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Alice Aldinucci is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford, Department of Education. She is part of the team working on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani, and she is a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group.

She holds a PhD in Education from the University of Glasgow (UK) where she was awarded the LKAS Interdisciplinary Scholarship. Her thesis applies a longitudinal qualitative research design and draws on the combination of Critical Realism and Capability Approach to explore aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to adulthood in Chile. Prior to her PhD, she completed a MA in International Education and Development from the University of Sussex (UK) where she was awarded the Centre for International Education Prize for the best overall MA performance. For her MA at Sussex, she conducted an empirical dissertation on the meaning making of Inclusive Education in Nepal. She holds a MA in Languages and Cultures for International Communication and Cooperation from the University of Milan (Italy) with a fieldwork research on tensions between policy and practice in bilingual multicultural education for indigenous students in Higher Education in Peru; and a BA in Languages and Intercultural Mediation from the University of Arezzo (Italy).

Alice’s research interests are interdisciplinary and relate to the critical linkages between intersecting inequalities, education, individual/societal development, and social justice at local and global levels, motivated by the question what education for what/whose development?

Areas, theoretical approaches and methodologies of interests:
• Sociology of education including aspirations in post-school transitions
• Cultural political economy of education and life chances/human flourishing/social justice
• Tensions between global educational frameworks and local knowledge and practices
• Critical Realism
• Capability Approach
• Qualitative and participatory methodologies
• Digital storytelling for social change

Besides her work in academia, Alice has gained experience as researcher, development practitioner and educator working in projects including early childhood education programmes, refugees’ education, girls’ education, SEN and inclusive education, TVET, global citizenship education, arts-based pedagogies. She lived and worked in different countries including in Nepal (a country she has developed a strong bond with), Tanzania, El Salvador, Italy and the UK. These experiences have reinforced her critical approach to international education and global development and to education as a catalyst for both inequalities, injustices, violence and more equitable social change and peace-building processes.

She served as Student Representative of the British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) from 2017 to 2019 and she is currently part of the college of reviewers of the editorial board of Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education.

Publications:

Aldinucci, A. (2022). Understanding aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to postschool trajectories in Chile. PhD thesis, University of Glasgow.
Aldinucci, A., Valiente, O., Hurrell S., and Zancajo, A. (2021). Understanding aspirations: Why do secondary TVET students aim so high in Chile? Journal of Vocational Education & Training.

Rawle, G., Riddle, N., Pettersson, G., Wallin, J., Bici, M., Jasper, P., Harb, J., Hebbar, M., Davis, J., Aldinucci, A., (2017), EQUIP-Tanzania Impact Evaluation. Midline Technical Report, Volume I and II. Oxford Policy Management.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Kabira is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. His research is funded by the Clarendon Fund.

Kabira is interested in improving learning outcomes for children in fragile and conflict – affected regions of the world, school health and nutrition programs, combatting gender-based violence and supporting children who are dealing with addiction.

His doctoral research focuses on education outcomes for young learners in Papua New Guinea who are addicted to psychoactive and carcinogenic betel quid.

Prior to moving to Oxford, Kabira was based in Washington DC, USA and worked for the World Bank and Save the Children on impact evaluations, learning assessments and improving the quality of education statistics in twenty-six countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, the Pacific, and the Middle East.

Kabira holds a Masters in Economics and Public Policy from Princeton University where he was a recipient of the Stokes’ Prize for exemplary academic achievement and public service leadership, a Masters in Development Economics from the School of Oriental and African Studies at London University where he graduated with distinction and an undergraduate degree in Economics and Statistics from St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai.

Research interests:

·       Education in conflict regions

·       Combatting school related gender-based violence (SRGBV)

·       School health and nutrition programs

·       Supporting children with addiction

 

Publications

Aliya teaches on the Comparative and International Education MSc programme at the Department of Education after having taught at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge. Her research focuses on how women in the South navigate their agency in highly constrained circumstances. Her specialised areas of interest are the capability approach, negative capability, epistemic paradoxicality and justice, and the promotion of knowledges (plural) and Southern epistemologies. Aliya actively engages in issues around the politics of representation and knowledge production in the academe. Aliya is currently accepting doctoral students with an interest in these areas.

 

Projects

‘Understanding the impact of COVID-19 on learning experiences of secondary school going age children among Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families’

Project summary:
COVID-19 related school disruption and closures have significantly impacted the lives of students. Notably, these disruptions have had a multi-fold impact on children living in ethnic minority families. Although ethnic and racial inequalities are persistent across contexts, this project particularly engages with young adults and other family members belonging to Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families living in England. Children in these families have been uniquely affected by the pandemic (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020), given the higher rates of prevalence of COVID among these communities and also greater and persistent structural inequalities.

Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families have been identified as a focus of this research because firstly, these particular groups have been strongly impacted by COVID (Platt & Warwick, 2020; Trivedy et al., 2020) and secondly, their socio cultural specificities make them more susceptible to disadvantage during COVID related school closures (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020). Our particular focus is on secondary school children whose learning has been majorly disrupted due to national lockdowns and uncertainty regarding national assessments.

Therefore, this project aims to address the unique situation and experiences of these BAME families with secondary school age children to understand how COVID-related challenges are shaping their learning experiences, household dynamics and future aspirations.

This is an exploratory, project which fills an important gap in existing knowledge by taking a strong cultural lens to understanding how learning among Bangladeshi and Pakistani families could be supported, drawing on a deeper understanding of their lived realities and contextualised understanding of the challenges they face. The aim is not simply to reproduce a deficit discourse (which tends to be associated with families from these ethnic minority groups), but to understand family dynamics and the opportunities offered herein.

Funded by:

Cambridge Humanities Research Grants Scheme

Research team:

Professor Nidhi Singal and Dr Aliya Khalid

 

‘Bridging the Local and Global: Women’s Spaces and Collectives’

Project summary:
While globalisation aims to connect the world equitably, global perspectives are often privileged over the local. Often the voices of women from the South (metaphor for marginalised) are least heard. This project acknowledges that any ‘Global’ ideology of (Dis)order needs to include local women’s voices by studying how they have generated order/disorder to create ‘spaces of action’/reflection (defined as collectives). We propose a multi-phase, multi-method study of women’s ‘collective spaces’. We first explore how ‘collectives’ have been understood. We will learn from women themselves by conducting two interview based case studies on (i) access to reproductive healthcare (Northern Ireland/Ireland) and (ii) mothers’ collective experiences of educating their children during a pandemic (ethnic minority families in England). In bringing together law and education, archives and interviews, reproductive healthcare and education, this project offers a novel way of understanding – and recording – collective responses to local/global challenges.

Funded by:

Virtual Sandpits, The British Academy

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid, Dr Jane Rooney and Dr Ruth Houghton, Dr Kate spencer-Bennet, Alana Farrel Kate Spencer-Bennett

 

‘Gendered Inequalities in Education and Capability Spaces for Women/Girls (and others) in Pakistan During Covid’

Project summary: This project explores the cumulative intersectional experiences of women/girls (and others) that are shaped by multidimensional inequalities existing in their physical (urban/rural) and social (market, society, community and family) settings. In particular, how gender interacts with the different vectors of disadvantage (for example, economic, technological, social, cultural and political) within the perimeters of their location (urban/rural) and setting (labour market, society and family) is to be explored. We refer to what we call ‘spaces of action/reflection’ that provide unique gendered experiences of seeking education. This project will thus conceptualise ‘spaces’ as those gendered experiences marked by economic, technological, social, cultural and political disadvantages that girls (and others) face in their locations (physical and social) as they seek education in the times of the pandemic. Hence, ‘space’ not only refers to the physical (urban/rural), but also, the social (community, family), cultural (society) and personal (psychological) aspects within which girls/women (and others) live and seek education.

This research aims to identify how these ‘spaces’ generate opportunities and constraints for girls/women (and others) in Pakistan. This exploration is essential today when Covid-19 has created ruptures in the supportive structures of educational provision. In this regard, it is essential to understand the limits and opportunities for girls/women’s (and that of others) education in Pakistan within these ‘spaces’ that have come about as a result of Covid-19 related educational and social restructuring of opportunities. In sum, the aim of the project is to contribute to international education by creating a deeper understanding of the gendered vulnerabilities that intersect with disadvantages and placement (physical and social) vectors to produce gendered experiences for the most marginalised in the context of Pakistan.

Funded by:

British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) Seedcorn Fund

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid and Dr Soufia Siddiqui

 

Publications

Khalid, A. (forthcoming). ‘Hearing their silences: Mothers agency as they support their daughters’ education in rural Punjab Pakistan’, Gender and Education.

Khalid, A., & Rose, P. (forthcoming). Mothers’ Capability to Influence their Daughters’ Education in Pakistan: Interconnections between mothers’ value of education, negative capability and agency. Journal of Human Development and Capabilities.

Khalid, A. (in preparation) ‘Comparisons of hope, education, and aspirations between Pakistani mothers and revolutionaries: The being and becoming of agents in the contexts of change’. Comparative Education

Khalid, A. & Singal, N. (in preparation) ”It’s made us stronger as a family’: Ethnic minority parenting experiences of educating children in England during Covid’. Journal of Family Studies

Singal, N. & Khalid, A. (in preparation) ”Time moves fast but it also goes slow’: Secondary school children’s experiences of ‘preparing’ for exams during lockdown in England. Children and Society

Khalid, A., Parpart, J. & Holmes, G. (Eds.) (in preparation) ‘ From the silence/voice binary to liminal spaces: Understanding gender, agency and power in a changing world’. Routledge

Khalid, A. & Siddiqi, S. (in preparation). Human Development Report 2022: Gendered inequalities in education and capability spaces for women/girls (and others) in Pakistan during Covid’. South Asia: Human Development Report UNDP

Alice Aldinucci is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford, Department of Education. She is part of the team working on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani, and she is a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group.

She holds a PhD in Education from the University of Glasgow (UK) where she was awarded the LKAS Interdisciplinary Scholarship. Her thesis applies a longitudinal qualitative research design and draws on the combination of Critical Realism and Capability Approach to explore aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to adulthood in Chile. Prior to her PhD, she completed a MA in International Education and Development from the University of Sussex (UK) where she was awarded the Centre for International Education Prize for the best overall MA performance. For her MA at Sussex, she conducted an empirical dissertation on the meaning making of Inclusive Education in Nepal. She holds a MA in Languages and Cultures for International Communication and Cooperation from the University of Milan (Italy) with a fieldwork research on tensions between policy and practice in bilingual multicultural education for indigenous students in Higher Education in Peru; and a BA in Languages and Intercultural Mediation from the University of Arezzo (Italy).

Alice’s research interests are interdisciplinary and relate to the critical linkages between intersecting inequalities, education, individual/societal development, and social justice at local and global levels, motivated by the question what education for what/whose development?

Areas, theoretical approaches and methodologies of interests:
• Sociology of education including aspirations in post-school transitions
• Cultural political economy of education and life chances/human flourishing/social justice
• Tensions between global educational frameworks and local knowledge and practices
• Critical Realism
• Capability Approach
• Qualitative and participatory methodologies
• Digital storytelling for social change

Besides her work in academia, Alice has gained experience as researcher, development practitioner and educator working in projects including early childhood education programmes, refugees’ education, girls’ education, SEN and inclusive education, TVET, global citizenship education, arts-based pedagogies. She lived and worked in different countries including in Nepal (a country she has developed a strong bond with), Tanzania, El Salvador, Italy and the UK. These experiences have reinforced her critical approach to international education and global development and to education as a catalyst for both inequalities, injustices, violence and more equitable social change and peace-building processes.

She served as Student Representative of the British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) from 2017 to 2019 and she is currently part of the college of reviewers of the editorial board of Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education.

Publications:

Aldinucci, A. (2022). Understanding aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to postschool trajectories in Chile. PhD thesis, University of Glasgow.
Aldinucci, A., Valiente, O., Hurrell S., and Zancajo, A. (2021). Understanding aspirations: Why do secondary TVET students aim so high in Chile? Journal of Vocational Education & Training.

Rawle, G., Riddle, N., Pettersson, G., Wallin, J., Bici, M., Jasper, P., Harb, J., Hebbar, M., Davis, J., Aldinucci, A., (2017), EQUIP-Tanzania Impact Evaluation. Midline Technical Report, Volume I and II. Oxford Policy Management.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Kabira is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. His research is funded by the Clarendon Fund.

Kabira is interested in improving learning outcomes for children in fragile and conflict – affected regions of the world, school health and nutrition programs, combatting gender-based violence and supporting children who are dealing with addiction.

His doctoral research focuses on education outcomes for young learners in Papua New Guinea who are addicted to psychoactive and carcinogenic betel quid.

Prior to moving to Oxford, Kabira was based in Washington DC, USA and worked for the World Bank and Save the Children on impact evaluations, learning assessments and improving the quality of education statistics in twenty-six countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, the Pacific, and the Middle East.

Kabira holds a Masters in Economics and Public Policy from Princeton University where he was a recipient of the Stokes’ Prize for exemplary academic achievement and public service leadership, a Masters in Development Economics from the School of Oriental and African Studies at London University where he graduated with distinction and an undergraduate degree in Economics and Statistics from St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai.

Research interests:

·       Education in conflict regions

·       Combatting school related gender-based violence (SRGBV)

·       School health and nutrition programs

·       Supporting children with addiction

 

Publications

Aliya teaches on the Comparative and International Education MSc programme at the Department of Education after having taught at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge. Her research focuses on how women in the South navigate their agency in highly constrained circumstances. Her specialised areas of interest are the capability approach, negative capability, epistemic paradoxicality and justice, and the promotion of knowledges (plural) and Southern epistemologies. Aliya actively engages in issues around the politics of representation and knowledge production in the academe. Aliya is currently accepting doctoral students with an interest in these areas.

 

Projects

‘Understanding the impact of COVID-19 on learning experiences of secondary school going age children among Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families’

Project summary:
COVID-19 related school disruption and closures have significantly impacted the lives of students. Notably, these disruptions have had a multi-fold impact on children living in ethnic minority families. Although ethnic and racial inequalities are persistent across contexts, this project particularly engages with young adults and other family members belonging to Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families living in England. Children in these families have been uniquely affected by the pandemic (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020), given the higher rates of prevalence of COVID among these communities and also greater and persistent structural inequalities.

Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families have been identified as a focus of this research because firstly, these particular groups have been strongly impacted by COVID (Platt & Warwick, 2020; Trivedy et al., 2020) and secondly, their socio cultural specificities make them more susceptible to disadvantage during COVID related school closures (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020). Our particular focus is on secondary school children whose learning has been majorly disrupted due to national lockdowns and uncertainty regarding national assessments.

Therefore, this project aims to address the unique situation and experiences of these BAME families with secondary school age children to understand how COVID-related challenges are shaping their learning experiences, household dynamics and future aspirations.

This is an exploratory, project which fills an important gap in existing knowledge by taking a strong cultural lens to understanding how learning among Bangladeshi and Pakistani families could be supported, drawing on a deeper understanding of their lived realities and contextualised understanding of the challenges they face. The aim is not simply to reproduce a deficit discourse (which tends to be associated with families from these ethnic minority groups), but to understand family dynamics and the opportunities offered herein.

Funded by:

Cambridge Humanities Research Grants Scheme

Research team:

Professor Nidhi Singal and Dr Aliya Khalid

 

‘Bridging the Local and Global: Women’s Spaces and Collectives’

Project summary:
While globalisation aims to connect the world equitably, global perspectives are often privileged over the local. Often the voices of women from the South (metaphor for marginalised) are least heard. This project acknowledges that any ‘Global’ ideology of (Dis)order needs to include local women’s voices by studying how they have generated order/disorder to create ‘spaces of action’/reflection (defined as collectives). We propose a multi-phase, multi-method study of women’s ‘collective spaces’. We first explore how ‘collectives’ have been understood. We will learn from women themselves by conducting two interview based case studies on (i) access to reproductive healthcare (Northern Ireland/Ireland) and (ii) mothers’ collective experiences of educating their children during a pandemic (ethnic minority families in England). In bringing together law and education, archives and interviews, reproductive healthcare and education, this project offers a novel way of understanding – and recording – collective responses to local/global challenges.

Funded by:

Virtual Sandpits, The British Academy

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid, Dr Jane Rooney and Dr Ruth Houghton, Dr Kate spencer-Bennet, Alana Farrel Kate Spencer-Bennett

 

‘Gendered Inequalities in Education and Capability Spaces for Women/Girls (and others) in Pakistan During Covid’

Project summary: This project explores the cumulative intersectional experiences of women/girls (and others) that are shaped by multidimensional inequalities existing in their physical (urban/rural) and social (market, society, community and family) settings. In particular, how gender interacts with the different vectors of disadvantage (for example, economic, technological, social, cultural and political) within the perimeters of their location (urban/rural) and setting (labour market, society and family) is to be explored. We refer to what we call ‘spaces of action/reflection’ that provide unique gendered experiences of seeking education. This project will thus conceptualise ‘spaces’ as those gendered experiences marked by economic, technological, social, cultural and political disadvantages that girls (and others) face in their locations (physical and social) as they seek education in the times of the pandemic. Hence, ‘space’ not only refers to the physical (urban/rural), but also, the social (community, family), cultural (society) and personal (psychological) aspects within which girls/women (and others) live and seek education.

This research aims to identify how these ‘spaces’ generate opportunities and constraints for girls/women (and others) in Pakistan. This exploration is essential today when Covid-19 has created ruptures in the supportive structures of educational provision. In this regard, it is essential to understand the limits and opportunities for girls/women’s (and that of others) education in Pakistan within these ‘spaces’ that have come about as a result of Covid-19 related educational and social restructuring of opportunities. In sum, the aim of the project is to contribute to international education by creating a deeper understanding of the gendered vulnerabilities that intersect with disadvantages and placement (physical and social) vectors to produce gendered experiences for the most marginalised in the context of Pakistan.

Funded by:

British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) Seedcorn Fund

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid and Dr Soufia Siddiqui

 

Publications

Khalid, A. (forthcoming). ‘Hearing their silences: Mothers agency as they support their daughters’ education in rural Punjab Pakistan’, Gender and Education.

Khalid, A., & Rose, P. (forthcoming). Mothers’ Capability to Influence their Daughters’ Education in Pakistan: Interconnections between mothers’ value of education, negative capability and agency. Journal of Human Development and Capabilities.

Khalid, A. (in preparation) ‘Comparisons of hope, education, and aspirations between Pakistani mothers and revolutionaries: The being and becoming of agents in the contexts of change’. Comparative Education

Khalid, A. & Singal, N. (in preparation) ”It’s made us stronger as a family’: Ethnic minority parenting experiences of educating children in England during Covid’. Journal of Family Studies

Singal, N. & Khalid, A. (in preparation) ”Time moves fast but it also goes slow’: Secondary school children’s experiences of ‘preparing’ for exams during lockdown in England. Children and Society

Khalid, A., Parpart, J. & Holmes, G. (Eds.) (in preparation) ‘ From the silence/voice binary to liminal spaces: Understanding gender, agency and power in a changing world’. Routledge

Khalid, A. & Siddiqi, S. (in preparation). Human Development Report 2022: Gendered inequalities in education and capability spaces for women/girls (and others) in Pakistan during Covid’. South Asia: Human Development Report UNDP

Alice Aldinucci is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford, Department of Education. She is part of the team working on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani, and she is a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group.

She holds a PhD in Education from the University of Glasgow (UK) where she was awarded the LKAS Interdisciplinary Scholarship. Her thesis applies a longitudinal qualitative research design and draws on the combination of Critical Realism and Capability Approach to explore aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to adulthood in Chile. Prior to her PhD, she completed a MA in International Education and Development from the University of Sussex (UK) where she was awarded the Centre for International Education Prize for the best overall MA performance. For her MA at Sussex, she conducted an empirical dissertation on the meaning making of Inclusive Education in Nepal. She holds a MA in Languages and Cultures for International Communication and Cooperation from the University of Milan (Italy) with a fieldwork research on tensions between policy and practice in bilingual multicultural education for indigenous students in Higher Education in Peru; and a BA in Languages and Intercultural Mediation from the University of Arezzo (Italy).

Alice’s research interests are interdisciplinary and relate to the critical linkages between intersecting inequalities, education, individual/societal development, and social justice at local and global levels, motivated by the question what education for what/whose development?

Areas, theoretical approaches and methodologies of interests:
• Sociology of education including aspirations in post-school transitions
• Cultural political economy of education and life chances/human flourishing/social justice
• Tensions between global educational frameworks and local knowledge and practices
• Critical Realism
• Capability Approach
• Qualitative and participatory methodologies
• Digital storytelling for social change

Besides her work in academia, Alice has gained experience as researcher, development practitioner and educator working in projects including early childhood education programmes, refugees’ education, girls’ education, SEN and inclusive education, TVET, global citizenship education, arts-based pedagogies. She lived and worked in different countries including in Nepal (a country she has developed a strong bond with), Tanzania, El Salvador, Italy and the UK. These experiences have reinforced her critical approach to international education and global development and to education as a catalyst for both inequalities, injustices, violence and more equitable social change and peace-building processes.

She served as Student Representative of the British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) from 2017 to 2019 and she is currently part of the college of reviewers of the editorial board of Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education.

Publications:

Aldinucci, A. (2022). Understanding aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to postschool trajectories in Chile. PhD thesis, University of Glasgow.
Aldinucci, A., Valiente, O., Hurrell S., and Zancajo, A. (2021). Understanding aspirations: Why do secondary TVET students aim so high in Chile? Journal of Vocational Education & Training.

Rawle, G., Riddle, N., Pettersson, G., Wallin, J., Bici, M., Jasper, P., Harb, J., Hebbar, M., Davis, J., Aldinucci, A., (2017), EQUIP-Tanzania Impact Evaluation. Midline Technical Report, Volume I and II. Oxford Policy Management.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Kabira is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. His research is funded by the Clarendon Fund.

