2

Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2020). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2020). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics. Routledge.

Rose, H., McKinley, J. & Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J. (2020). Data Collection in Applied Linguistics Research. Bloomsbury.

Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J., & McKinley, J. (2019). Language and the development of intercultural competence in an ‘internationalised’ university: Staff and student perspectives. Teaching in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/13562517.2019.1686698

McIntosh, S. McKinley, J., Milligan, L., & Mikolajewska, A. (2019). Whose values? Whose time? Issues of (in)visibility in academic practice in UK universities. Studies in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1637846

McKinley, J. (2019). Evolving the teaching-research nexus. TESOL Quarterly, 53(3), 875-884.

McKinley, J., Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J. (2019). Developing intercultural competence in the third space: postgraduate studies in the UK. Language and Intercultural Communication, 19(1), 9-22.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (2018). Conceptualizations of language errors, standards, norms and nativeness in English for research publication purposes. Journal of Second Language Writing, 42, 1-11.

McKinley, J. (2018). Integrating appraisal theory with possible selves in understanding university EFL writing. System, 78, 27-37.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2018). Japan’s English medium instruction initiatives and the globalization of higher education. Higher Education, 75(1), 111-129.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2017). The prevalence of pedagogy-related research in applied linguistics: Extending the debate. Applied Linguistics, 38(4), 599-604.

McKinley, J., & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2017). Doing Research in Applied Linguistics: Realities, Dilemmas and Solutions. Routledge.

McKinley, J. (2015). Critical argument and writer identity: Social constructivism as a theoretical framework for EFL academic writing. Critical Inquiry in Language Studies, 12(3), 184-207.

 

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Sarah is a Research Assistant at the Department of Education working with Professor Charles Hulme and Dr Gillian West.

Sarah completed her MSc in Social Cognition: Research and Applications at UCL. Her dissertation project was supervised by Dr Anne Schlottmann and investigated the development of a sense of fairness in children aged 4 to 7 years.

She is currently assisting on the Nuffield Early Language Intervention (NELI) trial for Reception children, working directly with schools as well as supporting the development and delivery of professional online training courses for school staff.

Andrew is currently working on the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools and will primarily be carrying out qualitative analysis of teacher interview data from schools who have had attachment and trauma training and a systematic review of recent literature.

Andrew has a background as a teacher and senior leader in a special school, and as a teacher trainer, particularly focused around inclusive education. Andrew’s area of research interest is around the influence of young people’s adoptive identity on educational experience and outcomes. Andrew’s research has included analysis of data from a range of sources including the Wales Adoption Cohort Study and Understanding Society, he is currently completing his doctoral thesis at Cardiff University.

 

Publications

Brown, A., Waters, C. S., & Shelton, K. H. (2017). A systematic review of the school performance and behavioural and emotional adjustments of children adopted from care. Adoption & Fostering, 41(4), 346-368.

Brown, A., Waters, C. S., & Shelton, K. H. (2019). The educational aspirations and psychological well-being of adopted young people in the UK. Adoption & Fostering, 43(1), 46-59.

Adam is a researcher in the Department’s Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance. He is currently a co-investigator on the ‘Unlocking the potential of AI for English law’ project.

This project is funded by the Industrial Strategy Challenge Fund’s (ICSF) Next Generation Services Research Programme and UK Research and Innovation (UKRI), run by researchers in the Oxford departments and faculties of Law, Economics, Computer Science, Education and the Said Business School, in 2019 and 2020.

Pinar is a post-doctoral researcher within the Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project at the Department of Education. As part of the wider team, Pinar is currently investigating the aspects of learning apps that support joint media engagement between parents and children and creative learning in early and middle childhood. Pinar is also contributing to a development of a game-based language intervention focused on the vocabulary acquisition of emerging bilingual and monolingual children in England.

Before joining the team, Pinar was a doctoral student and a researcher at the Department of Education. Supervised by Prof. Edward Melhuish, her thesis examined the factors contributing to bilingual language and identity development of ethnic minority children growing up in first generation immigrant households in the UK. During her doctoral studies, Pinar took up two significant research roles at the Department.  She coordinated a survey research including 300 Turkish families in the UK and led a qualitative study on the cultural experiences of ethnic minority children in England. Before joining the team, Pinar collaborated with a group of researchers at the Department for a report to the Pro-Vice-Chancellor of the University on a new education policy aiming to establish university-sponsored specialist schools in England.

Publications

Kolancali, P. (submitted for publication). The Effects of Immigration on the Language and Literacy Practices of Turkish Parents in England. Journal of Family Issues.

Broekhuizen, M. L., Guerra, R. & Kolancali, P. (in preparation). Acculturation orientations of Turkish immigrant parents across Europe. Journal of Social Issues. This paper is prepared at the request of the Journal of Social Issues for a special issue.

Baird, J., Kolancali, P., Melhuish, E., Mutton, T., Sammons, P., Skilling, K., & Stylianides, G. Specialist Mathematics Schools in England: A Review and Implications for Oxford. This paper was prepared at the request of Professor Martin Williams, Pro Vice-Chancellor (Education) at the University of Oxford, by a Working Group established at the Department of Education.

Kolancali, P. (2019) Factors related to bilingual language skills of Turkish-English Speaking Children. In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 55-70. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Kolancali, P., & Melhuish, E. (2019). How do home and school experiences of Turkish children in the UK interact with their language attitudes and preferences? In G. Pastori, V. Pagani, & A. S. Sarcinelli (Eds.) Children’s Views on Inclusion at School. ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.4. pp 76-83. https://staging-isotis-pw.framework.pt/site/assets/files/1191/d2_4_technical-report-on-the-child-interview-study.pdf

Kolancali, P., & Melhuish, E. (2019) How do family characteristics and migration shape the home learning environment of Turkish children in the UK? In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 98-102. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Broekhuizen, M. L., Guerra, R. & Kolancali, P. (2019) Acculturation orientations, intergroup relations and well-being of Turkish and Maghrebian immigrant parents across Europe (Integrative Report D2.5). In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 122-127. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Jim McKinley is an associate professor of Applied Linguistics in Higher Education at UCL Institute of Education, and a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He has been an associate of the EMI Oxford research group since arriving in the UK in 2016. Originally from the US, he later taught and studied in Australia and New Zealand, and also taught for many years on Japan’s oldest EMI program at Sophia University (2005-2016).

At Oxford, Jim regularly collaborates with Dr. Heath Rose as well as Prof. Victoria Murphy, has published with several DPhil students, and supervises dissertations on the MSc ALSLA and MSc ALLT programs.

Jim’s research mainly explores implications of globalisation for L2 writing, language education, and teaching in higher education. As principal investigator on the British Academy-funded project ‘Exploring the teaching-research nexus in higher education’ (2018), he continues to research and publish on the bifurcation of teaching and research in higher education and TESOL in the UK and internationally. Jim is a co-editor-in-chief of the journal System and series co-editor (with Dr Heath Rose) of Cambridge Elements: Language Teaching.

For further information, visit www.researchgate.net/profile/Jim-Mckinley.

 

Publications

Rose, H., McKinley, J., & Galloway, N. (2020). Global Englishes and Language Teaching: A systematic review of pedagogical research. Language Teaching. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0261444820000518

McKinley, J., McIntosh, S., Milligan, L. O., Mikolajewska, A. (2020). Eyes on the enterprise: Problematising the concept of a teaching-research nexus in UK higher education. Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00595-2

Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2020). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2020). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics. Routledge.

Rose, H., McKinley, J. & Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J. (2020). Data Collection in Applied Linguistics Research. Bloomsbury.

Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J., & McKinley, J. (2019). Language and the development of intercultural competence in an ‘internationalised’ university: Staff and student perspectives. Teaching in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/13562517.2019.1686698

McIntosh, S. McKinley, J., Milligan, L., & Mikolajewska, A. (2019). Whose values? Whose time? Issues of (in)visibility in academic practice in UK universities. Studies in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1637846

McKinley, J. (2019). Evolving the teaching-research nexus. TESOL Quarterly, 53(3), 875-884.

McKinley, J., Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J. (2019). Developing intercultural competence in the third space: postgraduate studies in the UK. Language and Intercultural Communication, 19(1), 9-22.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (2018). Conceptualizations of language errors, standards, norms and nativeness in English for research publication purposes. Journal of Second Language Writing, 42, 1-11.

McKinley, J. (2018). Integrating appraisal theory with possible selves in understanding university EFL writing. System, 78, 27-37.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2018). Japan’s English medium instruction initiatives and the globalization of higher education. Higher Education, 75(1), 111-129.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2017). The prevalence of pedagogy-related research in applied linguistics: Extending the debate. Applied Linguistics, 38(4), 599-604.

McKinley, J., & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2017). Doing Research in Applied Linguistics: Realities, Dilemmas and Solutions. Routledge.

McKinley, J. (2015). Critical argument and writer identity: Social constructivism as a theoretical framework for EFL academic writing. Critical Inquiry in Language Studies, 12(3), 184-207.

 

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Sarah is a Research Assistant at the Department of Education working with Professor Charles Hulme and Dr Gillian West.

Sarah completed her MSc in Social Cognition: Research and Applications at UCL. Her dissertation project was supervised by Dr Anne Schlottmann and investigated the development of a sense of fairness in children aged 4 to 7 years.

She is currently assisting on the Nuffield Early Language Intervention (NELI) trial for Reception children, working directly with schools as well as supporting the development and delivery of professional online training courses for school staff.

Andrew is currently working on the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools and will primarily be carrying out qualitative analysis of teacher interview data from schools who have had attachment and trauma training and a systematic review of recent literature.

Andrew has a background as a teacher and senior leader in a special school, and as a teacher trainer, particularly focused around inclusive education. Andrew’s area of research interest is around the influence of young people’s adoptive identity on educational experience and outcomes. Andrew’s research has included analysis of data from a range of sources including the Wales Adoption Cohort Study and Understanding Society, he is currently completing his doctoral thesis at Cardiff University.

 

Publications

Brown, A., Waters, C. S., & Shelton, K. H. (2017). A systematic review of the school performance and behavioural and emotional adjustments of children adopted from care. Adoption & Fostering, 41(4), 346-368.

Brown, A., Waters, C. S., & Shelton, K. H. (2019). The educational aspirations and psychological well-being of adopted young people in the UK. Adoption & Fostering, 43(1), 46-59.

Adam is a researcher in the Department’s Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance. He is currently a co-investigator on the ‘Unlocking the potential of AI for English law’ project.

This project is funded by the Industrial Strategy Challenge Fund’s (ICSF) Next Generation Services Research Programme and UK Research and Innovation (UKRI), run by researchers in the Oxford departments and faculties of Law, Economics, Computer Science, Education and the Said Business School, in 2019 and 2020.

Pinar is a post-doctoral researcher within the Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project at the Department of Education. As part of the wider team, Pinar is currently investigating the aspects of learning apps that support joint media engagement between parents and children and creative learning in early and middle childhood. Pinar is also contributing to a development of a game-based language intervention focused on the vocabulary acquisition of emerging bilingual and monolingual children in England.

Before joining the team, Pinar was a doctoral student and a researcher at the Department of Education. Supervised by Prof. Edward Melhuish, her thesis examined the factors contributing to bilingual language and identity development of ethnic minority children growing up in first generation immigrant households in the UK. During her doctoral studies, Pinar took up two significant research roles at the Department.  She coordinated a survey research including 300 Turkish families in the UK and led a qualitative study on the cultural experiences of ethnic minority children in England. Before joining the team, Pinar collaborated with a group of researchers at the Department for a report to the Pro-Vice-Chancellor of the University on a new education policy aiming to establish university-sponsored specialist schools in England.

Publications

Kolancali, P. (submitted for publication). The Effects of Immigration on the Language and Literacy Practices of Turkish Parents in England. Journal of Family Issues.

Broekhuizen, M. L., Guerra, R. & Kolancali, P. (in preparation). Acculturation orientations of Turkish immigrant parents across Europe. Journal of Social Issues. This paper is prepared at the request of the Journal of Social Issues for a special issue.

Baird, J., Kolancali, P., Melhuish, E., Mutton, T., Sammons, P., Skilling, K., & Stylianides, G. Specialist Mathematics Schools in England: A Review and Implications for Oxford. This paper was prepared at the request of Professor Martin Williams, Pro Vice-Chancellor (Education) at the University of Oxford, by a Working Group established at the Department of Education.

Kolancali, P. (2019) Factors related to bilingual language skills of Turkish-English Speaking Children. In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 55-70. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Kolancali, P., & Melhuish, E. (2019). How do home and school experiences of Turkish children in the UK interact with their language attitudes and preferences? In G. Pastori, V. Pagani, & A. S. Sarcinelli (Eds.) Children’s Views on Inclusion at School. ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.4. pp 76-83. https://staging-isotis-pw.framework.pt/site/assets/files/1191/d2_4_technical-report-on-the-child-interview-study.pdf

Kolancali, P., & Melhuish, E. (2019) How do family characteristics and migration shape the home learning environment of Turkish children in the UK? In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 98-102. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Broekhuizen, M. L., Guerra, R. & Kolancali, P. (2019) Acculturation orientations, intergroup relations and well-being of Turkish and Maghrebian immigrant parents across Europe (Integrative Report D2.5). In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 122-127. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Jim McKinley is an associate professor of Applied Linguistics in Higher Education at UCL Institute of Education, and a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He has been an associate of the EMI Oxford research group since arriving in the UK in 2016. Originally from the US, he later taught and studied in Australia and New Zealand, and also taught for many years on Japan’s oldest EMI program at Sophia University (2005-2016).

At Oxford, Jim regularly collaborates with Dr. Heath Rose as well as Prof. Victoria Murphy, has published with several DPhil students, and supervises dissertations on the MSc ALSLA and MSc ALLT programs.

Jim’s research mainly explores implications of globalisation for L2 writing, language education, and teaching in higher education. As principal investigator on the British Academy-funded project ‘Exploring the teaching-research nexus in higher education’ (2018), he continues to research and publish on the bifurcation of teaching and research in higher education and TESOL in the UK and internationally. Jim is a co-editor-in-chief of the journal System and series co-editor (with Dr Heath Rose) of Cambridge Elements: Language Teaching.

For further information, visit www.researchgate.net/profile/Jim-Mckinley.

 

Publications

Rose, H., McKinley, J., & Galloway, N. (2020). Global Englishes and Language Teaching: A systematic review of pedagogical research. Language Teaching. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0261444820000518

McKinley, J., McIntosh, S., Milligan, L. O., Mikolajewska, A. (2020). Eyes on the enterprise: Problematising the concept of a teaching-research nexus in UK higher education. Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00595-2

Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2020). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2020). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics. Routledge.

Rose, H., McKinley, J. & Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J. (2020). Data Collection in Applied Linguistics Research. Bloomsbury.

Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J., & McKinley, J. (2019). Language and the development of intercultural competence in an ‘internationalised’ university: Staff and student perspectives. Teaching in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/13562517.2019.1686698

McIntosh, S. McKinley, J., Milligan, L., & Mikolajewska, A. (2019). Whose values? Whose time? Issues of (in)visibility in academic practice in UK universities. Studies in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1637846

McKinley, J. (2019). Evolving the teaching-research nexus. TESOL Quarterly, 53(3), 875-884.

McKinley, J., Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J. (2019). Developing intercultural competence in the third space: postgraduate studies in the UK. Language and Intercultural Communication, 19(1), 9-22.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (2018). Conceptualizations of language errors, standards, norms and nativeness in English for research publication purposes. Journal of Second Language Writing, 42, 1-11.

McKinley, J. (2018). Integrating appraisal theory with possible selves in understanding university EFL writing. System, 78, 27-37.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2018). Japan’s English medium instruction initiatives and the globalization of higher education. Higher Education, 75(1), 111-129.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2017). The prevalence of pedagogy-related research in applied linguistics: Extending the debate. Applied Linguistics, 38(4), 599-604.

McKinley, J., & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2017). Doing Research in Applied Linguistics: Realities, Dilemmas and Solutions. Routledge.

McKinley, J. (2015). Critical argument and writer identity: Social constructivism as a theoretical framework for EFL academic writing. Critical Inquiry in Language Studies, 12(3), 184-207.

 

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Sarah is a Research Assistant at the Department of Education working with Professor Charles Hulme and Dr Gillian West.

Sarah completed her MSc in Social Cognition: Research and Applications at UCL. Her dissertation project was supervised by Dr Anne Schlottmann and investigated the development of a sense of fairness in children aged 4 to 7 years.

She is currently assisting on the Nuffield Early Language Intervention (NELI) trial for Reception children, working directly with schools as well as supporting the development and delivery of professional online training courses for school staff.

Andrew is currently working on the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools and will primarily be carrying out qualitative analysis of teacher interview data from schools who have had attachment and trauma training and a systematic review of recent literature.

Andrew has a background as a teacher and senior leader in a special school, and as a teacher trainer, particularly focused around inclusive education. Andrew’s area of research interest is around the influence of young people’s adoptive identity on educational experience and outcomes. Andrew’s research has included analysis of data from a range of sources including the Wales Adoption Cohort Study and Understanding Society, he is currently completing his doctoral thesis at Cardiff University.

 

Publications

Brown, A., Waters, C. S., & Shelton, K. H. (2017). A systematic review of the school performance and behavioural and emotional adjustments of children adopted from care. Adoption & Fostering, 41(4), 346-368.

Brown, A., Waters, C. S., & Shelton, K. H. (2019). The educational aspirations and psychological well-being of adopted young people in the UK. Adoption & Fostering, 43(1), 46-59.

Adam is a researcher in the Department’s Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance. He is currently a co-investigator on the ‘Unlocking the potential of AI for English law’ project.

This project is funded by the Industrial Strategy Challenge Fund’s (ICSF) Next Generation Services Research Programme and UK Research and Innovation (UKRI), run by researchers in the Oxford departments and faculties of Law, Economics, Computer Science, Education and the Said Business School, in 2019 and 2020.

Pinar is a post-doctoral researcher within the Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project at the Department of Education. As part of the wider team, Pinar is currently investigating the aspects of learning apps that support joint media engagement between parents and children and creative learning in early and middle childhood. Pinar is also contributing to a development of a game-based language intervention focused on the vocabulary acquisition of emerging bilingual and monolingual children in England.

Before joining the team, Pinar was a doctoral student and a researcher at the Department of Education. Supervised by Prof. Edward Melhuish, her thesis examined the factors contributing to bilingual language and identity development of ethnic minority children growing up in first generation immigrant households in the UK. During her doctoral studies, Pinar took up two significant research roles at the Department.  She coordinated a survey research including 300 Turkish families in the UK and led a qualitative study on the cultural experiences of ethnic minority children in England. Before joining the team, Pinar collaborated with a group of researchers at the Department for a report to the Pro-Vice-Chancellor of the University on a new education policy aiming to establish university-sponsored specialist schools in England.

Publications

Kolancali, P. (submitted for publication). The Effects of Immigration on the Language and Literacy Practices of Turkish Parents in England. Journal of Family Issues.

Broekhuizen, M. L., Guerra, R. & Kolancali, P. (in preparation). Acculturation orientations of Turkish immigrant parents across Europe. Journal of Social Issues. This paper is prepared at the request of the Journal of Social Issues for a special issue.

Baird, J., Kolancali, P., Melhuish, E., Mutton, T., Sammons, P., Skilling, K., & Stylianides, G. Specialist Mathematics Schools in England: A Review and Implications for Oxford. This paper was prepared at the request of Professor Martin Williams, Pro Vice-Chancellor (Education) at the University of Oxford, by a Working Group established at the Department of Education.

Kolancali, P. (2019) Factors related to bilingual language skills of Turkish-English Speaking Children. In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 55-70. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Kolancali, P., & Melhuish, E. (2019). How do home and school experiences of Turkish children in the UK interact with their language attitudes and preferences? In G. Pastori, V. Pagani, & A. S. Sarcinelli (Eds.) Children’s Views on Inclusion at School. ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.4. pp 76-83. https://staging-isotis-pw.framework.pt/site/assets/files/1191/d2_4_technical-report-on-the-child-interview-study.pdf

Kolancali, P., & Melhuish, E. (2019) How do family characteristics and migration shape the home learning environment of Turkish children in the UK? In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 98-102. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Broekhuizen, M. L., Guerra, R. & Kolancali, P. (2019) Acculturation orientations, intergroup relations and well-being of Turkish and Maghrebian immigrant parents across Europe (Integrative Report D2.5). In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 122-127. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Jim McKinley is an associate professor of Applied Linguistics in Higher Education at UCL Institute of Education, and a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He has been an associate of the EMI Oxford research group since arriving in the UK in 2016. Originally from the US, he later taught and studied in Australia and New Zealand, and also taught for many years on Japan’s oldest EMI program at Sophia University (2005-2016).

At Oxford, Jim regularly collaborates with Dr. Heath Rose as well as Prof. Victoria Murphy, has published with several DPhil students, and supervises dissertations on the MSc ALSLA and MSc ALLT programs.

Jim’s research mainly explores implications of globalisation for L2 writing, language education, and teaching in higher education. As principal investigator on the British Academy-funded project ‘Exploring the teaching-research nexus in higher education’ (2018), he continues to research and publish on the bifurcation of teaching and research in higher education and TESOL in the UK and internationally. Jim is a co-editor-in-chief of the journal System and series co-editor (with Dr Heath Rose) of Cambridge Elements: Language Teaching.

For further information, visit www.researchgate.net/profile/Jim-Mckinley.

 

Publications

Rose, H., McKinley, J., & Galloway, N. (2020). Global Englishes and Language Teaching: A systematic review of pedagogical research. Language Teaching. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0261444820000518

McKinley, J., McIntosh, S., Milligan, L. O., Mikolajewska, A. (2020). Eyes on the enterprise: Problematising the concept of a teaching-research nexus in UK higher education. Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00595-2

Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2020). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2020). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics. Routledge.

Rose, H., McKinley, J. & Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J. (2020). Data Collection in Applied Linguistics Research. Bloomsbury.

Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J., & McKinley, J. (2019). Language and the development of intercultural competence in an ‘internationalised’ university: Staff and student perspectives. Teaching in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/13562517.2019.1686698

McIntosh, S. McKinley, J., Milligan, L., & Mikolajewska, A. (2019). Whose values? Whose time? Issues of (in)visibility in academic practice in UK universities. Studies in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1637846

McKinley, J. (2019). Evolving the teaching-research nexus. TESOL Quarterly, 53(3), 875-884.

McKinley, J., Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J. (2019). Developing intercultural competence in the third space: postgraduate studies in the UK. Language and Intercultural Communication, 19(1), 9-22.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (2018). Conceptualizations of language errors, standards, norms and nativeness in English for research publication purposes. Journal of Second Language Writing, 42, 1-11.

McKinley, J. (2018). Integrating appraisal theory with possible selves in understanding university EFL writing. System, 78, 27-37.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2018). Japan’s English medium instruction initiatives and the globalization of higher education. Higher Education, 75(1), 111-129.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2017). The prevalence of pedagogy-related research in applied linguistics: Extending the debate. Applied Linguistics, 38(4), 599-604.

McKinley, J., & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2017). Doing Research in Applied Linguistics: Realities, Dilemmas and Solutions. Routledge.

McKinley, J. (2015). Critical argument and writer identity: Social constructivism as a theoretical framework for EFL academic writing. Critical Inquiry in Language Studies, 12(3), 184-207.

 

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Sarah is a Research Assistant at the Department of Education working with Professor Charles Hulme and Dr Gillian West.

Sarah completed her MSc in Social Cognition: Research and Applications at UCL. Her dissertation project was supervised by Dr Anne Schlottmann and investigated the development of a sense of fairness in children aged 4 to 7 years.

She is currently assisting on the Nuffield Early Language Intervention (NELI) trial for Reception children, working directly with schools as well as supporting the development and delivery of professional online training courses for school staff.

Andrew is currently working on the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools and will primarily be carrying out qualitative analysis of teacher interview data from schools who have had attachment and trauma training and a systematic review of recent literature.

Andrew has a background as a teacher and senior leader in a special school, and as a teacher trainer, particularly focused around inclusive education. Andrew’s area of research interest is around the influence of young people’s adoptive identity on educational experience and outcomes. Andrew’s research has included analysis of data from a range of sources including the Wales Adoption Cohort Study and Understanding Society, he is currently completing his doctoral thesis at Cardiff University.

 

Publications

Brown, A., Waters, C. S., & Shelton, K. H. (2017). A systematic review of the school performance and behavioural and emotional adjustments of children adopted from care. Adoption & Fostering, 41(4), 346-368.

Brown, A., Waters, C. S., & Shelton, K. H. (2019). The educational aspirations and psychological well-being of adopted young people in the UK. Adoption & Fostering, 43(1), 46-59.

Adam is a researcher in the Department’s Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance. He is currently a co-investigator on the ‘Unlocking the potential of AI for English law’ project.

This project is funded by the Industrial Strategy Challenge Fund’s (ICSF) Next Generation Services Research Programme and UK Research and Innovation (UKRI), run by researchers in the Oxford departments and faculties of Law, Economics, Computer Science, Education and the Said Business School, in 2019 and 2020.

Pinar is a post-doctoral researcher within the Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project at the Department of Education. As part of the wider team, Pinar is currently investigating the aspects of learning apps that support joint media engagement between parents and children and creative learning in early and middle childhood. Pinar is also contributing to a development of a game-based language intervention focused on the vocabulary acquisition of emerging bilingual and monolingual children in England.

Before joining the team, Pinar was a doctoral student and a researcher at the Department of Education. Supervised by Prof. Edward Melhuish, her thesis examined the factors contributing to bilingual language and identity development of ethnic minority children growing up in first generation immigrant households in the UK. During her doctoral studies, Pinar took up two significant research roles at the Department.  She coordinated a survey research including 300 Turkish families in the UK and led a qualitative study on the cultural experiences of ethnic minority children in England. Before joining the team, Pinar collaborated with a group of researchers at the Department for a report to the Pro-Vice-Chancellor of the University on a new education policy aiming to establish university-sponsored specialist schools in England.

Publications

Kolancali, P. (submitted for publication). The Effects of Immigration on the Language and Literacy Practices of Turkish Parents in England. Journal of Family Issues.

Broekhuizen, M. L., Guerra, R. & Kolancali, P. (in preparation). Acculturation orientations of Turkish immigrant parents across Europe. Journal of Social Issues. This paper is prepared at the request of the Journal of Social Issues for a special issue.

Baird, J., Kolancali, P., Melhuish, E., Mutton, T., Sammons, P., Skilling, K., & Stylianides, G. Specialist Mathematics Schools in England: A Review and Implications for Oxford. This paper was prepared at the request of Professor Martin Williams, Pro Vice-Chancellor (Education) at the University of Oxford, by a Working Group established at the Department of Education.

Kolancali, P. (2019) Factors related to bilingual language skills of Turkish-English Speaking Children. In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 55-70. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Kolancali, P., & Melhuish, E. (2019). How do home and school experiences of Turkish children in the UK interact with their language attitudes and preferences? In G. Pastori, V. Pagani, & A. S. Sarcinelli (Eds.) Children’s Views on Inclusion at School. ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.4. pp 76-83. https://staging-isotis-pw.framework.pt/site/assets/files/1191/d2_4_technical-report-on-the-child-interview-study.pdf

Kolancali, P., & Melhuish, E. (2019) How do family characteristics and migration shape the home learning environment of Turkish children in the UK? In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 98-102. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Broekhuizen, M. L., Guerra, R. & Kolancali, P. (2019) Acculturation orientations, intergroup relations and well-being of Turkish and Maghrebian immigrant parents across Europe (Integrative Report D2.5). In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 122-127. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Jim McKinley is an associate professor of Applied Linguistics in Higher Education at UCL Institute of Education, and a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He has been an associate of the EMI Oxford research group since arriving in the UK in 2016. Originally from the US, he later taught and studied in Australia and New Zealand, and also taught for many years on Japan’s oldest EMI program at Sophia University (2005-2016).

At Oxford, Jim regularly collaborates with Dr. Heath Rose as well as Prof. Victoria Murphy, has published with several DPhil students, and supervises dissertations on the MSc ALSLA and MSc ALLT programs.

Jim’s research mainly explores implications of globalisation for L2 writing, language education, and teaching in higher education. As principal investigator on the British Academy-funded project ‘Exploring the teaching-research nexus in higher education’ (2018), he continues to research and publish on the bifurcation of teaching and research in higher education and TESOL in the UK and internationally. Jim is a co-editor-in-chief of the journal System and series co-editor (with Dr Heath Rose) of Cambridge Elements: Language Teaching.

For further information, visit www.researchgate.net/profile/Jim-Mckinley.

 

Publications

Rose, H., McKinley, J., & Galloway, N. (2020). Global Englishes and Language Teaching: A systematic review of pedagogical research. Language Teaching. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0261444820000518

McKinley, J., McIntosh, S., Milligan, L. O., Mikolajewska, A. (2020). Eyes on the enterprise: Problematising the concept of a teaching-research nexus in UK higher education. Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00595-2

Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2020). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2020). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics. Routledge.

Rose, H., McKinley, J. & Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J. (2020). Data Collection in Applied Linguistics Research. Bloomsbury.

Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J., & McKinley, J. (2019). Language and the development of intercultural competence in an ‘internationalised’ university: Staff and student perspectives. Teaching in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/13562517.2019.1686698

McIntosh, S. McKinley, J., Milligan, L., & Mikolajewska, A. (2019). Whose values? Whose time? Issues of (in)visibility in academic practice in UK universities. Studies in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1637846

McKinley, J. (2019). Evolving the teaching-research nexus. TESOL Quarterly, 53(3), 875-884.

McKinley, J., Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J. (2019). Developing intercultural competence in the third space: postgraduate studies in the UK. Language and Intercultural Communication, 19(1), 9-22.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (2018). Conceptualizations of language errors, standards, norms and nativeness in English for research publication purposes. Journal of Second Language Writing, 42, 1-11.

McKinley, J. (2018). Integrating appraisal theory with possible selves in understanding university EFL writing. System, 78, 27-37.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2018). Japan’s English medium instruction initiatives and the globalization of higher education. Higher Education, 75(1), 111-129.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2017). The prevalence of pedagogy-related research in applied linguistics: Extending the debate. Applied Linguistics, 38(4), 599-604.

McKinley, J., & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2017). Doing Research in Applied Linguistics: Realities, Dilemmas and Solutions. Routledge.

McKinley, J. (2015). Critical argument and writer identity: Social constructivism as a theoretical framework for EFL academic writing. Critical Inquiry in Language Studies, 12(3), 184-207.

 

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Sarah is a Research Assistant at the Department of Education working with Professor Charles Hulme and Dr Gillian West.

Sarah completed her MSc in Social Cognition: Research and Applications at UCL. Her dissertation project was supervised by Dr Anne Schlottmann and investigated the development of a sense of fairness in children aged 4 to 7 years.

She is currently assisting on the Nuffield Early Language Intervention (NELI) trial for Reception children, working directly with schools as well as supporting the development and delivery of professional online training courses for school staff.

Andrew is currently working on the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools and will primarily be carrying out qualitative analysis of teacher interview data from schools who have had attachment and trauma training and a systematic review of recent literature.

Andrew has a background as a teacher and senior leader in a special school, and as a teacher trainer, particularly focused around inclusive education. Andrew’s area of research interest is around the influence of young people’s adoptive identity on educational experience and outcomes. Andrew’s research has included analysis of data from a range of sources including the Wales Adoption Cohort Study and Understanding Society, he is currently completing his doctoral thesis at Cardiff University.

 

Publications

Brown, A., Waters, C. S., & Shelton, K. H. (2017). A systematic review of the school performance and behavioural and emotional adjustments of children adopted from care. Adoption & Fostering, 41(4), 346-368.

Brown, A., Waters, C. S., & Shelton, K. H. (2019). The educational aspirations and psychological well-being of adopted young people in the UK. Adoption & Fostering, 43(1), 46-59.

Adam is a researcher in the Department’s Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance. He is currently a co-investigator on the ‘Unlocking the potential of AI for English law’ project.

This project is funded by the Industrial Strategy Challenge Fund’s (ICSF) Next Generation Services Research Programme and UK Research and Innovation (UKRI), run by researchers in the Oxford departments and faculties of Law, Economics, Computer Science, Education and the Said Business School, in 2019 and 2020.

Pinar is a post-doctoral researcher within the Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project at the Department of Education. As part of the wider team, Pinar is currently investigating the aspects of learning apps that support joint media engagement between parents and children and creative learning in early and middle childhood. Pinar is also contributing to a development of a game-based language intervention focused on the vocabulary acquisition of emerging bilingual and monolingual children in England.

Before joining the team, Pinar was a doctoral student and a researcher at the Department of Education. Supervised by Prof. Edward Melhuish, her thesis examined the factors contributing to bilingual language and identity development of ethnic minority children growing up in first generation immigrant households in the UK. During her doctoral studies, Pinar took up two significant research roles at the Department.  She coordinated a survey research including 300 Turkish families in the UK and led a qualitative study on the cultural experiences of ethnic minority children in England. Before joining the team, Pinar collaborated with a group of researchers at the Department for a report to the Pro-Vice-Chancellor of the University on a new education policy aiming to establish university-sponsored specialist schools in England.

Publications

Kolancali, P. (submitted for publication). The Effects of Immigration on the Language and Literacy Practices of Turkish Parents in England. Journal of Family Issues.

Broekhuizen, M. L., Guerra, R. & Kolancali, P. (in preparation). Acculturation orientations of Turkish immigrant parents across Europe. Journal of Social Issues. This paper is prepared at the request of the Journal of Social Issues for a special issue.

Baird, J., Kolancali, P., Melhuish, E., Mutton, T., Sammons, P., Skilling, K., & Stylianides, G. Specialist Mathematics Schools in England: A Review and Implications for Oxford. This paper was prepared at the request of Professor Martin Williams, Pro Vice-Chancellor (Education) at the University of Oxford, by a Working Group established at the Department of Education.

Kolancali, P. (2019) Factors related to bilingual language skills of Turkish-English Speaking Children. In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 55-70. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Kolancali, P., & Melhuish, E. (2019). How do home and school experiences of Turkish children in the UK interact with their language attitudes and preferences? In G. Pastori, V. Pagani, & A. S. Sarcinelli (Eds.) Children’s Views on Inclusion at School. ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.4. pp 76-83. https://staging-isotis-pw.framework.pt/site/assets/files/1191/d2_4_technical-report-on-the-child-interview-study.pdf

Kolancali, P., & Melhuish, E. (2019) How do family characteristics and migration shape the home learning environment of Turkish children in the UK? In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 98-102. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Broekhuizen, M. L., Guerra, R. & Kolancali, P. (2019) Acculturation orientations, intergroup relations and well-being of Turkish and Maghrebian immigrant parents across Europe (Integrative Report D2.5). In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 122-127. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Jim McKinley is an associate professor of Applied Linguistics in Higher Education at UCL Institute of Education, and a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He has been an associate of the EMI Oxford research group since arriving in the UK in 2016. Originally from the US, he later taught and studied in Australia and New Zealand, and also taught for many years on Japan’s oldest EMI program at Sophia University (2005-2016).

At Oxford, Jim regularly collaborates with Dr. Heath Rose as well as Prof. Victoria Murphy, has published with several DPhil students, and supervises dissertations on the MSc ALSLA and MSc ALLT programs.

Jim’s research mainly explores implications of globalisation for L2 writing, language education, and teaching in higher education. As principal investigator on the British Academy-funded project ‘Exploring the teaching-research nexus in higher education’ (2018), he continues to research and publish on the bifurcation of teaching and research in higher education and TESOL in the UK and internationally. Jim is a co-editor-in-chief of the journal System and series co-editor (with Dr Heath Rose) of Cambridge Elements: Language Teaching.

For further information, visit www.researchgate.net/profile/Jim-Mckinley.

 

Publications

Rose, H., McKinley, J., & Galloway, N. (2020). Global Englishes and Language Teaching: A systematic review of pedagogical research. Language Teaching. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0261444820000518

McKinley, J., McIntosh, S., Milligan, L. O., Mikolajewska, A. (2020). Eyes on the enterprise: Problematising the concept of a teaching-research nexus in UK higher education. Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00595-2

Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2020). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2020). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics. Routledge.

Rose, H., McKinley, J. & Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J. (2020). Data Collection in Applied Linguistics Research. Bloomsbury.

Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J., & McKinley, J. (2019). Language and the development of intercultural competence in an ‘internationalised’ university: Staff and student perspectives. Teaching in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/13562517.2019.1686698

McIntosh, S. McKinley, J., Milligan, L., & Mikolajewska, A. (2019). Whose values? Whose time? Issues of (in)visibility in academic practice in UK universities. Studies in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1637846

McKinley, J. (2019). Evolving the teaching-research nexus. TESOL Quarterly, 53(3), 875-884.

McKinley, J., Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J. (2019). Developing intercultural competence in the third space: postgraduate studies in the UK. Language and Intercultural Communication, 19(1), 9-22.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (2018). Conceptualizations of language errors, standards, norms and nativeness in English for research publication purposes. Journal of Second Language Writing, 42, 1-11.

McKinley, J. (2018). Integrating appraisal theory with possible selves in understanding university EFL writing. System, 78, 27-37.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2018). Japan’s English medium instruction initiatives and the globalization of higher education. Higher Education, 75(1), 111-129.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2017). The prevalence of pedagogy-related research in applied linguistics: Extending the debate. Applied Linguistics, 38(4), 599-604.

McKinley, J., & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2017). Doing Research in Applied Linguistics: Realities, Dilemmas and Solutions. Routledge.

McKinley, J. (2015). Critical argument and writer identity: Social constructivism as a theoretical framework for EFL academic writing. Critical Inquiry in Language Studies, 12(3), 184-207.

 

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Sarah is a Research Assistant at the Department of Education working with Professor Charles Hulme and Dr Gillian West.

Sarah completed her MSc in Social Cognition: Research and Applications at UCL. Her dissertation project was supervised by Dr Anne Schlottmann and investigated the development of a sense of fairness in children aged 4 to 7 years.

She is currently assisting on the Nuffield Early Language Intervention (NELI) trial for Reception children, working directly with schools as well as supporting the development and delivery of professional online training courses for school staff.

Andrew is currently working on the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools and will primarily be carrying out qualitative analysis of teacher interview data from schools who have had attachment and trauma training and a systematic review of recent literature.

Andrew has a background as a teacher and senior leader in a special school, and as a teacher trainer, particularly focused around inclusive education. Andrew’s area of research interest is around the influence of young people’s adoptive identity on educational experience and outcomes. Andrew’s research has included analysis of data from a range of sources including the Wales Adoption Cohort Study and Understanding Society, he is currently completing his doctoral thesis at Cardiff University.

 

Publications

Brown, A., Waters, C. S., & Shelton, K. H. (2017). A systematic review of the school performance and behavioural and emotional adjustments of children adopted from care. Adoption & Fostering, 41(4), 346-368.

Brown, A., Waters, C. S., & Shelton, K. H. (2019). The educational aspirations and psychological well-being of adopted young people in the UK. Adoption & Fostering, 43(1), 46-59.

Adam is a researcher in the Department’s Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance. He is currently a co-investigator on the ‘Unlocking the potential of AI for English law’ project.

This project is funded by the Industrial Strategy Challenge Fund’s (ICSF) Next Generation Services Research Programme and UK Research and Innovation (UKRI), run by researchers in the Oxford departments and faculties of Law, Economics, Computer Science, Education and the Said Business School, in 2019 and 2020.

Pinar is a post-doctoral researcher within the Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project at the Department of Education. As part of the wider team, Pinar is currently investigating the aspects of learning apps that support joint media engagement between parents and children and creative learning in early and middle childhood. Pinar is also contributing to a development of a game-based language intervention focused on the vocabulary acquisition of emerging bilingual and monolingual children in England.

Before joining the team, Pinar was a doctoral student and a researcher at the Department of Education. Supervised by Prof. Edward Melhuish, her thesis examined the factors contributing to bilingual language and identity development of ethnic minority children growing up in first generation immigrant households in the UK. During her doctoral studies, Pinar took up two significant research roles at the Department.  She coordinated a survey research including 300 Turkish families in the UK and led a qualitative study on the cultural experiences of ethnic minority children in England. Before joining the team, Pinar collaborated with a group of researchers at the Department for a report to the Pro-Vice-Chancellor of the University on a new education policy aiming to establish university-sponsored specialist schools in England.

Publications

Kolancali, P. (submitted for publication). The Effects of Immigration on the Language and Literacy Practices of Turkish Parents in England. Journal of Family Issues.

Broekhuizen, M. L., Guerra, R. & Kolancali, P. (in preparation). Acculturation orientations of Turkish immigrant parents across Europe. Journal of Social Issues. This paper is prepared at the request of the Journal of Social Issues for a special issue.

Baird, J., Kolancali, P., Melhuish, E., Mutton, T., Sammons, P., Skilling, K., & Stylianides, G. Specialist Mathematics Schools in England: A Review and Implications for Oxford. This paper was prepared at the request of Professor Martin Williams, Pro Vice-Chancellor (Education) at the University of Oxford, by a Working Group established at the Department of Education.

Kolancali, P. (2019) Factors related to bilingual language skills of Turkish-English Speaking Children. In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 55-70. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Kolancali, P., & Melhuish, E. (2019). How do home and school experiences of Turkish children in the UK interact with their language attitudes and preferences? In G. Pastori, V. Pagani, & A. S. Sarcinelli (Eds.) Children’s Views on Inclusion at School. ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.4. pp 76-83. https://staging-isotis-pw.framework.pt/site/assets/files/1191/d2_4_technical-report-on-the-child-interview-study.pdf

Kolancali, P., & Melhuish, E. (2019) How do family characteristics and migration shape the home learning environment of Turkish children in the UK? In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 98-102. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Broekhuizen, M. L., Guerra, R. & Kolancali, P. (2019) Acculturation orientations, intergroup relations and well-being of Turkish and Maghrebian immigrant parents across Europe (Integrative Report D2.5). In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 122-127. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Jim McKinley is an associate professor of Applied Linguistics in Higher Education at UCL Institute of Education, and a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He has been an associate of the EMI Oxford research group since arriving in the UK in 2016. Originally from the US, he later taught and studied in Australia and New Zealand, and also taught for many years on Japan’s oldest EMI program at Sophia University (2005-2016).

At Oxford, Jim regularly collaborates with Dr. Heath Rose as well as Prof. Victoria Murphy, has published with several DPhil students, and supervises dissertations on the MSc ALSLA and MSc ALLT programs.

Jim’s research mainly explores implications of globalisation for L2 writing, language education, and teaching in higher education. As principal investigator on the British Academy-funded project ‘Exploring the teaching-research nexus in higher education’ (2018), he continues to research and publish on the bifurcation of teaching and research in higher education and TESOL in the UK and internationally. Jim is a co-editor-in-chief of the journal System and series co-editor (with Dr Heath Rose) of Cambridge Elements: Language Teaching.

For further information, visit www.researchgate.net/profile/Jim-Mckinley.

 

Publications

Rose, H., McKinley, J., & Galloway, N. (2020). Global Englishes and Language Teaching: A systematic review of pedagogical research. Language Teaching. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0261444820000518

McKinley, J., McIntosh, S., Milligan, L. O., Mikolajewska, A. (2020). Eyes on the enterprise: Problematising the concept of a teaching-research nexus in UK higher education. Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00595-2

Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2020). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2020). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics. Routledge.

Rose, H., McKinley, J. & Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J. (2020). Data Collection in Applied Linguistics Research. Bloomsbury.

Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J., & McKinley, J. (2019). Language and the development of intercultural competence in an ‘internationalised’ university: Staff and student perspectives. Teaching in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/13562517.2019.1686698

McIntosh, S. McKinley, J., Milligan, L., & Mikolajewska, A. (2019). Whose values? Whose time? Issues of (in)visibility in academic practice in UK universities. Studies in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1637846

McKinley, J. (2019). Evolving the teaching-research nexus. TESOL Quarterly, 53(3), 875-884.

McKinley, J., Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J. (2019). Developing intercultural competence in the third space: postgraduate studies in the UK. Language and Intercultural Communication, 19(1), 9-22.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (2018). Conceptualizations of language errors, standards, norms and nativeness in English for research publication purposes. Journal of Second Language Writing, 42, 1-11.

McKinley, J. (2018). Integrating appraisal theory with possible selves in understanding university EFL writing. System, 78, 27-37.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2018). Japan’s English medium instruction initiatives and the globalization of higher education. Higher Education, 75(1), 111-129.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2017). The prevalence of pedagogy-related research in applied linguistics: Extending the debate. Applied Linguistics, 38(4), 599-604.

McKinley, J., & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2017). Doing Research in Applied Linguistics: Realities, Dilemmas and Solutions. Routledge.

McKinley, J. (2015). Critical argument and writer identity: Social constructivism as a theoretical framework for EFL academic writing. Critical Inquiry in Language Studies, 12(3), 184-207.

 

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Sarah is a Research Assistant at the Department of Education working with Professor Charles Hulme and Dr Gillian West.

Sarah completed her MSc in Social Cognition: Research and Applications at UCL. Her dissertation project was supervised by Dr Anne Schlottmann and investigated the development of a sense of fairness in children aged 4 to 7 years.

She is currently assisting on the Nuffield Early Language Intervention (NELI) trial for Reception children, working directly with schools as well as supporting the development and delivery of professional online training courses for school staff.

Andrew is currently working on the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools and will primarily be carrying out qualitative analysis of teacher interview data from schools who have had attachment and trauma training and a systematic review of recent literature.

Andrew has a background as a teacher and senior leader in a special school, and as a teacher trainer, particularly focused around inclusive education. Andrew’s area of research interest is around the influence of young people’s adoptive identity on educational experience and outcomes. Andrew’s research has included analysis of data from a range of sources including the Wales Adoption Cohort Study and Understanding Society, he is currently completing his doctoral thesis at Cardiff University.

 

Publications

Brown, A., Waters, C. S., & Shelton, K. H. (2017). A systematic review of the school performance and behavioural and emotional adjustments of children adopted from care. Adoption & Fostering, 41(4), 346-368.

Brown, A., Waters, C. S., & Shelton, K. H. (2019). The educational aspirations and psychological well-being of adopted young people in the UK. Adoption & Fostering, 43(1), 46-59.

Adam is a researcher in the Department’s Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance. He is currently a co-investigator on the ‘Unlocking the potential of AI for English law’ project.