Kabira is interested in improving learning outcomes for children in fragile and conflict – affected regions of the world, school health and nutrition programs, combatting gender-based violence and supporting children who are dealing with addiction.

His doctoral research focuses on education outcomes for young learners in Papua New Guinea who are addicted to psychoactive and carcinogenic betel quid.

Prior to moving to Oxford, Kabira was based in Washington DC, USA and worked for the World Bank and Save the Children on impact evaluations, learning assessments and improving the quality of education statistics in twenty-six countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, the Pacific, and the Middle East.

Kabira holds a Masters in Economics and Public Policy from Princeton University where he was a recipient of the Stokes’ Prize for exemplary academic achievement and public service leadership, a Masters in Development Economics from the School of Oriental and African Studies at London University where he graduated with distinction and an undergraduate degree in Economics and Statistics from St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai.

Research interests:

·       Education in conflict regions

·       Combatting school related gender-based violence (SRGBV)

·       School health and nutrition programs

·       Supporting children with addiction

 

Publications

Aliya teaches on the Comparative and International Education MSc programme at the Department of Education after having taught at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge. Her research focuses on how women in the South navigate their agency in highly constrained circumstances. Her specialised areas of interest are the capability approach, negative capability, epistemic paradoxicality and justice, and the promotion of knowledges (plural) and Southern epistemologies. Aliya actively engages in issues around the politics of representation and knowledge production in the academe. Aliya is currently accepting doctoral students with an interest in these areas.

 

Projects

‘Understanding the impact of COVID-19 on learning experiences of secondary school going age children among Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families’

Project summary:
COVID-19 related school disruption and closures have significantly impacted the lives of students. Notably, these disruptions have had a multi-fold impact on children living in ethnic minority families. Although ethnic and racial inequalities are persistent across contexts, this project particularly engages with young adults and other family members belonging to Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families living in England. Children in these families have been uniquely affected by the pandemic (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020), given the higher rates of prevalence of COVID among these communities and also greater and persistent structural inequalities.

Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families have been identified as a focus of this research because firstly, these particular groups have been strongly impacted by COVID (Platt & Warwick, 2020; Trivedy et al., 2020) and secondly, their socio cultural specificities make them more susceptible to disadvantage during COVID related school closures (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020). Our particular focus is on secondary school children whose learning has been majorly disrupted due to national lockdowns and uncertainty regarding national assessments.

Therefore, this project aims to address the unique situation and experiences of these BAME families with secondary school age children to understand how COVID-related challenges are shaping their learning experiences, household dynamics and future aspirations.

This is an exploratory, project which fills an important gap in existing knowledge by taking a strong cultural lens to understanding how learning among Bangladeshi and Pakistani families could be supported, drawing on a deeper understanding of their lived realities and contextualised understanding of the challenges they face. The aim is not simply to reproduce a deficit discourse (which tends to be associated with families from these ethnic minority groups), but to understand family dynamics and the opportunities offered herein.

Funded by:

Cambridge Humanities Research Grants Scheme

Research team:

Professor Nidhi Singal and Dr Aliya Khalid

 

‘Bridging the Local and Global: Women’s Spaces and Collectives’

Project summary:
While globalisation aims to connect the world equitably, global perspectives are often privileged over the local. Often the voices of women from the South (metaphor for marginalised) are least heard. This project acknowledges that any ‘Global’ ideology of (Dis)order needs to include local women’s voices by studying how they have generated order/disorder to create ‘spaces of action’/reflection (defined as collectives). We propose a multi-phase, multi-method study of women’s ‘collective spaces’. We first explore how ‘collectives’ have been understood. We will learn from women themselves by conducting two interview based case studies on (i) access to reproductive healthcare (Northern Ireland/Ireland) and (ii) mothers’ collective experiences of educating their children during a pandemic (ethnic minority families in England). In bringing together law and education, archives and interviews, reproductive healthcare and education, this project offers a novel way of understanding – and recording – collective responses to local/global challenges.

Funded by:

Virtual Sandpits, The British Academy

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid, Dr Jane Rooney and Dr Ruth Houghton, Dr Kate spencer-Bennet, Alana Farrel Kate Spencer-Bennett

 

‘Gendered Inequalities in Education and Capability Spaces for Women/Girls (and others) in Pakistan During Covid’

Project summary: This project explores the cumulative intersectional experiences of women/girls (and others) that are shaped by multidimensional inequalities existing in their physical (urban/rural) and social (market, society, community and family) settings. In particular, how gender interacts with the different vectors of disadvantage (for example, economic, technological, social, cultural and political) within the perimeters of their location (urban/rural) and setting (labour market, society and family) is to be explored. We refer to what we call ‘spaces of action/reflection’ that provide unique gendered experiences of seeking education. This project will thus conceptualise ‘spaces’ as those gendered experiences marked by economic, technological, social, cultural and political disadvantages that girls (and others) face in their locations (physical and social) as they seek education in the times of the pandemic. Hence, ‘space’ not only refers to the physical (urban/rural), but also, the social (community, family), cultural (society) and personal (psychological) aspects within which girls/women (and others) live and seek education.

This research aims to identify how these ‘spaces’ generate opportunities and constraints for girls/women (and others) in Pakistan. This exploration is essential today when Covid-19 has created ruptures in the supportive structures of educational provision. In this regard, it is essential to understand the limits and opportunities for girls/women’s (and that of others) education in Pakistan within these ‘spaces’ that have come about as a result of Covid-19 related educational and social restructuring of opportunities. In sum, the aim of the project is to contribute to international education by creating a deeper understanding of the gendered vulnerabilities that intersect with disadvantages and placement (physical and social) vectors to produce gendered experiences for the most marginalised in the context of Pakistan.

Funded by:

British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) Seedcorn Fund

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid and Dr Soufia Siddiqui

 

Publications

Khalid, A. (forthcoming). ‘Hearing their silences: Mothers agency as they support their daughters’ education in rural Punjab Pakistan’, Gender and Education.

Khalid, A., & Rose, P. (forthcoming). Mothers’ Capability to Influence their Daughters’ Education in Pakistan: Interconnections between mothers’ value of education, negative capability and agency. Journal of Human Development and Capabilities.

Khalid, A. (in preparation) ‘Comparisons of hope, education, and aspirations between Pakistani mothers and revolutionaries: The being and becoming of agents in the contexts of change’. Comparative Education

Khalid, A. & Singal, N. (in preparation) ”It’s made us stronger as a family’: Ethnic minority parenting experiences of educating children in England during Covid’. Journal of Family Studies

Singal, N. & Khalid, A. (in preparation) ”Time moves fast but it also goes slow’: Secondary school children’s experiences of ‘preparing’ for exams during lockdown in England. Children and Society

Khalid, A., Parpart, J. & Holmes, G. (Eds.) (in preparation) ‘ From the silence/voice binary to liminal spaces: Understanding gender, agency and power in a changing world’. Routledge

Khalid, A. & Siddiqi, S. (in preparation). Human Development Report 2022: Gendered inequalities in education and capability spaces for women/girls (and others) in Pakistan during Covid’. South Asia: Human Development Report UNDP

Alice Aldinucci is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford, Department of Education. She is part of the team working on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani, and she is a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group.

She holds a PhD in Education from the University of Glasgow (UK) where she was awarded the LKAS Interdisciplinary Scholarship. Her thesis applies a longitudinal qualitative research design and draws on the combination of Critical Realism and Capability Approach to explore aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to adulthood in Chile. Prior to her PhD, she completed a MA in International Education and Development from the University of Sussex (UK) where she was awarded the Centre for International Education Prize for the best overall MA performance. For her MA at Sussex, she conducted an empirical dissertation on the meaning making of Inclusive Education in Nepal. She holds a MA in Languages and Cultures for International Communication and Cooperation from the University of Milan (Italy) with a fieldwork research on tensions between policy and practice in bilingual multicultural education for indigenous students in Higher Education in Peru; and a BA in Languages and Intercultural Mediation from the University of Arezzo (Italy).

Alice’s research interests are interdisciplinary and relate to the critical linkages between intersecting inequalities, education, individual/societal development, and social justice at local and global levels, motivated by the question what education for what/whose development?

Areas, theoretical approaches and methodologies of interests:
• Sociology of education including aspirations in post-school transitions
• Cultural political economy of education and life chances/human flourishing/social justice
• Tensions between global educational frameworks and local knowledge and practices
• Critical Realism
• Capability Approach
• Qualitative and participatory methodologies
• Digital storytelling for social change

Besides her work in academia, Alice has gained experience as researcher, development practitioner and educator working in projects including early childhood education programmes, refugees’ education, girls’ education, SEN and inclusive education, TVET, global citizenship education, arts-based pedagogies. She lived and worked in different countries including in Nepal (a country she has developed a strong bond with), Tanzania, El Salvador, Italy and the UK. These experiences have reinforced her critical approach to international education and global development and to education as a catalyst for both inequalities, injustices, violence and more equitable social change and peace-building processes.

She served as Student Representative of the British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) from 2017 to 2019 and she is currently part of the college of reviewers of the editorial board of Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education.

Publications:

Aldinucci, A. (2022). Understanding aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to postschool trajectories in Chile. PhD thesis, University of Glasgow.
Aldinucci, A., Valiente, O., Hurrell S., and Zancajo, A. (2021). Understanding aspirations: Why do secondary TVET students aim so high in Chile? Journal of Vocational Education & Training.

Rawle, G., Riddle, N., Pettersson, G., Wallin, J., Bici, M., Jasper, P., Harb, J., Hebbar, M., Davis, J., Aldinucci, A., (2017), EQUIP-Tanzania Impact Evaluation. Midline Technical Report, Volume I and II. Oxford Policy Management.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Kabira is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. His research is funded by the Clarendon Fund.

Kabira is interested in improving learning outcomes for children in fragile and conflict – affected regions of the world, school health and nutrition programs, combatting gender-based violence and supporting children who are dealing with addiction.

His doctoral research focuses on education outcomes for young learners in Papua New Guinea who are addicted to psychoactive and carcinogenic betel quid.

Prior to moving to Oxford, Kabira was based in Washington DC, USA and worked for the World Bank and Save the Children on impact evaluations, learning assessments and improving the quality of education statistics in twenty-six countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, the Pacific, and the Middle East.

Kabira holds a Masters in Economics and Public Policy from Princeton University where he was a recipient of the Stokes’ Prize for exemplary academic achievement and public service leadership, a Masters in Development Economics from the School of Oriental and African Studies at London University where he graduated with distinction and an undergraduate degree in Economics and Statistics from St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai.

Research interests:

·       Education in conflict regions

·       Combatting school related gender-based violence (SRGBV)

·       School health and nutrition programs

·       Supporting children with addiction

 

Publications

Aliya teaches on the Comparative and International Education MSc programme at the Department of Education after having taught at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge. Her research focuses on how women in the South navigate their agency in highly constrained circumstances. Her specialised areas of interest are the capability approach, negative capability, epistemic paradoxicality and justice, and the promotion of knowledges (plural) and Southern epistemologies. Aliya actively engages in issues around the politics of representation and knowledge production in the academe. Aliya is currently accepting doctoral students with an interest in these areas.

 

Projects

‘Understanding the impact of COVID-19 on learning experiences of secondary school going age children among Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families’

Project summary:
COVID-19 related school disruption and closures have significantly impacted the lives of students. Notably, these disruptions have had a multi-fold impact on children living in ethnic minority families. Although ethnic and racial inequalities are persistent across contexts, this project particularly engages with young adults and other family members belonging to Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families living in England. Children in these families have been uniquely affected by the pandemic (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020), given the higher rates of prevalence of COVID among these communities and also greater and persistent structural inequalities.

Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families have been identified as a focus of this research because firstly, these particular groups have been strongly impacted by COVID (Platt & Warwick, 2020; Trivedy et al., 2020) and secondly, their socio cultural specificities make them more susceptible to disadvantage during COVID related school closures (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020). Our particular focus is on secondary school children whose learning has been majorly disrupted due to national lockdowns and uncertainty regarding national assessments.

Therefore, this project aims to address the unique situation and experiences of these BAME families with secondary school age children to understand how COVID-related challenges are shaping their learning experiences, household dynamics and future aspirations.

This is an exploratory, project which fills an important gap in existing knowledge by taking a strong cultural lens to understanding how learning among Bangladeshi and Pakistani families could be supported, drawing on a deeper understanding of their lived realities and contextualised understanding of the challenges they face. The aim is not simply to reproduce a deficit discourse (which tends to be associated with families from these ethnic minority groups), but to understand family dynamics and the opportunities offered herein.

Funded by:

Cambridge Humanities Research Grants Scheme

Research team:

Professor Nidhi Singal and Dr Aliya Khalid

 

‘Bridging the Local and Global: Women’s Spaces and Collectives’

Project summary:
While globalisation aims to connect the world equitably, global perspectives are often privileged over the local. Often the voices of women from the South (metaphor for marginalised) are least heard. This project acknowledges that any ‘Global’ ideology of (Dis)order needs to include local women’s voices by studying how they have generated order/disorder to create ‘spaces of action’/reflection (defined as collectives). We propose a multi-phase, multi-method study of women’s ‘collective spaces’. We first explore how ‘collectives’ have been understood. We will learn from women themselves by conducting two interview based case studies on (i) access to reproductive healthcare (Northern Ireland/Ireland) and (ii) mothers’ collective experiences of educating their children during a pandemic (ethnic minority families in England). In bringing together law and education, archives and interviews, reproductive healthcare and education, this project offers a novel way of understanding – and recording – collective responses to local/global challenges.

Funded by:

Virtual Sandpits, The British Academy

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid, Dr Jane Rooney and Dr Ruth Houghton, Dr Kate spencer-Bennet, Alana Farrel Kate Spencer-Bennett

 

‘Gendered Inequalities in Education and Capability Spaces for Women/Girls (and others) in Pakistan During Covid’

Project summary: This project explores the cumulative intersectional experiences of women/girls (and others) that are shaped by multidimensional inequalities existing in their physical (urban/rural) and social (market, society, community and family) settings. In particular, how gender interacts with the different vectors of disadvantage (for example, economic, technological, social, cultural and political) within the perimeters of their location (urban/rural) and setting (labour market, society and family) is to be explored. We refer to what we call ‘spaces of action/reflection’ that provide unique gendered experiences of seeking education. This project will thus conceptualise ‘spaces’ as those gendered experiences marked by economic, technological, social, cultural and political disadvantages that girls (and others) face in their locations (physical and social) as they seek education in the times of the pandemic. Hence, ‘space’ not only refers to the physical (urban/rural), but also, the social (community, family), cultural (society) and personal (psychological) aspects within which girls/women (and others) live and seek education.

This research aims to identify how these ‘spaces’ generate opportunities and constraints for girls/women (and others) in Pakistan. This exploration is essential today when Covid-19 has created ruptures in the supportive structures of educational provision. In this regard, it is essential to understand the limits and opportunities for girls/women’s (and that of others) education in Pakistan within these ‘spaces’ that have come about as a result of Covid-19 related educational and social restructuring of opportunities. In sum, the aim of the project is to contribute to international education by creating a deeper understanding of the gendered vulnerabilities that intersect with disadvantages and placement (physical and social) vectors to produce gendered experiences for the most marginalised in the context of Pakistan.

Funded by:

British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) Seedcorn Fund

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid and Dr Soufia Siddiqui

 

Publications

Khalid, A. (forthcoming). ‘Hearing their silences: Mothers agency as they support their daughters’ education in rural Punjab Pakistan’, Gender and Education.

Khalid, A., & Rose, P. (forthcoming). Mothers’ Capability to Influence their Daughters’ Education in Pakistan: Interconnections between mothers’ value of education, negative capability and agency. Journal of Human Development and Capabilities.

Khalid, A. (in preparation) ‘Comparisons of hope, education, and aspirations between Pakistani mothers and revolutionaries: The being and becoming of agents in the contexts of change’. Comparative Education

Khalid, A. & Singal, N. (in preparation) ”It’s made us stronger as a family’: Ethnic minority parenting experiences of educating children in England during Covid’. Journal of Family Studies

Singal, N. & Khalid, A. (in preparation) ”Time moves fast but it also goes slow’: Secondary school children’s experiences of ‘preparing’ for exams during lockdown in England. Children and Society

Khalid, A., Parpart, J. & Holmes, G. (Eds.) (in preparation) ‘ From the silence/voice binary to liminal spaces: Understanding gender, agency and power in a changing world’. Routledge

Khalid, A. & Siddiqi, S. (in preparation). Human Development Report 2022: Gendered inequalities in education and capability spaces for women/girls (and others) in Pakistan during Covid’. South Asia: Human Development Report UNDP

Alice Aldinucci is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford, Department of Education. She is part of the team working on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani, and she is a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group.

She holds a PhD in Education from the University of Glasgow (UK) where she was awarded the LKAS Interdisciplinary Scholarship. Her thesis applies a longitudinal qualitative research design and draws on the combination of Critical Realism and Capability Approach to explore aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to adulthood in Chile. Prior to her PhD, she completed a MA in International Education and Development from the University of Sussex (UK) where she was awarded the Centre for International Education Prize for the best overall MA performance. For her MA at Sussex, she conducted an empirical dissertation on the meaning making of Inclusive Education in Nepal. She holds a MA in Languages and Cultures for International Communication and Cooperation from the University of Milan (Italy) with a fieldwork research on tensions between policy and practice in bilingual multicultural education for indigenous students in Higher Education in Peru; and a BA in Languages and Intercultural Mediation from the University of Arezzo (Italy).

Alice’s research interests are interdisciplinary and relate to the critical linkages between intersecting inequalities, education, individual/societal development, and social justice at local and global levels, motivated by the question what education for what/whose development?

Areas, theoretical approaches and methodologies of interests:
• Sociology of education including aspirations in post-school transitions
• Cultural political economy of education and life chances/human flourishing/social justice
• Tensions between global educational frameworks and local knowledge and practices
• Critical Realism
• Capability Approach
• Qualitative and participatory methodologies
• Digital storytelling for social change

Besides her work in academia, Alice has gained experience as researcher, development practitioner and educator working in projects including early childhood education programmes, refugees’ education, girls’ education, SEN and inclusive education, TVET, global citizenship education, arts-based pedagogies. She lived and worked in different countries including in Nepal (a country she has developed a strong bond with), Tanzania, El Salvador, Italy and the UK. These experiences have reinforced her critical approach to international education and global development and to education as a catalyst for both inequalities, injustices, violence and more equitable social change and peace-building processes.

She served as Student Representative of the British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) from 2017 to 2019 and she is currently part of the college of reviewers of the editorial board of Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education.

Publications:

Aldinucci, A. (2022). Understanding aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to postschool trajectories in Chile. PhD thesis, University of Glasgow.
Aldinucci, A., Valiente, O., Hurrell S., and Zancajo, A. (2021). Understanding aspirations: Why do secondary TVET students aim so high in Chile? Journal of Vocational Education & Training.

Rawle, G., Riddle, N., Pettersson, G., Wallin, J., Bici, M., Jasper, P., Harb, J., Hebbar, M., Davis, J., Aldinucci, A., (2017), EQUIP-Tanzania Impact Evaluation. Midline Technical Report, Volume I and II. Oxford Policy Management.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Kabira is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. His research is funded by the Clarendon Fund.

Kabira is interested in improving learning outcomes for children in fragile and conflict – affected regions of the world, school health and nutrition programs, combatting gender-based violence and supporting children who are dealing with addiction.

His doctoral research focuses on education outcomes for young learners in Papua New Guinea who are addicted to psychoactive and carcinogenic betel quid.

Prior to moving to Oxford, Kabira was based in Washington DC, USA and worked for the World Bank and Save the Children on impact evaluations, learning assessments and improving the quality of education statistics in twenty-six countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, the Pacific, and the Middle East.

Kabira holds a Masters in Economics and Public Policy from Princeton University where he was a recipient of the Stokes’ Prize for exemplary academic achievement and public service leadership, a Masters in Development Economics from the School of Oriental and African Studies at London University where he graduated with distinction and an undergraduate degree in Economics and Statistics from St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai.

Research interests:

·       Education in conflict regions

·       Combatting school related gender-based violence (SRGBV)

·       School health and nutrition programs

·       Supporting children with addiction

 

Publications

Aliya teaches on the Comparative and International Education MSc programme at the Department of Education after having taught at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge. Her research focuses on how women in the South navigate their agency in highly constrained circumstances. Her specialised areas of interest are the capability approach, negative capability, epistemic paradoxicality and justice, and the promotion of knowledges (plural) and Southern epistemologies. Aliya actively engages in issues around the politics of representation and knowledge production in the academe. Aliya is currently accepting doctoral students with an interest in these areas.

 

Projects

‘Understanding the impact of COVID-19 on learning experiences of secondary school going age children among Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families’

Project summary:
COVID-19 related school disruption and closures have significantly impacted the lives of students. Notably, these disruptions have had a multi-fold impact on children living in ethnic minority families. Although ethnic and racial inequalities are persistent across contexts, this project particularly engages with young adults and other family members belonging to Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families living in England. Children in these families have been uniquely affected by the pandemic (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020), given the higher rates of prevalence of COVID among these communities and also greater and persistent structural inequalities.

Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families have been identified as a focus of this research because firstly, these particular groups have been strongly impacted by COVID (Platt & Warwick, 2020; Trivedy et al., 2020) and secondly, their socio cultural specificities make them more susceptible to disadvantage during COVID related school closures (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020). Our particular focus is on secondary school children whose learning has been majorly disrupted due to national lockdowns and uncertainty regarding national assessments.

Therefore, this project aims to address the unique situation and experiences of these BAME families with secondary school age children to understand how COVID-related challenges are shaping their learning experiences, household dynamics and future aspirations.