This project is funded by the Industrial Strategy Challenge Fund’s (ICSF) Next Generation Services Research Programme and UK Research and Innovation (UKRI), run by researchers in the Oxford departments and faculties of Law, Economics, Computer Science, Education and the Said Business School, in 2019 and 2020.

Pinar is a post-doctoral researcher within the Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project at the Department of Education. As part of the wider team, Pinar is currently investigating the aspects of learning apps that support joint media engagement between parents and children and creative learning in early and middle childhood. Pinar is also contributing to a development of a game-based language intervention focused on the vocabulary acquisition of emerging bilingual and monolingual children in England.

Before joining the team, Pinar was a doctoral student and a researcher at the Department of Education. Supervised by Prof. Edward Melhuish, her thesis examined the factors contributing to bilingual language and identity development of ethnic minority children growing up in first generation immigrant households in the UK. During her doctoral studies, Pinar took up two significant research roles at the Department.  She coordinated a survey research including 300 Turkish families in the UK and led a qualitative study on the cultural experiences of ethnic minority children in England. Before joining the team, Pinar collaborated with a group of researchers at the Department for a report to the Pro-Vice-Chancellor of the University on a new education policy aiming to establish university-sponsored specialist schools in England.

Publications

Kolancali, P. (submitted for publication). The Effects of Immigration on the Language and Literacy Practices of Turkish Parents in England. Journal of Family Issues.

Broekhuizen, M. L., Guerra, R. & Kolancali, P. (in preparation). Acculturation orientations of Turkish immigrant parents across Europe. Journal of Social Issues. This paper is prepared at the request of the Journal of Social Issues for a special issue.

Baird, J., Kolancali, P., Melhuish, E., Mutton, T., Sammons, P., Skilling, K., & Stylianides, G. Specialist Mathematics Schools in England: A Review and Implications for Oxford. This paper was prepared at the request of Professor Martin Williams, Pro Vice-Chancellor (Education) at the University of Oxford, by a Working Group established at the Department of Education.

Kolancali, P. (2019) Factors related to bilingual language skills of Turkish-English Speaking Children. In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 55-70. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Kolancali, P., & Melhuish, E. (2019). How do home and school experiences of Turkish children in the UK interact with their language attitudes and preferences? In G. Pastori, V. Pagani, & A. S. Sarcinelli (Eds.) Children’s Views on Inclusion at School. ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.4. pp 76-83. https://staging-isotis-pw.framework.pt/site/assets/files/1191/d2_4_technical-report-on-the-child-interview-study.pdf

Kolancali, P., & Melhuish, E. (2019) How do family characteristics and migration shape the home learning environment of Turkish children in the UK? In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 98-102. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Broekhuizen, M. L., Guerra, R. & Kolancali, P. (2019) Acculturation orientations, intergroup relations and well-being of Turkish and Maghrebian immigrant parents across Europe (Integrative Report D2.5). In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 122-127. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Jim McKinley is an associate professor of Applied Linguistics in Higher Education at UCL Institute of Education, and a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He has been an associate of the EMI Oxford research group since arriving in the UK in 2016. Originally from the US, he later taught and studied in Australia and New Zealand, and also taught for many years on Japan’s oldest EMI program at Sophia University (2005-2016).

At Oxford, Jim regularly collaborates with Dr. Heath Rose as well as Prof. Victoria Murphy, has published with several DPhil students, and supervises dissertations on the MSc ALSLA and MSc ALLT programs.

Jim’s research mainly explores implications of globalisation for L2 writing, language education, and teaching in higher education. As principal investigator on the British Academy-funded project ‘Exploring the teaching-research nexus in higher education’ (2018), he continues to research and publish on the bifurcation of teaching and research in higher education and TESOL in the UK and internationally. Jim is a co-editor-in-chief of the journal System and series co-editor (with Dr Heath Rose) of Cambridge Elements: Language Teaching.

For further information, visit www.researchgate.net/profile/Jim-Mckinley.

 

Publications

Rose, H., McKinley, J., & Galloway, N. (2020). Global Englishes and Language Teaching: A systematic review of pedagogical research. Language Teaching. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0261444820000518

McKinley, J., McIntosh, S., Milligan, L. O., Mikolajewska, A. (2020). Eyes on the enterprise: Problematising the concept of a teaching-research nexus in UK higher education. Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00595-2

Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2020). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2020). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics. Routledge.

Rose, H., McKinley, J. & Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J. (2020). Data Collection in Applied Linguistics Research. Bloomsbury.

Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J., & McKinley, J. (2019). Language and the development of intercultural competence in an ‘internationalised’ university: Staff and student perspectives. Teaching in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/13562517.2019.1686698

McIntosh, S. McKinley, J., Milligan, L., & Mikolajewska, A. (2019). Whose values? Whose time? Issues of (in)visibility in academic practice in UK universities. Studies in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1637846

McKinley, J. (2019). Evolving the teaching-research nexus. TESOL Quarterly, 53(3), 875-884.

McKinley, J., Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J. (2019). Developing intercultural competence in the third space: postgraduate studies in the UK. Language and Intercultural Communication, 19(1), 9-22.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (2018). Conceptualizations of language errors, standards, norms and nativeness in English for research publication purposes. Journal of Second Language Writing, 42, 1-11.

McKinley, J. (2018). Integrating appraisal theory with possible selves in understanding university EFL writing. System, 78, 27-37.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2018). Japan’s English medium instruction initiatives and the globalization of higher education. Higher Education, 75(1), 111-129.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2017). The prevalence of pedagogy-related research in applied linguistics: Extending the debate. Applied Linguistics, 38(4), 599-604.

McKinley, J., & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2017). Doing Research in Applied Linguistics: Realities, Dilemmas and Solutions. Routledge.

McKinley, J. (2015). Critical argument and writer identity: Social constructivism as a theoretical framework for EFL academic writing. Critical Inquiry in Language Studies, 12(3), 184-207.

 

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Sarah is a Research Assistant at the Department of Education working with Professor Charles Hulme and Dr Gillian West.

Sarah completed her MSc in Social Cognition: Research and Applications at UCL. Her dissertation project was supervised by Dr Anne Schlottmann and investigated the development of a sense of fairness in children aged 4 to 7 years.

She is currently assisting on the Nuffield Early Language Intervention (NELI) trial for Reception children, working directly with schools as well as supporting the development and delivery of professional online training courses for school staff.

Andrew is currently working on the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools and will primarily be carrying out qualitative analysis of teacher interview data from schools who have had attachment and trauma training and a systematic review of recent literature.

Andrew has a background as a teacher and senior leader in a special school, and as a teacher trainer, particularly focused around inclusive education. Andrew’s area of research interest is around the influence of young people’s adoptive identity on educational experience and outcomes. Andrew’s research has included analysis of data from a range of sources including the Wales Adoption Cohort Study and Understanding Society, he is currently completing his doctoral thesis at Cardiff University.

 

Publications

Brown, A., Waters, C. S., & Shelton, K. H. (2017). A systematic review of the school performance and behavioural and emotional adjustments of children adopted from care. Adoption & Fostering, 41(4), 346-368.

Brown, A., Waters, C. S., & Shelton, K. H. (2019). The educational aspirations and psychological well-being of adopted young people in the UK. Adoption & Fostering, 43(1), 46-59.

Adam is a researcher in the Department’s Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance. He is currently a co-investigator on the ‘Unlocking the potential of AI for English law’ project.

This project is funded by the Industrial Strategy Challenge Fund’s (ICSF) Next Generation Services Research Programme and UK Research and Innovation (UKRI), run by researchers in the Oxford departments and faculties of Law, Economics, Computer Science, Education and the Said Business School, in 2019 and 2020.

Pinar is a post-doctoral researcher within the Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project at the Department of Education. As part of the wider team, Pinar is currently investigating the aspects of learning apps that support joint media engagement between parents and children and creative learning in early and middle childhood. Pinar is also contributing to a development of a game-based language intervention focused on the vocabulary acquisition of emerging bilingual and monolingual children in England.

Before joining the team, Pinar was a doctoral student and a researcher at the Department of Education. Supervised by Prof. Edward Melhuish, her thesis examined the factors contributing to bilingual language and identity development of ethnic minority children growing up in first generation immigrant households in the UK. During her doctoral studies, Pinar took up two significant research roles at the Department.  She coordinated a survey research including 300 Turkish families in the UK and led a qualitative study on the cultural experiences of ethnic minority children in England. Before joining the team, Pinar collaborated with a group of researchers at the Department for a report to the Pro-Vice-Chancellor of the University on a new education policy aiming to establish university-sponsored specialist schools in England.

Publications

Kolancali, P. (submitted for publication). The Effects of Immigration on the Language and Literacy Practices of Turkish Parents in England. Journal of Family Issues.

Broekhuizen, M. L., Guerra, R. & Kolancali, P. (in preparation). Acculturation orientations of Turkish immigrant parents across Europe. Journal of Social Issues. This paper is prepared at the request of the Journal of Social Issues for a special issue.

Baird, J., Kolancali, P., Melhuish, E., Mutton, T., Sammons, P., Skilling, K., & Stylianides, G. Specialist Mathematics Schools in England: A Review and Implications for Oxford. This paper was prepared at the request of Professor Martin Williams, Pro Vice-Chancellor (Education) at the University of Oxford, by a Working Group established at the Department of Education.

Kolancali, P. (2019) Factors related to bilingual language skills of Turkish-English Speaking Children. In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 55-70. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Kolancali, P., & Melhuish, E. (2019). How do home and school experiences of Turkish children in the UK interact with their language attitudes and preferences? In G. Pastori, V. Pagani, & A. S. Sarcinelli (Eds.) Children’s Views on Inclusion at School. ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.4. pp 76-83. https://staging-isotis-pw.framework.pt/site/assets/files/1191/d2_4_technical-report-on-the-child-interview-study.pdf

Kolancali, P., & Melhuish, E. (2019) How do family characteristics and migration shape the home learning environment of Turkish children in the UK? In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 98-102. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Broekhuizen, M. L., Guerra, R. & Kolancali, P. (2019) Acculturation orientations, intergroup relations and well-being of Turkish and Maghrebian immigrant parents across Europe (Integrative Report D2.5). In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 122-127. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Jim McKinley is an associate professor of Applied Linguistics in Higher Education at UCL Institute of Education, and a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He has been an associate of the EMI Oxford research group since arriving in the UK in 2016. Originally from the US, he later taught and studied in Australia and New Zealand, and also taught for many years on Japan’s oldest EMI program at Sophia University (2005-2016).

At Oxford, Jim regularly collaborates with Dr. Heath Rose as well as Prof. Victoria Murphy, has published with several DPhil students, and supervises dissertations on the MSc ALSLA and MSc ALLT programs.

Jim’s research mainly explores implications of globalisation for L2 writing, language education, and teaching in higher education. As principal investigator on the British Academy-funded project ‘Exploring the teaching-research nexus in higher education’ (2018), he continues to research and publish on the bifurcation of teaching and research in higher education and TESOL in the UK and internationally. Jim is a co-editor-in-chief of the journal System and series co-editor (with Dr Heath Rose) of Cambridge Elements: Language Teaching.

For further information, visit www.researchgate.net/profile/Jim-Mckinley.

 

Publications

Rose, H., McKinley, J., & Galloway, N. (2020). Global Englishes and Language Teaching: A systematic review of pedagogical research. Language Teaching. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0261444820000518

McKinley, J., McIntosh, S., Milligan, L. O., Mikolajewska, A. (2020). Eyes on the enterprise: Problematising the concept of a teaching-research nexus in UK higher education. Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00595-2

Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2020). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2020). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics. Routledge.

Rose, H., McKinley, J. & Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J. (2020). Data Collection in Applied Linguistics Research. Bloomsbury.

Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J., & McKinley, J. (2019). Language and the development of intercultural competence in an ‘internationalised’ university: Staff and student perspectives. Teaching in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/13562517.2019.1686698

McIntosh, S. McKinley, J., Milligan, L., & Mikolajewska, A. (2019). Whose values? Whose time? Issues of (in)visibility in academic practice in UK universities. Studies in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1637846

McKinley, J. (2019). Evolving the teaching-research nexus. TESOL Quarterly, 53(3), 875-884.

McKinley, J., Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J. (2019). Developing intercultural competence in the third space: postgraduate studies in the UK. Language and Intercultural Communication, 19(1), 9-22.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (2018). Conceptualizations of language errors, standards, norms and nativeness in English for research publication purposes. Journal of Second Language Writing, 42, 1-11.

McKinley, J. (2018). Integrating appraisal theory with possible selves in understanding university EFL writing. System, 78, 27-37.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2018). Japan’s English medium instruction initiatives and the globalization of higher education. Higher Education, 75(1), 111-129.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2017). The prevalence of pedagogy-related research in applied linguistics: Extending the debate. Applied Linguistics, 38(4), 599-604.

McKinley, J., & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2017). Doing Research in Applied Linguistics: Realities, Dilemmas and Solutions. Routledge.

McKinley, J. (2015). Critical argument and writer identity: Social constructivism as a theoretical framework for EFL academic writing. Critical Inquiry in Language Studies, 12(3), 184-207.

 

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Sarah is a Research Assistant at the Department of Education working with Professor Charles Hulme and Dr Gillian West.

Sarah completed her MSc in Social Cognition: Research and Applications at UCL. Her dissertation project was supervised by Dr Anne Schlottmann and investigated the development of a sense of fairness in children aged 4 to 7 years.

She is currently assisting on the Nuffield Early Language Intervention (NELI) trial for Reception children, working directly with schools as well as supporting the development and delivery of professional online training courses for school staff.

Andrew is currently working on the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools and will primarily be carrying out qualitative analysis of teacher interview data from schools who have had attachment and trauma training and a systematic review of recent literature.

Andrew has a background as a teacher and senior leader in a special school, and as a teacher trainer, particularly focused around inclusive education. Andrew’s area of research interest is around the influence of young people’s adoptive identity on educational experience and outcomes. Andrew’s research has included analysis of data from a range of sources including the Wales Adoption Cohort Study and Understanding Society, he is currently completing his doctoral thesis at Cardiff University.

 

Publications

Brown, A., Waters, C. S., & Shelton, K. H. (2017). A systematic review of the school performance and behavioural and emotional adjustments of children adopted from care. Adoption & Fostering, 41(4), 346-368.

Brown, A., Waters, C. S., & Shelton, K. H. (2019). The educational aspirations and psychological well-being of adopted young people in the UK. Adoption & Fostering, 43(1), 46-59.

Adam is a researcher in the Department’s Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance. He is currently a co-investigator on the ‘Unlocking the potential of AI for English law’ project.

This project is funded by the Industrial Strategy Challenge Fund’s (ICSF) Next Generation Services Research Programme and UK Research and Innovation (UKRI), run by researchers in the Oxford departments and faculties of Law, Economics, Computer Science, Education and the Said Business School, in 2019 and 2020.

Pinar is a post-doctoral researcher within the Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project at the Department of Education. As part of the wider team, Pinar is currently investigating the aspects of learning apps that support joint media engagement between parents and children and creative learning in early and middle childhood. Pinar is also contributing to a development of a game-based language intervention focused on the vocabulary acquisition of emerging bilingual and monolingual children in England.

Before joining the team, Pinar was a doctoral student and a researcher at the Department of Education. Supervised by Prof. Edward Melhuish, her thesis examined the factors contributing to bilingual language and identity development of ethnic minority children growing up in first generation immigrant households in the UK. During her doctoral studies, Pinar took up two significant research roles at the Department.  She coordinated a survey research including 300 Turkish families in the UK and led a qualitative study on the cultural experiences of ethnic minority children in England. Before joining the team, Pinar collaborated with a group of researchers at the Department for a report to the Pro-Vice-Chancellor of the University on a new education policy aiming to establish university-sponsored specialist schools in England.

Publications

Kolancali, P. (submitted for publication). The Effects of Immigration on the Language and Literacy Practices of Turkish Parents in England. Journal of Family Issues.

Broekhuizen, M. L., Guerra, R. & Kolancali, P. (in preparation). Acculturation orientations of Turkish immigrant parents across Europe. Journal of Social Issues. This paper is prepared at the request of the Journal of Social Issues for a special issue.

Baird, J., Kolancali, P., Melhuish, E., Mutton, T., Sammons, P., Skilling, K., & Stylianides, G. Specialist Mathematics Schools in England: A Review and Implications for Oxford. This paper was prepared at the request of Professor Martin Williams, Pro Vice-Chancellor (Education) at the University of Oxford, by a Working Group established at the Department of Education.

Kolancali, P. (2019) Factors related to bilingual language skills of Turkish-English Speaking Children. In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 55-70. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Kolancali, P., & Melhuish, E. (2019). How do home and school experiences of Turkish children in the UK interact with their language attitudes and preferences? In G. Pastori, V. Pagani, & A. S. Sarcinelli (Eds.) Children’s Views on Inclusion at School. ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.4. pp 76-83. https://staging-isotis-pw.framework.pt/site/assets/files/1191/d2_4_technical-report-on-the-child-interview-study.pdf

Kolancali, P., & Melhuish, E. (2019) How do family characteristics and migration shape the home learning environment of Turkish children in the UK? In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 98-102. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Broekhuizen, M. L., Guerra, R. & Kolancali, P. (2019) Acculturation orientations, intergroup relations and well-being of Turkish and Maghrebian immigrant parents across Europe (Integrative Report D2.5). In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 122-127. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Jim McKinley is an associate professor of Applied Linguistics in Higher Education at UCL Institute of Education, and a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He has been an associate of the EMI Oxford research group since arriving in the UK in 2016. Originally from the US, he later taught and studied in Australia and New Zealand, and also taught for many years on Japan’s oldest EMI program at Sophia University (2005-2016).

At Oxford, Jim regularly collaborates with Dr. Heath Rose as well as Prof. Victoria Murphy, has published with several DPhil students, and supervises dissertations on the MSc ALSLA and MSc ALLT programs.

Jim’s research mainly explores implications of globalisation for L2 writing, language education, and teaching in higher education. As principal investigator on the British Academy-funded project ‘Exploring the teaching-research nexus in higher education’ (2018), he continues to research and publish on the bifurcation of teaching and research in higher education and TESOL in the UK and internationally. Jim is a co-editor-in-chief of the journal System and series co-editor (with Dr Heath Rose) of Cambridge Elements: Language Teaching.

For further information, visit www.researchgate.net/profile/Jim-Mckinley.

 

Publications

Rose, H., McKinley, J., & Galloway, N. (2020). Global Englishes and Language Teaching: A systematic review of pedagogical research. Language Teaching. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0261444820000518

McKinley, J., McIntosh, S., Milligan, L. O., Mikolajewska, A. (2020). Eyes on the enterprise: Problematising the concept of a teaching-research nexus in UK higher education. Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00595-2

Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2020). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2020). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics. Routledge.

Rose, H., McKinley, J. & Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J. (2020). Data Collection in Applied Linguistics Research. Bloomsbury.

Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J., & McKinley, J. (2019). Language and the development of intercultural competence in an ‘internationalised’ university: Staff and student perspectives. Teaching in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/13562517.2019.1686698

McIntosh, S. McKinley, J., Milligan, L., & Mikolajewska, A. (2019). Whose values? Whose time? Issues of (in)visibility in academic practice in UK universities. Studies in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1637846

McKinley, J. (2019). Evolving the teaching-research nexus. TESOL Quarterly, 53(3), 875-884.

McKinley, J., Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J. (2019). Developing intercultural competence in the third space: postgraduate studies in the UK. Language and Intercultural Communication, 19(1), 9-22.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (2018). Conceptualizations of language errors, standards, norms and nativeness in English for research publication purposes. Journal of Second Language Writing, 42, 1-11.

McKinley, J. (2018). Integrating appraisal theory with possible selves in understanding university EFL writing. System, 78, 27-37.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2018). Japan’s English medium instruction initiatives and the globalization of higher education. Higher Education, 75(1), 111-129.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2017). The prevalence of pedagogy-related research in applied linguistics: Extending the debate. Applied Linguistics, 38(4), 599-604.

McKinley, J., & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2017). Doing Research in Applied Linguistics: Realities, Dilemmas and Solutions. Routledge.

McKinley, J. (2015). Critical argument and writer identity: Social constructivism as a theoretical framework for EFL academic writing. Critical Inquiry in Language Studies, 12(3), 184-207.

 

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Sarah is a Research Assistant at the Department of Education working with Professor Charles Hulme and Dr Gillian West.

Sarah completed her MSc in Social Cognition: Research and Applications at UCL. Her dissertation project was supervised by Dr Anne Schlottmann and investigated the development of a sense of fairness in children aged 4 to 7 years.

She is currently assisting on the Nuffield Early Language Intervention (NELI) trial for Reception children, working directly with schools as well as supporting the development and delivery of professional online training courses for school staff.

Andrew is currently working on the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools and will primarily be carrying out qualitative analysis of teacher interview data from schools who have had attachment and trauma training and a systematic review of recent literature.

Andrew has a background as a teacher and senior leader in a special school, and as a teacher trainer, particularly focused around inclusive education. Andrew’s area of research interest is around the influence of young people’s adoptive identity on educational experience and outcomes. Andrew’s research has included analysis of data from a range of sources including the Wales Adoption Cohort Study and Understanding Society, he is currently completing his doctoral thesis at Cardiff University.

 

Publications

Brown, A., Waters, C. S., & Shelton, K. H. (2017). A systematic review of the school performance and behavioural and emotional adjustments of children adopted from care. Adoption & Fostering, 41(4), 346-368.

Brown, A., Waters, C. S., & Shelton, K. H. (2019). The educational aspirations and psychological well-being of adopted young people in the UK. Adoption & Fostering, 43(1), 46-59.

Adam is a researcher in the Department’s Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance. He is currently a co-investigator on the ‘Unlocking the potential of AI for English law’ project.

This project is funded by the Industrial Strategy Challenge Fund’s (ICSF) Next Generation Services Research Programme and UK Research and Innovation (UKRI), run by researchers in the Oxford departments and faculties of Law, Economics, Computer Science, Education and the Said Business School, in 2019 and 2020.

Pinar is a post-doctoral researcher within the Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project at the Department of Education. As part of the wider team, Pinar is currently investigating the aspects of learning apps that support joint media engagement between parents and children and creative learning in early and middle childhood. Pinar is also contributing to a development of a game-based language intervention focused on the vocabulary acquisition of emerging bilingual and monolingual children in England.

Before joining the team, Pinar was a doctoral student and a researcher at the Department of Education. Supervised by Prof. Edward Melhuish, her thesis examined the factors contributing to bilingual language and identity development of ethnic minority children growing up in first generation immigrant households in the UK. During her doctoral studies, Pinar took up two significant research roles at the Department.  She coordinated a survey research including 300 Turkish families in the UK and led a qualitative study on the cultural experiences of ethnic minority children in England. Before joining the team, Pinar collaborated with a group of researchers at the Department for a report to the Pro-Vice-Chancellor of the University on a new education policy aiming to establish university-sponsored specialist schools in England.

Publications

Kolancali, P. (submitted for publication). The Effects of Immigration on the Language and Literacy Practices of Turkish Parents in England. Journal of Family Issues.

Broekhuizen, M. L., Guerra, R. & Kolancali, P. (in preparation). Acculturation orientations of Turkish immigrant parents across Europe. Journal of Social Issues. This paper is prepared at the request of the Journal of Social Issues for a special issue.

Baird, J., Kolancali, P., Melhuish, E., Mutton, T., Sammons, P., Skilling, K., & Stylianides, G. Specialist Mathematics Schools in England: A Review and Implications for Oxford. This paper was prepared at the request of Professor Martin Williams, Pro Vice-Chancellor (Education) at the University of Oxford, by a Working Group established at the Department of Education.

Kolancali, P. (2019) Factors related to bilingual language skills of Turkish-English Speaking Children. In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 55-70. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Kolancali, P., & Melhuish, E. (2019). How do home and school experiences of Turkish children in the UK interact with their language attitudes and preferences? In G. Pastori, V. Pagani, & A. S. Sarcinelli (Eds.) Children’s Views on Inclusion at School. ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.4. pp 76-83. https://staging-isotis-pw.framework.pt/site/assets/files/1191/d2_4_technical-report-on-the-child-interview-study.pdf

Kolancali, P., & Melhuish, E. (2019) How do family characteristics and migration shape the home learning environment of Turkish children in the UK? In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 98-102. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Broekhuizen, M. L., Guerra, R. & Kolancali, P. (2019) Acculturation orientations, intergroup relations and well-being of Turkish and Maghrebian immigrant parents across Europe (Integrative Report D2.5). In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 122-127. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Jim McKinley is an associate professor of Applied Linguistics in Higher Education at UCL Institute of Education, and a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He has been an associate of the EMI Oxford research group since arriving in the UK in 2016. Originally from the US, he later taught and studied in Australia and New Zealand, and also taught for many years on Japan’s oldest EMI program at Sophia University (2005-2016).

At Oxford, Jim regularly collaborates with Dr. Heath Rose as well as Prof. Victoria Murphy, has published with several DPhil students, and supervises dissertations on the MSc ALSLA and MSc ALLT programs.

Jim’s research mainly explores implications of globalisation for L2 writing, language education, and teaching in higher education. As principal investigator on the British Academy-funded project ‘Exploring the teaching-research nexus in higher education’ (2018), he continues to research and publish on the bifurcation of teaching and research in higher education and TESOL in the UK and internationally. Jim is a co-editor-in-chief of the journal System and series co-editor (with Dr Heath Rose) of Cambridge Elements: Language Teaching.

For further information, visit www.researchgate.net/profile/Jim-Mckinley.

 

Publications

Rose, H., McKinley, J., & Galloway, N. (2020). Global Englishes and Language Teaching: A systematic review of pedagogical research. Language Teaching. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0261444820000518

McKinley, J., McIntosh, S., Milligan, L. O., Mikolajewska, A. (2020). Eyes on the enterprise: Problematising the concept of a teaching-research nexus in UK higher education. Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00595-2

Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2020). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2020). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics. Routledge.

Rose, H., McKinley, J. & Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J. (2020). Data Collection in Applied Linguistics Research. Bloomsbury.

Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J., & McKinley, J. (2019). Language and the development of intercultural competence in an ‘internationalised’ university: Staff and student perspectives. Teaching in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/13562517.2019.1686698

McIntosh, S. McKinley, J., Milligan, L., & Mikolajewska, A. (2019). Whose values? Whose time? Issues of (in)visibility in academic practice in UK universities. Studies in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1637846

McKinley, J. (2019). Evolving the teaching-research nexus. TESOL Quarterly, 53(3), 875-884.

McKinley, J., Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J. (2019). Developing intercultural competence in the third space: postgraduate studies in the UK. Language and Intercultural Communication, 19(1), 9-22.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (2018). Conceptualizations of language errors, standards, norms and nativeness in English for research publication purposes. Journal of Second Language Writing, 42, 1-11.

McKinley, J. (2018). Integrating appraisal theory with possible selves in understanding university EFL writing. System, 78, 27-37.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2018). Japan’s English medium instruction initiatives and the globalization of higher education. Higher Education, 75(1), 111-129.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2017). The prevalence of pedagogy-related research in applied linguistics: Extending the debate. Applied Linguistics, 38(4), 599-604.

McKinley, J., & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2017). Doing Research in Applied Linguistics: Realities, Dilemmas and Solutions. Routledge.

McKinley, J. (2015). Critical argument and writer identity: Social constructivism as a theoretical framework for EFL academic writing. Critical Inquiry in Language Studies, 12(3), 184-207.

 

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Sarah is a Research Assistant at the Department of Education working with Professor Charles Hulme and Dr Gillian West.

Sarah completed her MSc in Social Cognition: Research and Applications at UCL. Her dissertation project was supervised by Dr Anne Schlottmann and investigated the development of a sense of fairness in children aged 4 to 7 years.

She is currently assisting on the Nuffield Early Language Intervention (NELI) trial for Reception children, working directly with schools as well as supporting the development and delivery of professional online training courses for school staff.

Andrew is currently working on the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools and will primarily be carrying out qualitative analysis of teacher interview data from schools who have had attachment and trauma training and a systematic review of recent literature.

Andrew has a background as a teacher and senior leader in a special school, and as a teacher trainer, particularly focused around inclusive education. Andrew’s area of research interest is around the influence of young people’s adoptive identity on educational experience and outcomes. Andrew’s research has included analysis of data from a range of sources including the Wales Adoption Cohort Study and Understanding Society, he is currently completing his doctoral thesis at Cardiff University.

 

Publications

Brown, A., Waters, C. S., & Shelton, K. H. (2017). A systematic review of the school performance and behavioural and emotional adjustments of children adopted from care. Adoption & Fostering, 41(4), 346-368.

Brown, A., Waters, C. S., & Shelton, K. H. (2019). The educational aspirations and psychological well-being of adopted young people in the UK. Adoption & Fostering, 43(1), 46-59.

Adam is a researcher in the Department’s Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance. He is currently a co-investigator on the ‘Unlocking the potential of AI for English law’ project.

This project is funded by the Industrial Strategy Challenge Fund’s (ICSF) Next Generation Services Research Programme and UK Research and Innovation (UKRI), run by researchers in the Oxford departments and faculties of Law, Economics, Computer Science, Education and the Said Business School, in 2019 and 2020.

Pinar is a post-doctoral researcher within the Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project at the Department of Education. As part of the wider team, Pinar is currently investigating the aspects of learning apps that support joint media engagement between parents and children and creative learning in early and middle childhood. Pinar is also contributing to a development of a game-based language intervention focused on the vocabulary acquisition of emerging bilingual and monolingual children in England.

Before joining the team, Pinar was a doctoral student and a researcher at the Department of Education. Supervised by Prof. Edward Melhuish, her thesis examined the factors contributing to bilingual language and identity development of ethnic minority children growing up in first generation immigrant households in the UK. During her doctoral studies, Pinar took up two significant research roles at the Department.  She coordinated a survey research including 300 Turkish families in the UK and led a qualitative study on the cultural experiences of ethnic minority children in England. Before joining the team, Pinar collaborated with a group of researchers at the Department for a report to the Pro-Vice-Chancellor of the University on a new education policy aiming to establish university-sponsored specialist schools in England.

Publications

Kolancali, P. (submitted for publication). The Effects of Immigration on the Language and Literacy Practices of Turkish Parents in England. Journal of Family Issues.

Broekhuizen, M. L., Guerra, R. & Kolancali, P. (in preparation). Acculturation orientations of Turkish immigrant parents across Europe. Journal of Social Issues. This paper is prepared at the request of the Journal of Social Issues for a special issue.

Baird, J., Kolancali, P., Melhuish, E., Mutton, T., Sammons, P., Skilling, K., & Stylianides, G. Specialist Mathematics Schools in England: A Review and Implications for Oxford. This paper was prepared at the request of Professor Martin Williams, Pro Vice-Chancellor (Education) at the University of Oxford, by a Working Group established at the Department of Education.

Kolancali, P. (2019) Factors related to bilingual language skills of Turkish-English Speaking Children. In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 55-70. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Kolancali, P., & Melhuish, E. (2019). How do home and school experiences of Turkish children in the UK interact with their language attitudes and preferences? In G. Pastori, V. Pagani, & A. S. Sarcinelli (Eds.) Children’s Views on Inclusion at School. ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.4. pp 76-83. https://staging-isotis-pw.framework.pt/site/assets/files/1191/d2_4_technical-report-on-the-child-interview-study.pdf

Kolancali, P., & Melhuish, E. (2019) How do family characteristics and migration shape the home learning environment of Turkish children in the UK? In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 98-102. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Broekhuizen, M. L., Guerra, R. & Kolancali, P. (2019) Acculturation orientations, intergroup relations and well-being of Turkish and Maghrebian immigrant parents across Europe (Integrative Report D2.5). In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 122-127. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Jim McKinley is an associate professor of Applied Linguistics in Higher Education at UCL Institute of Education, and a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He has been an associate of the EMI Oxford research group since arriving in the UK in 2016. Originally from the US, he later taught and studied in Australia and New Zealand, and also taught for many years on Japan’s oldest EMI program at Sophia University (2005-2016).

At Oxford, Jim regularly collaborates with Dr. Heath Rose as well as Prof. Victoria Murphy, has published with several DPhil students, and supervises dissertations on the MSc ALSLA and MSc ALLT programs.

Jim’s research mainly explores implications of globalisation for L2 writing, language education, and teaching in higher education. As principal investigator on the British Academy-funded project ‘Exploring the teaching-research nexus in higher education’ (2018), he continues to research and publish on the bifurcation of teaching and research in higher education and TESOL in the UK and internationally. Jim is a co-editor-in-chief of the journal System and series co-editor (with Dr Heath Rose) of Cambridge Elements: Language Teaching.

For further information, visit www.researchgate.net/profile/Jim-Mckinley.

 

Publications

Rose, H., McKinley, J., & Galloway, N. (2020). Global Englishes and Language Teaching: A systematic review of pedagogical research. Language Teaching. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0261444820000518

McKinley, J., McIntosh, S., Milligan, L. O., Mikolajewska, A. (2020). Eyes on the enterprise: Problematising the concept of a teaching-research nexus in UK higher education. Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00595-2

Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2020). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2020). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics. Routledge.

Rose, H., McKinley, J. & Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J. (2020). Data Collection in Applied Linguistics Research. Bloomsbury.

Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J., & McKinley, J. (2019). Language and the development of intercultural competence in an ‘internationalised’ university: Staff and student perspectives. Teaching in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/13562517.2019.1686698

McIntosh, S. McKinley, J., Milligan, L., & Mikolajewska, A. (2019). Whose values? Whose time? Issues of (in)visibility in academic practice in UK universities. Studies in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1637846

McKinley, J. (2019). Evolving the teaching-research nexus. TESOL Quarterly, 53(3), 875-884.

McKinley, J., Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J. (2019). Developing intercultural competence in the third space: postgraduate studies in the UK. Language and Intercultural Communication, 19(1), 9-22.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (2018). Conceptualizations of language errors, standards, norms and nativeness in English for research publication purposes. Journal of Second Language Writing, 42, 1-11.

McKinley, J. (2018). Integrating appraisal theory with possible selves in understanding university EFL writing. System, 78, 27-37.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2018). Japan’s English medium instruction initiatives and the globalization of higher education. Higher Education, 75(1), 111-129.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2017). The prevalence of pedagogy-related research in applied linguistics: Extending the debate. Applied Linguistics, 38(4), 599-604.

McKinley, J., & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2017). Doing Research in Applied Linguistics: Realities, Dilemmas and Solutions. Routledge.

McKinley, J. (2015). Critical argument and writer identity: Social constructivism as a theoretical framework for EFL academic writing. Critical Inquiry in Language Studies, 12(3), 184-207.

 

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Sarah is a Research Assistant at the Department of Education working with Professor Charles Hulme and Dr Gillian West.

Sarah completed her MSc in Social Cognition: Research and Applications at UCL. Her dissertation project was supervised by Dr Anne Schlottmann and investigated the development of a sense of fairness in children aged 4 to 7 years.

She is currently assisting on the Nuffield Early Language Intervention (NELI) trial for Reception children, working directly with schools as well as supporting the development and delivery of professional online training courses for school staff.

Andrew is currently working on the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools and will primarily be carrying out qualitative analysis of teacher interview data from schools who have had attachment and trauma training and a systematic review of recent literature.

Andrew has a background as a teacher and senior leader in a special school, and as a teacher trainer, particularly focused around inclusive education. Andrew’s area of research interest is around the influence of young people’s adoptive identity on educational experience and outcomes. Andrew’s research has included analysis of data from a range of sources including the Wales Adoption Cohort Study and Understanding Society, he is currently completing his doctoral thesis at Cardiff University.

 

Publications

Brown, A., Waters, C. S., & Shelton, K. H. (2017). A systematic review of the school performance and behavioural and emotional adjustments of children adopted from care. Adoption & Fostering, 41(4), 346-368.

Brown, A., Waters, C. S., & Shelton, K. H. (2019). The educational aspirations and psychological well-being of adopted young people in the UK. Adoption & Fostering, 43(1), 46-59.

Adam is a researcher in the Department’s Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance. He is currently a co-investigator on the ‘Unlocking the potential of AI for English law’ project.

This project is funded by the Industrial Strategy Challenge Fund’s (ICSF) Next Generation Services Research Programme and UK Research and Innovation (UKRI), run by researchers in the Oxford departments and faculties of Law, Economics, Computer Science, Education and the Said Business School, in 2019 and 2020.

Pinar is a post-doctoral researcher within the Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project at the Department of Education. As part of the wider team, Pinar is currently investigating the aspects of learning apps that support joint media engagement between parents and children and creative learning in early and middle childhood. Pinar is also contributing to a development of a game-based language intervention focused on the vocabulary acquisition of emerging bilingual and monolingual children in England.

Before joining the team, Pinar was a doctoral student and a researcher at the Department of Education. Supervised by Prof. Edward Melhuish, her thesis examined the factors contributing to bilingual language and identity development of ethnic minority children growing up in first generation immigrant households in the UK. During her doctoral studies, Pinar took up two significant research roles at the Department.  She coordinated a survey research including 300 Turkish families in the UK and led a qualitative study on the cultural experiences of ethnic minority children in England. Before joining the team, Pinar collaborated with a group of researchers at the Department for a report to the Pro-Vice-Chancellor of the University on a new education policy aiming to establish university-sponsored specialist schools in England.

Publications

Kolancali, P. (submitted for publication). The Effects of Immigration on the Language and Literacy Practices of Turkish Parents in England. Journal of Family Issues.

Broekhuizen, M. L., Guerra, R. & Kolancali, P. (in preparation). Acculturation orientations of Turkish immigrant parents across Europe. Journal of Social Issues. This paper is prepared at the request of the Journal of Social Issues for a special issue.

Baird, J., Kolancali, P., Melhuish, E., Mutton, T., Sammons, P., Skilling, K., & Stylianides, G. Specialist Mathematics Schools in England: A Review and Implications for Oxford. This paper was prepared at the request of Professor Martin Williams, Pro Vice-Chancellor (Education) at the University of Oxford, by a Working Group established at the Department of Education.

Kolancali, P. (2019) Factors related to bilingual language skills of Turkish-English Speaking Children. In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 55-70. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Kolancali, P., & Melhuish, E. (2019). How do home and school experiences of Turkish children in the UK interact with their language attitudes and preferences? In G. Pastori, V. Pagani, & A. S. Sarcinelli (Eds.) Children’s Views on Inclusion at School. ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.4. pp 76-83. https://staging-isotis-pw.framework.pt/site/assets/files/1191/d2_4_technical-report-on-the-child-interview-study.pdf

Kolancali, P., & Melhuish, E. (2019) How do family characteristics and migration shape the home learning environment of Turkish children in the UK? In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 98-102. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Broekhuizen, M. L., Guerra, R. & Kolancali, P. (2019) Acculturation orientations, intergroup relations and well-being of Turkish and Maghrebian immigrant parents across Europe (Integrative Report D2.5). In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 122-127. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Jim McKinley is an associate professor of Applied Linguistics in Higher Education at UCL Institute of Education, and a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He has been an associate of the EMI Oxford research group since arriving in the UK in 2016. Originally from the US, he later taught and studied in Australia and New Zealand, and also taught for many years on Japan’s oldest EMI program at Sophia University (2005-2016).

At Oxford, Jim regularly collaborates with Dr. Heath Rose as well as Prof. Victoria Murphy, has published with several DPhil students, and supervises dissertations on the MSc ALSLA and MSc ALLT programs.

Jim’s research mainly explores implications of globalisation for L2 writing, language education, and teaching in higher education. As principal investigator on the British Academy-funded project ‘Exploring the teaching-research nexus in higher education’ (2018), he continues to research and publish on the bifurcation of teaching and research in higher education and TESOL in the UK and internationally. Jim is a co-editor-in-chief of the journal System and series co-editor (with Dr Heath Rose) of Cambridge Elements: Language Teaching.

For further information, visit www.researchgate.net/profile/Jim-Mckinley.

 

Publications

Rose, H., McKinley, J., & Galloway, N. (2020). Global Englishes and Language Teaching: A systematic review of pedagogical research. Language Teaching. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0261444820000518

McKinley, J., McIntosh, S., Milligan, L. O., Mikolajewska, A. (2020). Eyes on the enterprise: Problematising the concept of a teaching-research nexus in UK higher education. Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00595-2

Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2020). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2020). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics. Routledge.

Rose, H., McKinley, J. & Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J. (2020). Data Collection in Applied Linguistics Research. Bloomsbury.

Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J., & McKinley, J. (2019). Language and the development of intercultural competence in an ‘internationalised’ university: Staff and student perspectives. Teaching in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/13562517.2019.1686698

McIntosh, S. McKinley, J., Milligan, L., & Mikolajewska, A. (2019). Whose values? Whose time? Issues of (in)visibility in academic practice in UK universities. Studies in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1637846

McKinley, J. (2019). Evolving the teaching-research nexus. TESOL Quarterly, 53(3), 875-884.

McKinley, J., Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J. (2019). Developing intercultural competence in the third space: postgraduate studies in the UK. Language and Intercultural Communication, 19(1), 9-22.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (2018). Conceptualizations of language errors, standards, norms and nativeness in English for research publication purposes. Journal of Second Language Writing, 42, 1-11.

McKinley, J. (2018). Integrating appraisal theory with possible selves in understanding university EFL writing. System, 78, 27-37.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2018). Japan’s English medium instruction initiatives and the globalization of higher education. Higher Education, 75(1), 111-129.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2017). The prevalence of pedagogy-related research in applied linguistics: Extending the debate. Applied Linguistics, 38(4), 599-604.

McKinley, J., & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2017). Doing Research in Applied Linguistics: Realities, Dilemmas and Solutions. Routledge.

McKinley, J. (2015). Critical argument and writer identity: Social constructivism as a theoretical framework for EFL academic writing. Critical Inquiry in Language Studies, 12(3), 184-207.

 

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Sarah is a Research Assistant at the Department of Education working with Professor Charles Hulme and Dr Gillian West.

Sarah completed her MSc in Social Cognition: Research and Applications at UCL. Her dissertation project was supervised by Dr Anne Schlottmann and investigated the development of a sense of fairness in children aged 4 to 7 years.

She is currently assisting on the Nuffield Early Language Intervention (NELI) trial for Reception children, working directly with schools as well as supporting the development and delivery of professional online training courses for school staff.

Andrew is currently working on the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools and will primarily be carrying out qualitative analysis of teacher interview data from schools who have had attachment and trauma training and a systematic review of recent literature.

Andrew has a background as a teacher and senior leader in a special school, and as a teacher trainer, particularly focused around inclusive education. Andrew’s area of research interest is around the influence of young people’s adoptive identity on educational experience and outcomes. Andrew’s research has included analysis of data from a range of sources including the Wales Adoption Cohort Study and Understanding Society, he is currently completing his doctoral thesis at Cardiff University.

 

Publications

Brown, A., Waters, C. S., & Shelton, K. H. (2017). A systematic review of the school performance and behavioural and emotional adjustments of children adopted from care. Adoption & Fostering, 41(4), 346-368.

Brown, A., Waters, C. S., & Shelton, K. H. (2019). The educational aspirations and psychological well-being of adopted young people in the UK. Adoption & Fostering, 43(1), 46-59.

Adam is a researcher in the Department’s Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance. He is currently a co-investigator on the ‘Unlocking the potential of AI for English law’ project.

This project is funded by the Industrial Strategy Challenge Fund’s (ICSF) Next Generation Services Research Programme and UK Research and Innovation (UKRI), run by researchers in the Oxford departments and faculties of Law, Economics, Computer Science, Education and the Said Business School, in 2019 and 2020.

Pinar is a post-doctoral researcher within the Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project at the Department of Education. As part of the wider team, Pinar is currently investigating the aspects of learning apps that support joint media engagement between parents and children and creative learning in early and middle childhood. Pinar is also contributing to a development of a game-based language intervention focused on the vocabulary acquisition of emerging bilingual and monolingual children in England.

Before joining the team, Pinar was a doctoral student and a researcher at the Department of Education. Supervised by Prof. Edward Melhuish, her thesis examined the factors contributing to bilingual language and identity development of ethnic minority children growing up in first generation immigrant households in the UK. During her doctoral studies, Pinar took up two significant research roles at the Department.  She coordinated a survey research including 300 Turkish families in the UK and led a qualitative study on the cultural experiences of ethnic minority children in England. Before joining the team, Pinar collaborated with a group of researchers at the Department for a report to the Pro-Vice-Chancellor of the University on a new education policy aiming to establish university-sponsored specialist schools in England.

Publications

Kolancali, P. (submitted for publication). The Effects of Immigration on the Language and Literacy Practices of Turkish Parents in England. Journal of Family Issues.

Broekhuizen, M. L., Guerra, R. & Kolancali, P. (in preparation). Acculturation orientations of Turkish immigrant parents across Europe. Journal of Social Issues. This paper is prepared at the request of the Journal of Social Issues for a special issue.

Baird, J., Kolancali, P., Melhuish, E., Mutton, T., Sammons, P., Skilling, K., & Stylianides, G. Specialist Mathematics Schools in England: A Review and Implications for Oxford. This paper was prepared at the request of Professor Martin Williams, Pro Vice-Chancellor (Education) at the University of Oxford, by a Working Group established at the Department of Education.

Kolancali, P. (2019) Factors related to bilingual language skills of Turkish-English Speaking Children. In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 55-70. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Kolancali, P., & Melhuish, E. (2019). How do home and school experiences of Turkish children in the UK interact with their language attitudes and preferences? In G. Pastori, V. Pagani, & A. S. Sarcinelli (Eds.) Children’s Views on Inclusion at School. ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.4. pp 76-83. https://staging-isotis-pw.framework.pt/site/assets/files/1191/d2_4_technical-report-on-the-child-interview-study.pdf

Kolancali, P., & Melhuish, E. (2019) How do family characteristics and migration shape the home learning environment of Turkish children in the UK? In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 98-102. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Broekhuizen, M. L., Guerra, R. & Kolancali, P. (2019) Acculturation orientations, intergroup relations and well-being of Turkish and Maghrebian immigrant parents across Europe (Integrative Report D2.5). In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 122-127. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Jim McKinley is an associate professor of Applied Linguistics in Higher Education at UCL Institute of Education, and a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He has been an associate of the EMI Oxford research group since arriving in the UK in 2016. Originally from the US, he later taught and studied in Australia and New Zealand, and also taught for many years on Japan’s oldest EMI program at Sophia University (2005-2016).

At Oxford, Jim regularly collaborates with Dr. Heath Rose as well as Prof. Victoria Murphy, has published with several DPhil students, and supervises dissertations on the MSc ALSLA and MSc ALLT programs.