This is an exploratory, project which fills an important gap in existing knowledge by taking a strong cultural lens to understanding how learning among Bangladeshi and Pakistani families could be supported, drawing on a deeper understanding of their lived realities and contextualised understanding of the challenges they face. The aim is not simply to reproduce a deficit discourse (which tends to be associated with families from these ethnic minority groups), but to understand family dynamics and the opportunities offered herein.

Funded by:

Cambridge Humanities Research Grants Scheme

Research team:

Professor Nidhi Singal and Dr Aliya Khalid

 

‘Bridging the Local and Global: Women’s Spaces and Collectives’

Project summary:
While globalisation aims to connect the world equitably, global perspectives are often privileged over the local. Often the voices of women from the South (metaphor for marginalised) are least heard. This project acknowledges that any ‘Global’ ideology of (Dis)order needs to include local women’s voices by studying how they have generated order/disorder to create ‘spaces of action’/reflection (defined as collectives). We propose a multi-phase, multi-method study of women’s ‘collective spaces’. We first explore how ‘collectives’ have been understood. We will learn from women themselves by conducting two interview based case studies on (i) access to reproductive healthcare (Northern Ireland/Ireland) and (ii) mothers’ collective experiences of educating their children during a pandemic (ethnic minority families in England). In bringing together law and education, archives and interviews, reproductive healthcare and education, this project offers a novel way of understanding – and recording – collective responses to local/global challenges.

Funded by:

Virtual Sandpits, The British Academy

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid, Dr Jane Rooney and Dr Ruth Houghton, Dr Kate spencer-Bennet, Alana Farrel Kate Spencer-Bennett

 

‘Gendered Inequalities in Education and Capability Spaces for Women/Girls (and others) in Pakistan During Covid’

Project summary: This project explores the cumulative intersectional experiences of women/girls (and others) that are shaped by multidimensional inequalities existing in their physical (urban/rural) and social (market, society, community and family) settings. In particular, how gender interacts with the different vectors of disadvantage (for example, economic, technological, social, cultural and political) within the perimeters of their location (urban/rural) and setting (labour market, society and family) is to be explored. We refer to what we call ‘spaces of action/reflection’ that provide unique gendered experiences of seeking education. This project will thus conceptualise ‘spaces’ as those gendered experiences marked by economic, technological, social, cultural and political disadvantages that girls (and others) face in their locations (physical and social) as they seek education in the times of the pandemic. Hence, ‘space’ not only refers to the physical (urban/rural), but also, the social (community, family), cultural (society) and personal (psychological) aspects within which girls/women (and others) live and seek education.

This research aims to identify how these ‘spaces’ generate opportunities and constraints for girls/women (and others) in Pakistan. This exploration is essential today when Covid-19 has created ruptures in the supportive structures of educational provision. In this regard, it is essential to understand the limits and opportunities for girls/women’s (and that of others) education in Pakistan within these ‘spaces’ that have come about as a result of Covid-19 related educational and social restructuring of opportunities. In sum, the aim of the project is to contribute to international education by creating a deeper understanding of the gendered vulnerabilities that intersect with disadvantages and placement (physical and social) vectors to produce gendered experiences for the most marginalised in the context of Pakistan.

Funded by:

British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) Seedcorn Fund

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid and Dr Soufia Siddiqui

 

Publications

Khalid, A. (forthcoming). ‘Hearing their silences: Mothers agency as they support their daughters’ education in rural Punjab Pakistan’, Gender and Education.

Khalid, A., & Rose, P. (forthcoming). Mothers’ Capability to Influence their Daughters’ Education in Pakistan: Interconnections between mothers’ value of education, negative capability and agency. Journal of Human Development and Capabilities.

Khalid, A. (in preparation) ‘Comparisons of hope, education, and aspirations between Pakistani mothers and revolutionaries: The being and becoming of agents in the contexts of change’. Comparative Education

Khalid, A. & Singal, N. (in preparation) ”It’s made us stronger as a family’: Ethnic minority parenting experiences of educating children in England during Covid’. Journal of Family Studies

Singal, N. & Khalid, A. (in preparation) ”Time moves fast but it also goes slow’: Secondary school children’s experiences of ‘preparing’ for exams during lockdown in England. Children and Society

Khalid, A., Parpart, J. & Holmes, G. (Eds.) (in preparation) ‘ From the silence/voice binary to liminal spaces: Understanding gender, agency and power in a changing world’. Routledge

Khalid, A. & Siddiqi, S. (in preparation). Human Development Report 2022: Gendered inequalities in education and capability spaces for women/girls (and others) in Pakistan during Covid’. South Asia: Human Development Report UNDP

Alice Aldinucci is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford, Department of Education. She is part of the team working on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani, and she is a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group.

She holds a PhD in Education from the University of Glasgow (UK) where she was awarded the LKAS Interdisciplinary Scholarship. Her thesis applies a longitudinal qualitative research design and draws on the combination of Critical Realism and Capability Approach to explore aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to adulthood in Chile. Prior to her PhD, she completed a MA in International Education and Development from the University of Sussex (UK) where she was awarded the Centre for International Education Prize for the best overall MA performance. For her MA at Sussex, she conducted an empirical dissertation on the meaning making of Inclusive Education in Nepal. She holds a MA in Languages and Cultures for International Communication and Cooperation from the University of Milan (Italy) with a fieldwork research on tensions between policy and practice in bilingual multicultural education for indigenous students in Higher Education in Peru; and a BA in Languages and Intercultural Mediation from the University of Arezzo (Italy).

Alice’s research interests are interdisciplinary and relate to the critical linkages between intersecting inequalities, education, individual/societal development, and social justice at local and global levels, motivated by the question what education for what/whose development?

Areas, theoretical approaches and methodologies of interests:
• Sociology of education including aspirations in post-school transitions
• Cultural political economy of education and life chances/human flourishing/social justice
• Tensions between global educational frameworks and local knowledge and practices
• Critical Realism
• Capability Approach
• Qualitative and participatory methodologies
• Digital storytelling for social change

Besides her work in academia, Alice has gained experience as researcher, development practitioner and educator working in projects including early childhood education programmes, refugees’ education, girls’ education, SEN and inclusive education, TVET, global citizenship education, arts-based pedagogies. She lived and worked in different countries including in Nepal (a country she has developed a strong bond with), Tanzania, El Salvador, Italy and the UK. These experiences have reinforced her critical approach to international education and global development and to education as a catalyst for both inequalities, injustices, violence and more equitable social change and peace-building processes.

She served as Student Representative of the British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) from 2017 to 2019 and she is currently part of the college of reviewers of the editorial board of Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education.

Publications:

Aldinucci, A. (2022). Understanding aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to postschool trajectories in Chile. PhD thesis, University of Glasgow.
Aldinucci, A., Valiente, O., Hurrell S., and Zancajo, A. (2021). Understanding aspirations: Why do secondary TVET students aim so high in Chile? Journal of Vocational Education & Training.

Rawle, G., Riddle, N., Pettersson, G., Wallin, J., Bici, M., Jasper, P., Harb, J., Hebbar, M., Davis, J., Aldinucci, A., (2017), EQUIP-Tanzania Impact Evaluation. Midline Technical Report, Volume I and II. Oxford Policy Management.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Kabira is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. His research is funded by the Clarendon Fund.

Kabira is interested in improving learning outcomes for children in fragile and conflict – affected regions of the world, school health and nutrition programs, combatting gender-based violence and supporting children who are dealing with addiction.

His doctoral research focuses on education outcomes for young learners in Papua New Guinea who are addicted to psychoactive and carcinogenic betel quid.

Prior to moving to Oxford, Kabira was based in Washington DC, USA and worked for the World Bank and Save the Children on impact evaluations, learning assessments and improving the quality of education statistics in twenty-six countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, the Pacific, and the Middle East.

Kabira holds a Masters in Economics and Public Policy from Princeton University where he was a recipient of the Stokes’ Prize for exemplary academic achievement and public service leadership, a Masters in Development Economics from the School of Oriental and African Studies at London University where he graduated with distinction and an undergraduate degree in Economics and Statistics from St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai.

Research interests:

·       Education in conflict regions

·       Combatting school related gender-based violence (SRGBV)

·       School health and nutrition programs

·       Supporting children with addiction

 

Publications

Aliya teaches on the Comparative and International Education MSc programme at the Department of Education after having taught at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge. Her research focuses on how women in the South navigate their agency in highly constrained circumstances. Her specialised areas of interest are the capability approach, negative capability, epistemic paradoxicality and justice, and the promotion of knowledges (plural) and Southern epistemologies. Aliya actively engages in issues around the politics of representation and knowledge production in the academe. Aliya is currently accepting doctoral students with an interest in these areas.

 

Projects

‘Understanding the impact of COVID-19 on learning experiences of secondary school going age children among Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families’

Project summary:
COVID-19 related school disruption and closures have significantly impacted the lives of students. Notably, these disruptions have had a multi-fold impact on children living in ethnic minority families. Although ethnic and racial inequalities are persistent across contexts, this project particularly engages with young adults and other family members belonging to Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families living in England. Children in these families have been uniquely affected by the pandemic (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020), given the higher rates of prevalence of COVID among these communities and also greater and persistent structural inequalities.

Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families have been identified as a focus of this research because firstly, these particular groups have been strongly impacted by COVID (Platt & Warwick, 2020; Trivedy et al., 2020) and secondly, their socio cultural specificities make them more susceptible to disadvantage during COVID related school closures (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020). Our particular focus is on secondary school children whose learning has been majorly disrupted due to national lockdowns and uncertainty regarding national assessments.

Therefore, this project aims to address the unique situation and experiences of these BAME families with secondary school age children to understand how COVID-related challenges are shaping their learning experiences, household dynamics and future aspirations.

This is an exploratory, project which fills an important gap in existing knowledge by taking a strong cultural lens to understanding how learning among Bangladeshi and Pakistani families could be supported, drawing on a deeper understanding of their lived realities and contextualised understanding of the challenges they face. The aim is not simply to reproduce a deficit discourse (which tends to be associated with families from these ethnic minority groups), but to understand family dynamics and the opportunities offered herein.

Funded by:

Cambridge Humanities Research Grants Scheme

Research team:

Professor Nidhi Singal and Dr Aliya Khalid

 

‘Bridging the Local and Global: Women’s Spaces and Collectives’

Project summary:
While globalisation aims to connect the world equitably, global perspectives are often privileged over the local. Often the voices of women from the South (metaphor for marginalised) are least heard. This project acknowledges that any ‘Global’ ideology of (Dis)order needs to include local women’s voices by studying how they have generated order/disorder to create ‘spaces of action’/reflection (defined as collectives). We propose a multi-phase, multi-method study of women’s ‘collective spaces’. We first explore how ‘collectives’ have been understood. We will learn from women themselves by conducting two interview based case studies on (i) access to reproductive healthcare (Northern Ireland/Ireland) and (ii) mothers’ collective experiences of educating their children during a pandemic (ethnic minority families in England). In bringing together law and education, archives and interviews, reproductive healthcare and education, this project offers a novel way of understanding – and recording – collective responses to local/global challenges.

Funded by:

Virtual Sandpits, The British Academy

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid, Dr Jane Rooney and Dr Ruth Houghton, Dr Kate spencer-Bennet, Alana Farrel Kate Spencer-Bennett

 

‘Gendered Inequalities in Education and Capability Spaces for Women/Girls (and others) in Pakistan During Covid’

Project summary: This project explores the cumulative intersectional experiences of women/girls (and others) that are shaped by multidimensional inequalities existing in their physical (urban/rural) and social (market, society, community and family) settings. In particular, how gender interacts with the different vectors of disadvantage (for example, economic, technological, social, cultural and political) within the perimeters of their location (urban/rural) and setting (labour market, society and family) is to be explored. We refer to what we call ‘spaces of action/reflection’ that provide unique gendered experiences of seeking education. This project will thus conceptualise ‘spaces’ as those gendered experiences marked by economic, technological, social, cultural and political disadvantages that girls (and others) face in their locations (physical and social) as they seek education in the times of the pandemic. Hence, ‘space’ not only refers to the physical (urban/rural), but also, the social (community, family), cultural (society) and personal (psychological) aspects within which girls/women (and others) live and seek education.

This research aims to identify how these ‘spaces’ generate opportunities and constraints for girls/women (and others) in Pakistan. This exploration is essential today when Covid-19 has created ruptures in the supportive structures of educational provision. In this regard, it is essential to understand the limits and opportunities for girls/women’s (and that of others) education in Pakistan within these ‘spaces’ that have come about as a result of Covid-19 related educational and social restructuring of opportunities. In sum, the aim of the project is to contribute to international education by creating a deeper understanding of the gendered vulnerabilities that intersect with disadvantages and placement (physical and social) vectors to produce gendered experiences for the most marginalised in the context of Pakistan.

Funded by:

British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) Seedcorn Fund

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid and Dr Soufia Siddiqui

 

Publications

Khalid, A. (forthcoming). ‘Hearing their silences: Mothers agency as they support their daughters’ education in rural Punjab Pakistan’, Gender and Education.

Khalid, A., & Rose, P. (forthcoming). Mothers’ Capability to Influence their Daughters’ Education in Pakistan: Interconnections between mothers’ value of education, negative capability and agency. Journal of Human Development and Capabilities.

Khalid, A. (in preparation) ‘Comparisons of hope, education, and aspirations between Pakistani mothers and revolutionaries: The being and becoming of agents in the contexts of change’. Comparative Education

Khalid, A. & Singal, N. (in preparation) ”It’s made us stronger as a family’: Ethnic minority parenting experiences of educating children in England during Covid’. Journal of Family Studies

Singal, N. & Khalid, A. (in preparation) ”Time moves fast but it also goes slow’: Secondary school children’s experiences of ‘preparing’ for exams during lockdown in England. Children and Society

Khalid, A., Parpart, J. & Holmes, G. (Eds.) (in preparation) ‘ From the silence/voice binary to liminal spaces: Understanding gender, agency and power in a changing world’. Routledge

Khalid, A. & Siddiqi, S. (in preparation). Human Development Report 2022: Gendered inequalities in education and capability spaces for women/girls (and others) in Pakistan during Covid’. South Asia: Human Development Report UNDP

Alice Aldinucci is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford, Department of Education. She is part of the team working on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani, and she is a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group.

She holds a PhD in Education from the University of Glasgow (UK) where she was awarded the LKAS Interdisciplinary Scholarship. Her thesis applies a longitudinal qualitative research design and draws on the combination of Critical Realism and Capability Approach to explore aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to adulthood in Chile. Prior to her PhD, she completed a MA in International Education and Development from the University of Sussex (UK) where she was awarded the Centre for International Education Prize for the best overall MA performance. For her MA at Sussex, she conducted an empirical dissertation on the meaning making of Inclusive Education in Nepal. She holds a MA in Languages and Cultures for International Communication and Cooperation from the University of Milan (Italy) with a fieldwork research on tensions between policy and practice in bilingual multicultural education for indigenous students in Higher Education in Peru; and a BA in Languages and Intercultural Mediation from the University of Arezzo (Italy).

Alice’s research interests are interdisciplinary and relate to the critical linkages between intersecting inequalities, education, individual/societal development, and social justice at local and global levels, motivated by the question what education for what/whose development?

Areas, theoretical approaches and methodologies of interests:
• Sociology of education including aspirations in post-school transitions
• Cultural political economy of education and life chances/human flourishing/social justice
• Tensions between global educational frameworks and local knowledge and practices
• Critical Realism
• Capability Approach
• Qualitative and participatory methodologies
• Digital storytelling for social change

Besides her work in academia, Alice has gained experience as researcher, development practitioner and educator working in projects including early childhood education programmes, refugees’ education, girls’ education, SEN and inclusive education, TVET, global citizenship education, arts-based pedagogies. She lived and worked in different countries including in Nepal (a country she has developed a strong bond with), Tanzania, El Salvador, Italy and the UK. These experiences have reinforced her critical approach to international education and global development and to education as a catalyst for both inequalities, injustices, violence and more equitable social change and peace-building processes.

She served as Student Representative of the British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) from 2017 to 2019 and she is currently part of the college of reviewers of the editorial board of Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education.

Publications:

Aldinucci, A. (2022). Understanding aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to postschool trajectories in Chile. PhD thesis, University of Glasgow.
Aldinucci, A., Valiente, O., Hurrell S., and Zancajo, A. (2021). Understanding aspirations: Why do secondary TVET students aim so high in Chile? Journal of Vocational Education & Training.

Rawle, G., Riddle, N., Pettersson, G., Wallin, J., Bici, M., Jasper, P., Harb, J., Hebbar, M., Davis, J., Aldinucci, A., (2017), EQUIP-Tanzania Impact Evaluation. Midline Technical Report, Volume I and II. Oxford Policy Management.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Kabira is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. His research is funded by the Clarendon Fund.

Kabira is interested in improving learning outcomes for children in fragile and conflict – affected regions of the world, school health and nutrition programs, combatting gender-based violence and supporting children who are dealing with addiction.

His doctoral research focuses on education outcomes for young learners in Papua New Guinea who are addicted to psychoactive and carcinogenic betel quid.

Prior to moving to Oxford, Kabira was based in Washington DC, USA and worked for the World Bank and Save the Children on impact evaluations, learning assessments and improving the quality of education statistics in twenty-six countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, the Pacific, and the Middle East.

Kabira holds a Masters in Economics and Public Policy from Princeton University where he was a recipient of the Stokes’ Prize for exemplary academic achievement and public service leadership, a Masters in Development Economics from the School of Oriental and African Studies at London University where he graduated with distinction and an undergraduate degree in Economics and Statistics from St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai.

Research interests:

·       Education in conflict regions

·       Combatting school related gender-based violence (SRGBV)

·       School health and nutrition programs

·       Supporting children with addiction

 

Publications

Aliya teaches on the Comparative and International Education MSc programme at the Department of Education after having taught at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge. Her research focuses on how women in the South navigate their agency in highly constrained circumstances. Her specialised areas of interest are the capability approach, negative capability, epistemic paradoxicality and justice, and the promotion of knowledges (plural) and Southern epistemologies. Aliya actively engages in issues around the politics of representation and knowledge production in the academe. Aliya is currently accepting doctoral students with an interest in these areas.

 

Projects

‘Understanding the impact of COVID-19 on learning experiences of secondary school going age children among Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families’

Project summary:
COVID-19 related school disruption and closures have significantly impacted the lives of students. Notably, these disruptions have had a multi-fold impact on children living in ethnic minority families. Although ethnic and racial inequalities are persistent across contexts, this project particularly engages with young adults and other family members belonging to Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families living in England. Children in these families have been uniquely affected by the pandemic (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020), given the higher rates of prevalence of COVID among these communities and also greater and persistent structural inequalities.

Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families have been identified as a focus of this research because firstly, these particular groups have been strongly impacted by COVID (Platt & Warwick, 2020; Trivedy et al., 2020) and secondly, their socio cultural specificities make them more susceptible to disadvantage during COVID related school closures (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020). Our particular focus is on secondary school children whose learning has been majorly disrupted due to national lockdowns and uncertainty regarding national assessments.

Therefore, this project aims to address the unique situation and experiences of these BAME families with secondary school age children to understand how COVID-related challenges are shaping their learning experiences, household dynamics and future aspirations.

This is an exploratory, project which fills an important gap in existing knowledge by taking a strong cultural lens to understanding how learning among Bangladeshi and Pakistani families could be supported, drawing on a deeper understanding of their lived realities and contextualised understanding of the challenges they face. The aim is not simply to reproduce a deficit discourse (which tends to be associated with families from these ethnic minority groups), but to understand family dynamics and the opportunities offered herein.

Funded by:

Cambridge Humanities Research Grants Scheme

Research team:

Professor Nidhi Singal and Dr Aliya Khalid

 

‘Bridging the Local and Global: Women’s Spaces and Collectives’

Project summary:
While globalisation aims to connect the world equitably, global perspectives are often privileged over the local. Often the voices of women from the South (metaphor for marginalised) are least heard. This project acknowledges that any ‘Global’ ideology of (Dis)order needs to include local women’s voices by studying how they have generated order/disorder to create ‘spaces of action’/reflection (defined as collectives). We propose a multi-phase, multi-method study of women’s ‘collective spaces’. We first explore how ‘collectives’ have been understood. We will learn from women themselves by conducting two interview based case studies on (i) access to reproductive healthcare (Northern Ireland/Ireland) and (ii) mothers’ collective experiences of educating their children during a pandemic (ethnic minority families in England). In bringing together law and education, archives and interviews, reproductive healthcare and education, this project offers a novel way of understanding – and recording – collective responses to local/global challenges.

Funded by:

Virtual Sandpits, The British Academy

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid, Dr Jane Rooney and Dr Ruth Houghton, Dr Kate spencer-Bennet, Alana Farrel Kate Spencer-Bennett

 

‘Gendered Inequalities in Education and Capability Spaces for Women/Girls (and others) in Pakistan During Covid’

Project summary: This project explores the cumulative intersectional experiences of women/girls (and others) that are shaped by multidimensional inequalities existing in their physical (urban/rural) and social (market, society, community and family) settings. In particular, how gender interacts with the different vectors of disadvantage (for example, economic, technological, social, cultural and political) within the perimeters of their location (urban/rural) and setting (labour market, society and family) is to be explored. We refer to what we call ‘spaces of action/reflection’ that provide unique gendered experiences of seeking education. This project will thus conceptualise ‘spaces’ as those gendered experiences marked by economic, technological, social, cultural and political disadvantages that girls (and others) face in their locations (physical and social) as they seek education in the times of the pandemic. Hence, ‘space’ not only refers to the physical (urban/rural), but also, the social (community, family), cultural (society) and personal (psychological) aspects within which girls/women (and others) live and seek education.