Jim’s research mainly explores implications of globalisation for L2 writing, language education, and teaching in higher education. As principal investigator on the British Academy-funded project ‘Exploring the teaching-research nexus in higher education’ (2018), he continues to research and publish on the bifurcation of teaching and research in higher education and TESOL in the UK and internationally. Jim is a co-editor-in-chief of the journal System and series co-editor (with Dr Heath Rose) of Cambridge Elements: Language Teaching.

For further information, visit www.researchgate.net/profile/Jim-Mckinley.

 

Publications

Rose, H., McKinley, J., & Galloway, N. (2020). Global Englishes and Language Teaching: A systematic review of pedagogical research. Language Teaching. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0261444820000518

McKinley, J., McIntosh, S., Milligan, L. O., Mikolajewska, A. (2020). Eyes on the enterprise: Problematising the concept of a teaching-research nexus in UK higher education. Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00595-2

Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2020). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2020). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics. Routledge.

Rose, H., McKinley, J. & Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J. (2020). Data Collection in Applied Linguistics Research. Bloomsbury.

Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J., & McKinley, J. (2019). Language and the development of intercultural competence in an ‘internationalised’ university: Staff and student perspectives. Teaching in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/13562517.2019.1686698

McIntosh, S. McKinley, J., Milligan, L., & Mikolajewska, A. (2019). Whose values? Whose time? Issues of (in)visibility in academic practice in UK universities. Studies in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1637846

McKinley, J. (2019). Evolving the teaching-research nexus. TESOL Quarterly, 53(3), 875-884.

McKinley, J., Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J. (2019). Developing intercultural competence in the third space: postgraduate studies in the UK. Language and Intercultural Communication, 19(1), 9-22.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (2018). Conceptualizations of language errors, standards, norms and nativeness in English for research publication purposes. Journal of Second Language Writing, 42, 1-11.

McKinley, J. (2018). Integrating appraisal theory with possible selves in understanding university EFL writing. System, 78, 27-37.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2018). Japan’s English medium instruction initiatives and the globalization of higher education. Higher Education, 75(1), 111-129.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2017). The prevalence of pedagogy-related research in applied linguistics: Extending the debate. Applied Linguistics, 38(4), 599-604.

McKinley, J., & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2017). Doing Research in Applied Linguistics: Realities, Dilemmas and Solutions. Routledge.

McKinley, J. (2015). Critical argument and writer identity: Social constructivism as a theoretical framework for EFL academic writing. Critical Inquiry in Language Studies, 12(3), 184-207.

 

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Sarah is a Research Assistant at the Department of Education working with Professor Charles Hulme and Dr Gillian West.

Sarah completed her MSc in Social Cognition: Research and Applications at UCL. Her dissertation project was supervised by Dr Anne Schlottmann and investigated the development of a sense of fairness in children aged 4 to 7 years.

She is currently assisting on the Nuffield Early Language Intervention (NELI) trial for Reception children, working directly with schools as well as supporting the development and delivery of professional online training courses for school staff.

Andrew is currently working on the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools and will primarily be carrying out qualitative analysis of teacher interview data from schools who have had attachment and trauma training and a systematic review of recent literature.

Andrew has a background as a teacher and senior leader in a special school, and as a teacher trainer, particularly focused around inclusive education. Andrew’s area of research interest is around the influence of young people’s adoptive identity on educational experience and outcomes. Andrew’s research has included analysis of data from a range of sources including the Wales Adoption Cohort Study and Understanding Society, he is currently completing his doctoral thesis at Cardiff University.

 

Publications

Brown, A., Waters, C. S., & Shelton, K. H. (2017). A systematic review of the school performance and behavioural and emotional adjustments of children adopted from care. Adoption & Fostering, 41(4), 346-368.

Brown, A., Waters, C. S., & Shelton, K. H. (2019). The educational aspirations and psychological well-being of adopted young people in the UK. Adoption & Fostering, 43(1), 46-59.

Adam is a researcher in the Department’s Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance. He is currently a co-investigator on the ‘Unlocking the potential of AI for English law’ project.

This project is funded by the Industrial Strategy Challenge Fund’s (ICSF) Next Generation Services Research Programme and UK Research and Innovation (UKRI), run by researchers in the Oxford departments and faculties of Law, Economics, Computer Science, Education and the Said Business School, in 2019 and 2020.

Pinar is a post-doctoral researcher within the Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project at the Department of Education. As part of the wider team, Pinar is currently investigating the aspects of learning apps that support joint media engagement between parents and children and creative learning in early and middle childhood. Pinar is also contributing to a development of a game-based language intervention focused on the vocabulary acquisition of emerging bilingual and monolingual children in England.

Before joining the team, Pinar was a doctoral student and a researcher at the Department of Education. Supervised by Prof. Edward Melhuish, her thesis examined the factors contributing to bilingual language and identity development of ethnic minority children growing up in first generation immigrant households in the UK. During her doctoral studies, Pinar took up two significant research roles at the Department.  She coordinated a survey research including 300 Turkish families in the UK and led a qualitative study on the cultural experiences of ethnic minority children in England. Before joining the team, Pinar collaborated with a group of researchers at the Department for a report to the Pro-Vice-Chancellor of the University on a new education policy aiming to establish university-sponsored specialist schools in England.

Publications

Kolancali, P. (submitted for publication). The Effects of Immigration on the Language and Literacy Practices of Turkish Parents in England. Journal of Family Issues.

Broekhuizen, M. L., Guerra, R. & Kolancali, P. (in preparation). Acculturation orientations of Turkish immigrant parents across Europe. Journal of Social Issues. This paper is prepared at the request of the Journal of Social Issues for a special issue.

Baird, J., Kolancali, P., Melhuish, E., Mutton, T., Sammons, P., Skilling, K., & Stylianides, G. Specialist Mathematics Schools in England: A Review and Implications for Oxford. This paper was prepared at the request of Professor Martin Williams, Pro Vice-Chancellor (Education) at the University of Oxford, by a Working Group established at the Department of Education.

Kolancali, P. (2019) Factors related to bilingual language skills of Turkish-English Speaking Children. In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 55-70. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Kolancali, P., & Melhuish, E. (2019). How do home and school experiences of Turkish children in the UK interact with their language attitudes and preferences? In G. Pastori, V. Pagani, & A. S. Sarcinelli (Eds.) Children’s Views on Inclusion at School. ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.4. pp 76-83. https://staging-isotis-pw.framework.pt/site/assets/files/1191/d2_4_technical-report-on-the-child-interview-study.pdf

Kolancali, P., & Melhuish, E. (2019) How do family characteristics and migration shape the home learning environment of Turkish children in the UK? In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 98-102. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Broekhuizen, M. L., Guerra, R. & Kolancali, P. (2019) Acculturation orientations, intergroup relations and well-being of Turkish and Maghrebian immigrant parents across Europe (Integrative Report D2.5). In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 122-127. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Jim McKinley is an associate professor of Applied Linguistics in Higher Education at UCL Institute of Education, and a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He has been an associate of the EMI Oxford research group since arriving in the UK in 2016. Originally from the US, he later taught and studied in Australia and New Zealand, and also taught for many years on Japan’s oldest EMI program at Sophia University (2005-2016).

At Oxford, Jim regularly collaborates with Dr. Heath Rose as well as Prof. Victoria Murphy, has published with several DPhil students, and supervises dissertations on the MSc ALSLA and MSc ALLT programs.

Jim’s research mainly explores implications of globalisation for L2 writing, language education, and teaching in higher education. As principal investigator on the British Academy-funded project ‘Exploring the teaching-research nexus in higher education’ (2018), he continues to research and publish on the bifurcation of teaching and research in higher education and TESOL in the UK and internationally. Jim is a co-editor-in-chief of the journal System and series co-editor (with Dr Heath Rose) of Cambridge Elements: Language Teaching.

For further information, visit www.researchgate.net/profile/Jim-Mckinley.

 

Publications

Rose, H., McKinley, J., & Galloway, N. (2020). Global Englishes and Language Teaching: A systematic review of pedagogical research. Language Teaching. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0261444820000518

McKinley, J., McIntosh, S., Milligan, L. O., Mikolajewska, A. (2020). Eyes on the enterprise: Problematising the concept of a teaching-research nexus in UK higher education. Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00595-2

Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2020). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2020). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics. Routledge.

Rose, H., McKinley, J. & Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J. (2020). Data Collection in Applied Linguistics Research. Bloomsbury.

Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J., & McKinley, J. (2019). Language and the development of intercultural competence in an ‘internationalised’ university: Staff and student perspectives. Teaching in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/13562517.2019.1686698

McIntosh, S. McKinley, J., Milligan, L., & Mikolajewska, A. (2019). Whose values? Whose time? Issues of (in)visibility in academic practice in UK universities. Studies in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1637846

McKinley, J. (2019). Evolving the teaching-research nexus. TESOL Quarterly, 53(3), 875-884.

McKinley, J., Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J. (2019). Developing intercultural competence in the third space: postgraduate studies in the UK. Language and Intercultural Communication, 19(1), 9-22.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (2018). Conceptualizations of language errors, standards, norms and nativeness in English for research publication purposes. Journal of Second Language Writing, 42, 1-11.

McKinley, J. (2018). Integrating appraisal theory with possible selves in understanding university EFL writing. System, 78, 27-37.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2018). Japan’s English medium instruction initiatives and the globalization of higher education. Higher Education, 75(1), 111-129.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2017). The prevalence of pedagogy-related research in applied linguistics: Extending the debate. Applied Linguistics, 38(4), 599-604.

McKinley, J., & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2017). Doing Research in Applied Linguistics: Realities, Dilemmas and Solutions. Routledge.

McKinley, J. (2015). Critical argument and writer identity: Social constructivism as a theoretical framework for EFL academic writing. Critical Inquiry in Language Studies, 12(3), 184-207.

 

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Sarah is a Research Assistant at the Department of Education working with Professor Charles Hulme and Dr Gillian West.

Sarah completed her MSc in Social Cognition: Research and Applications at UCL. Her dissertation project was supervised by Dr Anne Schlottmann and investigated the development of a sense of fairness in children aged 4 to 7 years.

She is currently assisting on the Nuffield Early Language Intervention (NELI) trial for Reception children, working directly with schools as well as supporting the development and delivery of professional online training courses for school staff.

Andrew is currently working on the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools and will primarily be carrying out qualitative analysis of teacher interview data from schools who have had attachment and trauma training and a systematic review of recent literature.

Andrew has a background as a teacher and senior leader in a special school, and as a teacher trainer, particularly focused around inclusive education. Andrew’s area of research interest is around the influence of young people’s adoptive identity on educational experience and outcomes. Andrew’s research has included analysis of data from a range of sources including the Wales Adoption Cohort Study and Understanding Society, he is currently completing his doctoral thesis at Cardiff University.

 

Publications

Brown, A., Waters, C. S., & Shelton, K. H. (2017). A systematic review of the school performance and behavioural and emotional adjustments of children adopted from care. Adoption & Fostering, 41(4), 346-368.

Brown, A., Waters, C. S., & Shelton, K. H. (2019). The educational aspirations and psychological well-being of adopted young people in the UK. Adoption & Fostering, 43(1), 46-59.

Adam is a researcher in the Department’s Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance. He is currently a co-investigator on the ‘Unlocking the potential of AI for English law’ project.

This project is funded by the Industrial Strategy Challenge Fund’s (ICSF) Next Generation Services Research Programme and UK Research and Innovation (UKRI), run by researchers in the Oxford departments and faculties of Law, Economics, Computer Science, Education and the Said Business School, in 2019 and 2020.

Pinar is a post-doctoral researcher within the Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project at the Department of Education. As part of the wider team, Pinar is currently investigating the aspects of learning apps that support joint media engagement between parents and children and creative learning in early and middle childhood. Pinar is also contributing to a development of a game-based language intervention focused on the vocabulary acquisition of emerging bilingual and monolingual children in England.

Before joining the team, Pinar was a doctoral student and a researcher at the Department of Education. Supervised by Prof. Edward Melhuish, her thesis examined the factors contributing to bilingual language and identity development of ethnic minority children growing up in first generation immigrant households in the UK. During her doctoral studies, Pinar took up two significant research roles at the Department.  She coordinated a survey research including 300 Turkish families in the UK and led a qualitative study on the cultural experiences of ethnic minority children in England. Before joining the team, Pinar collaborated with a group of researchers at the Department for a report to the Pro-Vice-Chancellor of the University on a new education policy aiming to establish university-sponsored specialist schools in England.

Publications

Kolancali, P. (submitted for publication). The Effects of Immigration on the Language and Literacy Practices of Turkish Parents in England. Journal of Family Issues.

Broekhuizen, M. L., Guerra, R. & Kolancali, P. (in preparation). Acculturation orientations of Turkish immigrant parents across Europe. Journal of Social Issues. This paper is prepared at the request of the Journal of Social Issues for a special issue.

Baird, J., Kolancali, P., Melhuish, E., Mutton, T., Sammons, P., Skilling, K., & Stylianides, G. Specialist Mathematics Schools in England: A Review and Implications for Oxford. This paper was prepared at the request of Professor Martin Williams, Pro Vice-Chancellor (Education) at the University of Oxford, by a Working Group established at the Department of Education.

Kolancali, P. (2019) Factors related to bilingual language skills of Turkish-English Speaking Children. In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 55-70. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Kolancali, P., & Melhuish, E. (2019). How do home and school experiences of Turkish children in the UK interact with their language attitudes and preferences? In G. Pastori, V. Pagani, & A. S. Sarcinelli (Eds.) Children’s Views on Inclusion at School. ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.4. pp 76-83. https://staging-isotis-pw.framework.pt/site/assets/files/1191/d2_4_technical-report-on-the-child-interview-study.pdf

Kolancali, P., & Melhuish, E. (2019) How do family characteristics and migration shape the home learning environment of Turkish children in the UK? In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 98-102. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Broekhuizen, M. L., Guerra, R. & Kolancali, P. (2019) Acculturation orientations, intergroup relations and well-being of Turkish and Maghrebian immigrant parents across Europe (Integrative Report D2.5). In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 122-127. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Jim McKinley is an associate professor of Applied Linguistics in Higher Education at UCL Institute of Education, and a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He has been an associate of the EMI Oxford research group since arriving in the UK in 2016. Originally from the US, he later taught and studied in Australia and New Zealand, and also taught for many years on Japan’s oldest EMI program at Sophia University (2005-2016).

At Oxford, Jim regularly collaborates with Dr. Heath Rose as well as Prof. Victoria Murphy, has published with several DPhil students, and supervises dissertations on the MSc ALSLA and MSc ALLT programs.

Jim’s research mainly explores implications of globalisation for L2 writing, language education, and teaching in higher education. As principal investigator on the British Academy-funded project ‘Exploring the teaching-research nexus in higher education’ (2018), he continues to research and publish on the bifurcation of teaching and research in higher education and TESOL in the UK and internationally. Jim is a co-editor-in-chief of the journal System and series co-editor (with Dr Heath Rose) of Cambridge Elements: Language Teaching.

For further information, visit www.researchgate.net/profile/Jim-Mckinley.

 

Publications

Rose, H., McKinley, J., & Galloway, N. (2020). Global Englishes and Language Teaching: A systematic review of pedagogical research. Language Teaching. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0261444820000518

McKinley, J., McIntosh, S., Milligan, L. O., Mikolajewska, A. (2020). Eyes on the enterprise: Problematising the concept of a teaching-research nexus in UK higher education. Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00595-2

Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2020). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2020). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics. Routledge.

Rose, H., McKinley, J. & Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J. (2020). Data Collection in Applied Linguistics Research. Bloomsbury.

Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J., & McKinley, J. (2019). Language and the development of intercultural competence in an ‘internationalised’ university: Staff and student perspectives. Teaching in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/13562517.2019.1686698

McIntosh, S. McKinley, J., Milligan, L., & Mikolajewska, A. (2019). Whose values? Whose time? Issues of (in)visibility in academic practice in UK universities. Studies in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1637846

McKinley, J. (2019). Evolving the teaching-research nexus. TESOL Quarterly, 53(3), 875-884.

McKinley, J., Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J. (2019). Developing intercultural competence in the third space: postgraduate studies in the UK. Language and Intercultural Communication, 19(1), 9-22.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (2018). Conceptualizations of language errors, standards, norms and nativeness in English for research publication purposes. Journal of Second Language Writing, 42, 1-11.

McKinley, J. (2018). Integrating appraisal theory with possible selves in understanding university EFL writing. System, 78, 27-37.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2018). Japan’s English medium instruction initiatives and the globalization of higher education. Higher Education, 75(1), 111-129.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2017). The prevalence of pedagogy-related research in applied linguistics: Extending the debate. Applied Linguistics, 38(4), 599-604.

McKinley, J., & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2017). Doing Research in Applied Linguistics: Realities, Dilemmas and Solutions. Routledge.

McKinley, J. (2015). Critical argument and writer identity: Social constructivism as a theoretical framework for EFL academic writing. Critical Inquiry in Language Studies, 12(3), 184-207.

 

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Sarah is a Research Assistant at the Department of Education working with Professor Charles Hulme and Dr Gillian West.

Sarah completed her MSc in Social Cognition: Research and Applications at UCL. Her dissertation project was supervised by Dr Anne Schlottmann and investigated the development of a sense of fairness in children aged 4 to 7 years.

She is currently assisting on the Nuffield Early Language Intervention (NELI) trial for Reception children, working directly with schools as well as supporting the development and delivery of professional online training courses for school staff.

Andrew is currently working on the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools and will primarily be carrying out qualitative analysis of teacher interview data from schools who have had attachment and trauma training and a systematic review of recent literature.

Andrew has a background as a teacher and senior leader in a special school, and as a teacher trainer, particularly focused around inclusive education. Andrew’s area of research interest is around the influence of young people’s adoptive identity on educational experience and outcomes. Andrew’s research has included analysis of data from a range of sources including the Wales Adoption Cohort Study and Understanding Society, he is currently completing his doctoral thesis at Cardiff University.

 

Publications

Brown, A., Waters, C. S., & Shelton, K. H. (2017). A systematic review of the school performance and behavioural and emotional adjustments of children adopted from care. Adoption & Fostering, 41(4), 346-368.

Brown, A., Waters, C. S., & Shelton, K. H. (2019). The educational aspirations and psychological well-being of adopted young people in the UK. Adoption & Fostering, 43(1), 46-59.

Adam is a researcher in the Department’s Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance. He is currently a co-investigator on the ‘Unlocking the potential of AI for English law’ project.

This project is funded by the Industrial Strategy Challenge Fund’s (ICSF) Next Generation Services Research Programme and UK Research and Innovation (UKRI), run by researchers in the Oxford departments and faculties of Law, Economics, Computer Science, Education and the Said Business School, in 2019 and 2020.

Pinar is a post-doctoral researcher within the Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project at the Department of Education. As part of the wider team, Pinar is currently investigating the aspects of learning apps that support joint media engagement between parents and children and creative learning in early and middle childhood. Pinar is also contributing to a development of a game-based language intervention focused on the vocabulary acquisition of emerging bilingual and monolingual children in England.

Before joining the team, Pinar was a doctoral student and a researcher at the Department of Education. Supervised by Prof. Edward Melhuish, her thesis examined the factors contributing to bilingual language and identity development of ethnic minority children growing up in first generation immigrant households in the UK. During her doctoral studies, Pinar took up two significant research roles at the Department.  She coordinated a survey research including 300 Turkish families in the UK and led a qualitative study on the cultural experiences of ethnic minority children in England. Before joining the team, Pinar collaborated with a group of researchers at the Department for a report to the Pro-Vice-Chancellor of the University on a new education policy aiming to establish university-sponsored specialist schools in England.

Publications

Kolancali, P. (submitted for publication). The Effects of Immigration on the Language and Literacy Practices of Turkish Parents in England. Journal of Family Issues.

Broekhuizen, M. L., Guerra, R. & Kolancali, P. (in preparation). Acculturation orientations of Turkish immigrant parents across Europe. Journal of Social Issues. This paper is prepared at the request of the Journal of Social Issues for a special issue.

Baird, J., Kolancali, P., Melhuish, E., Mutton, T., Sammons, P., Skilling, K., & Stylianides, G. Specialist Mathematics Schools in England: A Review and Implications for Oxford. This paper was prepared at the request of Professor Martin Williams, Pro Vice-Chancellor (Education) at the University of Oxford, by a Working Group established at the Department of Education.

Kolancali, P. (2019) Factors related to bilingual language skills of Turkish-English Speaking Children. In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 55-70. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Kolancali, P., & Melhuish, E. (2019). How do home and school experiences of Turkish children in the UK interact with their language attitudes and preferences? In G. Pastori, V. Pagani, & A. S. Sarcinelli (Eds.) Children’s Views on Inclusion at School. ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.4. pp 76-83. https://staging-isotis-pw.framework.pt/site/assets/files/1191/d2_4_technical-report-on-the-child-interview-study.pdf

Kolancali, P., & Melhuish, E. (2019) How do family characteristics and migration shape the home learning environment of Turkish children in the UK? In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 98-102. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Broekhuizen, M. L., Guerra, R. & Kolancali, P. (2019) Acculturation orientations, intergroup relations and well-being of Turkish and Maghrebian immigrant parents across Europe (Integrative Report D2.5). In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 122-127. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Jim McKinley is an associate professor of Applied Linguistics in Higher Education at UCL Institute of Education, and a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He has been an associate of the EMI Oxford research group since arriving in the UK in 2016. Originally from the US, he later taught and studied in Australia and New Zealand, and also taught for many years on Japan’s oldest EMI program at Sophia University (2005-2016).

At Oxford, Jim regularly collaborates with Dr. Heath Rose as well as Prof. Victoria Murphy, has published with several DPhil students, and supervises dissertations on the MSc ALSLA and MSc ALLT programs.

Jim’s research mainly explores implications of globalisation for L2 writing, language education, and teaching in higher education. As principal investigator on the British Academy-funded project ‘Exploring the teaching-research nexus in higher education’ (2018), he continues to research and publish on the bifurcation of teaching and research in higher education and TESOL in the UK and internationally. Jim is a co-editor-in-chief of the journal System and series co-editor (with Dr Heath Rose) of Cambridge Elements: Language Teaching.

For further information, visit www.researchgate.net/profile/Jim-Mckinley.

 

Publications

Rose, H., McKinley, J., & Galloway, N. (2020). Global Englishes and Language Teaching: A systematic review of pedagogical research. Language Teaching. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0261444820000518

McKinley, J., McIntosh, S., Milligan, L. O., Mikolajewska, A. (2020). Eyes on the enterprise: Problematising the concept of a teaching-research nexus in UK higher education. Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00595-2

Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2020). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2020). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics. Routledge.

Rose, H., McKinley, J. & Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J. (2020). Data Collection in Applied Linguistics Research. Bloomsbury.

Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J., & McKinley, J. (2019). Language and the development of intercultural competence in an ‘internationalised’ university: Staff and student perspectives. Teaching in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/13562517.2019.1686698

McIntosh, S. McKinley, J., Milligan, L., & Mikolajewska, A. (2019). Whose values? Whose time? Issues of (in)visibility in academic practice in UK universities. Studies in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1637846

McKinley, J. (2019). Evolving the teaching-research nexus. TESOL Quarterly, 53(3), 875-884.