This research aims to identify how these ‘spaces’ generate opportunities and constraints for girls/women (and others) in Pakistan. This exploration is essential today when Covid-19 has created ruptures in the supportive structures of educational provision. In this regard, it is essential to understand the limits and opportunities for girls/women’s (and that of others) education in Pakistan within these ‘spaces’ that have come about as a result of Covid-19 related educational and social restructuring of opportunities. In sum, the aim of the project is to contribute to international education by creating a deeper understanding of the gendered vulnerabilities that intersect with disadvantages and placement (physical and social) vectors to produce gendered experiences for the most marginalised in the context of Pakistan.

Funded by:

British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) Seedcorn Fund

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid and Dr Soufia Siddiqui

 

Publications

Khalid, A. (forthcoming). ‘Hearing their silences: Mothers agency as they support their daughters’ education in rural Punjab Pakistan’, Gender and Education.

Khalid, A., & Rose, P. (forthcoming). Mothers’ Capability to Influence their Daughters’ Education in Pakistan: Interconnections between mothers’ value of education, negative capability and agency. Journal of Human Development and Capabilities.

Khalid, A. (in preparation) ‘Comparisons of hope, education, and aspirations between Pakistani mothers and revolutionaries: The being and becoming of agents in the contexts of change’. Comparative Education

Khalid, A. & Singal, N. (in preparation) ”It’s made us stronger as a family’: Ethnic minority parenting experiences of educating children in England during Covid’. Journal of Family Studies

Singal, N. & Khalid, A. (in preparation) ”Time moves fast but it also goes slow’: Secondary school children’s experiences of ‘preparing’ for exams during lockdown in England. Children and Society

Khalid, A., Parpart, J. & Holmes, G. (Eds.) (in preparation) ‘ From the silence/voice binary to liminal spaces: Understanding gender, agency and power in a changing world’. Routledge

Khalid, A. & Siddiqi, S. (in preparation). Human Development Report 2022: Gendered inequalities in education and capability spaces for women/girls (and others) in Pakistan during Covid’. South Asia: Human Development Report UNDP

Alice Aldinucci is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford, Department of Education. She is part of the team working on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani, and she is a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group.

She holds a PhD in Education from the University of Glasgow (UK) where she was awarded the LKAS Interdisciplinary Scholarship. Her thesis applies a longitudinal qualitative research design and draws on the combination of Critical Realism and Capability Approach to explore aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to adulthood in Chile. Prior to her PhD, she completed a MA in International Education and Development from the University of Sussex (UK) where she was awarded the Centre for International Education Prize for the best overall MA performance. For her MA at Sussex, she conducted an empirical dissertation on the meaning making of Inclusive Education in Nepal. She holds a MA in Languages and Cultures for International Communication and Cooperation from the University of Milan (Italy) with a fieldwork research on tensions between policy and practice in bilingual multicultural education for indigenous students in Higher Education in Peru; and a BA in Languages and Intercultural Mediation from the University of Arezzo (Italy).

Alice’s research interests are interdisciplinary and relate to the critical linkages between intersecting inequalities, education, individual/societal development, and social justice at local and global levels, motivated by the question what education for what/whose development?

Areas, theoretical approaches and methodologies of interests:
• Sociology of education including aspirations in post-school transitions
• Cultural political economy of education and life chances/human flourishing/social justice
• Tensions between global educational frameworks and local knowledge and practices
• Critical Realism
• Capability Approach
• Qualitative and participatory methodologies
• Digital storytelling for social change

Besides her work in academia, Alice has gained experience as researcher, development practitioner and educator working in projects including early childhood education programmes, refugees’ education, girls’ education, SEN and inclusive education, TVET, global citizenship education, arts-based pedagogies. She lived and worked in different countries including in Nepal (a country she has developed a strong bond with), Tanzania, El Salvador, Italy and the UK. These experiences have reinforced her critical approach to international education and global development and to education as a catalyst for both inequalities, injustices, violence and more equitable social change and peace-building processes.

She served as Student Representative of the British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) from 2017 to 2019 and she is currently part of the college of reviewers of the editorial board of Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education.

Publications:

Aldinucci, A. (2022). Understanding aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to postschool trajectories in Chile. PhD thesis, University of Glasgow.
Aldinucci, A., Valiente, O., Hurrell S., and Zancajo, A. (2021). Understanding aspirations: Why do secondary TVET students aim so high in Chile? Journal of Vocational Education & Training.

Rawle, G., Riddle, N., Pettersson, G., Wallin, J., Bici, M., Jasper, P., Harb, J., Hebbar, M., Davis, J., Aldinucci, A., (2017), EQUIP-Tanzania Impact Evaluation. Midline Technical Report, Volume I and II. Oxford Policy Management.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Kabira is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. His research is funded by the Clarendon Fund.

Kabira is interested in improving learning outcomes for children in fragile and conflict – affected regions of the world, school health and nutrition programs, combatting gender-based violence and supporting children who are dealing with addiction.

His doctoral research focuses on education outcomes for young learners in Papua New Guinea who are addicted to psychoactive and carcinogenic betel quid.

Prior to moving to Oxford, Kabira was based in Washington DC, USA and worked for the World Bank and Save the Children on impact evaluations, learning assessments and improving the quality of education statistics in twenty-six countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, the Pacific, and the Middle East.

Kabira holds a Masters in Economics and Public Policy from Princeton University where he was a recipient of the Stokes’ Prize for exemplary academic achievement and public service leadership, a Masters in Development Economics from the School of Oriental and African Studies at London University where he graduated with distinction and an undergraduate degree in Economics and Statistics from St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai.

Research interests:

·       Education in conflict regions

·       Combatting school related gender-based violence (SRGBV)

·       School health and nutrition programs

·       Supporting children with addiction

 

Publications

Aliya teaches on the Comparative and International Education MSc programme at the Department of Education after having taught at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge. Her research focuses on how women in the South navigate their agency in highly constrained circumstances. Her specialised areas of interest are the capability approach, negative capability, epistemic paradoxicality and justice, and the promotion of knowledges (plural) and Southern epistemologies. Aliya actively engages in issues around the politics of representation and knowledge production in the academe. Aliya is currently accepting doctoral students with an interest in these areas.

 

Projects

‘Understanding the impact of COVID-19 on learning experiences of secondary school going age children among Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families’

Project summary:
COVID-19 related school disruption and closures have significantly impacted the lives of students. Notably, these disruptions have had a multi-fold impact on children living in ethnic minority families. Although ethnic and racial inequalities are persistent across contexts, this project particularly engages with young adults and other family members belonging to Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families living in England. Children in these families have been uniquely affected by the pandemic (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020), given the higher rates of prevalence of COVID among these communities and also greater and persistent structural inequalities.

Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families have been identified as a focus of this research because firstly, these particular groups have been strongly impacted by COVID (Platt & Warwick, 2020; Trivedy et al., 2020) and secondly, their socio cultural specificities make them more susceptible to disadvantage during COVID related school closures (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020). Our particular focus is on secondary school children whose learning has been majorly disrupted due to national lockdowns and uncertainty regarding national assessments.

Therefore, this project aims to address the unique situation and experiences of these BAME families with secondary school age children to understand how COVID-related challenges are shaping their learning experiences, household dynamics and future aspirations.

This is an exploratory, project which fills an important gap in existing knowledge by taking a strong cultural lens to understanding how learning among Bangladeshi and Pakistani families could be supported, drawing on a deeper understanding of their lived realities and contextualised understanding of the challenges they face. The aim is not simply to reproduce a deficit discourse (which tends to be associated with families from these ethnic minority groups), but to understand family dynamics and the opportunities offered herein.

Funded by:

Cambridge Humanities Research Grants Scheme

Research team:

Professor Nidhi Singal and Dr Aliya Khalid

 

‘Bridging the Local and Global: Women’s Spaces and Collectives’

Project summary:
While globalisation aims to connect the world equitably, global perspectives are often privileged over the local. Often the voices of women from the South (metaphor for marginalised) are least heard. This project acknowledges that any ‘Global’ ideology of (Dis)order needs to include local women’s voices by studying how they have generated order/disorder to create ‘spaces of action’/reflection (defined as collectives). We propose a multi-phase, multi-method study of women’s ‘collective spaces’. We first explore how ‘collectives’ have been understood. We will learn from women themselves by conducting two interview based case studies on (i) access to reproductive healthcare (Northern Ireland/Ireland) and (ii) mothers’ collective experiences of educating their children during a pandemic (ethnic minority families in England). In bringing together law and education, archives and interviews, reproductive healthcare and education, this project offers a novel way of understanding – and recording – collective responses to local/global challenges.

Funded by:

Virtual Sandpits, The British Academy

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid, Dr Jane Rooney and Dr Ruth Houghton, Dr Kate spencer-Bennet, Alana Farrel Kate Spencer-Bennett

 

‘Gendered Inequalities in Education and Capability Spaces for Women/Girls (and others) in Pakistan During Covid’

Project summary: This project explores the cumulative intersectional experiences of women/girls (and others) that are shaped by multidimensional inequalities existing in their physical (urban/rural) and social (market, society, community and family) settings. In particular, how gender interacts with the different vectors of disadvantage (for example, economic, technological, social, cultural and political) within the perimeters of their location (urban/rural) and setting (labour market, society and family) is to be explored. We refer to what we call ‘spaces of action/reflection’ that provide unique gendered experiences of seeking education. This project will thus conceptualise ‘spaces’ as those gendered experiences marked by economic, technological, social, cultural and political disadvantages that girls (and others) face in their locations (physical and social) as they seek education in the times of the pandemic. Hence, ‘space’ not only refers to the physical (urban/rural), but also, the social (community, family), cultural (society) and personal (psychological) aspects within which girls/women (and others) live and seek education.

This research aims to identify how these ‘spaces’ generate opportunities and constraints for girls/women (and others) in Pakistan. This exploration is essential today when Covid-19 has created ruptures in the supportive structures of educational provision. In this regard, it is essential to understand the limits and opportunities for girls/women’s (and that of others) education in Pakistan within these ‘spaces’ that have come about as a result of Covid-19 related educational and social restructuring of opportunities. In sum, the aim of the project is to contribute to international education by creating a deeper understanding of the gendered vulnerabilities that intersect with disadvantages and placement (physical and social) vectors to produce gendered experiences for the most marginalised in the context of Pakistan.

Funded by:

British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) Seedcorn Fund

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid and Dr Soufia Siddiqui

 

Publications

Khalid, A. (forthcoming). ‘Hearing their silences: Mothers agency as they support their daughters’ education in rural Punjab Pakistan’, Gender and Education.

Khalid, A., & Rose, P. (forthcoming). Mothers’ Capability to Influence their Daughters’ Education in Pakistan: Interconnections between mothers’ value of education, negative capability and agency. Journal of Human Development and Capabilities.

Khalid, A. (in preparation) ‘Comparisons of hope, education, and aspirations between Pakistani mothers and revolutionaries: The being and becoming of agents in the contexts of change’. Comparative Education

Khalid, A. & Singal, N. (in preparation) ”It’s made us stronger as a family’: Ethnic minority parenting experiences of educating children in England during Covid’. Journal of Family Studies

Singal, N. & Khalid, A. (in preparation) ”Time moves fast but it also goes slow’: Secondary school children’s experiences of ‘preparing’ for exams during lockdown in England. Children and Society

Khalid, A., Parpart, J. & Holmes, G. (Eds.) (in preparation) ‘ From the silence/voice binary to liminal spaces: Understanding gender, agency and power in a changing world’. Routledge

Khalid, A. & Siddiqi, S. (in preparation). Human Development Report 2022: Gendered inequalities in education and capability spaces for women/girls (and others) in Pakistan during Covid’. South Asia: Human Development Report UNDP

Alice Aldinucci is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford, Department of Education. She is part of the team working on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani, and she is a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group.

She holds a PhD in Education from the University of Glasgow (UK) where she was awarded the LKAS Interdisciplinary Scholarship. Her thesis applies a longitudinal qualitative research design and draws on the combination of Critical Realism and Capability Approach to explore aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to adulthood in Chile. Prior to her PhD, she completed a MA in International Education and Development from the University of Sussex (UK) where she was awarded the Centre for International Education Prize for the best overall MA performance. For her MA at Sussex, she conducted an empirical dissertation on the meaning making of Inclusive Education in Nepal. She holds a MA in Languages and Cultures for International Communication and Cooperation from the University of Milan (Italy) with a fieldwork research on tensions between policy and practice in bilingual multicultural education for indigenous students in Higher Education in Peru; and a BA in Languages and Intercultural Mediation from the University of Arezzo (Italy).

Alice’s research interests are interdisciplinary and relate to the critical linkages between intersecting inequalities, education, individual/societal development, and social justice at local and global levels, motivated by the question what education for what/whose development?

Areas, theoretical approaches and methodologies of interests:
• Sociology of education including aspirations in post-school transitions
• Cultural political economy of education and life chances/human flourishing/social justice
• Tensions between global educational frameworks and local knowledge and practices
• Critical Realism
• Capability Approach
• Qualitative and participatory methodologies
• Digital storytelling for social change

Besides her work in academia, Alice has gained experience as researcher, development practitioner and educator working in projects including early childhood education programmes, refugees’ education, girls’ education, SEN and inclusive education, TVET, global citizenship education, arts-based pedagogies. She lived and worked in different countries including in Nepal (a country she has developed a strong bond with), Tanzania, El Salvador, Italy and the UK. These experiences have reinforced her critical approach to international education and global development and to education as a catalyst for both inequalities, injustices, violence and more equitable social change and peace-building processes.

She served as Student Representative of the British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) from 2017 to 2019 and she is currently part of the college of reviewers of the editorial board of Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education.

Publications:

Aldinucci, A. (2022). Understanding aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to postschool trajectories in Chile. PhD thesis, University of Glasgow.
Aldinucci, A., Valiente, O., Hurrell S., and Zancajo, A. (2021). Understanding aspirations: Why do secondary TVET students aim so high in Chile? Journal of Vocational Education & Training.

Rawle, G., Riddle, N., Pettersson, G., Wallin, J., Bici, M., Jasper, P., Harb, J., Hebbar, M., Davis, J., Aldinucci, A., (2017), EQUIP-Tanzania Impact Evaluation. Midline Technical Report, Volume I and II. Oxford Policy Management.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Kabira is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. His research is funded by the Clarendon Fund.

Kabira is interested in improving learning outcomes for children in fragile and conflict – affected regions of the world, school health and nutrition programs, combatting gender-based violence and supporting children who are dealing with addiction.

His doctoral research focuses on education outcomes for young learners in Papua New Guinea who are addicted to psychoactive and carcinogenic betel quid.

Prior to moving to Oxford, Kabira was based in Washington DC, USA and worked for the World Bank and Save the Children on impact evaluations, learning assessments and improving the quality of education statistics in twenty-six countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, the Pacific, and the Middle East.

Kabira holds a Masters in Economics and Public Policy from Princeton University where he was a recipient of the Stokes’ Prize for exemplary academic achievement and public service leadership, a Masters in Development Economics from the School of Oriental and African Studies at London University where he graduated with distinction and an undergraduate degree in Economics and Statistics from St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai.

Research interests:

·       Education in conflict regions

·       Combatting school related gender-based violence (SRGBV)

·       School health and nutrition programs

·       Supporting children with addiction

 

Publications

Aliya teaches on the Comparative and International Education MSc programme at the Department of Education after having taught at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge. Her research focuses on how women in the South navigate their agency in highly constrained circumstances. Her specialised areas of interest are the capability approach, negative capability, epistemic paradoxicality and justice, and the promotion of knowledges (plural) and Southern epistemologies. Aliya actively engages in issues around the politics of representation and knowledge production in the academe. Aliya is currently accepting doctoral students with an interest in these areas.

 

Projects

‘Understanding the impact of COVID-19 on learning experiences of secondary school going age children among Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families’

Project summary:
COVID-19 related school disruption and closures have significantly impacted the lives of students. Notably, these disruptions have had a multi-fold impact on children living in ethnic minority families. Although ethnic and racial inequalities are persistent across contexts, this project particularly engages with young adults and other family members belonging to Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families living in England. Children in these families have been uniquely affected by the pandemic (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020), given the higher rates of prevalence of COVID among these communities and also greater and persistent structural inequalities.

Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families have been identified as a focus of this research because firstly, these particular groups have been strongly impacted by COVID (Platt & Warwick, 2020; Trivedy et al., 2020) and secondly, their socio cultural specificities make them more susceptible to disadvantage during COVID related school closures (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020). Our particular focus is on secondary school children whose learning has been majorly disrupted due to national lockdowns and uncertainty regarding national assessments.

Therefore, this project aims to address the unique situation and experiences of these BAME families with secondary school age children to understand how COVID-related challenges are shaping their learning experiences, household dynamics and future aspirations.

This is an exploratory, project which fills an important gap in existing knowledge by taking a strong cultural lens to understanding how learning among Bangladeshi and Pakistani families could be supported, drawing on a deeper understanding of their lived realities and contextualised understanding of the challenges they face. The aim is not simply to reproduce a deficit discourse (which tends to be associated with families from these ethnic minority groups), but to understand family dynamics and the opportunities offered herein.

Funded by:

Cambridge Humanities Research Grants Scheme

Research team:

Professor Nidhi Singal and Dr Aliya Khalid

 

‘Bridging the Local and Global: Women’s Spaces and Collectives’

Project summary:
While globalisation aims to connect the world equitably, global perspectives are often privileged over the local. Often the voices of women from the South (metaphor for marginalised) are least heard. This project acknowledges that any ‘Global’ ideology of (Dis)order needs to include local women’s voices by studying how they have generated order/disorder to create ‘spaces of action’/reflection (defined as collectives). We propose a multi-phase, multi-method study of women’s ‘collective spaces’. We first explore how ‘collectives’ have been understood. We will learn from women themselves by conducting two interview based case studies on (i) access to reproductive healthcare (Northern Ireland/Ireland) and (ii) mothers’ collective experiences of educating their children during a pandemic (ethnic minority families in England). In bringing together law and education, archives and interviews, reproductive healthcare and education, this project offers a novel way of understanding – and recording – collective responses to local/global challenges.

Funded by:

Virtual Sandpits, The British Academy

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid, Dr Jane Rooney and Dr Ruth Houghton, Dr Kate spencer-Bennet, Alana Farrel Kate Spencer-Bennett

 

‘Gendered Inequalities in Education and Capability Spaces for Women/Girls (and others) in Pakistan During Covid’

Project summary: This project explores the cumulative intersectional experiences of women/girls (and others) that are shaped by multidimensional inequalities existing in their physical (urban/rural) and social (market, society, community and family) settings. In particular, how gender interacts with the different vectors of disadvantage (for example, economic, technological, social, cultural and political) within the perimeters of their location (urban/rural) and setting (labour market, society and family) is to be explored. We refer to what we call ‘spaces of action/reflection’ that provide unique gendered experiences of seeking education. This project will thus conceptualise ‘spaces’ as those gendered experiences marked by economic, technological, social, cultural and political disadvantages that girls (and others) face in their locations (physical and social) as they seek education in the times of the pandemic. Hence, ‘space’ not only refers to the physical (urban/rural), but also, the social (community, family), cultural (society) and personal (psychological) aspects within which girls/women (and others) live and seek education.

This research aims to identify how these ‘spaces’ generate opportunities and constraints for girls/women (and others) in Pakistan. This exploration is essential today when Covid-19 has created ruptures in the supportive structures of educational provision. In this regard, it is essential to understand the limits and opportunities for girls/women’s (and that of others) education in Pakistan within these ‘spaces’ that have come about as a result of Covid-19 related educational and social restructuring of opportunities. In sum, the aim of the project is to contribute to international education by creating a deeper understanding of the gendered vulnerabilities that intersect with disadvantages and placement (physical and social) vectors to produce gendered experiences for the most marginalised in the context of Pakistan.

Funded by:

British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) Seedcorn Fund

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid and Dr Soufia Siddiqui

 

Publications

Khalid, A. (forthcoming). ‘Hearing their silences: Mothers agency as they support their daughters’ education in rural Punjab Pakistan’, Gender and Education.

Khalid, A., & Rose, P. (forthcoming). Mothers’ Capability to Influence their Daughters’ Education in Pakistan: Interconnections between mothers’ value of education, negative capability and agency. Journal of Human Development and Capabilities.

Khalid, A. (in preparation) ‘Comparisons of hope, education, and aspirations between Pakistani mothers and revolutionaries: The being and becoming of agents in the contexts of change’. Comparative Education

Khalid, A. & Singal, N. (in preparation) ”It’s made us stronger as a family’: Ethnic minority parenting experiences of educating children in England during Covid’. Journal of Family Studies

Singal, N. & Khalid, A. (in preparation) ”Time moves fast but it also goes slow’: Secondary school children’s experiences of ‘preparing’ for exams during lockdown in England. Children and Society

Khalid, A., Parpart, J. & Holmes, G. (Eds.) (in preparation) ‘ From the silence/voice binary to liminal spaces: Understanding gender, agency and power in a changing world’. Routledge

Khalid, A. & Siddiqi, S. (in preparation). Human Development Report 2022: Gendered inequalities in education and capability spaces for women/girls (and others) in Pakistan during Covid’. South Asia: Human Development Report UNDP

Alice Aldinucci is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford, Department of Education. She is part of the team working on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani, and she is a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group.

She holds a PhD in Education from the University of Glasgow (UK) where she was awarded the LKAS Interdisciplinary Scholarship. Her thesis applies a longitudinal qualitative research design and draws on the combination of Critical Realism and Capability Approach to explore aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to adulthood in Chile. Prior to her PhD, she completed a MA in International Education and Development from the University of Sussex (UK) where she was awarded the Centre for International Education Prize for the best overall MA performance. For her MA at Sussex, she conducted an empirical dissertation on the meaning making of Inclusive Education in Nepal. She holds a MA in Languages and Cultures for International Communication and Cooperation from the University of Milan (Italy) with a fieldwork research on tensions between policy and practice in bilingual multicultural education for indigenous students in Higher Education in Peru; and a BA in Languages and Intercultural Mediation from the University of Arezzo (Italy).