McKinley, J., Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J. (2019). Developing intercultural competence in the third space: postgraduate studies in the UK. Language and Intercultural Communication, 19(1), 9-22.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (2018). Conceptualizations of language errors, standards, norms and nativeness in English for research publication purposes. Journal of Second Language Writing, 42, 1-11.

McKinley, J. (2018). Integrating appraisal theory with possible selves in understanding university EFL writing. System, 78, 27-37.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2018). Japan’s English medium instruction initiatives and the globalization of higher education. Higher Education, 75(1), 111-129.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2017). The prevalence of pedagogy-related research in applied linguistics: Extending the debate. Applied Linguistics, 38(4), 599-604.

McKinley, J., & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2017). Doing Research in Applied Linguistics: Realities, Dilemmas and Solutions. Routledge.

McKinley, J. (2015). Critical argument and writer identity: Social constructivism as a theoretical framework for EFL academic writing. Critical Inquiry in Language Studies, 12(3), 184-207.

 

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Sarah is a Research Assistant at the Department of Education working with Professor Charles Hulme and Dr Gillian West.

Sarah completed her MSc in Social Cognition: Research and Applications at UCL. Her dissertation project was supervised by Dr Anne Schlottmann and investigated the development of a sense of fairness in children aged 4 to 7 years.

She is currently assisting on the Nuffield Early Language Intervention (NELI) trial for Reception children, working directly with schools as well as supporting the development and delivery of professional online training courses for school staff.

Andrew is currently working on the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools and will primarily be carrying out qualitative analysis of teacher interview data from schools who have had attachment and trauma training and a systematic review of recent literature.

Andrew has a background as a teacher and senior leader in a special school, and as a teacher trainer, particularly focused around inclusive education. Andrew’s area of research interest is around the influence of young people’s adoptive identity on educational experience and outcomes. Andrew’s research has included analysis of data from a range of sources including the Wales Adoption Cohort Study and Understanding Society, he is currently completing his doctoral thesis at Cardiff University.

 

Publications

Brown, A., Waters, C. S., & Shelton, K. H. (2017). A systematic review of the school performance and behavioural and emotional adjustments of children adopted from care. Adoption & Fostering, 41(4), 346-368.

Brown, A., Waters, C. S., & Shelton, K. H. (2019). The educational aspirations and psychological well-being of adopted young people in the UK. Adoption & Fostering, 43(1), 46-59.

Adam is a researcher in the Department’s Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance. He is currently a co-investigator on the ‘Unlocking the potential of AI for English law’ project.

This project is funded by the Industrial Strategy Challenge Fund’s (ICSF) Next Generation Services Research Programme and UK Research and Innovation (UKRI), run by researchers in the Oxford departments and faculties of Law, Economics, Computer Science, Education and the Said Business School, in 2019 and 2020.

Pinar is a post-doctoral researcher within the Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project at the Department of Education. As part of the wider team, Pinar is currently investigating the aspects of learning apps that support joint media engagement between parents and children and creative learning in early and middle childhood. Pinar is also contributing to a development of a game-based language intervention focused on the vocabulary acquisition of emerging bilingual and monolingual children in England.

Before joining the team, Pinar was a doctoral student and a researcher at the Department of Education. Supervised by Prof. Edward Melhuish, her thesis examined the factors contributing to bilingual language and identity development of ethnic minority children growing up in first generation immigrant households in the UK. During her doctoral studies, Pinar took up two significant research roles at the Department.  She coordinated a survey research including 300 Turkish families in the UK and led a qualitative study on the cultural experiences of ethnic minority children in England. Before joining the team, Pinar collaborated with a group of researchers at the Department for a report to the Pro-Vice-Chancellor of the University on a new education policy aiming to establish university-sponsored specialist schools in England.

Publications

Kolancali, P. (submitted for publication). The Effects of Immigration on the Language and Literacy Practices of Turkish Parents in England. Journal of Family Issues.

Broekhuizen, M. L., Guerra, R. & Kolancali, P. (in preparation). Acculturation orientations of Turkish immigrant parents across Europe. Journal of Social Issues. This paper is prepared at the request of the Journal of Social Issues for a special issue.

Baird, J., Kolancali, P., Melhuish, E., Mutton, T., Sammons, P., Skilling, K., & Stylianides, G. Specialist Mathematics Schools in England: A Review and Implications for Oxford. This paper was prepared at the request of Professor Martin Williams, Pro Vice-Chancellor (Education) at the University of Oxford, by a Working Group established at the Department of Education.

Kolancali, P. (2019) Factors related to bilingual language skills of Turkish-English Speaking Children. In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 55-70. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Kolancali, P., & Melhuish, E. (2019). How do home and school experiences of Turkish children in the UK interact with their language attitudes and preferences? In G. Pastori, V. Pagani, & A. S. Sarcinelli (Eds.) Children’s Views on Inclusion at School. ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.4. pp 76-83. https://staging-isotis-pw.framework.pt/site/assets/files/1191/d2_4_technical-report-on-the-child-interview-study.pdf

Kolancali, P., & Melhuish, E. (2019) How do family characteristics and migration shape the home learning environment of Turkish children in the UK? In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 98-102. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Broekhuizen, M. L., Guerra, R. & Kolancali, P. (2019) Acculturation orientations, intergroup relations and well-being of Turkish and Maghrebian immigrant parents across Europe (Integrative Report D2.5). In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 122-127. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Jim McKinley is an associate professor of Applied Linguistics in Higher Education at UCL Institute of Education, and a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He has been an associate of the EMI Oxford research group since arriving in the UK in 2016. Originally from the US, he later taught and studied in Australia and New Zealand, and also taught for many years on Japan’s oldest EMI program at Sophia University (2005-2016).

At Oxford, Jim regularly collaborates with Dr. Heath Rose as well as Prof. Victoria Murphy, has published with several DPhil students, and supervises dissertations on the MSc ALSLA and MSc ALLT programs.

Jim’s research mainly explores implications of globalisation for L2 writing, language education, and teaching in higher education. As principal investigator on the British Academy-funded project ‘Exploring the teaching-research nexus in higher education’ (2018), he continues to research and publish on the bifurcation of teaching and research in higher education and TESOL in the UK and internationally. Jim is a co-editor-in-chief of the journal System and series co-editor (with Dr Heath Rose) of Cambridge Elements: Language Teaching.

For further information, visit www.researchgate.net/profile/Jim-Mckinley.

 

Publications

Rose, H., McKinley, J., & Galloway, N. (2020). Global Englishes and Language Teaching: A systematic review of pedagogical research. Language Teaching. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0261444820000518

McKinley, J., McIntosh, S., Milligan, L. O., Mikolajewska, A. (2020). Eyes on the enterprise: Problematising the concept of a teaching-research nexus in UK higher education. Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00595-2

Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2020). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2020). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics. Routledge.

Rose, H., McKinley, J. & Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J. (2020). Data Collection in Applied Linguistics Research. Bloomsbury.

Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J., & McKinley, J. (2019). Language and the development of intercultural competence in an ‘internationalised’ university: Staff and student perspectives. Teaching in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/13562517.2019.1686698

McIntosh, S. McKinley, J., Milligan, L., & Mikolajewska, A. (2019). Whose values? Whose time? Issues of (in)visibility in academic practice in UK universities. Studies in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1637846

McKinley, J. (2019). Evolving the teaching-research nexus. TESOL Quarterly, 53(3), 875-884.

McKinley, J., Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J. (2019). Developing intercultural competence in the third space: postgraduate studies in the UK. Language and Intercultural Communication, 19(1), 9-22.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (2018). Conceptualizations of language errors, standards, norms and nativeness in English for research publication purposes. Journal of Second Language Writing, 42, 1-11.

McKinley, J. (2018). Integrating appraisal theory with possible selves in understanding university EFL writing. System, 78, 27-37.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2018). Japan’s English medium instruction initiatives and the globalization of higher education. Higher Education, 75(1), 111-129.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2017). The prevalence of pedagogy-related research in applied linguistics: Extending the debate. Applied Linguistics, 38(4), 599-604.

McKinley, J., & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2017). Doing Research in Applied Linguistics: Realities, Dilemmas and Solutions. Routledge.

McKinley, J. (2015). Critical argument and writer identity: Social constructivism as a theoretical framework for EFL academic writing. Critical Inquiry in Language Studies, 12(3), 184-207.

 

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Sarah is a Research Assistant at the Department of Education working with Professor Charles Hulme and Dr Gillian West.

Sarah completed her MSc in Social Cognition: Research and Applications at UCL. Her dissertation project was supervised by Dr Anne Schlottmann and investigated the development of a sense of fairness in children aged 4 to 7 years.

She is currently assisting on the Nuffield Early Language Intervention (NELI) trial for Reception children, working directly with schools as well as supporting the development and delivery of professional online training courses for school staff.

Andrew is currently working on the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools and will primarily be carrying out qualitative analysis of teacher interview data from schools who have had attachment and trauma training and a systematic review of recent literature.

Andrew has a background as a teacher and senior leader in a special school, and as a teacher trainer, particularly focused around inclusive education. Andrew’s area of research interest is around the influence of young people’s adoptive identity on educational experience and outcomes. Andrew’s research has included analysis of data from a range of sources including the Wales Adoption Cohort Study and Understanding Society, he is currently completing his doctoral thesis at Cardiff University.

 

Publications

Brown, A., Waters, C. S., & Shelton, K. H. (2017). A systematic review of the school performance and behavioural and emotional adjustments of children adopted from care. Adoption & Fostering, 41(4), 346-368.

Brown, A., Waters, C. S., & Shelton, K. H. (2019). The educational aspirations and psychological well-being of adopted young people in the UK. Adoption & Fostering, 43(1), 46-59.

Adam is a researcher in the Department’s Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance. He is currently a co-investigator on the ‘Unlocking the potential of AI for English law’ project.

This project is funded by the Industrial Strategy Challenge Fund’s (ICSF) Next Generation Services Research Programme and UK Research and Innovation (UKRI), run by researchers in the Oxford departments and faculties of Law, Economics, Computer Science, Education and the Said Business School, in 2019 and 2020.

Pinar is a post-doctoral researcher within the Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project at the Department of Education. As part of the wider team, Pinar is currently investigating the aspects of learning apps that support joint media engagement between parents and children and creative learning in early and middle childhood. Pinar is also contributing to a development of a game-based language intervention focused on the vocabulary acquisition of emerging bilingual and monolingual children in England.

Before joining the team, Pinar was a doctoral student and a researcher at the Department of Education. Supervised by Prof. Edward Melhuish, her thesis examined the factors contributing to bilingual language and identity development of ethnic minority children growing up in first generation immigrant households in the UK. During her doctoral studies, Pinar took up two significant research roles at the Department.  She coordinated a survey research including 300 Turkish families in the UK and led a qualitative study on the cultural experiences of ethnic minority children in England. Before joining the team, Pinar collaborated with a group of researchers at the Department for a report to the Pro-Vice-Chancellor of the University on a new education policy aiming to establish university-sponsored specialist schools in England.

Publications

Kolancali, P. (submitted for publication). The Effects of Immigration on the Language and Literacy Practices of Turkish Parents in England. Journal of Family Issues.

Broekhuizen, M. L., Guerra, R. & Kolancali, P. (in preparation). Acculturation orientations of Turkish immigrant parents across Europe. Journal of Social Issues. This paper is prepared at the request of the Journal of Social Issues for a special issue.

Baird, J., Kolancali, P., Melhuish, E., Mutton, T., Sammons, P., Skilling, K., & Stylianides, G. Specialist Mathematics Schools in England: A Review and Implications for Oxford. This paper was prepared at the request of Professor Martin Williams, Pro Vice-Chancellor (Education) at the University of Oxford, by a Working Group established at the Department of Education.

Kolancali, P. (2019) Factors related to bilingual language skills of Turkish-English Speaking Children. In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 55-70. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Kolancali, P., & Melhuish, E. (2019). How do home and school experiences of Turkish children in the UK interact with their language attitudes and preferences? In G. Pastori, V. Pagani, & A. S. Sarcinelli (Eds.) Children’s Views on Inclusion at School. ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.4. pp 76-83. https://staging-isotis-pw.framework.pt/site/assets/files/1191/d2_4_technical-report-on-the-child-interview-study.pdf

Kolancali, P., & Melhuish, E. (2019) How do family characteristics and migration shape the home learning environment of Turkish children in the UK? In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 98-102. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Broekhuizen, M. L., Guerra, R. & Kolancali, P. (2019) Acculturation orientations, intergroup relations and well-being of Turkish and Maghrebian immigrant parents across Europe (Integrative Report D2.5). In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 122-127. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Jim McKinley is an associate professor of Applied Linguistics in Higher Education at UCL Institute of Education, and a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He has been an associate of the EMI Oxford research group since arriving in the UK in 2016. Originally from the US, he later taught and studied in Australia and New Zealand, and also taught for many years on Japan’s oldest EMI program at Sophia University (2005-2016).

At Oxford, Jim regularly collaborates with Dr. Heath Rose as well as Prof. Victoria Murphy, has published with several DPhil students, and supervises dissertations on the MSc ALSLA and MSc ALLT programs.

Jim’s research mainly explores implications of globalisation for L2 writing, language education, and teaching in higher education. As principal investigator on the British Academy-funded project ‘Exploring the teaching-research nexus in higher education’ (2018), he continues to research and publish on the bifurcation of teaching and research in higher education and TESOL in the UK and internationally. Jim is a co-editor-in-chief of the journal System and series co-editor (with Dr Heath Rose) of Cambridge Elements: Language Teaching.

For further information, visit www.researchgate.net/profile/Jim-Mckinley.

 

Publications

Rose, H., McKinley, J., & Galloway, N. (2020). Global Englishes and Language Teaching: A systematic review of pedagogical research. Language Teaching. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0261444820000518

McKinley, J., McIntosh, S., Milligan, L. O., Mikolajewska, A. (2020). Eyes on the enterprise: Problematising the concept of a teaching-research nexus in UK higher education. Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00595-2

Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2020). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2020). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics. Routledge.

Rose, H., McKinley, J. & Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J. (2020). Data Collection in Applied Linguistics Research. Bloomsbury.

Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J., & McKinley, J. (2019). Language and the development of intercultural competence in an ‘internationalised’ university: Staff and student perspectives. Teaching in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/13562517.2019.1686698

McIntosh, S. McKinley, J., Milligan, L., & Mikolajewska, A. (2019). Whose values? Whose time? Issues of (in)visibility in academic practice in UK universities. Studies in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1637846

McKinley, J. (2019). Evolving the teaching-research nexus. TESOL Quarterly, 53(3), 875-884.

McKinley, J., Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J. (2019). Developing intercultural competence in the third space: postgraduate studies in the UK. Language and Intercultural Communication, 19(1), 9-22.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (2018). Conceptualizations of language errors, standards, norms and nativeness in English for research publication purposes. Journal of Second Language Writing, 42, 1-11.

McKinley, J. (2018). Integrating appraisal theory with possible selves in understanding university EFL writing. System, 78, 27-37.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2018). Japan’s English medium instruction initiatives and the globalization of higher education. Higher Education, 75(1), 111-129.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2017). The prevalence of pedagogy-related research in applied linguistics: Extending the debate. Applied Linguistics, 38(4), 599-604.

McKinley, J., & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2017). Doing Research in Applied Linguistics: Realities, Dilemmas and Solutions. Routledge.

McKinley, J. (2015). Critical argument and writer identity: Social constructivism as a theoretical framework for EFL academic writing. Critical Inquiry in Language Studies, 12(3), 184-207.

 

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Sarah is a Research Assistant at the Department of Education working with Professor Charles Hulme and Dr Gillian West.

Sarah completed her MSc in Social Cognition: Research and Applications at UCL. Her dissertation project was supervised by Dr Anne Schlottmann and investigated the development of a sense of fairness in children aged 4 to 7 years.

She is currently assisting on the Nuffield Early Language Intervention (NELI) trial for Reception children, working directly with schools as well as supporting the development and delivery of professional online training courses for school staff.

Andrew is currently working on the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools and will primarily be carrying out qualitative analysis of teacher interview data from schools who have had attachment and trauma training and a systematic review of recent literature.

Andrew has a background as a teacher and senior leader in a special school, and as a teacher trainer, particularly focused around inclusive education. Andrew’s area of research interest is around the influence of young people’s adoptive identity on educational experience and outcomes. Andrew’s research has included analysis of data from a range of sources including the Wales Adoption Cohort Study and Understanding Society, he is currently completing his doctoral thesis at Cardiff University.

 

Publications

Brown, A., Waters, C. S., & Shelton, K. H. (2017). A systematic review of the school performance and behavioural and emotional adjustments of children adopted from care. Adoption & Fostering, 41(4), 346-368.

Brown, A., Waters, C. S., & Shelton, K. H. (2019). The educational aspirations and psychological well-being of adopted young people in the UK. Adoption & Fostering, 43(1), 46-59.

Adam is a researcher in the Department’s Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance. He is currently a co-investigator on the ‘Unlocking the potential of AI for English law’ project.

This project is funded by the Industrial Strategy Challenge Fund’s (ICSF) Next Generation Services Research Programme and UK Research and Innovation (UKRI), run by researchers in the Oxford departments and faculties of Law, Economics, Computer Science, Education and the Said Business School, in 2019 and 2020.

Pinar is a post-doctoral researcher within the Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project at the Department of Education. As part of the wider team, Pinar is currently investigating the aspects of learning apps that support joint media engagement between parents and children and creative learning in early and middle childhood. Pinar is also contributing to a development of a game-based language intervention focused on the vocabulary acquisition of emerging bilingual and monolingual children in England.

Before joining the team, Pinar was a doctoral student and a researcher at the Department of Education. Supervised by Prof. Edward Melhuish, her thesis examined the factors contributing to bilingual language and identity development of ethnic minority children growing up in first generation immigrant households in the UK. During her doctoral studies, Pinar took up two significant research roles at the Department.  She coordinated a survey research including 300 Turkish families in the UK and led a qualitative study on the cultural experiences of ethnic minority children in England. Before joining the team, Pinar collaborated with a group of researchers at the Department for a report to the Pro-Vice-Chancellor of the University on a new education policy aiming to establish university-sponsored specialist schools in England.

Publications

Kolancali, P. (submitted for publication). The Effects of Immigration on the Language and Literacy Practices of Turkish Parents in England. Journal of Family Issues.

Broekhuizen, M. L., Guerra, R. & Kolancali, P. (in preparation). Acculturation orientations of Turkish immigrant parents across Europe. Journal of Social Issues. This paper is prepared at the request of the Journal of Social Issues for a special issue.

Baird, J., Kolancali, P., Melhuish, E., Mutton, T., Sammons, P., Skilling, K., & Stylianides, G. Specialist Mathematics Schools in England: A Review and Implications for Oxford. This paper was prepared at the request of Professor Martin Williams, Pro Vice-Chancellor (Education) at the University of Oxford, by a Working Group established at the Department of Education.

Kolancali, P. (2019) Factors related to bilingual language skills of Turkish-English Speaking Children. In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 55-70. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Kolancali, P., & Melhuish, E. (2019). How do home and school experiences of Turkish children in the UK interact with their language attitudes and preferences? In G. Pastori, V. Pagani, & A. S. Sarcinelli (Eds.) Children’s Views on Inclusion at School. ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.4. pp 76-83. https://staging-isotis-pw.framework.pt/site/assets/files/1191/d2_4_technical-report-on-the-child-interview-study.pdf

Kolancali, P., & Melhuish, E. (2019) How do family characteristics and migration shape the home learning environment of Turkish children in the UK? In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 98-102. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Broekhuizen, M. L., Guerra, R. & Kolancali, P. (2019) Acculturation orientations, intergroup relations and well-being of Turkish and Maghrebian immigrant parents across Europe (Integrative Report D2.5). In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 122-127. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Jim McKinley is an associate professor of Applied Linguistics in Higher Education at UCL Institute of Education, and a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He has been an associate of the EMI Oxford research group since arriving in the UK in 2016. Originally from the US, he later taught and studied in Australia and New Zealand, and also taught for many years on Japan’s oldest EMI program at Sophia University (2005-2016).

At Oxford, Jim regularly collaborates with Dr. Heath Rose as well as Prof. Victoria Murphy, has published with several DPhil students, and supervises dissertations on the MSc ALSLA and MSc ALLT programs.

Jim’s research mainly explores implications of globalisation for L2 writing, language education, and teaching in higher education. As principal investigator on the British Academy-funded project ‘Exploring the teaching-research nexus in higher education’ (2018), he continues to research and publish on the bifurcation of teaching and research in higher education and TESOL in the UK and internationally. Jim is a co-editor-in-chief of the journal System and series co-editor (with Dr Heath Rose) of Cambridge Elements: Language Teaching.

For further information, visit www.researchgate.net/profile/Jim-Mckinley.

 

Publications

Rose, H., McKinley, J., & Galloway, N. (2020). Global Englishes and Language Teaching: A systematic review of pedagogical research. Language Teaching. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0261444820000518

McKinley, J., McIntosh, S., Milligan, L. O., Mikolajewska, A. (2020). Eyes on the enterprise: Problematising the concept of a teaching-research nexus in UK higher education. Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00595-2

Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2020). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2020). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics. Routledge.

Rose, H., McKinley, J. & Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J. (2020). Data Collection in Applied Linguistics Research. Bloomsbury.

Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J., & McKinley, J. (2019). Language and the development of intercultural competence in an ‘internationalised’ university: Staff and student perspectives. Teaching in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/13562517.2019.1686698

McIntosh, S. McKinley, J., Milligan, L., & Mikolajewska, A. (2019). Whose values? Whose time? Issues of (in)visibility in academic practice in UK universities. Studies in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1637846

McKinley, J. (2019). Evolving the teaching-research nexus. TESOL Quarterly, 53(3), 875-884.

McKinley, J., Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J. (2019). Developing intercultural competence in the third space: postgraduate studies in the UK. Language and Intercultural Communication, 19(1), 9-22.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (2018). Conceptualizations of language errors, standards, norms and nativeness in English for research publication purposes. Journal of Second Language Writing, 42, 1-11.

McKinley, J. (2018). Integrating appraisal theory with possible selves in understanding university EFL writing. System, 78, 27-37.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2018). Japan’s English medium instruction initiatives and the globalization of higher education. Higher Education, 75(1), 111-129.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2017). The prevalence of pedagogy-related research in applied linguistics: Extending the debate. Applied Linguistics, 38(4), 599-604.

McKinley, J., & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2017). Doing Research in Applied Linguistics: Realities, Dilemmas and Solutions. Routledge.

McKinley, J. (2015). Critical argument and writer identity: Social constructivism as a theoretical framework for EFL academic writing. Critical Inquiry in Language Studies, 12(3), 184-207.

 

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Sarah is a Research Assistant at the Department of Education working with Professor Charles Hulme and Dr Gillian West.

Sarah completed her MSc in Social Cognition: Research and Applications at UCL. Her dissertation project was supervised by Dr Anne Schlottmann and investigated the development of a sense of fairness in children aged 4 to 7 years.

She is currently assisting on the Nuffield Early Language Intervention (NELI) trial for Reception children, working directly with schools as well as supporting the development and delivery of professional online training courses for school staff.

Andrew is currently working on the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools and will primarily be carrying out qualitative analysis of teacher interview data from schools who have had attachment and trauma training and a systematic review of recent literature.