Alice’s research interests are interdisciplinary and relate to the critical linkages between intersecting inequalities, education, individual/societal development, and social justice at local and global levels, motivated by the question what education for what/whose development?

Areas, theoretical approaches and methodologies of interests:
• Sociology of education including aspirations in post-school transitions
• Cultural political economy of education and life chances/human flourishing/social justice
• Tensions between global educational frameworks and local knowledge and practices
• Critical Realism
• Capability Approach
• Qualitative and participatory methodologies
• Digital storytelling for social change

Besides her work in academia, Alice has gained experience as researcher, development practitioner and educator working in projects including early childhood education programmes, refugees’ education, girls’ education, SEN and inclusive education, TVET, global citizenship education, arts-based pedagogies. She lived and worked in different countries including in Nepal (a country she has developed a strong bond with), Tanzania, El Salvador, Italy and the UK. These experiences have reinforced her critical approach to international education and global development and to education as a catalyst for both inequalities, injustices, violence and more equitable social change and peace-building processes.

She served as Student Representative of the British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) from 2017 to 2019 and she is currently part of the college of reviewers of the editorial board of Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education.

Publications:

Aldinucci, A. (2022). Understanding aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to postschool trajectories in Chile. PhD thesis, University of Glasgow.
Aldinucci, A., Valiente, O., Hurrell S., and Zancajo, A. (2021). Understanding aspirations: Why do secondary TVET students aim so high in Chile? Journal of Vocational Education & Training.

Rawle, G., Riddle, N., Pettersson, G., Wallin, J., Bici, M., Jasper, P., Harb, J., Hebbar, M., Davis, J., Aldinucci, A., (2017), EQUIP-Tanzania Impact Evaluation. Midline Technical Report, Volume I and II. Oxford Policy Management.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Kabira is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. His research is funded by the Clarendon Fund.

Kabira is interested in improving learning outcomes for children in fragile and conflict – affected regions of the world, school health and nutrition programs, combatting gender-based violence and supporting children who are dealing with addiction.

His doctoral research focuses on education outcomes for young learners in Papua New Guinea who are addicted to psychoactive and carcinogenic betel quid.

Prior to moving to Oxford, Kabira was based in Washington DC, USA and worked for the World Bank and Save the Children on impact evaluations, learning assessments and improving the quality of education statistics in twenty-six countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, the Pacific, and the Middle East.

Kabira holds a Masters in Economics and Public Policy from Princeton University where he was a recipient of the Stokes’ Prize for exemplary academic achievement and public service leadership, a Masters in Development Economics from the School of Oriental and African Studies at London University where he graduated with distinction and an undergraduate degree in Economics and Statistics from St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai.

Research interests:

·       Education in conflict regions

·       Combatting school related gender-based violence (SRGBV)

·       School health and nutrition programs

·       Supporting children with addiction

 

Publications

Aliya teaches on the Comparative and International Education MSc programme at the Department of Education after having taught at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge. Her research focuses on how women in the South navigate their agency in highly constrained circumstances. Her specialised areas of interest are the capability approach, negative capability, epistemic paradoxicality and justice, and the promotion of knowledges (plural) and Southern epistemologies. Aliya actively engages in issues around the politics of representation and knowledge production in the academe. Aliya is currently accepting doctoral students with an interest in these areas.

 

Projects

‘Understanding the impact of COVID-19 on learning experiences of secondary school going age children among Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families’

Project summary:
COVID-19 related school disruption and closures have significantly impacted the lives of students. Notably, these disruptions have had a multi-fold impact on children living in ethnic minority families. Although ethnic and racial inequalities are persistent across contexts, this project particularly engages with young adults and other family members belonging to Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families living in England. Children in these families have been uniquely affected by the pandemic (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020), given the higher rates of prevalence of COVID among these communities and also greater and persistent structural inequalities.

Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families have been identified as a focus of this research because firstly, these particular groups have been strongly impacted by COVID (Platt & Warwick, 2020; Trivedy et al., 2020) and secondly, their socio cultural specificities make them more susceptible to disadvantage during COVID related school closures (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020). Our particular focus is on secondary school children whose learning has been majorly disrupted due to national lockdowns and uncertainty regarding national assessments.

Therefore, this project aims to address the unique situation and experiences of these BAME families with secondary school age children to understand how COVID-related challenges are shaping their learning experiences, household dynamics and future aspirations.

This is an exploratory, project which fills an important gap in existing knowledge by taking a strong cultural lens to understanding how learning among Bangladeshi and Pakistani families could be supported, drawing on a deeper understanding of their lived realities and contextualised understanding of the challenges they face. The aim is not simply to reproduce a deficit discourse (which tends to be associated with families from these ethnic minority groups), but to understand family dynamics and the opportunities offered herein.

Funded by:

Cambridge Humanities Research Grants Scheme

Research team:

Professor Nidhi Singal and Dr Aliya Khalid

 

‘Bridging the Local and Global: Women’s Spaces and Collectives’

Project summary:
While globalisation aims to connect the world equitably, global perspectives are often privileged over the local. Often the voices of women from the South (metaphor for marginalised) are least heard. This project acknowledges that any ‘Global’ ideology of (Dis)order needs to include local women’s voices by studying how they have generated order/disorder to create ‘spaces of action’/reflection (defined as collectives). We propose a multi-phase, multi-method study of women’s ‘collective spaces’. We first explore how ‘collectives’ have been understood. We will learn from women themselves by conducting two interview based case studies on (i) access to reproductive healthcare (Northern Ireland/Ireland) and (ii) mothers’ collective experiences of educating their children during a pandemic (ethnic minority families in England). In bringing together law and education, archives and interviews, reproductive healthcare and education, this project offers a novel way of understanding – and recording – collective responses to local/global challenges.

Funded by:

Virtual Sandpits, The British Academy

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid, Dr Jane Rooney and Dr Ruth Houghton, Dr Kate spencer-Bennet, Alana Farrel Kate Spencer-Bennett

 

‘Gendered Inequalities in Education and Capability Spaces for Women/Girls (and others) in Pakistan During Covid’

Project summary: This project explores the cumulative intersectional experiences of women/girls (and others) that are shaped by multidimensional inequalities existing in their physical (urban/rural) and social (market, society, community and family) settings. In particular, how gender interacts with the different vectors of disadvantage (for example, economic, technological, social, cultural and political) within the perimeters of their location (urban/rural) and setting (labour market, society and family) is to be explored. We refer to what we call ‘spaces of action/reflection’ that provide unique gendered experiences of seeking education. This project will thus conceptualise ‘spaces’ as those gendered experiences marked by economic, technological, social, cultural and political disadvantages that girls (and others) face in their locations (physical and social) as they seek education in the times of the pandemic. Hence, ‘space’ not only refers to the physical (urban/rural), but also, the social (community, family), cultural (society) and personal (psychological) aspects within which girls/women (and others) live and seek education.

This research aims to identify how these ‘spaces’ generate opportunities and constraints for girls/women (and others) in Pakistan. This exploration is essential today when Covid-19 has created ruptures in the supportive structures of educational provision. In this regard, it is essential to understand the limits and opportunities for girls/women’s (and that of others) education in Pakistan within these ‘spaces’ that have come about as a result of Covid-19 related educational and social restructuring of opportunities. In sum, the aim of the project is to contribute to international education by creating a deeper understanding of the gendered vulnerabilities that intersect with disadvantages and placement (physical and social) vectors to produce gendered experiences for the most marginalised in the context of Pakistan.

Funded by:

British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) Seedcorn Fund

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid and Dr Soufia Siddiqui

 

Publications

Khalid, A. (forthcoming). ‘Hearing their silences: Mothers agency as they support their daughters’ education in rural Punjab Pakistan’, Gender and Education.

Khalid, A., & Rose, P. (forthcoming). Mothers’ Capability to Influence their Daughters’ Education in Pakistan: Interconnections between mothers’ value of education, negative capability and agency. Journal of Human Development and Capabilities.

Khalid, A. (in preparation) ‘Comparisons of hope, education, and aspirations between Pakistani mothers and revolutionaries: The being and becoming of agents in the contexts of change’. Comparative Education

Khalid, A. & Singal, N. (in preparation) ”It’s made us stronger as a family’: Ethnic minority parenting experiences of educating children in England during Covid’. Journal of Family Studies

Singal, N. & Khalid, A. (in preparation) ”Time moves fast but it also goes slow’: Secondary school children’s experiences of ‘preparing’ for exams during lockdown in England. Children and Society

Khalid, A., Parpart, J. & Holmes, G. (Eds.) (in preparation) ‘ From the silence/voice binary to liminal spaces: Understanding gender, agency and power in a changing world’. Routledge

Khalid, A. & Siddiqi, S. (in preparation). Human Development Report 2022: Gendered inequalities in education and capability spaces for women/girls (and others) in Pakistan during Covid’. South Asia: Human Development Report UNDP

Alice Aldinucci is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford, Department of Education. She is part of the team working on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani, and she is a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group.

She holds a PhD in Education from the University of Glasgow (UK) where she was awarded the LKAS Interdisciplinary Scholarship. Her thesis applies a longitudinal qualitative research design and draws on the combination of Critical Realism and Capability Approach to explore aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to adulthood in Chile. Prior to her PhD, she completed a MA in International Education and Development from the University of Sussex (UK) where she was awarded the Centre for International Education Prize for the best overall MA performance. For her MA at Sussex, she conducted an empirical dissertation on the meaning making of Inclusive Education in Nepal. She holds a MA in Languages and Cultures for International Communication and Cooperation from the University of Milan (Italy) with a fieldwork research on tensions between policy and practice in bilingual multicultural education for indigenous students in Higher Education in Peru; and a BA in Languages and Intercultural Mediation from the University of Arezzo (Italy).

Alice’s research interests are interdisciplinary and relate to the critical linkages between intersecting inequalities, education, individual/societal development, and social justice at local and global levels, motivated by the question what education for what/whose development?

Areas, theoretical approaches and methodologies of interests:
• Sociology of education including aspirations in post-school transitions
• Cultural political economy of education and life chances/human flourishing/social justice
• Tensions between global educational frameworks and local knowledge and practices
• Critical Realism
• Capability Approach
• Qualitative and participatory methodologies
• Digital storytelling for social change

Besides her work in academia, Alice has gained experience as researcher, development practitioner and educator working in projects including early childhood education programmes, refugees’ education, girls’ education, SEN and inclusive education, TVET, global citizenship education, arts-based pedagogies. She lived and worked in different countries including in Nepal (a country she has developed a strong bond with), Tanzania, El Salvador, Italy and the UK. These experiences have reinforced her critical approach to international education and global development and to education as a catalyst for both inequalities, injustices, violence and more equitable social change and peace-building processes.

She served as Student Representative of the British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) from 2017 to 2019 and she is currently part of the college of reviewers of the editorial board of Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education.

Publications:

Aldinucci, A. (2022). Understanding aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to postschool trajectories in Chile. PhD thesis, University of Glasgow.
Aldinucci, A., Valiente, O., Hurrell S., and Zancajo, A. (2021). Understanding aspirations: Why do secondary TVET students aim so high in Chile? Journal of Vocational Education & Training.

Rawle, G., Riddle, N., Pettersson, G., Wallin, J., Bici, M., Jasper, P., Harb, J., Hebbar, M., Davis, J., Aldinucci, A., (2017), EQUIP-Tanzania Impact Evaluation. Midline Technical Report, Volume I and II. Oxford Policy Management.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Kabira is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. His research is funded by the Clarendon Fund.

Kabira is interested in improving learning outcomes for children in fragile and conflict – affected regions of the world, school health and nutrition programs, combatting gender-based violence and supporting children who are dealing with addiction.

His doctoral research focuses on education outcomes for young learners in Papua New Guinea who are addicted to psychoactive and carcinogenic betel quid.

Prior to moving to Oxford, Kabira was based in Washington DC, USA and worked for the World Bank and Save the Children on impact evaluations, learning assessments and improving the quality of education statistics in twenty-six countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, the Pacific, and the Middle East.

Kabira holds a Masters in Economics and Public Policy from Princeton University where he was a recipient of the Stokes’ Prize for exemplary academic achievement and public service leadership, a Masters in Development Economics from the School of Oriental and African Studies at London University where he graduated with distinction and an undergraduate degree in Economics and Statistics from St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai.

Research interests:

·       Education in conflict regions

·       Combatting school related gender-based violence (SRGBV)

·       School health and nutrition programs

·       Supporting children with addiction

 

Publications

Aliya teaches on the Comparative and International Education MSc programme at the Department of Education after having taught at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge. Her research focuses on how women in the South navigate their agency in highly constrained circumstances. Her specialised areas of interest are the capability approach, negative capability, epistemic paradoxicality and justice, and the promotion of knowledges (plural) and Southern epistemologies. Aliya actively engages in issues around the politics of representation and knowledge production in the academe. Aliya is currently accepting doctoral students with an interest in these areas.

 

Projects

‘Understanding the impact of COVID-19 on learning experiences of secondary school going age children among Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families’

Project summary:
COVID-19 related school disruption and closures have significantly impacted the lives of students. Notably, these disruptions have had a multi-fold impact on children living in ethnic minority families. Although ethnic and racial inequalities are persistent across contexts, this project particularly engages with young adults and other family members belonging to Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families living in England. Children in these families have been uniquely affected by the pandemic (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020), given the higher rates of prevalence of COVID among these communities and also greater and persistent structural inequalities.

Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families have been identified as a focus of this research because firstly, these particular groups have been strongly impacted by COVID (Platt & Warwick, 2020; Trivedy et al., 2020) and secondly, their socio cultural specificities make them more susceptible to disadvantage during COVID related school closures (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020). Our particular focus is on secondary school children whose learning has been majorly disrupted due to national lockdowns and uncertainty regarding national assessments.

Therefore, this project aims to address the unique situation and experiences of these BAME families with secondary school age children to understand how COVID-related challenges are shaping their learning experiences, household dynamics and future aspirations.

This is an exploratory, project which fills an important gap in existing knowledge by taking a strong cultural lens to understanding how learning among Bangladeshi and Pakistani families could be supported, drawing on a deeper understanding of their lived realities and contextualised understanding of the challenges they face. The aim is not simply to reproduce a deficit discourse (which tends to be associated with families from these ethnic minority groups), but to understand family dynamics and the opportunities offered herein.

Funded by:

Cambridge Humanities Research Grants Scheme

Research team:

Professor Nidhi Singal and Dr Aliya Khalid

 

‘Bridging the Local and Global: Women’s Spaces and Collectives’

Project summary:
While globalisation aims to connect the world equitably, global perspectives are often privileged over the local. Often the voices of women from the South (metaphor for marginalised) are least heard. This project acknowledges that any ‘Global’ ideology of (Dis)order needs to include local women’s voices by studying how they have generated order/disorder to create ‘spaces of action’/reflection (defined as collectives). We propose a multi-phase, multi-method study of women’s ‘collective spaces’. We first explore how ‘collectives’ have been understood. We will learn from women themselves by conducting two interview based case studies on (i) access to reproductive healthcare (Northern Ireland/Ireland) and (ii) mothers’ collective experiences of educating their children during a pandemic (ethnic minority families in England). In bringing together law and education, archives and interviews, reproductive healthcare and education, this project offers a novel way of understanding – and recording – collective responses to local/global challenges.

Funded by:

Virtual Sandpits, The British Academy

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid, Dr Jane Rooney and Dr Ruth Houghton, Dr Kate spencer-Bennet, Alana Farrel Kate Spencer-Bennett

 

‘Gendered Inequalities in Education and Capability Spaces for Women/Girls (and others) in Pakistan During Covid’

Project summary: This project explores the cumulative intersectional experiences of women/girls (and others) that are shaped by multidimensional inequalities existing in their physical (urban/rural) and social (market, society, community and family) settings. In particular, how gender interacts with the different vectors of disadvantage (for example, economic, technological, social, cultural and political) within the perimeters of their location (urban/rural) and setting (labour market, society and family) is to be explored. We refer to what we call ‘spaces of action/reflection’ that provide unique gendered experiences of seeking education. This project will thus conceptualise ‘spaces’ as those gendered experiences marked by economic, technological, social, cultural and political disadvantages that girls (and others) face in their locations (physical and social) as they seek education in the times of the pandemic. Hence, ‘space’ not only refers to the physical (urban/rural), but also, the social (community, family), cultural (society) and personal (psychological) aspects within which girls/women (and others) live and seek education.

This research aims to identify how these ‘spaces’ generate opportunities and constraints for girls/women (and others) in Pakistan. This exploration is essential today when Covid-19 has created ruptures in the supportive structures of educational provision. In this regard, it is essential to understand the limits and opportunities for girls/women’s (and that of others) education in Pakistan within these ‘spaces’ that have come about as a result of Covid-19 related educational and social restructuring of opportunities. In sum, the aim of the project is to contribute to international education by creating a deeper understanding of the gendered vulnerabilities that intersect with disadvantages and placement (physical and social) vectors to produce gendered experiences for the most marginalised in the context of Pakistan.

Funded by:

British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) Seedcorn Fund

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid and Dr Soufia Siddiqui

 

Publications

Khalid, A. (forthcoming). ‘Hearing their silences: Mothers agency as they support their daughters’ education in rural Punjab Pakistan’, Gender and Education.

Khalid, A., & Rose, P. (forthcoming). Mothers’ Capability to Influence their Daughters’ Education in Pakistan: Interconnections between mothers’ value of education, negative capability and agency. Journal of Human Development and Capabilities.

Khalid, A. (in preparation) ‘Comparisons of hope, education, and aspirations between Pakistani mothers and revolutionaries: The being and becoming of agents in the contexts of change’. Comparative Education

Khalid, A. & Singal, N. (in preparation) ”It’s made us stronger as a family’: Ethnic minority parenting experiences of educating children in England during Covid’. Journal of Family Studies

Singal, N. & Khalid, A. (in preparation) ”Time moves fast but it also goes slow’: Secondary school children’s experiences of ‘preparing’ for exams during lockdown in England. Children and Society

Khalid, A., Parpart, J. & Holmes, G. (Eds.) (in preparation) ‘ From the silence/voice binary to liminal spaces: Understanding gender, agency and power in a changing world’. Routledge

Khalid, A. & Siddiqi, S. (in preparation). Human Development Report 2022: Gendered inequalities in education and capability spaces for women/girls (and others) in Pakistan during Covid’. South Asia: Human Development Report UNDP

Alice Aldinucci is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford, Department of Education. She is part of the team working on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani, and she is a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group.

She holds a PhD in Education from the University of Glasgow (UK) where she was awarded the LKAS Interdisciplinary Scholarship. Her thesis applies a longitudinal qualitative research design and draws on the combination of Critical Realism and Capability Approach to explore aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to adulthood in Chile. Prior to her PhD, she completed a MA in International Education and Development from the University of Sussex (UK) where she was awarded the Centre for International Education Prize for the best overall MA performance. For her MA at Sussex, she conducted an empirical dissertation on the meaning making of Inclusive Education in Nepal. She holds a MA in Languages and Cultures for International Communication and Cooperation from the University of Milan (Italy) with a fieldwork research on tensions between policy and practice in bilingual multicultural education for indigenous students in Higher Education in Peru; and a BA in Languages and Intercultural Mediation from the University of Arezzo (Italy).

Alice’s research interests are interdisciplinary and relate to the critical linkages between intersecting inequalities, education, individual/societal development, and social justice at local and global levels, motivated by the question what education for what/whose development?

Areas, theoretical approaches and methodologies of interests:
• Sociology of education including aspirations in post-school transitions
• Cultural political economy of education and life chances/human flourishing/social justice
• Tensions between global educational frameworks and local knowledge and practices
• Critical Realism
• Capability Approach
• Qualitative and participatory methodologies
• Digital storytelling for social change

Besides her work in academia, Alice has gained experience as researcher, development practitioner and educator working in projects including early childhood education programmes, refugees’ education, girls’ education, SEN and inclusive education, TVET, global citizenship education, arts-based pedagogies. She lived and worked in different countries including in Nepal (a country she has developed a strong bond with), Tanzania, El Salvador, Italy and the UK. These experiences have reinforced her critical approach to international education and global development and to education as a catalyst for both inequalities, injustices, violence and more equitable social change and peace-building processes.

She served as Student Representative of the British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) from 2017 to 2019 and she is currently part of the college of reviewers of the editorial board of Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education.

Publications:

Aldinucci, A. (2022). Understanding aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to postschool trajectories in Chile. PhD thesis, University of Glasgow.
Aldinucci, A., Valiente, O., Hurrell S., and Zancajo, A. (2021). Understanding aspirations: Why do secondary TVET students aim so high in Chile? Journal of Vocational Education & Training.

Rawle, G., Riddle, N., Pettersson, G., Wallin, J., Bici, M., Jasper, P., Harb, J., Hebbar, M., Davis, J., Aldinucci, A., (2017), EQUIP-Tanzania Impact Evaluation. Midline Technical Report, Volume I and II. Oxford Policy Management.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Kabira is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. His research is funded by the Clarendon Fund.

Kabira is interested in improving learning outcomes for children in fragile and conflict – affected regions of the world, school health and nutrition programs, combatting gender-based violence and supporting children who are dealing with addiction.

His doctoral research focuses on education outcomes for young learners in Papua New Guinea who are addicted to psychoactive and carcinogenic betel quid.

Prior to moving to Oxford, Kabira was based in Washington DC, USA and worked for the World Bank and Save the Children on impact evaluations, learning assessments and improving the quality of education statistics in twenty-six countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, the Pacific, and the Middle East.

Kabira holds a Masters in Economics and Public Policy from Princeton University where he was a recipient of the Stokes’ Prize for exemplary academic achievement and public service leadership, a Masters in Development Economics from the School of Oriental and African Studies at London University where he graduated with distinction and an undergraduate degree in Economics and Statistics from St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai.

Research interests:

·       Education in conflict regions

·       Combatting school related gender-based violence (SRGBV)

·       School health and nutrition programs

·       Supporting children with addiction

 

Publications

Aliya teaches on the Comparative and International Education MSc programme at the Department of Education after having taught at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge. Her research focuses on how women in the South navigate their agency in highly constrained circumstances. Her specialised areas of interest are the capability approach, negative capability, epistemic paradoxicality and justice, and the promotion of knowledges (plural) and Southern epistemologies. Aliya actively engages in issues around the politics of representation and knowledge production in the academe. Aliya is currently accepting doctoral students with an interest in these areas.

 

Projects

‘Understanding the impact of COVID-19 on learning experiences of secondary school going age children among Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families’

Project summary:
COVID-19 related school disruption and closures have significantly impacted the lives of students. Notably, these disruptions have had a multi-fold impact on children living in ethnic minority families. Although ethnic and racial inequalities are persistent across contexts, this project particularly engages with young adults and other family members belonging to Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families living in England. Children in these families have been uniquely affected by the pandemic (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020), given the higher rates of prevalence of COVID among these communities and also greater and persistent structural inequalities.

Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families have been identified as a focus of this research because firstly, these particular groups have been strongly impacted by COVID (Platt & Warwick, 2020; Trivedy et al., 2020) and secondly, their socio cultural specificities make them more susceptible to disadvantage during COVID related school closures (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020). Our particular focus is on secondary school children whose learning has been majorly disrupted due to national lockdowns and uncertainty regarding national assessments.

Therefore, this project aims to address the unique situation and experiences of these BAME families with secondary school age children to understand how COVID-related challenges are shaping their learning experiences, household dynamics and future aspirations.

This is an exploratory, project which fills an important gap in existing knowledge by taking a strong cultural lens to understanding how learning among Bangladeshi and Pakistani families could be supported, drawing on a deeper understanding of their lived realities and contextualised understanding of the challenges they face. The aim is not simply to reproduce a deficit discourse (which tends to be associated with families from these ethnic minority groups), but to understand family dynamics and the opportunities offered herein.

Funded by:

Cambridge Humanities Research Grants Scheme

Research team:

Professor Nidhi Singal and Dr Aliya Khalid

 

‘Bridging the Local and Global: Women’s Spaces and Collectives’

Project summary:
While globalisation aims to connect the world equitably, global perspectives are often privileged over the local. Often the voices of women from the South (metaphor for marginalised) are least heard. This project acknowledges that any ‘Global’ ideology of (Dis)order needs to include local women’s voices by studying how they have generated order/disorder to create ‘spaces of action’/reflection (defined as collectives). We propose a multi-phase, multi-method study of women’s ‘collective spaces’. We first explore how ‘collectives’ have been understood. We will learn from women themselves by conducting two interview based case studies on (i) access to reproductive healthcare (Northern Ireland/Ireland) and (ii) mothers’ collective experiences of educating their children during a pandemic (ethnic minority families in England). In bringing together law and education, archives and interviews, reproductive healthcare and education, this project offers a novel way of understanding – and recording – collective responses to local/global challenges.

Funded by:

Virtual Sandpits, The British Academy

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid, Dr Jane Rooney and Dr Ruth Houghton, Dr Kate spencer-Bennet, Alana Farrel Kate Spencer-Bennett

 

‘Gendered Inequalities in Education and Capability Spaces for Women/Girls (and others) in Pakistan During Covid’

Project summary: This project explores the cumulative intersectional experiences of women/girls (and others) that are shaped by multidimensional inequalities existing in their physical (urban/rural) and social (market, society, community and family) settings. In particular, how gender interacts with the different vectors of disadvantage (for example, economic, technological, social, cultural and political) within the perimeters of their location (urban/rural) and setting (labour market, society and family) is to be explored. We refer to what we call ‘spaces of action/reflection’ that provide unique gendered experiences of seeking education. This project will thus conceptualise ‘spaces’ as those gendered experiences marked by economic, technological, social, cultural and political disadvantages that girls (and others) face in their locations (physical and social) as they seek education in the times of the pandemic. Hence, ‘space’ not only refers to the physical (urban/rural), but also, the social (community, family), cultural (society) and personal (psychological) aspects within which girls/women (and others) live and seek education.

This research aims to identify how these ‘spaces’ generate opportunities and constraints for girls/women (and others) in Pakistan. This exploration is essential today when Covid-19 has created ruptures in the supportive structures of educational provision. In this regard, it is essential to understand the limits and opportunities for girls/women’s (and that of others) education in Pakistan within these ‘spaces’ that have come about as a result of Covid-19 related educational and social restructuring of opportunities. In sum, the aim of the project is to contribute to international education by creating a deeper understanding of the gendered vulnerabilities that intersect with disadvantages and placement (physical and social) vectors to produce gendered experiences for the most marginalised in the context of Pakistan.

Funded by:

British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) Seedcorn Fund

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid and Dr Soufia Siddiqui

 

Publications

Khalid, A. (forthcoming). ‘Hearing their silences: Mothers agency as they support their daughters’ education in rural Punjab Pakistan’, Gender and Education.

Khalid, A., & Rose, P. (forthcoming). Mothers’ Capability to Influence their Daughters’ Education in Pakistan: Interconnections between mothers’ value of education, negative capability and agency. Journal of Human Development and Capabilities.

Khalid, A. (in preparation) ‘Comparisons of hope, education, and aspirations between Pakistani mothers and revolutionaries: The being and becoming of agents in the contexts of change’. Comparative Education

Khalid, A. & Singal, N. (in preparation) ”It’s made us stronger as a family’: Ethnic minority parenting experiences of educating children in England during Covid’. Journal of Family Studies

Singal, N. & Khalid, A. (in preparation) ”Time moves fast but it also goes slow’: Secondary school children’s experiences of ‘preparing’ for exams during lockdown in England. Children and Society

Khalid, A., Parpart, J. & Holmes, G. (Eds.) (in preparation) ‘ From the silence/voice binary to liminal spaces: Understanding gender, agency and power in a changing world’. Routledge

Khalid, A. & Siddiqi, S. (in preparation). Human Development Report 2022: Gendered inequalities in education and capability spaces for women/girls (and others) in Pakistan during Covid’. South Asia: Human Development Report UNDP

Alice Aldinucci is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford, Department of Education. She is part of the team working on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani, and she is a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group.

She holds a PhD in Education from the University of Glasgow (UK) where she was awarded the LKAS Interdisciplinary Scholarship. Her thesis applies a longitudinal qualitative research design and draws on the combination of Critical Realism and Capability Approach to explore aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to adulthood in Chile. Prior to her PhD, she completed a MA in International Education and Development from the University of Sussex (UK) where she was awarded the Centre for International Education Prize for the best overall MA performance. For her MA at Sussex, she conducted an empirical dissertation on the meaning making of Inclusive Education in Nepal. She holds a MA in Languages and Cultures for International Communication and Cooperation from the University of Milan (Italy) with a fieldwork research on tensions between policy and practice in bilingual multicultural education for indigenous students in Higher Education in Peru; and a BA in Languages and Intercultural Mediation from the University of Arezzo (Italy).

Alice’s research interests are interdisciplinary and relate to the critical linkages between intersecting inequalities, education, individual/societal development, and social justice at local and global levels, motivated by the question what education for what/whose development?

Areas, theoretical approaches and methodologies of interests:
• Sociology of education including aspirations in post-school transitions
• Cultural political economy of education and life chances/human flourishing/social justice
• Tensions between global educational frameworks and local knowledge and practices
• Critical Realism
• Capability Approach
• Qualitative and participatory methodologies
• Digital storytelling for social change

Besides her work in academia, Alice has gained experience as researcher, development practitioner and educator working in projects including early childhood education programmes, refugees’ education, girls’ education, SEN and inclusive education, TVET, global citizenship education, arts-based pedagogies. She lived and worked in different countries including in Nepal (a country she has developed a strong bond with), Tanzania, El Salvador, Italy and the UK. These experiences have reinforced her critical approach to international education and global development and to education as a catalyst for both inequalities, injustices, violence and more equitable social change and peace-building processes.

She served as Student Representative of the British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) from 2017 to 2019 and she is currently part of the college of reviewers of the editorial board of Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education.

Publications:

Aldinucci, A. (2022). Understanding aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to postschool trajectories in Chile. PhD thesis, University of Glasgow.
Aldinucci, A., Valiente, O., Hurrell S., and Zancajo, A. (2021). Understanding aspirations: Why do secondary TVET students aim so high in Chile? Journal of Vocational Education & Training.

Rawle, G., Riddle, N., Pettersson, G., Wallin, J., Bici, M., Jasper, P., Harb, J., Hebbar, M., Davis, J., Aldinucci, A., (2017), EQUIP-Tanzania Impact Evaluation. Midline Technical Report, Volume I and II. Oxford Policy Management.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Kabira is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. His research is funded by the Clarendon Fund.

Kabira is interested in improving learning outcomes for children in fragile and conflict – affected regions of the world, school health and nutrition programs, combatting gender-based violence and supporting children who are dealing with addiction.

His doctoral research focuses on education outcomes for young learners in Papua New Guinea who are addicted to psychoactive and carcinogenic betel quid.

Prior to moving to Oxford, Kabira was based in Washington DC, USA and worked for the World Bank and Save the Children on impact evaluations, learning assessments and improving the quality of education statistics in twenty-six countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, the Pacific, and the Middle East.

Kabira holds a Masters in Economics and Public Policy from Princeton University where he was a recipient of the Stokes’ Prize for exemplary academic achievement and public service leadership, a Masters in Development Economics from the School of Oriental and African Studies at London University where he graduated with distinction and an undergraduate degree in Economics and Statistics from St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai.

Research interests:

·       Education in conflict regions

·       Combatting school related gender-based violence (SRGBV)

·       School health and nutrition programs

·       Supporting children with addiction

 

Publications

Aliya teaches on the Comparative and International Education MSc programme at the Department of Education after having taught at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge. Her research focuses on how women in the South navigate their agency in highly constrained circumstances. Her specialised areas of interest are the capability approach, negative capability, epistemic paradoxicality and justice, and the promotion of knowledges (plural) and Southern epistemologies. Aliya actively engages in issues around the politics of representation and knowledge production in the academe. Aliya is currently accepting doctoral students with an interest in these areas.

 

Projects

‘Understanding the impact of COVID-19 on learning experiences of secondary school going age children among Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families’

Project summary:
COVID-19 related school disruption and closures have significantly impacted the lives of students. Notably, these disruptions have had a multi-fold impact on children living in ethnic minority families. Although ethnic and racial inequalities are persistent across contexts, this project particularly engages with young adults and other family members belonging to Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families living in England. Children in these families have been uniquely affected by the pandemic (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020), given the higher rates of prevalence of COVID among these communities and also greater and persistent structural inequalities.

Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families have been identified as a focus of this research because firstly, these particular groups have been strongly impacted by COVID (Platt & Warwick, 2020; Trivedy et al., 2020) and secondly, their socio cultural specificities make them more susceptible to disadvantage during COVID related school closures (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020). Our particular focus is on secondary school children whose learning has been majorly disrupted due to national lockdowns and uncertainty regarding national assessments.

Therefore, this project aims to address the unique situation and experiences of these BAME families with secondary school age children to understand how COVID-related challenges are shaping their learning experiences, household dynamics and future aspirations.

This is an exploratory, project which fills an important gap in existing knowledge by taking a strong cultural lens to understanding how learning among Bangladeshi and Pakistani families could be supported, drawing on a deeper understanding of their lived realities and contextualised understanding of the challenges they face. The aim is not simply to reproduce a deficit discourse (which tends to be associated with families from these ethnic minority groups), but to understand family dynamics and the opportunities offered herein.

Funded by:

Cambridge Humanities Research Grants Scheme

Research team:

Professor Nidhi Singal and Dr Aliya Khalid

 

‘Bridging the Local and Global: Women’s Spaces and Collectives’

Project summary:
While globalisation aims to connect the world equitably, global perspectives are often privileged over the local. Often the voices of women from the South (metaphor for marginalised) are least heard. This project acknowledges that any ‘Global’ ideology of (Dis)order needs to include local women’s voices by studying how they have generated order/disorder to create ‘spaces of action’/reflection (defined as collectives). We propose a multi-phase, multi-method study of women’s ‘collective spaces’. We first explore how ‘collectives’ have been understood. We will learn from women themselves by conducting two interview based case studies on (i) access to reproductive healthcare (Northern Ireland/Ireland) and (ii) mothers’ collective experiences of educating their children during a pandemic (ethnic minority families in England). In bringing together law and education, archives and interviews, reproductive healthcare and education, this project offers a novel way of understanding – and recording – collective responses to local/global challenges.

Funded by:

Virtual Sandpits, The British Academy

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid, Dr Jane Rooney and Dr Ruth Houghton, Dr Kate spencer-Bennet, Alana Farrel Kate Spencer-Bennett

 

‘Gendered Inequalities in Education and Capability Spaces for Women/Girls (and others) in Pakistan During Covid’

Project summary: This project explores the cumulative intersectional experiences of women/girls (and others) that are shaped by multidimensional inequalities existing in their physical (urban/rural) and social (market, society, community and family) settings. In particular, how gender interacts with the different vectors of disadvantage (for example, economic, technological, social, cultural and political) within the perimeters of their location (urban/rural) and setting (labour market, society and family) is to be explored. We refer to what we call ‘spaces of action/reflection’ that provide unique gendered experiences of seeking education. This project will thus conceptualise ‘spaces’ as those gendered experiences marked by economic, technological, social, cultural and political disadvantages that girls (and others) face in their locations (physical and social) as they seek education in the times of the pandemic. Hence, ‘space’ not only refers to the physical (urban/rural), but also, the social (community, family), cultural (society) and personal (psychological) aspects within which girls/women (and others) live and seek education.

This research aims to identify how these ‘spaces’ generate opportunities and constraints for girls/women (and others) in Pakistan. This exploration is essential today when Covid-19 has created ruptures in the supportive structures of educational provision. In this regard, it is essential to understand the limits and opportunities for girls/women’s (and that of others) education in Pakistan within these ‘spaces’ that have come about as a result of Covid-19 related educational and social restructuring of opportunities. In sum, the aim of the project is to contribute to international education by creating a deeper understanding of the gendered vulnerabilities that intersect with disadvantages and placement (physical and social) vectors to produce gendered experiences for the most marginalised in the context of Pakistan.

Funded by:

British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) Seedcorn Fund

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid and Dr Soufia Siddiqui

 

Publications

Khalid, A. (forthcoming). ‘Hearing their silences: Mothers agency as they support their daughters’ education in rural Punjab Pakistan’, Gender and Education.

Khalid, A., & Rose, P. (forthcoming). Mothers’ Capability to Influence their Daughters’ Education in Pakistan: Interconnections between mothers’ value of education, negative capability and agency. Journal of Human Development and Capabilities.

Khalid, A. (in preparation) ‘Comparisons of hope, education, and aspirations between Pakistani mothers and revolutionaries: The being and becoming of agents in the contexts of change’. Comparative Education

Khalid, A. & Singal, N. (in preparation) ”It’s made us stronger as a family’: Ethnic minority parenting experiences of educating children in England during Covid’. Journal of Family Studies

Singal, N. & Khalid, A. (in preparation) ”Time moves fast but it also goes slow’: Secondary school children’s experiences of ‘preparing’ for exams during lockdown in England. Children and Society

Khalid, A., Parpart, J. & Holmes, G. (Eds.) (in preparation) ‘ From the silence/voice binary to liminal spaces: Understanding gender, agency and power in a changing world’. Routledge

Khalid, A. & Siddiqi, S. (in preparation). Human Development Report 2022: Gendered inequalities in education and capability spaces for women/girls (and others) in Pakistan during Covid’. South Asia: Human Development Report UNDP

Alice Aldinucci is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford, Department of Education. She is part of the team working on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani, and she is a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group.

She holds a PhD in Education from the University of Glasgow (UK) where she was awarded the LKAS Interdisciplinary Scholarship. Her thesis applies a longitudinal qualitative research design and draws on the combination of Critical Realism and Capability Approach to explore aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to adulthood in Chile. Prior to her PhD, she completed a MA in International Education and Development from the University of Sussex (UK) where she was awarded the Centre for International Education Prize for the best overall MA performance. For her MA at Sussex, she conducted an empirical dissertation on the meaning making of Inclusive Education in Nepal. She holds a MA in Languages and Cultures for International Communication and Cooperation from the University of Milan (Italy) with a fieldwork research on tensions between policy and practice in bilingual multicultural education for indigenous students in Higher Education in Peru; and a BA in Languages and Intercultural Mediation from the University of Arezzo (Italy).

Alice’s research interests are interdisciplinary and relate to the critical linkages between intersecting inequalities, education, individual/societal development, and social justice at local and global levels, motivated by the question what education for what/whose development?

Areas, theoretical approaches and methodologies of interests:
• Sociology of education including aspirations in post-school transitions
• Cultural political economy of education and life chances/human flourishing/social justice
• Tensions between global educational frameworks and local knowledge and practices
• Critical Realism
• Capability Approach
• Qualitative and participatory methodologies
• Digital storytelling for social change

Besides her work in academia, Alice has gained experience as researcher, development practitioner and educator working in projects including early childhood education programmes, refugees’ education, girls’ education, SEN and inclusive education, TVET, global citizenship education, arts-based pedagogies. She lived and worked in different countries including in Nepal (a country she has developed a strong bond with), Tanzania, El Salvador, Italy and the UK. These experiences have reinforced her critical approach to international education and global development and to education as a catalyst for both inequalities, injustices, violence and more equitable social change and peace-building processes.

She served as Student Representative of the British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) from 2017 to 2019 and she is currently part of the college of reviewers of the editorial board of Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education.

Publications:

Aldinucci, A. (2022). Understanding aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to postschool trajectories in Chile. PhD thesis, University of Glasgow.
Aldinucci, A., Valiente, O., Hurrell S., and Zancajo, A. (2021). Understanding aspirations: Why do secondary TVET students aim so high in Chile? Journal of Vocational Education & Training.

Rawle, G., Riddle, N., Pettersson, G., Wallin, J., Bici, M., Jasper, P., Harb, J., Hebbar, M., Davis, J., Aldinucci, A., (2017), EQUIP-Tanzania Impact Evaluation. Midline Technical Report, Volume I and II. Oxford Policy Management.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Kabira is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. His research is funded by the Clarendon Fund.

Kabira is interested in improving learning outcomes for children in fragile and conflict – affected regions of the world, school health and nutrition programs, combatting gender-based violence and supporting children who are dealing with addiction.

His doctoral research focuses on education outcomes for young learners in Papua New Guinea who are addicted to psychoactive and carcinogenic betel quid.

Prior to moving to Oxford, Kabira was based in Washington DC, USA and worked for the World Bank and Save the Children on impact evaluations, learning assessments and improving the quality of education statistics in twenty-six countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, the Pacific, and the Middle East.

Kabira holds a Masters in Economics and Public Policy from Princeton University where he was a recipient of the Stokes’ Prize for exemplary academic achievement and public service leadership, a Masters in Development Economics from the School of Oriental and African Studies at London University where he graduated with distinction and an undergraduate degree in Economics and Statistics from St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai.

Research interests:

·       Education in conflict regions

·       Combatting school related gender-based violence (SRGBV)

·       School health and nutrition programs

·       Supporting children with addiction

 

Publications

Aliya teaches on the Comparative and International Education MSc programme at the Department of Education after having taught at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge. Her research focuses on how women in the South navigate their agency in highly constrained circumstances. Her specialised areas of interest are the capability approach, negative capability, epistemic paradoxicality and justice, and the promotion of knowledges (plural) and Southern epistemologies. Aliya actively engages in issues around the politics of representation and knowledge production in the academe. Aliya is currently accepting doctoral students with an interest in these areas.

 

Projects

‘Understanding the impact of COVID-19 on learning experiences of secondary school going age children among Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families’

Project summary:
COVID-19 related school disruption and closures have significantly impacted the lives of students. Notably, these disruptions have had a multi-fold impact on children living in ethnic minority families. Although ethnic and racial inequalities are persistent across contexts, this project particularly engages with young adults and other family members belonging to Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families living in England. Children in these families have been uniquely affected by the pandemic (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020), given the higher rates of prevalence of COVID among these communities and also greater and persistent structural inequalities.

Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families have been identified as a focus of this research because firstly, these particular groups have been strongly impacted by COVID (Platt & Warwick, 2020; Trivedy et al., 2020) and secondly, their socio cultural specificities make them more susceptible to disadvantage during COVID related school closures (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020). Our particular focus is on secondary school children whose learning has been majorly disrupted due to national lockdowns and uncertainty regarding national assessments.

Therefore, this project aims to address the unique situation and experiences of these BAME families with secondary school age children to understand how COVID-related challenges are shaping their learning experiences, household dynamics and future aspirations.

This is an exploratory, project which fills an important gap in existing knowledge by taking a strong cultural lens to understanding how learning among Bangladeshi and Pakistani families could be supported, drawing on a deeper understanding of their lived realities and contextualised understanding of the challenges they face. The aim is not simply to reproduce a deficit discourse (which tends to be associated with families from these ethnic minority groups), but to understand family dynamics and the opportunities offered herein.