Andrew has a background as a teacher and senior leader in a special school, and as a teacher trainer, particularly focused around inclusive education. Andrew’s area of research interest is around the influence of young people’s adoptive identity on educational experience and outcomes. Andrew’s research has included analysis of data from a range of sources including the Wales Adoption Cohort Study and Understanding Society, he is currently completing his doctoral thesis at Cardiff University.

 

Publications

Brown, A., Waters, C. S., & Shelton, K. H. (2017). A systematic review of the school performance and behavioural and emotional adjustments of children adopted from care. Adoption & Fostering, 41(4), 346-368.

Brown, A., Waters, C. S., & Shelton, K. H. (2019). The educational aspirations and psychological well-being of adopted young people in the UK. Adoption & Fostering, 43(1), 46-59.

Adam is a researcher in the Department’s Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance. He is currently a co-investigator on the ‘Unlocking the potential of AI for English law’ project.

This project is funded by the Industrial Strategy Challenge Fund’s (ICSF) Next Generation Services Research Programme and UK Research and Innovation (UKRI), run by researchers in the Oxford departments and faculties of Law, Economics, Computer Science, Education and the Said Business School, in 2019 and 2020.

Pinar is a post-doctoral researcher within the Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project at the Department of Education. As part of the wider team, Pinar is currently investigating the aspects of learning apps that support joint media engagement between parents and children and creative learning in early and middle childhood. Pinar is also contributing to a development of a game-based language intervention focused on the vocabulary acquisition of emerging bilingual and monolingual children in England.

Before joining the team, Pinar was a doctoral student and a researcher at the Department of Education. Supervised by Prof. Edward Melhuish, her thesis examined the factors contributing to bilingual language and identity development of ethnic minority children growing up in first generation immigrant households in the UK. During her doctoral studies, Pinar took up two significant research roles at the Department.  She coordinated a survey research including 300 Turkish families in the UK and led a qualitative study on the cultural experiences of ethnic minority children in England. Before joining the team, Pinar collaborated with a group of researchers at the Department for a report to the Pro-Vice-Chancellor of the University on a new education policy aiming to establish university-sponsored specialist schools in England.

Publications

Kolancali, P. (submitted for publication). The Effects of Immigration on the Language and Literacy Practices of Turkish Parents in England. Journal of Family Issues.

Broekhuizen, M. L., Guerra, R. & Kolancali, P. (in preparation). Acculturation orientations of Turkish immigrant parents across Europe. Journal of Social Issues. This paper is prepared at the request of the Journal of Social Issues for a special issue.

Baird, J., Kolancali, P., Melhuish, E., Mutton, T., Sammons, P., Skilling, K., & Stylianides, G. Specialist Mathematics Schools in England: A Review and Implications for Oxford. This paper was prepared at the request of Professor Martin Williams, Pro Vice-Chancellor (Education) at the University of Oxford, by a Working Group established at the Department of Education.

Kolancali, P. (2019) Factors related to bilingual language skills of Turkish-English Speaking Children. In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 55-70. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Kolancali, P., & Melhuish, E. (2019). How do home and school experiences of Turkish children in the UK interact with their language attitudes and preferences? In G. Pastori, V. Pagani, & A. S. Sarcinelli (Eds.) Children’s Views on Inclusion at School. ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.4. pp 76-83. https://staging-isotis-pw.framework.pt/site/assets/files/1191/d2_4_technical-report-on-the-child-interview-study.pdf

Kolancali, P., & Melhuish, E. (2019) How do family characteristics and migration shape the home learning environment of Turkish children in the UK? In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 98-102. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Broekhuizen, M. L., Guerra, R. & Kolancali, P. (2019) Acculturation orientations, intergroup relations and well-being of Turkish and Maghrebian immigrant parents across Europe (Integrative Report D2.5). In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 122-127. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Jim McKinley is an associate professor of Applied Linguistics in Higher Education at UCL Institute of Education, and a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He has been an associate of the EMI Oxford research group since arriving in the UK in 2016. Originally from the US, he later taught and studied in Australia and New Zealand, and also taught for many years on Japan’s oldest EMI program at Sophia University (2005-2016).

At Oxford, Jim regularly collaborates with Dr. Heath Rose as well as Prof. Victoria Murphy, has published with several DPhil students, and supervises dissertations on the MSc ALSLA and MSc ALLT programs.

Jim’s research mainly explores implications of globalisation for L2 writing, language education, and teaching in higher education. As principal investigator on the British Academy-funded project ‘Exploring the teaching-research nexus in higher education’ (2018), he continues to research and publish on the bifurcation of teaching and research in higher education and TESOL in the UK and internationally. Jim is a co-editor-in-chief of the journal System and series co-editor (with Dr Heath Rose) of Cambridge Elements: Language Teaching.

For further information, visit www.researchgate.net/profile/Jim-Mckinley.

 

Publications

Rose, H., McKinley, J., & Galloway, N. (2020). Global Englishes and Language Teaching: A systematic review of pedagogical research. Language Teaching. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0261444820000518

McKinley, J., McIntosh, S., Milligan, L. O., Mikolajewska, A. (2020). Eyes on the enterprise: Problematising the concept of a teaching-research nexus in UK higher education. Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00595-2

Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2020). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2020). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics. Routledge.

Rose, H., McKinley, J. & Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J. (2020). Data Collection in Applied Linguistics Research. Bloomsbury.

Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J., & McKinley, J. (2019). Language and the development of intercultural competence in an ‘internationalised’ university: Staff and student perspectives. Teaching in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/13562517.2019.1686698

McIntosh, S. McKinley, J., Milligan, L., & Mikolajewska, A. (2019). Whose values? Whose time? Issues of (in)visibility in academic practice in UK universities. Studies in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1637846

McKinley, J. (2019). Evolving the teaching-research nexus. TESOL Quarterly, 53(3), 875-884.

McKinley, J., Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J. (2019). Developing intercultural competence in the third space: postgraduate studies in the UK. Language and Intercultural Communication, 19(1), 9-22.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (2018). Conceptualizations of language errors, standards, norms and nativeness in English for research publication purposes. Journal of Second Language Writing, 42, 1-11.

McKinley, J. (2018). Integrating appraisal theory with possible selves in understanding university EFL writing. System, 78, 27-37.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2018). Japan’s English medium instruction initiatives and the globalization of higher education. Higher Education, 75(1), 111-129.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2017). The prevalence of pedagogy-related research in applied linguistics: Extending the debate. Applied Linguistics, 38(4), 599-604.

McKinley, J., & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2017). Doing Research in Applied Linguistics: Realities, Dilemmas and Solutions. Routledge.

McKinley, J. (2015). Critical argument and writer identity: Social constructivism as a theoretical framework for EFL academic writing. Critical Inquiry in Language Studies, 12(3), 184-207.

 

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Sarah is a Research Assistant at the Department of Education working with Professor Charles Hulme and Dr Gillian West.

Sarah completed her MSc in Social Cognition: Research and Applications at UCL. Her dissertation project was supervised by Dr Anne Schlottmann and investigated the development of a sense of fairness in children aged 4 to 7 years.

She is currently assisting on the Nuffield Early Language Intervention (NELI) trial for Reception children, working directly with schools as well as supporting the development and delivery of professional online training courses for school staff.

Andrew is currently working on the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools and will primarily be carrying out qualitative analysis of teacher interview data from schools who have had attachment and trauma training and a systematic review of recent literature.

Andrew has a background as a teacher and senior leader in a special school, and as a teacher trainer, particularly focused around inclusive education. Andrew’s area of research interest is around the influence of young people’s adoptive identity on educational experience and outcomes. Andrew’s research has included analysis of data from a range of sources including the Wales Adoption Cohort Study and Understanding Society, he is currently completing his doctoral thesis at Cardiff University.

 

Publications

Brown, A., Waters, C. S., & Shelton, K. H. (2017). A systematic review of the school performance and behavioural and emotional adjustments of children adopted from care. Adoption & Fostering, 41(4), 346-368.

Brown, A., Waters, C. S., & Shelton, K. H. (2019). The educational aspirations and psychological well-being of adopted young people in the UK. Adoption & Fostering, 43(1), 46-59.

Adam is a researcher in the Department’s Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance. He is currently a co-investigator on the ‘Unlocking the potential of AI for English law’ project.

This project is funded by the Industrial Strategy Challenge Fund’s (ICSF) Next Generation Services Research Programme and UK Research and Innovation (UKRI), run by researchers in the Oxford departments and faculties of Law, Economics, Computer Science, Education and the Said Business School, in 2019 and 2020.

Pinar is a post-doctoral researcher within the Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project at the Department of Education. As part of the wider team, Pinar is currently investigating the aspects of learning apps that support joint media engagement between parents and children and creative learning in early and middle childhood. Pinar is also contributing to a development of a game-based language intervention focused on the vocabulary acquisition of emerging bilingual and monolingual children in England.

Before joining the team, Pinar was a doctoral student and a researcher at the Department of Education. Supervised by Prof. Edward Melhuish, her thesis examined the factors contributing to bilingual language and identity development of ethnic minority children growing up in first generation immigrant households in the UK. During her doctoral studies, Pinar took up two significant research roles at the Department.  She coordinated a survey research including 300 Turkish families in the UK and led a qualitative study on the cultural experiences of ethnic minority children in England. Before joining the team, Pinar collaborated with a group of researchers at the Department for a report to the Pro-Vice-Chancellor of the University on a new education policy aiming to establish university-sponsored specialist schools in England.

Publications

Kolancali, P. (submitted for publication). The Effects of Immigration on the Language and Literacy Practices of Turkish Parents in England. Journal of Family Issues.

Broekhuizen, M. L., Guerra, R. & Kolancali, P. (in preparation). Acculturation orientations of Turkish immigrant parents across Europe. Journal of Social Issues. This paper is prepared at the request of the Journal of Social Issues for a special issue.

Baird, J., Kolancali, P., Melhuish, E., Mutton, T., Sammons, P., Skilling, K., & Stylianides, G. Specialist Mathematics Schools in England: A Review and Implications for Oxford. This paper was prepared at the request of Professor Martin Williams, Pro Vice-Chancellor (Education) at the University of Oxford, by a Working Group established at the Department of Education.

Kolancali, P. (2019) Factors related to bilingual language skills of Turkish-English Speaking Children. In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 55-70. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Kolancali, P., & Melhuish, E. (2019). How do home and school experiences of Turkish children in the UK interact with their language attitudes and preferences? In G. Pastori, V. Pagani, & A. S. Sarcinelli (Eds.) Children’s Views on Inclusion at School. ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.4. pp 76-83. https://staging-isotis-pw.framework.pt/site/assets/files/1191/d2_4_technical-report-on-the-child-interview-study.pdf

Kolancali, P., & Melhuish, E. (2019) How do family characteristics and migration shape the home learning environment of Turkish children in the UK? In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 98-102. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Broekhuizen, M. L., Guerra, R. & Kolancali, P. (2019) Acculturation orientations, intergroup relations and well-being of Turkish and Maghrebian immigrant parents across Europe (Integrative Report D2.5). In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 122-127. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Jim McKinley is an associate professor of Applied Linguistics in Higher Education at UCL Institute of Education, and a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He has been an associate of the EMI Oxford research group since arriving in the UK in 2016. Originally from the US, he later taught and studied in Australia and New Zealand, and also taught for many years on Japan’s oldest EMI program at Sophia University (2005-2016).

At Oxford, Jim regularly collaborates with Dr. Heath Rose as well as Prof. Victoria Murphy, has published with several DPhil students, and supervises dissertations on the MSc ALSLA and MSc ALLT programs.

Jim’s research mainly explores implications of globalisation for L2 writing, language education, and teaching in higher education. As principal investigator on the British Academy-funded project ‘Exploring the teaching-research nexus in higher education’ (2018), he continues to research and publish on the bifurcation of teaching and research in higher education and TESOL in the UK and internationally. Jim is a co-editor-in-chief of the journal System and series co-editor (with Dr Heath Rose) of Cambridge Elements: Language Teaching.

For further information, visit www.researchgate.net/profile/Jim-Mckinley.

 

Publications

Rose, H., McKinley, J., & Galloway, N. (2020). Global Englishes and Language Teaching: A systematic review of pedagogical research. Language Teaching. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0261444820000518

McKinley, J., McIntosh, S., Milligan, L. O., Mikolajewska, A. (2020). Eyes on the enterprise: Problematising the concept of a teaching-research nexus in UK higher education. Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00595-2

Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2020). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2020). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics. Routledge.

Rose, H., McKinley, J. & Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J. (2020). Data Collection in Applied Linguistics Research. Bloomsbury.

Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J., & McKinley, J. (2019). Language and the development of intercultural competence in an ‘internationalised’ university: Staff and student perspectives. Teaching in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/13562517.2019.1686698

McIntosh, S. McKinley, J., Milligan, L., & Mikolajewska, A. (2019). Whose values? Whose time? Issues of (in)visibility in academic practice in UK universities. Studies in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1637846

McKinley, J. (2019). Evolving the teaching-research nexus. TESOL Quarterly, 53(3), 875-884.

McKinley, J., Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J. (2019). Developing intercultural competence in the third space: postgraduate studies in the UK. Language and Intercultural Communication, 19(1), 9-22.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (2018). Conceptualizations of language errors, standards, norms and nativeness in English for research publication purposes. Journal of Second Language Writing, 42, 1-11.

McKinley, J. (2018). Integrating appraisal theory with possible selves in understanding university EFL writing. System, 78, 27-37.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2018). Japan’s English medium instruction initiatives and the globalization of higher education. Higher Education, 75(1), 111-129.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2017). The prevalence of pedagogy-related research in applied linguistics: Extending the debate. Applied Linguistics, 38(4), 599-604.

McKinley, J., & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2017). Doing Research in Applied Linguistics: Realities, Dilemmas and Solutions. Routledge.

McKinley, J. (2015). Critical argument and writer identity: Social constructivism as a theoretical framework for EFL academic writing. Critical Inquiry in Language Studies, 12(3), 184-207.

 

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Sarah is a Research Assistant at the Department of Education working with Professor Charles Hulme and Dr Gillian West.

Sarah completed her MSc in Social Cognition: Research and Applications at UCL. Her dissertation project was supervised by Dr Anne Schlottmann and investigated the development of a sense of fairness in children aged 4 to 7 years.

She is currently assisting on the Nuffield Early Language Intervention (NELI) trial for Reception children, working directly with schools as well as supporting the development and delivery of professional online training courses for school staff.

Andrew is currently working on the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools and will primarily be carrying out qualitative analysis of teacher interview data from schools who have had attachment and trauma training and a systematic review of recent literature.

Andrew has a background as a teacher and senior leader in a special school, and as a teacher trainer, particularly focused around inclusive education. Andrew’s area of research interest is around the influence of young people’s adoptive identity on educational experience and outcomes. Andrew’s research has included analysis of data from a range of sources including the Wales Adoption Cohort Study and Understanding Society, he is currently completing his doctoral thesis at Cardiff University.

 

Publications

Brown, A., Waters, C. S., & Shelton, K. H. (2017). A systematic review of the school performance and behavioural and emotional adjustments of children adopted from care. Adoption & Fostering, 41(4), 346-368.

Brown, A., Waters, C. S., & Shelton, K. H. (2019). The educational aspirations and psychological well-being of adopted young people in the UK. Adoption & Fostering, 43(1), 46-59.

Adam is a researcher in the Department’s Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance. He is currently a co-investigator on the ‘Unlocking the potential of AI for English law’ project.

This project is funded by the Industrial Strategy Challenge Fund’s (ICSF) Next Generation Services Research Programme and UK Research and Innovation (UKRI), run by researchers in the Oxford departments and faculties of Law, Economics, Computer Science, Education and the Said Business School, in 2019 and 2020.

Pinar is a post-doctoral researcher within the Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project at the Department of Education. As part of the wider team, Pinar is currently investigating the aspects of learning apps that support joint media engagement between parents and children and creative learning in early and middle childhood. Pinar is also contributing to a development of a game-based language intervention focused on the vocabulary acquisition of emerging bilingual and monolingual children in England.

Before joining the team, Pinar was a doctoral student and a researcher at the Department of Education. Supervised by Prof. Edward Melhuish, her thesis examined the factors contributing to bilingual language and identity development of ethnic minority children growing up in first generation immigrant households in the UK. During her doctoral studies, Pinar took up two significant research roles at the Department.  She coordinated a survey research including 300 Turkish families in the UK and led a qualitative study on the cultural experiences of ethnic minority children in England. Before joining the team, Pinar collaborated with a group of researchers at the Department for a report to the Pro-Vice-Chancellor of the University on a new education policy aiming to establish university-sponsored specialist schools in England.

Publications

Kolancali, P. (submitted for publication). The Effects of Immigration on the Language and Literacy Practices of Turkish Parents in England. Journal of Family Issues.

Broekhuizen, M. L., Guerra, R. & Kolancali, P. (in preparation). Acculturation orientations of Turkish immigrant parents across Europe. Journal of Social Issues. This paper is prepared at the request of the Journal of Social Issues for a special issue.

Baird, J., Kolancali, P., Melhuish, E., Mutton, T., Sammons, P., Skilling, K., & Stylianides, G. Specialist Mathematics Schools in England: A Review and Implications for Oxford. This paper was prepared at the request of Professor Martin Williams, Pro Vice-Chancellor (Education) at the University of Oxford, by a Working Group established at the Department of Education.

Kolancali, P. (2019) Factors related to bilingual language skills of Turkish-English Speaking Children. In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 55-70. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Kolancali, P., & Melhuish, E. (2019). How do home and school experiences of Turkish children in the UK interact with their language attitudes and preferences? In G. Pastori, V. Pagani, & A. S. Sarcinelli (Eds.) Children’s Views on Inclusion at School. ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.4. pp 76-83. https://staging-isotis-pw.framework.pt/site/assets/files/1191/d2_4_technical-report-on-the-child-interview-study.pdf

Kolancali, P., & Melhuish, E. (2019) How do family characteristics and migration shape the home learning environment of Turkish children in the UK? In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 98-102. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Broekhuizen, M. L., Guerra, R. & Kolancali, P. (2019) Acculturation orientations, intergroup relations and well-being of Turkish and Maghrebian immigrant parents across Europe (Integrative Report D2.5). In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 122-127. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Jim McKinley is an associate professor of Applied Linguistics in Higher Education at UCL Institute of Education, and a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He has been an associate of the EMI Oxford research group since arriving in the UK in 2016. Originally from the US, he later taught and studied in Australia and New Zealand, and also taught for many years on Japan’s oldest EMI program at Sophia University (2005-2016).

At Oxford, Jim regularly collaborates with Dr. Heath Rose as well as Prof. Victoria Murphy, has published with several DPhil students, and supervises dissertations on the MSc ALSLA and MSc ALLT programs.

Jim’s research mainly explores implications of globalisation for L2 writing, language education, and teaching in higher education. As principal investigator on the British Academy-funded project ‘Exploring the teaching-research nexus in higher education’ (2018), he continues to research and publish on the bifurcation of teaching and research in higher education and TESOL in the UK and internationally. Jim is a co-editor-in-chief of the journal System and series co-editor (with Dr Heath Rose) of Cambridge Elements: Language Teaching.

For further information, visit www.researchgate.net/profile/Jim-Mckinley.

 

Publications

Rose, H., McKinley, J., & Galloway, N. (2020). Global Englishes and Language Teaching: A systematic review of pedagogical research. Language Teaching. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0261444820000518

McKinley, J., McIntosh, S., Milligan, L. O., Mikolajewska, A. (2020). Eyes on the enterprise: Problematising the concept of a teaching-research nexus in UK higher education. Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00595-2

Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2020). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2020). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics. Routledge.

Rose, H., McKinley, J. & Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J. (2020). Data Collection in Applied Linguistics Research. Bloomsbury.

Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J., & McKinley, J. (2019). Language and the development of intercultural competence in an ‘internationalised’ university: Staff and student perspectives. Teaching in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/13562517.2019.1686698

McIntosh, S. McKinley, J., Milligan, L., & Mikolajewska, A. (2019). Whose values? Whose time? Issues of (in)visibility in academic practice in UK universities. Studies in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1637846

McKinley, J. (2019). Evolving the teaching-research nexus. TESOL Quarterly, 53(3), 875-884.

McKinley, J., Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J. (2019). Developing intercultural competence in the third space: postgraduate studies in the UK. Language and Intercultural Communication, 19(1), 9-22.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (2018). Conceptualizations of language errors, standards, norms and nativeness in English for research publication purposes. Journal of Second Language Writing, 42, 1-11.

McKinley, J. (2018). Integrating appraisal theory with possible selves in understanding university EFL writing. System, 78, 27-37.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2018). Japan’s English medium instruction initiatives and the globalization of higher education. Higher Education, 75(1), 111-129.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2017). The prevalence of pedagogy-related research in applied linguistics: Extending the debate. Applied Linguistics, 38(4), 599-604.

McKinley, J., & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2017). Doing Research in Applied Linguistics: Realities, Dilemmas and Solutions. Routledge.

McKinley, J. (2015). Critical argument and writer identity: Social constructivism as a theoretical framework for EFL academic writing. Critical Inquiry in Language Studies, 12(3), 184-207.

 

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Sarah is a Research Assistant at the Department of Education working with Professor Charles Hulme and Dr Gillian West.

Sarah completed her MSc in Social Cognition: Research and Applications at UCL. Her dissertation project was supervised by Dr Anne Schlottmann and investigated the development of a sense of fairness in children aged 4 to 7 years.

She is currently assisting on the Nuffield Early Language Intervention (NELI) trial for Reception children, working directly with schools as well as supporting the development and delivery of professional online training courses for school staff.

Andrew is currently working on the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools and will primarily be carrying out qualitative analysis of teacher interview data from schools who have had attachment and trauma training and a systematic review of recent literature.

Andrew has a background as a teacher and senior leader in a special school, and as a teacher trainer, particularly focused around inclusive education. Andrew’s area of research interest is around the influence of young people’s adoptive identity on educational experience and outcomes. Andrew’s research has included analysis of data from a range of sources including the Wales Adoption Cohort Study and Understanding Society, he is currently completing his doctoral thesis at Cardiff University.

 

Publications

Brown, A., Waters, C. S., & Shelton, K. H. (2017). A systematic review of the school performance and behavioural and emotional adjustments of children adopted from care. Adoption & Fostering, 41(4), 346-368.

Brown, A., Waters, C. S., & Shelton, K. H. (2019). The educational aspirations and psychological well-being of adopted young people in the UK. Adoption & Fostering, 43(1), 46-59.

Adam is a researcher in the Department’s Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance. He is currently a co-investigator on the ‘Unlocking the potential of AI for English law’ project.

This project is funded by the Industrial Strategy Challenge Fund’s (ICSF) Next Generation Services Research Programme and UK Research and Innovation (UKRI), run by researchers in the Oxford departments and faculties of Law, Economics, Computer Science, Education and the Said Business School, in 2019 and 2020.

Pinar is a post-doctoral researcher within the Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project at the Department of Education. As part of the wider team, Pinar is currently investigating the aspects of learning apps that support joint media engagement between parents and children and creative learning in early and middle childhood. Pinar is also contributing to a development of a game-based language intervention focused on the vocabulary acquisition of emerging bilingual and monolingual children in England.