Funded by:

Cambridge Humanities Research Grants Scheme

Research team:

Professor Nidhi Singal and Dr Aliya Khalid

 

‘Bridging the Local and Global: Women’s Spaces and Collectives’

Project summary:
While globalisation aims to connect the world equitably, global perspectives are often privileged over the local. Often the voices of women from the South (metaphor for marginalised) are least heard. This project acknowledges that any ‘Global’ ideology of (Dis)order needs to include local women’s voices by studying how they have generated order/disorder to create ‘spaces of action’/reflection (defined as collectives). We propose a multi-phase, multi-method study of women’s ‘collective spaces’. We first explore how ‘collectives’ have been understood. We will learn from women themselves by conducting two interview based case studies on (i) access to reproductive healthcare (Northern Ireland/Ireland) and (ii) mothers’ collective experiences of educating their children during a pandemic (ethnic minority families in England). In bringing together law and education, archives and interviews, reproductive healthcare and education, this project offers a novel way of understanding – and recording – collective responses to local/global challenges.

Funded by:

Virtual Sandpits, The British Academy

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid, Dr Jane Rooney and Dr Ruth Houghton, Dr Kate spencer-Bennet, Alana Farrel Kate Spencer-Bennett

 

‘Gendered Inequalities in Education and Capability Spaces for Women/Girls (and others) in Pakistan During Covid’

Project summary: This project explores the cumulative intersectional experiences of women/girls (and others) that are shaped by multidimensional inequalities existing in their physical (urban/rural) and social (market, society, community and family) settings. In particular, how gender interacts with the different vectors of disadvantage (for example, economic, technological, social, cultural and political) within the perimeters of their location (urban/rural) and setting (labour market, society and family) is to be explored. We refer to what we call ‘spaces of action/reflection’ that provide unique gendered experiences of seeking education. This project will thus conceptualise ‘spaces’ as those gendered experiences marked by economic, technological, social, cultural and political disadvantages that girls (and others) face in their locations (physical and social) as they seek education in the times of the pandemic. Hence, ‘space’ not only refers to the physical (urban/rural), but also, the social (community, family), cultural (society) and personal (psychological) aspects within which girls/women (and others) live and seek education.

This research aims to identify how these ‘spaces’ generate opportunities and constraints for girls/women (and others) in Pakistan. This exploration is essential today when Covid-19 has created ruptures in the supportive structures of educational provision. In this regard, it is essential to understand the limits and opportunities for girls/women’s (and that of others) education in Pakistan within these ‘spaces’ that have come about as a result of Covid-19 related educational and social restructuring of opportunities. In sum, the aim of the project is to contribute to international education by creating a deeper understanding of the gendered vulnerabilities that intersect with disadvantages and placement (physical and social) vectors to produce gendered experiences for the most marginalised in the context of Pakistan.

Funded by:

British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) Seedcorn Fund

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid and Dr Soufia Siddiqui

 

Publications

Khalid, A. (forthcoming). ‘Hearing their silences: Mothers agency as they support their daughters’ education in rural Punjab Pakistan’, Gender and Education.

Khalid, A., & Rose, P. (forthcoming). Mothers’ Capability to Influence their Daughters’ Education in Pakistan: Interconnections between mothers’ value of education, negative capability and agency. Journal of Human Development and Capabilities.

Khalid, A. (in preparation) ‘Comparisons of hope, education, and aspirations between Pakistani mothers and revolutionaries: The being and becoming of agents in the contexts of change’. Comparative Education

Khalid, A. & Singal, N. (in preparation) ”It’s made us stronger as a family’: Ethnic minority parenting experiences of educating children in England during Covid’. Journal of Family Studies

Singal, N. & Khalid, A. (in preparation) ”Time moves fast but it also goes slow’: Secondary school children’s experiences of ‘preparing’ for exams during lockdown in England. Children and Society

Khalid, A., Parpart, J. & Holmes, G. (Eds.) (in preparation) ‘ From the silence/voice binary to liminal spaces: Understanding gender, agency and power in a changing world’. Routledge

Khalid, A. & Siddiqi, S. (in preparation). Human Development Report 2022: Gendered inequalities in education and capability spaces for women/girls (and others) in Pakistan during Covid’. South Asia: Human Development Report UNDP

Alice Aldinucci is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford, Department of Education. She is part of the team working on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani, and she is a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group.

She holds a PhD in Education from the University of Glasgow (UK) where she was awarded the LKAS Interdisciplinary Scholarship. Her thesis applies a longitudinal qualitative research design and draws on the combination of Critical Realism and Capability Approach to explore aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to adulthood in Chile. Prior to her PhD, she completed a MA in International Education and Development from the University of Sussex (UK) where she was awarded the Centre for International Education Prize for the best overall MA performance. For her MA at Sussex, she conducted an empirical dissertation on the meaning making of Inclusive Education in Nepal. She holds a MA in Languages and Cultures for International Communication and Cooperation from the University of Milan (Italy) with a fieldwork research on tensions between policy and practice in bilingual multicultural education for indigenous students in Higher Education in Peru; and a BA in Languages and Intercultural Mediation from the University of Arezzo (Italy).

Alice’s research interests are interdisciplinary and relate to the critical linkages between intersecting inequalities, education, individual/societal development, and social justice at local and global levels, motivated by the question what education for what/whose development?

Areas, theoretical approaches and methodologies of interests:
• Sociology of education including aspirations in post-school transitions
• Cultural political economy of education and life chances/human flourishing/social justice
• Tensions between global educational frameworks and local knowledge and practices
• Critical Realism
• Capability Approach
• Qualitative and participatory methodologies
• Digital storytelling for social change

Besides her work in academia, Alice has gained experience as researcher, development practitioner and educator working in projects including early childhood education programmes, refugees’ education, girls’ education, SEN and inclusive education, TVET, global citizenship education, arts-based pedagogies. She lived and worked in different countries including in Nepal (a country she has developed a strong bond with), Tanzania, El Salvador, Italy and the UK. These experiences have reinforced her critical approach to international education and global development and to education as a catalyst for both inequalities, injustices, violence and more equitable social change and peace-building processes.

She served as Student Representative of the British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) from 2017 to 2019 and she is currently part of the college of reviewers of the editorial board of Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education.

Publications:

Aldinucci, A. (2022). Understanding aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to postschool trajectories in Chile. PhD thesis, University of Glasgow.
Aldinucci, A., Valiente, O., Hurrell S., and Zancajo, A. (2021). Understanding aspirations: Why do secondary TVET students aim so high in Chile? Journal of Vocational Education & Training.

Rawle, G., Riddle, N., Pettersson, G., Wallin, J., Bici, M., Jasper, P., Harb, J., Hebbar, M., Davis, J., Aldinucci, A., (2017), EQUIP-Tanzania Impact Evaluation. Midline Technical Report, Volume I and II. Oxford Policy Management.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Kabira is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. His research is funded by the Clarendon Fund.

Kabira is interested in improving learning outcomes for children in fragile and conflict – affected regions of the world, school health and nutrition programs, combatting gender-based violence and supporting children who are dealing with addiction.

His doctoral research focuses on education outcomes for young learners in Papua New Guinea who are addicted to psychoactive and carcinogenic betel quid.

Prior to moving to Oxford, Kabira was based in Washington DC, USA and worked for the World Bank and Save the Children on impact evaluations, learning assessments and improving the quality of education statistics in twenty-six countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, the Pacific, and the Middle East.

Kabira holds a Masters in Economics and Public Policy from Princeton University where he was a recipient of the Stokes’ Prize for exemplary academic achievement and public service leadership, a Masters in Development Economics from the School of Oriental and African Studies at London University where he graduated with distinction and an undergraduate degree in Economics and Statistics from St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai.

Research interests:

·       Education in conflict regions

·       Combatting school related gender-based violence (SRGBV)

·       School health and nutrition programs

·       Supporting children with addiction

 

Publications

Aliya teaches on the Comparative and International Education MSc programme at the Department of Education after having taught at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge. Her research focuses on how women in the South navigate their agency in highly constrained circumstances. Her specialised areas of interest are the capability approach, negative capability, epistemic paradoxicality and justice, and the promotion of knowledges (plural) and Southern epistemologies. Aliya actively engages in issues around the politics of representation and knowledge production in the academe. Aliya is currently accepting doctoral students with an interest in these areas.

 

Projects

‘Understanding the impact of COVID-19 on learning experiences of secondary school going age children among Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families’

Project summary:
COVID-19 related school disruption and closures have significantly impacted the lives of students. Notably, these disruptions have had a multi-fold impact on children living in ethnic minority families. Although ethnic and racial inequalities are persistent across contexts, this project particularly engages with young adults and other family members belonging to Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families living in England. Children in these families have been uniquely affected by the pandemic (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020), given the higher rates of prevalence of COVID among these communities and also greater and persistent structural inequalities.

Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families have been identified as a focus of this research because firstly, these particular groups have been strongly impacted by COVID (Platt & Warwick, 2020; Trivedy et al., 2020) and secondly, their socio cultural specificities make them more susceptible to disadvantage during COVID related school closures (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020). Our particular focus is on secondary school children whose learning has been majorly disrupted due to national lockdowns and uncertainty regarding national assessments.

Therefore, this project aims to address the unique situation and experiences of these BAME families with secondary school age children to understand how COVID-related challenges are shaping their learning experiences, household dynamics and future aspirations.

This is an exploratory, project which fills an important gap in existing knowledge by taking a strong cultural lens to understanding how learning among Bangladeshi and Pakistani families could be supported, drawing on a deeper understanding of their lived realities and contextualised understanding of the challenges they face. The aim is not simply to reproduce a deficit discourse (which tends to be associated with families from these ethnic minority groups), but to understand family dynamics and the opportunities offered herein.

Funded by:

Cambridge Humanities Research Grants Scheme

Research team:

Professor Nidhi Singal and Dr Aliya Khalid

 

‘Bridging the Local and Global: Women’s Spaces and Collectives’

Project summary:
While globalisation aims to connect the world equitably, global perspectives are often privileged over the local. Often the voices of women from the South (metaphor for marginalised) are least heard. This project acknowledges that any ‘Global’ ideology of (Dis)order needs to include local women’s voices by studying how they have generated order/disorder to create ‘spaces of action’/reflection (defined as collectives). We propose a multi-phase, multi-method study of women’s ‘collective spaces’. We first explore how ‘collectives’ have been understood. We will learn from women themselves by conducting two interview based case studies on (i) access to reproductive healthcare (Northern Ireland/Ireland) and (ii) mothers’ collective experiences of educating their children during a pandemic (ethnic minority families in England). In bringing together law and education, archives and interviews, reproductive healthcare and education, this project offers a novel way of understanding – and recording – collective responses to local/global challenges.

Funded by:

Virtual Sandpits, The British Academy

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid, Dr Jane Rooney and Dr Ruth Houghton, Dr Kate spencer-Bennet, Alana Farrel Kate Spencer-Bennett

 

‘Gendered Inequalities in Education and Capability Spaces for Women/Girls (and others) in Pakistan During Covid’

Project summary: This project explores the cumulative intersectional experiences of women/girls (and others) that are shaped by multidimensional inequalities existing in their physical (urban/rural) and social (market, society, community and family) settings. In particular, how gender interacts with the different vectors of disadvantage (for example, economic, technological, social, cultural and political) within the perimeters of their location (urban/rural) and setting (labour market, society and family) is to be explored. We refer to what we call ‘spaces of action/reflection’ that provide unique gendered experiences of seeking education. This project will thus conceptualise ‘spaces’ as those gendered experiences marked by economic, technological, social, cultural and political disadvantages that girls (and others) face in their locations (physical and social) as they seek education in the times of the pandemic. Hence, ‘space’ not only refers to the physical (urban/rural), but also, the social (community, family), cultural (society) and personal (psychological) aspects within which girls/women (and others) live and seek education.

This research aims to identify how these ‘spaces’ generate opportunities and constraints for girls/women (and others) in Pakistan. This exploration is essential today when Covid-19 has created ruptures in the supportive structures of educational provision. In this regard, it is essential to understand the limits and opportunities for girls/women’s (and that of others) education in Pakistan within these ‘spaces’ that have come about as a result of Covid-19 related educational and social restructuring of opportunities. In sum, the aim of the project is to contribute to international education by creating a deeper understanding of the gendered vulnerabilities that intersect with disadvantages and placement (physical and social) vectors to produce gendered experiences for the most marginalised in the context of Pakistan.

Funded by:

British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) Seedcorn Fund

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid and Dr Soufia Siddiqui

 

Publications

Khalid, A. (forthcoming). ‘Hearing their silences: Mothers agency as they support their daughters’ education in rural Punjab Pakistan’, Gender and Education.

Khalid, A., & Rose, P. (forthcoming). Mothers’ Capability to Influence their Daughters’ Education in Pakistan: Interconnections between mothers’ value of education, negative capability and agency. Journal of Human Development and Capabilities.

Khalid, A. (in preparation) ‘Comparisons of hope, education, and aspirations between Pakistani mothers and revolutionaries: The being and becoming of agents in the contexts of change’. Comparative Education

Khalid, A. & Singal, N. (in preparation) ”It’s made us stronger as a family’: Ethnic minority parenting experiences of educating children in England during Covid’. Journal of Family Studies

Singal, N. & Khalid, A. (in preparation) ”Time moves fast but it also goes slow’: Secondary school children’s experiences of ‘preparing’ for exams during lockdown in England. Children and Society

Khalid, A., Parpart, J. & Holmes, G. (Eds.) (in preparation) ‘ From the silence/voice binary to liminal spaces: Understanding gender, agency and power in a changing world’. Routledge

Khalid, A. & Siddiqi, S. (in preparation). Human Development Report 2022: Gendered inequalities in education and capability spaces for women/girls (and others) in Pakistan during Covid’. South Asia: Human Development Report UNDP

Alice Aldinucci is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford, Department of Education. She is part of the team working on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani, and she is a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group.

She holds a PhD in Education from the University of Glasgow (UK) where she was awarded the LKAS Interdisciplinary Scholarship. Her thesis applies a longitudinal qualitative research design and draws on the combination of Critical Realism and Capability Approach to explore aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to adulthood in Chile. Prior to her PhD, she completed a MA in International Education and Development from the University of Sussex (UK) where she was awarded the Centre for International Education Prize for the best overall MA performance. For her MA at Sussex, she conducted an empirical dissertation on the meaning making of Inclusive Education in Nepal. She holds a MA in Languages and Cultures for International Communication and Cooperation from the University of Milan (Italy) with a fieldwork research on tensions between policy and practice in bilingual multicultural education for indigenous students in Higher Education in Peru; and a BA in Languages and Intercultural Mediation from the University of Arezzo (Italy).

Alice’s research interests are interdisciplinary and relate to the critical linkages between intersecting inequalities, education, individual/societal development, and social justice at local and global levels, motivated by the question what education for what/whose development?

Areas, theoretical approaches and methodologies of interests:
• Sociology of education including aspirations in post-school transitions
• Cultural political economy of education and life chances/human flourishing/social justice
• Tensions between global educational frameworks and local knowledge and practices
• Critical Realism
• Capability Approach
• Qualitative and participatory methodologies
• Digital storytelling for social change

Besides her work in academia, Alice has gained experience as researcher, development practitioner and educator working in projects including early childhood education programmes, refugees’ education, girls’ education, SEN and inclusive education, TVET, global citizenship education, arts-based pedagogies. She lived and worked in different countries including in Nepal (a country she has developed a strong bond with), Tanzania, El Salvador, Italy and the UK. These experiences have reinforced her critical approach to international education and global development and to education as a catalyst for both inequalities, injustices, violence and more equitable social change and peace-building processes.

She served as Student Representative of the British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) from 2017 to 2019 and she is currently part of the college of reviewers of the editorial board of Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education.

Publications:

Aldinucci, A. (2022). Understanding aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to postschool trajectories in Chile. PhD thesis, University of Glasgow.
Aldinucci, A., Valiente, O., Hurrell S., and Zancajo, A. (2021). Understanding aspirations: Why do secondary TVET students aim so high in Chile? Journal of Vocational Education & Training.

Rawle, G., Riddle, N., Pettersson, G., Wallin, J., Bici, M., Jasper, P., Harb, J., Hebbar, M., Davis, J., Aldinucci, A., (2017), EQUIP-Tanzania Impact Evaluation. Midline Technical Report, Volume I and II. Oxford Policy Management.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Kabira is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. His research is funded by the Clarendon Fund.

Kabira is interested in improving learning outcomes for children in fragile and conflict – affected regions of the world, school health and nutrition programs, combatting gender-based violence and supporting children who are dealing with addiction.

His doctoral research focuses on education outcomes for young learners in Papua New Guinea who are addicted to psychoactive and carcinogenic betel quid.

Prior to moving to Oxford, Kabira was based in Washington DC, USA and worked for the World Bank and Save the Children on impact evaluations, learning assessments and improving the quality of education statistics in twenty-six countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, the Pacific, and the Middle East.

Kabira holds a Masters in Economics and Public Policy from Princeton University where he was a recipient of the Stokes’ Prize for exemplary academic achievement and public service leadership, a Masters in Development Economics from the School of Oriental and African Studies at London University where he graduated with distinction and an undergraduate degree in Economics and Statistics from St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai.

Research interests:

·       Education in conflict regions

·       Combatting school related gender-based violence (SRGBV)

·       School health and nutrition programs

·       Supporting children with addiction

 

Publications

Aliya teaches on the Comparative and International Education MSc programme at the Department of Education after having taught at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge. Her research focuses on how women in the South navigate their agency in highly constrained circumstances. Her specialised areas of interest are the capability approach, negative capability, epistemic paradoxicality and justice, and the promotion of knowledges (plural) and Southern epistemologies. Aliya actively engages in issues around the politics of representation and knowledge production in the academe. Aliya is currently accepting doctoral students with an interest in these areas.

 

Projects

‘Understanding the impact of COVID-19 on learning experiences of secondary school going age children among Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families’

Project summary:
COVID-19 related school disruption and closures have significantly impacted the lives of students. Notably, these disruptions have had a multi-fold impact on children living in ethnic minority families. Although ethnic and racial inequalities are persistent across contexts, this project particularly engages with young adults and other family members belonging to Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families living in England. Children in these families have been uniquely affected by the pandemic (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020), given the higher rates of prevalence of COVID among these communities and also greater and persistent structural inequalities.

Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families have been identified as a focus of this research because firstly, these particular groups have been strongly impacted by COVID (Platt & Warwick, 2020; Trivedy et al., 2020) and secondly, their socio cultural specificities make them more susceptible to disadvantage during COVID related school closures (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020). Our particular focus is on secondary school children whose learning has been majorly disrupted due to national lockdowns and uncertainty regarding national assessments.

Therefore, this project aims to address the unique situation and experiences of these BAME families with secondary school age children to understand how COVID-related challenges are shaping their learning experiences, household dynamics and future aspirations.

This is an exploratory, project which fills an important gap in existing knowledge by taking a strong cultural lens to understanding how learning among Bangladeshi and Pakistani families could be supported, drawing on a deeper understanding of their lived realities and contextualised understanding of the challenges they face. The aim is not simply to reproduce a deficit discourse (which tends to be associated with families from these ethnic minority groups), but to understand family dynamics and the opportunities offered herein.

Funded by:

Cambridge Humanities Research Grants Scheme

Research team:

Professor Nidhi Singal and Dr Aliya Khalid

 

‘Bridging the Local and Global: Women’s Spaces and Collectives’

Project summary:
While globalisation aims to connect the world equitably, global perspectives are often privileged over the local. Often the voices of women from the South (metaphor for marginalised) are least heard. This project acknowledges that any ‘Global’ ideology of (Dis)order needs to include local women’s voices by studying how they have generated order/disorder to create ‘spaces of action’/reflection (defined as collectives). We propose a multi-phase, multi-method study of women’s ‘collective spaces’. We first explore how ‘collectives’ have been understood. We will learn from women themselves by conducting two interview based case studies on (i) access to reproductive healthcare (Northern Ireland/Ireland) and (ii) mothers’ collective experiences of educating their children during a pandemic (ethnic minority families in England). In bringing together law and education, archives and interviews, reproductive healthcare and education, this project offers a novel way of understanding – and recording – collective responses to local/global challenges.

Funded by:

Virtual Sandpits, The British Academy

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid, Dr Jane Rooney and Dr Ruth Houghton, Dr Kate spencer-Bennet, Alana Farrel Kate Spencer-Bennett

 

‘Gendered Inequalities in Education and Capability Spaces for Women/Girls (and others) in Pakistan During Covid’

Project summary: This project explores the cumulative intersectional experiences of women/girls (and others) that are shaped by multidimensional inequalities existing in their physical (urban/rural) and social (market, society, community and family) settings. In particular, how gender interacts with the different vectors of disadvantage (for example, economic, technological, social, cultural and political) within the perimeters of their location (urban/rural) and setting (labour market, society and family) is to be explored. We refer to what we call ‘spaces of action/reflection’ that provide unique gendered experiences of seeking education. This project will thus conceptualise ‘spaces’ as those gendered experiences marked by economic, technological, social, cultural and political disadvantages that girls (and others) face in their locations (physical and social) as they seek education in the times of the pandemic. Hence, ‘space’ not only refers to the physical (urban/rural), but also, the social (community, family), cultural (society) and personal (psychological) aspects within which girls/women (and others) live and seek education.

This research aims to identify how these ‘spaces’ generate opportunities and constraints for girls/women (and others) in Pakistan. This exploration is essential today when Covid-19 has created ruptures in the supportive structures of educational provision. In this regard, it is essential to understand the limits and opportunities for girls/women’s (and that of others) education in Pakistan within these ‘spaces’ that have come about as a result of Covid-19 related educational and social restructuring of opportunities. In sum, the aim of the project is to contribute to international education by creating a deeper understanding of the gendered vulnerabilities that intersect with disadvantages and placement (physical and social) vectors to produce gendered experiences for the most marginalised in the context of Pakistan.

Funded by:

British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) Seedcorn Fund

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid and Dr Soufia Siddiqui

 

Publications

Khalid, A. (forthcoming). ‘Hearing their silences: Mothers agency as they support their daughters’ education in rural Punjab Pakistan’, Gender and Education.