Before joining the team, Pinar was a doctoral student and a researcher at the Department of Education. Supervised by Prof. Edward Melhuish, her thesis examined the factors contributing to bilingual language and identity development of ethnic minority children growing up in first generation immigrant households in the UK. During her doctoral studies, Pinar took up two significant research roles at the Department.  She coordinated a survey research including 300 Turkish families in the UK and led a qualitative study on the cultural experiences of ethnic minority children in England. Before joining the team, Pinar collaborated with a group of researchers at the Department for a report to the Pro-Vice-Chancellor of the University on a new education policy aiming to establish university-sponsored specialist schools in England.

Publications

Kolancali, P. (submitted for publication). The Effects of Immigration on the Language and Literacy Practices of Turkish Parents in England. Journal of Family Issues.

Broekhuizen, M. L., Guerra, R. & Kolancali, P. (in preparation). Acculturation orientations of Turkish immigrant parents across Europe. Journal of Social Issues. This paper is prepared at the request of the Journal of Social Issues for a special issue.

Baird, J., Kolancali, P., Melhuish, E., Mutton, T., Sammons, P., Skilling, K., & Stylianides, G. Specialist Mathematics Schools in England: A Review and Implications for Oxford. This paper was prepared at the request of Professor Martin Williams, Pro Vice-Chancellor (Education) at the University of Oxford, by a Working Group established at the Department of Education.

Kolancali, P. (2019) Factors related to bilingual language skills of Turkish-English Speaking Children. In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 55-70. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Kolancali, P., & Melhuish, E. (2019). How do home and school experiences of Turkish children in the UK interact with their language attitudes and preferences? In G. Pastori, V. Pagani, & A. S. Sarcinelli (Eds.) Children’s Views on Inclusion at School. ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.4. pp 76-83. https://staging-isotis-pw.framework.pt/site/assets/files/1191/d2_4_technical-report-on-the-child-interview-study.pdf

Kolancali, P., & Melhuish, E. (2019) How do family characteristics and migration shape the home learning environment of Turkish children in the UK? In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 98-102. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Broekhuizen, M. L., Guerra, R. & Kolancali, P. (2019) Acculturation orientations, intergroup relations and well-being of Turkish and Maghrebian immigrant parents across Europe (Integrative Report D2.5). In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 122-127. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Jim McKinley is an associate professor of Applied Linguistics in Higher Education at UCL Institute of Education, and a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He has been an associate of the EMI Oxford research group since arriving in the UK in 2016. Originally from the US, he later taught and studied in Australia and New Zealand, and also taught for many years on Japan’s oldest EMI program at Sophia University (2005-2016).

At Oxford, Jim regularly collaborates with Dr. Heath Rose as well as Prof. Victoria Murphy, has published with several DPhil students, and supervises dissertations on the MSc ALSLA and MSc ALLT programs.

Jim’s research mainly explores implications of globalisation for L2 writing, language education, and teaching in higher education. As principal investigator on the British Academy-funded project ‘Exploring the teaching-research nexus in higher education’ (2018), he continues to research and publish on the bifurcation of teaching and research in higher education and TESOL in the UK and internationally. Jim is a co-editor-in-chief of the journal System and series co-editor (with Dr Heath Rose) of Cambridge Elements: Language Teaching.

For further information, visit www.researchgate.net/profile/Jim-Mckinley.

 

Publications

Rose, H., McKinley, J., & Galloway, N. (2020). Global Englishes and Language Teaching: A systematic review of pedagogical research. Language Teaching. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0261444820000518

McKinley, J., McIntosh, S., Milligan, L. O., Mikolajewska, A. (2020). Eyes on the enterprise: Problematising the concept of a teaching-research nexus in UK higher education. Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00595-2

Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2020). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2020). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics. Routledge.

Rose, H., McKinley, J. & Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J. (2020). Data Collection in Applied Linguistics Research. Bloomsbury.

Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J., & McKinley, J. (2019). Language and the development of intercultural competence in an ‘internationalised’ university: Staff and student perspectives. Teaching in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/13562517.2019.1686698

McIntosh, S. McKinley, J., Milligan, L., & Mikolajewska, A. (2019). Whose values? Whose time? Issues of (in)visibility in academic practice in UK universities. Studies in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1637846

McKinley, J. (2019). Evolving the teaching-research nexus. TESOL Quarterly, 53(3), 875-884.

McKinley, J., Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J. (2019). Developing intercultural competence in the third space: postgraduate studies in the UK. Language and Intercultural Communication, 19(1), 9-22.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (2018). Conceptualizations of language errors, standards, norms and nativeness in English for research publication purposes. Journal of Second Language Writing, 42, 1-11.

McKinley, J. (2018). Integrating appraisal theory with possible selves in understanding university EFL writing. System, 78, 27-37.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2018). Japan’s English medium instruction initiatives and the globalization of higher education. Higher Education, 75(1), 111-129.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2017). The prevalence of pedagogy-related research in applied linguistics: Extending the debate. Applied Linguistics, 38(4), 599-604.

McKinley, J., & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2017). Doing Research in Applied Linguistics: Realities, Dilemmas and Solutions. Routledge.

McKinley, J. (2015). Critical argument and writer identity: Social constructivism as a theoretical framework for EFL academic writing. Critical Inquiry in Language Studies, 12(3), 184-207.

 

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Sarah is a Research Assistant at the Department of Education working with Professor Charles Hulme and Dr Gillian West.

Sarah completed her MSc in Social Cognition: Research and Applications at UCL. Her dissertation project was supervised by Dr Anne Schlottmann and investigated the development of a sense of fairness in children aged 4 to 7 years.

She is currently assisting on the Nuffield Early Language Intervention (NELI) trial for Reception children, working directly with schools as well as supporting the development and delivery of professional online training courses for school staff.

Andrew is currently working on the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools and will primarily be carrying out qualitative analysis of teacher interview data from schools who have had attachment and trauma training and a systematic review of recent literature.

Andrew has a background as a teacher and senior leader in a special school, and as a teacher trainer, particularly focused around inclusive education. Andrew’s area of research interest is around the influence of young people’s adoptive identity on educational experience and outcomes. Andrew’s research has included analysis of data from a range of sources including the Wales Adoption Cohort Study and Understanding Society, he is currently completing his doctoral thesis at Cardiff University.

 

Publications

Brown, A., Waters, C. S., & Shelton, K. H. (2017). A systematic review of the school performance and behavioural and emotional adjustments of children adopted from care. Adoption & Fostering, 41(4), 346-368.

Brown, A., Waters, C. S., & Shelton, K. H. (2019). The educational aspirations and psychological well-being of adopted young people in the UK. Adoption & Fostering, 43(1), 46-59.

Adam is a researcher in the Department’s Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance. He is currently a co-investigator on the ‘Unlocking the potential of AI for English law’ project.

This project is funded by the Industrial Strategy Challenge Fund’s (ICSF) Next Generation Services Research Programme and UK Research and Innovation (UKRI), run by researchers in the Oxford departments and faculties of Law, Economics, Computer Science, Education and the Said Business School, in 2019 and 2020.

Pinar is a post-doctoral researcher within the Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project at the Department of Education. As part of the wider team, Pinar is currently investigating the aspects of learning apps that support joint media engagement between parents and children and creative learning in early and middle childhood. Pinar is also contributing to a development of a game-based language intervention focused on the vocabulary acquisition of emerging bilingual and monolingual children in England.

Before joining the team, Pinar was a doctoral student and a researcher at the Department of Education. Supervised by Prof. Edward Melhuish, her thesis examined the factors contributing to bilingual language and identity development of ethnic minority children growing up in first generation immigrant households in the UK. During her doctoral studies, Pinar took up two significant research roles at the Department.  She coordinated a survey research including 300 Turkish families in the UK and led a qualitative study on the cultural experiences of ethnic minority children in England. Before joining the team, Pinar collaborated with a group of researchers at the Department for a report to the Pro-Vice-Chancellor of the University on a new education policy aiming to establish university-sponsored specialist schools in England.

Publications

Kolancali, P. (submitted for publication). The Effects of Immigration on the Language and Literacy Practices of Turkish Parents in England. Journal of Family Issues.

Broekhuizen, M. L., Guerra, R. & Kolancali, P. (in preparation). Acculturation orientations of Turkish immigrant parents across Europe. Journal of Social Issues. This paper is prepared at the request of the Journal of Social Issues for a special issue.

Baird, J., Kolancali, P., Melhuish, E., Mutton, T., Sammons, P., Skilling, K., & Stylianides, G. Specialist Mathematics Schools in England: A Review and Implications for Oxford. This paper was prepared at the request of Professor Martin Williams, Pro Vice-Chancellor (Education) at the University of Oxford, by a Working Group established at the Department of Education.

Kolancali, P. (2019) Factors related to bilingual language skills of Turkish-English Speaking Children. In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 55-70. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Kolancali, P., & Melhuish, E. (2019). How do home and school experiences of Turkish children in the UK interact with their language attitudes and preferences? In G. Pastori, V. Pagani, & A. S. Sarcinelli (Eds.) Children’s Views on Inclusion at School. ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.4. pp 76-83. https://staging-isotis-pw.framework.pt/site/assets/files/1191/d2_4_technical-report-on-the-child-interview-study.pdf

Kolancali, P., & Melhuish, E. (2019) How do family characteristics and migration shape the home learning environment of Turkish children in the UK? In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 98-102. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Broekhuizen, M. L., Guerra, R. & Kolancali, P. (2019) Acculturation orientations, intergroup relations and well-being of Turkish and Maghrebian immigrant parents across Europe (Integrative Report D2.5). In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 122-127. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Jim McKinley is an associate professor of Applied Linguistics in Higher Education at UCL Institute of Education, and a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He has been an associate of the EMI Oxford research group since arriving in the UK in 2016. Originally from the US, he later taught and studied in Australia and New Zealand, and also taught for many years on Japan’s oldest EMI program at Sophia University (2005-2016).

At Oxford, Jim regularly collaborates with Dr. Heath Rose as well as Prof. Victoria Murphy, has published with several DPhil students, and supervises dissertations on the MSc ALSLA and MSc ALLT programs.

Jim’s research mainly explores implications of globalisation for L2 writing, language education, and teaching in higher education. As principal investigator on the British Academy-funded project ‘Exploring the teaching-research nexus in higher education’ (2018), he continues to research and publish on the bifurcation of teaching and research in higher education and TESOL in the UK and internationally. Jim is a co-editor-in-chief of the journal System and series co-editor (with Dr Heath Rose) of Cambridge Elements: Language Teaching.

For further information, visit www.researchgate.net/profile/Jim-Mckinley.

 

Publications

Rose, H., McKinley, J., & Galloway, N. (2020). Global Englishes and Language Teaching: A systematic review of pedagogical research. Language Teaching. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0261444820000518

McKinley, J., McIntosh, S., Milligan, L. O., Mikolajewska, A. (2020). Eyes on the enterprise: Problematising the concept of a teaching-research nexus in UK higher education. Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00595-2

Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2020). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2020). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics. Routledge.

Rose, H., McKinley, J. & Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J. (2020). Data Collection in Applied Linguistics Research. Bloomsbury.

Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J., & McKinley, J. (2019). Language and the development of intercultural competence in an ‘internationalised’ university: Staff and student perspectives. Teaching in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/13562517.2019.1686698

McIntosh, S. McKinley, J., Milligan, L., & Mikolajewska, A. (2019). Whose values? Whose time? Issues of (in)visibility in academic practice in UK universities. Studies in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1637846

McKinley, J. (2019). Evolving the teaching-research nexus. TESOL Quarterly, 53(3), 875-884.

McKinley, J., Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J. (2019). Developing intercultural competence in the third space: postgraduate studies in the UK. Language and Intercultural Communication, 19(1), 9-22.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (2018). Conceptualizations of language errors, standards, norms and nativeness in English for research publication purposes. Journal of Second Language Writing, 42, 1-11.

McKinley, J. (2018). Integrating appraisal theory with possible selves in understanding university EFL writing. System, 78, 27-37.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2018). Japan’s English medium instruction initiatives and the globalization of higher education. Higher Education, 75(1), 111-129.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2017). The prevalence of pedagogy-related research in applied linguistics: Extending the debate. Applied Linguistics, 38(4), 599-604.

McKinley, J., & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2017). Doing Research in Applied Linguistics: Realities, Dilemmas and Solutions. Routledge.

McKinley, J. (2015). Critical argument and writer identity: Social constructivism as a theoretical framework for EFL academic writing. Critical Inquiry in Language Studies, 12(3), 184-207.

 

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Sarah is a Research Assistant at the Department of Education working with Professor Charles Hulme and Dr Gillian West.

Sarah completed her MSc in Social Cognition: Research and Applications at UCL. Her dissertation project was supervised by Dr Anne Schlottmann and investigated the development of a sense of fairness in children aged 4 to 7 years.

She is currently assisting on the Nuffield Early Language Intervention (NELI) trial for Reception children, working directly with schools as well as supporting the development and delivery of professional online training courses for school staff.

Andrew is currently working on the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools and will primarily be carrying out qualitative analysis of teacher interview data from schools who have had attachment and trauma training and a systematic review of recent literature.

Andrew has a background as a teacher and senior leader in a special school, and as a teacher trainer, particularly focused around inclusive education. Andrew’s area of research interest is around the influence of young people’s adoptive identity on educational experience and outcomes. Andrew’s research has included analysis of data from a range of sources including the Wales Adoption Cohort Study and Understanding Society, he is currently completing his doctoral thesis at Cardiff University.

 

Publications

Brown, A., Waters, C. S., & Shelton, K. H. (2017). A systematic review of the school performance and behavioural and emotional adjustments of children adopted from care. Adoption & Fostering, 41(4), 346-368.

Brown, A., Waters, C. S., & Shelton, K. H. (2019). The educational aspirations and psychological well-being of adopted young people in the UK. Adoption & Fostering, 43(1), 46-59.

Adam is a researcher in the Department’s Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance. He is currently a co-investigator on the ‘Unlocking the potential of AI for English law’ project.

This project is funded by the Industrial Strategy Challenge Fund’s (ICSF) Next Generation Services Research Programme and UK Research and Innovation (UKRI), run by researchers in the Oxford departments and faculties of Law, Economics, Computer Science, Education and the Said Business School, in 2019 and 2020.

Pinar is a post-doctoral researcher within the Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project at the Department of Education. As part of the wider team, Pinar is currently investigating the aspects of learning apps that support joint media engagement between parents and children and creative learning in early and middle childhood. Pinar is also contributing to a development of a game-based language intervention focused on the vocabulary acquisition of emerging bilingual and monolingual children in England.

Before joining the team, Pinar was a doctoral student and a researcher at the Department of Education. Supervised by Prof. Edward Melhuish, her thesis examined the factors contributing to bilingual language and identity development of ethnic minority children growing up in first generation immigrant households in the UK. During her doctoral studies, Pinar took up two significant research roles at the Department.  She coordinated a survey research including 300 Turkish families in the UK and led a qualitative study on the cultural experiences of ethnic minority children in England. Before joining the team, Pinar collaborated with a group of researchers at the Department for a report to the Pro-Vice-Chancellor of the University on a new education policy aiming to establish university-sponsored specialist schools in England.

Publications

Kolancali, P. (submitted for publication). The Effects of Immigration on the Language and Literacy Practices of Turkish Parents in England. Journal of Family Issues.

Broekhuizen, M. L., Guerra, R. & Kolancali, P. (in preparation). Acculturation orientations of Turkish immigrant parents across Europe. Journal of Social Issues. This paper is prepared at the request of the Journal of Social Issues for a special issue.

Baird, J., Kolancali, P., Melhuish, E., Mutton, T., Sammons, P., Skilling, K., & Stylianides, G. Specialist Mathematics Schools in England: A Review and Implications for Oxford. This paper was prepared at the request of Professor Martin Williams, Pro Vice-Chancellor (Education) at the University of Oxford, by a Working Group established at the Department of Education.

Kolancali, P. (2019) Factors related to bilingual language skills of Turkish-English Speaking Children. In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 55-70. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Kolancali, P., & Melhuish, E. (2019). How do home and school experiences of Turkish children in the UK interact with their language attitudes and preferences? In G. Pastori, V. Pagani, & A. S. Sarcinelli (Eds.) Children’s Views on Inclusion at School. ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.4. pp 76-83. https://staging-isotis-pw.framework.pt/site/assets/files/1191/d2_4_technical-report-on-the-child-interview-study.pdf

Kolancali, P., & Melhuish, E. (2019) How do family characteristics and migration shape the home learning environment of Turkish children in the UK? In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 98-102. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Broekhuizen, M. L., Guerra, R. & Kolancali, P. (2019) Acculturation orientations, intergroup relations and well-being of Turkish and Maghrebian immigrant parents across Europe (Integrative Report D2.5). In M. Broekhuisen et al. (Eds.) Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.  ISOTIS Integrative Report D2.5. pp 122-127. https://katedry.ped.muni.cz/iviv/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2020/02/2019_d2-5_resoures.pdf#page=55

Dr Juliet Scott-Barrett is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.

Juliet is currently working with Professor Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Dr Tracey Denton-CalabreseDr Samantha-Kaye Johnston and Dr Joshua McGrane on a research study funded by the Jacobs Foundation on exploring, evaluating and facilitating creativity and curiosity in the classroom. This research is being conducted in collaboration with the Australian Council for Educational Research and the International Baccalaureate.

In her previous post, she was a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education, and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all.

Juliet completed her doctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego, voice-recorders and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication and play. She also  conducted a study interviewing researchers about conducting collaborative and meaningful research with autistic children and young people. She originally trained as a Secondary School teacher and has a PGCE and Masters in Education from the University of Cambridge.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Jim McKinley is an associate professor of Applied Linguistics in Higher Education at UCL Institute of Education, and a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He has been an associate of the EMI Oxford research group since arriving in the UK in 2016. Originally from the US, he later taught and studied in Australia and New Zealand, and also taught for many years on Japan’s oldest EMI program at Sophia University (2005-2016).

At Oxford, Jim regularly collaborates with Dr. Heath Rose as well as Prof. Victoria Murphy, has published with several DPhil students, and supervises dissertations on the MSc ALSLA and MSc ALLT programs.

Jim’s research mainly explores implications of globalisation for L2 writing, language education, and teaching in higher education. As principal investigator on the British Academy-funded project ‘Exploring the teaching-research nexus in higher education’ (2018), he continues to research and publish on the bifurcation of teaching and research in higher education and TESOL in the UK and internationally. Jim is a co-editor-in-chief of the journal System and series co-editor (with Dr Heath Rose) of Cambridge Elements: Language Teaching.

For further information, visit www.researchgate.net/profile/Jim-Mckinley.

 

Publications

Rose, H., McKinley, J., & Galloway, N. (2020). Global Englishes and Language Teaching: A systematic review of pedagogical research. Language Teaching. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0261444820000518

McKinley, J., McIntosh, S., Milligan, L. O., Mikolajewska, A. (2020). Eyes on the enterprise: Problematising the concept of a teaching-research nexus in UK higher education. Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00595-2

Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2020). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2020). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics. Routledge.

Rose, H., McKinley, J. & Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J. (2020). Data Collection in Applied Linguistics Research. Bloomsbury.

Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J., & McKinley, J. (2019). Language and the development of intercultural competence in an ‘internationalised’ university: Staff and student perspectives. Teaching in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/13562517.2019.1686698

McIntosh, S. McKinley, J., Milligan, L., & Mikolajewska, A. (2019). Whose values? Whose time? Issues of (in)visibility in academic practice in UK universities. Studies in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1637846

McKinley, J. (2019). Evolving the teaching-research nexus. TESOL Quarterly, 53(3), 875-884.

McKinley, J., Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J. (2019). Developing intercultural competence in the third space: postgraduate studies in the UK. Language and Intercultural Communication, 19(1), 9-22.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (2018). Conceptualizations of language errors, standards, norms and nativeness in English for research publication purposes. Journal of Second Language Writing, 42, 1-11.

McKinley, J. (2018). Integrating appraisal theory with possible selves in understanding university EFL writing. System, 78, 27-37.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2018). Japan’s English medium instruction initiatives and the globalization of higher education. Higher Education, 75(1), 111-129.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2017). The prevalence of pedagogy-related research in applied linguistics: Extending the debate. Applied Linguistics, 38(4), 599-604.

McKinley, J., & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2017). Doing Research in Applied Linguistics: Realities, Dilemmas and Solutions. Routledge.

McKinley, J. (2015). Critical argument and writer identity: Social constructivism as a theoretical framework for EFL academic writing. Critical Inquiry in Language Studies, 12(3), 184-207.

 

 

Denise is a Co-Investigator and Project Manager for the Teaching Effective Early Mathematics and Understanding in Primary (TEEMUP) Schools study.

She plays a leading role in the management of the study and has responsibility for the development of its manuals, delivery of the intervention and direction of the work. As a Co-Investigator of the study, she has primary responsibility for developing the intervention associated with this Education Endowment Foundation funded research project.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Sarah is a Research Assistant at the Department of Education working with Professor Charles Hulme and Dr Gillian West.

Sarah completed her MSc in Social Cognition: Research and Applications at UCL. Her dissertation project was supervised by Dr Anne Schlottmann and investigated the development of a sense of fairness in children aged 4 to 7 years.

She is currently assisting on the Nuffield Early Language Intervention (NELI) trial for Reception children, working directly with schools as well as supporting the development and delivery of professional online training courses for school staff.

Andrew is currently working on the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools and will primarily be carrying out qualitative analysis of teacher interview data from schools who have had attachment and trauma training and a systematic review of recent literature.

Andrew has a background as a teacher and senior leader in a special school, and as a teacher trainer, particularly focused around inclusive education. Andrew’s area of research interest is around the influence of young people’s adoptive identity on educational experience and outcomes. Andrew’s research has included analysis of data from a range of sources including the Wales Adoption Cohort Study and Understanding Society, he is currently completing his doctoral thesis at Cardiff University.

 

Publications

Brown, A., Waters, C. S., & Shelton, K. H. (2017). A systematic review of the school performance and behavioural and emotional adjustments of children adopted from care. Adoption & Fostering, 41(4), 346-368.

Brown, A., Waters, C. S., & Shelton, K. H. (2019). The educational aspirations and psychological well-being of adopted young people in the UK. Adoption & Fostering, 43(1), 46-59.

Adam is a researcher in the Department’s Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance. He is currently a co-investigator on the ‘Unlocking the potential of AI for English law’ project.

This project is funded by the Industrial Strategy Challenge Fund’s (ICSF) Next Generation Services Research Programme and UK Research and Innovation (UKRI), run by researchers in the Oxford departments and faculties of Law, Economics, Computer Science, Education and the Said Business School, in 2019 and 2020.

Pinar is a post-doctoral researcher within the Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project at the Department of Education. As part of the wider team, Pinar is currently investigating the aspects of learning apps that support joint media engagement between parents and children and creative learning in early and middle childhood. Pinar is also contributing to a development of a game-based language intervention focused on the vocabulary acquisition of emerging bilingual and monolingual children in England.

Before joining the team, Pinar was a doctoral student and a researcher at the Department of Education. Supervised by Prof. Edward Melhuish, her thesis examined the factors contributing to bilingual language and identity development of ethnic minority children growing up in first generation immigrant households in the UK. During her doctoral studies, Pinar took up two significant research roles at the Department.  She coordinated a survey research including 300 Turkish families in the UK and led a qualitative study on the cultural experiences of ethnic minority children in England. Before joining the team, Pinar collaborated with a group of researchers at the Department for a report to the Pro-Vice-Chancellor