Khalid, A., & Rose, P. (forthcoming). Mothers’ Capability to Influence their Daughters’ Education in Pakistan: Interconnections between mothers’ value of education, negative capability and agency. Journal of Human Development and Capabilities.

Khalid, A. (in preparation) ‘Comparisons of hope, education, and aspirations between Pakistani mothers and revolutionaries: The being and becoming of agents in the contexts of change’. Comparative Education

Khalid, A. & Singal, N. (in preparation) ”It’s made us stronger as a family’: Ethnic minority parenting experiences of educating children in England during Covid’. Journal of Family Studies

Singal, N. & Khalid, A. (in preparation) ”Time moves fast but it also goes slow’: Secondary school children’s experiences of ‘preparing’ for exams during lockdown in England. Children and Society

Khalid, A., Parpart, J. & Holmes, G. (Eds.) (in preparation) ‘ From the silence/voice binary to liminal spaces: Understanding gender, agency and power in a changing world’. Routledge

Khalid, A. & Siddiqi, S. (in preparation). Human Development Report 2022: Gendered inequalities in education and capability spaces for women/girls (and others) in Pakistan during Covid’. South Asia: Human Development Report UNDP

Alice Aldinucci is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford, Department of Education. She is part of the team working on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani, and she is a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group.

She holds a PhD in Education from the University of Glasgow (UK) where she was awarded the LKAS Interdisciplinary Scholarship. Her thesis applies a longitudinal qualitative research design and draws on the combination of Critical Realism and Capability Approach to explore aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to adulthood in Chile. Prior to her PhD, she completed a MA in International Education and Development from the University of Sussex (UK) where she was awarded the Centre for International Education Prize for the best overall MA performance. For her MA at Sussex, she conducted an empirical dissertation on the meaning making of Inclusive Education in Nepal. She holds a MA in Languages and Cultures for International Communication and Cooperation from the University of Milan (Italy) with a fieldwork research on tensions between policy and practice in bilingual multicultural education for indigenous students in Higher Education in Peru; and a BA in Languages and Intercultural Mediation from the University of Arezzo (Italy).

Alice’s research interests are interdisciplinary and relate to the critical linkages between intersecting inequalities, education, individual/societal development, and social justice at local and global levels, motivated by the question what education for what/whose development?

Areas, theoretical approaches and methodologies of interests:
• Sociology of education including aspirations in post-school transitions
• Cultural political economy of education and life chances/human flourishing/social justice
• Tensions between global educational frameworks and local knowledge and practices
• Critical Realism
• Capability Approach
• Qualitative and participatory methodologies
• Digital storytelling for social change

Besides her work in academia, Alice has gained experience as researcher, development practitioner and educator working in projects including early childhood education programmes, refugees’ education, girls’ education, SEN and inclusive education, TVET, global citizenship education, arts-based pedagogies. She lived and worked in different countries including in Nepal (a country she has developed a strong bond with), Tanzania, El Salvador, Italy and the UK. These experiences have reinforced her critical approach to international education and global development and to education as a catalyst for both inequalities, injustices, violence and more equitable social change and peace-building processes.

She served as Student Representative of the British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) from 2017 to 2019 and she is currently part of the college of reviewers of the editorial board of Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education.

Publications:

Aldinucci, A. (2022). Understanding aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to postschool trajectories in Chile. PhD thesis, University of Glasgow.
Aldinucci, A., Valiente, O., Hurrell S., and Zancajo, A. (2021). Understanding aspirations: Why do secondary TVET students aim so high in Chile? Journal of Vocational Education & Training.

Rawle, G., Riddle, N., Pettersson, G., Wallin, J., Bici, M., Jasper, P., Harb, J., Hebbar, M., Davis, J., Aldinucci, A., (2017), EQUIP-Tanzania Impact Evaluation. Midline Technical Report, Volume I and II. Oxford Policy Management.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Kabira is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. His research is funded by the Clarendon Fund.

Kabira is interested in improving learning outcomes for children in fragile and conflict – affected regions of the world, school health and nutrition programs, combatting gender-based violence and supporting children who are dealing with addiction.

His doctoral research focuses on education outcomes for young learners in Papua New Guinea who are addicted to psychoactive and carcinogenic betel quid.

Prior to moving to Oxford, Kabira was based in Washington DC, USA and worked for the World Bank and Save the Children on impact evaluations, learning assessments and improving the quality of education statistics in twenty-six countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, the Pacific, and the Middle East.

Kabira holds a Masters in Economics and Public Policy from Princeton University where he was a recipient of the Stokes’ Prize for exemplary academic achievement and public service leadership, a Masters in Development Economics from the School of Oriental and African Studies at London University where he graduated with distinction and an undergraduate degree in Economics and Statistics from St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai.

Research interests:

·       Education in conflict regions

·       Combatting school related gender-based violence (SRGBV)

·       School health and nutrition programs

·       Supporting children with addiction

 

Publications

Aliya teaches on the Comparative and International Education MSc programme at the Department of Education after having taught at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge. Her research focuses on how women in the South navigate their agency in highly constrained circumstances. Her specialised areas of interest are the capability approach, negative capability, epistemic paradoxicality and justice, and the promotion of knowledges (plural) and Southern epistemologies. Aliya actively engages in issues around the politics of representation and knowledge production in the academe. Aliya is currently accepting doctoral students with an interest in these areas.

 

Projects

‘Understanding the impact of COVID-19 on learning experiences of secondary school going age children among Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families’

Project summary:
COVID-19 related school disruption and closures have significantly impacted the lives of students. Notably, these disruptions have had a multi-fold impact on children living in ethnic minority families. Although ethnic and racial inequalities are persistent across contexts, this project particularly engages with young adults and other family members belonging to Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families living in England. Children in these families have been uniquely affected by the pandemic (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020), given the higher rates of prevalence of COVID among these communities and also greater and persistent structural inequalities.

Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families have been identified as a focus of this research because firstly, these particular groups have been strongly impacted by COVID (Platt & Warwick, 2020; Trivedy et al., 2020) and secondly, their socio cultural specificities make them more susceptible to disadvantage during COVID related school closures (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020). Our particular focus is on secondary school children whose learning has been majorly disrupted due to national lockdowns and uncertainty regarding national assessments.

Therefore, this project aims to address the unique situation and experiences of these BAME families with secondary school age children to understand how COVID-related challenges are shaping their learning experiences, household dynamics and future aspirations.

This is an exploratory, project which fills an important gap in existing knowledge by taking a strong cultural lens to understanding how learning among Bangladeshi and Pakistani families could be supported, drawing on a deeper understanding of their lived realities and contextualised understanding of the challenges they face. The aim is not simply to reproduce a deficit discourse (which tends to be associated with families from these ethnic minority groups), but to understand family dynamics and the opportunities offered herein.

Funded by:

Cambridge Humanities Research Grants Scheme

Research team:

Professor Nidhi Singal and Dr Aliya Khalid

 

‘Bridging the Local and Global: Women’s Spaces and Collectives’

Project summary:
While globalisation aims to connect the world equitably, global perspectives are often privileged over the local. Often the voices of women from the South (metaphor for marginalised) are least heard. This project acknowledges that any ‘Global’ ideology of (Dis)order needs to include local women’s voices by studying how they have generated order/disorder to create ‘spaces of action’/reflection (defined as collectives). We propose a multi-phase, multi-method study of women’s ‘collective spaces’. We first explore how ‘collectives’ have been understood. We will learn from women themselves by conducting two interview based case studies on (i) access to reproductive healthcare (Northern Ireland/Ireland) and (ii) mothers’ collective experiences of educating their children during a pandemic (ethnic minority families in England). In bringing together law and education, archives and interviews, reproductive healthcare and education, this project offers a novel way of understanding – and recording – collective responses to local/global challenges.

Funded by:

Virtual Sandpits, The British Academy

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid, Dr Jane Rooney and Dr Ruth Houghton, Dr Kate spencer-Bennet, Alana Farrel Kate Spencer-Bennett

 

‘Gendered Inequalities in Education and Capability Spaces for Women/Girls (and others) in Pakistan During Covid’

Project summary: This project explores the cumulative intersectional experiences of women/girls (and others) that are shaped by multidimensional inequalities existing in their physical (urban/rural) and social (market, society, community and family) settings. In particular, how gender interacts with the different vectors of disadvantage (for example, economic, technological, social, cultural and political) within the perimeters of their location (urban/rural) and setting (labour market, society and family) is to be explored. We refer to what we call ‘spaces of action/reflection’ that provide unique gendered experiences of seeking education. This project will thus conceptualise ‘spaces’ as those gendered experiences marked by economic, technological, social, cultural and political disadvantages that girls (and others) face in their locations (physical and social) as they seek education in the times of the pandemic. Hence, ‘space’ not only refers to the physical (urban/rural), but also, the social (community, family), cultural (society) and personal (psychological) aspects within which girls/women (and others) live and seek education.

This research aims to identify how these ‘spaces’ generate opportunities and constraints for girls/women (and others) in Pakistan. This exploration is essential today when Covid-19 has created ruptures in the supportive structures of educational provision. In this regard, it is essential to understand the limits and opportunities for girls/women’s (and that of others) education in Pakistan within these ‘spaces’ that have come about as a result of Covid-19 related educational and social restructuring of opportunities. In sum, the aim of the project is to contribute to international education by creating a deeper understanding of the gendered vulnerabilities that intersect with disadvantages and placement (physical and social) vectors to produce gendered experiences for the most marginalised in the context of Pakistan.

Funded by:

British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) Seedcorn Fund

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid and Dr Soufia Siddiqui

 

Publications

Khalid, A. (forthcoming). ‘Hearing their silences: Mothers agency as they support their daughters’ education in rural Punjab Pakistan’, Gender and Education.

Khalid, A., & Rose, P. (forthcoming). Mothers’ Capability to Influence their Daughters’ Education in Pakistan: Interconnections between mothers’ value of education, negative capability and agency. Journal of Human Development and Capabilities.

Khalid, A. (in preparation) ‘Comparisons of hope, education, and aspirations between Pakistani mothers and revolutionaries: The being and becoming of agents in the contexts of change’. Comparative Education

Khalid, A. & Singal, N. (in preparation) ”It’s made us stronger as a family’: Ethnic minority parenting experiences of educating children in England during Covid’. Journal of Family Studies

Singal, N. & Khalid, A. (in preparation) ”Time moves fast but it also goes slow’: Secondary school children’s experiences of ‘preparing’ for exams during lockdown in England. Children and Society

Khalid, A., Parpart, J. & Holmes, G. (Eds.) (in preparation) ‘ From the silence/voice binary to liminal spaces: Understanding gender, agency and power in a changing world’. Routledge

Khalid, A. & Siddiqi, S. (in preparation). Human Development Report 2022: Gendered inequalities in education and capability spaces for women/girls (and others) in Pakistan during Covid’. South Asia: Human Development Report UNDP

Alice Aldinucci is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford, Department of Education. She is part of the team working on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani, and she is a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group.

She holds a PhD in Education from the University of Glasgow (UK) where she was awarded the LKAS Interdisciplinary Scholarship. Her thesis applies a longitudinal qualitative research design and draws on the combination of Critical Realism and Capability Approach to explore aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to adulthood in Chile. Prior to her PhD, she completed a MA in International Education and Development from the University of Sussex (UK) where she was awarded the Centre for International Education Prize for the best overall MA performance. For her MA at Sussex, she conducted an empirical dissertation on the meaning making of Inclusive Education in Nepal. She holds a MA in Languages and Cultures for International Communication and Cooperation from the University of Milan (Italy) with a fieldwork research on tensions between policy and practice in bilingual multicultural education for indigenous students in Higher Education in Peru; and a BA in Languages and Intercultural Mediation from the University of Arezzo (Italy).

Alice’s research interests are interdisciplinary and relate to the critical linkages between intersecting inequalities, education, individual/societal development, and social justice at local and global levels, motivated by the question what education for what/whose development?

Areas, theoretical approaches and methodologies of interests:
• Sociology of education including aspirations in post-school transitions
• Cultural political economy of education and life chances/human flourishing/social justice
• Tensions between global educational frameworks and local knowledge and practices
• Critical Realism
• Capability Approach
• Qualitative and participatory methodologies
• Digital storytelling for social change

Besides her work in academia, Alice has gained experience as researcher, development practitioner and educator working in projects including early childhood education programmes, refugees’ education, girls’ education, SEN and inclusive education, TVET, global citizenship education, arts-based pedagogies. She lived and worked in different countries including in Nepal (a country she has developed a strong bond with), Tanzania, El Salvador, Italy and the UK. These experiences have reinforced her critical approach to international education and global development and to education as a catalyst for both inequalities, injustices, violence and more equitable social change and peace-building processes.

She served as Student Representative of the British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) from 2017 to 2019 and she is currently part of the college of reviewers of the editorial board of Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education.

Publications:

Aldinucci, A. (2022). Understanding aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to postschool trajectories in Chile. PhD thesis, University of Glasgow.
Aldinucci, A., Valiente, O., Hurrell S., and Zancajo, A. (2021). Understanding aspirations: Why do secondary TVET students aim so high in Chile? Journal of Vocational Education & Training.

Rawle, G., Riddle, N., Pettersson, G., Wallin, J., Bici, M., Jasper, P., Harb, J., Hebbar, M., Davis, J., Aldinucci, A., (2017), EQUIP-Tanzania Impact Evaluation. Midline Technical Report, Volume I and II. Oxford Policy Management.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Kabira is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. His research is funded by the Clarendon Fund.

Kabira is interested in improving learning outcomes for children in fragile and conflict – affected regions of the world, school health and nutrition programs, combatting gender-based violence and supporting children who are dealing with addiction.

His doctoral research focuses on education outcomes for young learners in Papua New Guinea who are addicted to psychoactive and carcinogenic betel quid.

Prior to moving to Oxford, Kabira was based in Washington DC, USA and worked for the World Bank and Save the Children on impact evaluations, learning assessments and improving the quality of education statistics in twenty-six countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, the Pacific, and the Middle East.

Kabira holds a Masters in Economics and Public Policy from Princeton University where he was a recipient of the Stokes’ Prize for exemplary academic achievement and public service leadership, a Masters in Development Economics from the School of Oriental and African Studies at London University where he graduated with distinction and an undergraduate degree in Economics and Statistics from St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai.

Research interests:

·       Education in conflict regions

·       Combatting school related gender-based violence (SRGBV)

·       School health and nutrition programs

·       Supporting children with addiction

 

Publications

Aliya teaches on the Comparative and International Education MSc programme at the Department of Education after having taught at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge. Her research focuses on how women in the South navigate their agency in highly constrained circumstances. Her specialised areas of interest are the capability approach, negative capability, epistemic paradoxicality and justice, and the promotion of knowledges (plural) and Southern epistemologies. Aliya actively engages in issues around the politics of representation and knowledge production in the academe. Aliya is currently accepting doctoral students with an interest in these areas.

 

Projects

‘Understanding the impact of COVID-19 on learning experiences of secondary school going age children among Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families’

Project summary:
COVID-19 related school disruption and closures have significantly impacted the lives of students. Notably, these disruptions have had a multi-fold impact on children living in ethnic minority families. Although ethnic and racial inequalities are persistent across contexts, this project particularly engages with young adults and other family members belonging to Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families living in England. Children in these families have been uniquely affected by the pandemic (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020), given the higher rates of prevalence of COVID among these communities and also greater and persistent structural inequalities.

Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families have been identified as a focus of this research because firstly, these particular groups have been strongly impacted by COVID (Platt & Warwick, 2020; Trivedy et al., 2020) and secondly, their socio cultural specificities make them more susceptible to disadvantage during COVID related school closures (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020). Our particular focus is on secondary school children whose learning has been majorly disrupted due to national lockdowns and uncertainty regarding national assessments.

Therefore, this project aims to address the unique situation and experiences of these BAME families with secondary school age children to understand how COVID-related challenges are shaping their learning experiences, household dynamics and future aspirations.

This is an exploratory, project which fills an important gap in existing knowledge by taking a strong cultural lens to understanding how learning among Bangladeshi and Pakistani families could be supported, drawing on a deeper understanding of their lived realities and contextualised understanding of the challenges they face. The aim is not simply to reproduce a deficit discourse (which tends to be associated with families from these ethnic minority groups), but to understand family dynamics and the opportunities offered herein.

Funded by:

Cambridge Humanities Research Grants Scheme

Research team:

Professor Nidhi Singal and Dr Aliya Khalid

 

‘Bridging the Local and Global: Women’s Spaces and Collectives’

Project summary:
While globalisation aims to connect the world equitably, global perspectives are often privileged over the local. Often the voices of women from the South (metaphor for marginalised) are least heard. This project acknowledges that any ‘Global’ ideology of (Dis)order needs to include local women’s voices by studying how they have generated order/disorder to create ‘spaces of action’/reflection (defined as collectives). We propose a multi-phase, multi-method study of women’s ‘collective spaces’. We first explore how ‘collectives’ have been understood. We will learn from women themselves by conducting two interview based case studies on (i) access to reproductive healthcare (Northern Ireland/Ireland) and (ii) mothers’ collective experiences of educating their children during a pandemic (ethnic minority families in England). In bringing together law and education, archives and interviews, reproductive healthcare and education, this project offers a novel way of understanding – and recording – collective responses to local/global challenges.

Funded by:

Virtual Sandpits, The British Academy

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid, Dr Jane Rooney and Dr Ruth Houghton, Dr Kate spencer-Bennet, Alana Farrel Kate Spencer-Bennett

 

‘Gendered Inequalities in Education and Capability Spaces for Women/Girls (and others) in Pakistan During Covid’

Project summary: This project explores the cumulative intersectional experiences of women/girls (and others) that are shaped by multidimensional inequalities existing in their physical (urban/rural) and social (market, society, community and family) settings. In particular, how gender interacts with the different vectors of disadvantage (for example, economic, technological, social, cultural and political) within the perimeters of their location (urban/rural) and setting (labour market, society and family) is to be explored. We refer to what we call ‘spaces of action/reflection’ that provide unique gendered experiences of seeking education. This project will thus conceptualise ‘spaces’ as those gendered experiences marked by economic, technological, social, cultural and political disadvantages that girls (and others) face in their locations (physical and social) as they seek education in the times of the pandemic. Hence, ‘space’ not only refers to the physical (urban/rural), but also, the social (community, family), cultural (society) and personal (psychological) aspects within which girls/women (and others) live and seek education.

This research aims to identify how these ‘spaces’ generate opportunities and constraints for girls/women (and others) in Pakistan. This exploration is essential today when Covid-19 has created ruptures in the supportive structures of educational provision. In this regard, it is essential to understand the limits and opportunities for girls/women’s (and that of others) education in Pakistan within these ‘spaces’ that have come about as a result of Covid-19 related educational and social restructuring of opportunities. In sum, the aim of the project is to contribute to international education by creating a deeper understanding of the gendered vulnerabilities that intersect with disadvantages and placement (physical and social) vectors to produce gendered experiences for the most marginalised in the context of Pakistan.

Funded by:

British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) Seedcorn Fund

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid and Dr Soufia Siddiqui

 

Publications

Khalid, A. (forthcoming). ‘Hearing their silences: Mothers agency as they support their daughters’ education in rural Punjab Pakistan’, Gender and Education.

Khalid, A., & Rose, P. (forthcoming). Mothers’ Capability to Influence their Daughters’ Education in Pakistan: Interconnections between mothers’ value of education, negative capability and agency. Journal of Human Development and Capabilities.

Khalid, A. (in preparation) ‘Comparisons of hope, education, and aspirations between Pakistani mothers and revolutionaries: The being and becoming of agents in the contexts of change’. Comparative Education

Khalid, A. & Singal, N. (in preparation) ”It’s made us stronger as a family’: Ethnic minority parenting experiences of educating children in England during Covid’. Journal of Family Studies

Singal, N. & Khalid, A. (in preparation) ”Time moves fast but it also goes slow’: Secondary school children’s experiences of ‘preparing’ for exams during lockdown in England. Children and Society

Khalid, A., Parpart, J. & Holmes, G. (Eds.) (in preparation) ‘ From the silence/voice binary to liminal spaces: Understanding gender, agency and power in a changing world’. Routledge

Khalid, A. & Siddiqi, S. (in preparation). Human Development Report 2022: Gendered inequalities in education and capability spaces for women/girls (and others) in Pakistan during Covid’. South Asia: Human Development Report UNDP

Alice Aldinucci is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford, Department of Education. She is part of the team working on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani, and she is a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group.

She holds a PhD in Education from the University of Glasgow (UK) where she was awarded the LKAS Interdisciplinary Scholarship. Her thesis applies a longitudinal qualitative research design and draws on the combination of Critical Realism and Capability Approach to explore aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to adulthood in Chile. Prior to her PhD, she completed a MA in International Education and Development from the University of Sussex (UK) where she was awarded the Centre for International Education Prize for the best overall MA performance. For her MA at Sussex, she conducted an empirical dissertation on the meaning making of Inclusive Education in Nepal. She holds a MA in Languages and Cultures for International Communication and Cooperation from the University of Milan (Italy) with a fieldwork research on tensions between policy and practice in bilingual multicultural education for indigenous students in Higher Education in Peru; and a BA in Languages and Intercultural Mediation from the University of Arezzo (Italy).

Alice’s research interests are interdisciplinary and relate to the critical linkages between intersecting inequalities, education, individual/societal development, and social justice at local and global levels, motivated by the question what education for what/whose development?

Areas, theoretical approaches and methodologies of interests:
• Sociology of education including aspirations in post-school transitions
• Cultural political economy of education and life chances/human flourishing/social justice
• Tensions between global educational frameworks and local knowledge and practices
• Critical Realism
• Capability Approach
• Qualitative and participatory methodologies
• Digital storytelling for social change

Besides her work in academia, Alice has gained experience as researcher, development practitioner and educator working in projects including early childhood education programmes, refugees’ education, girls’ education, SEN and inclusive education, TVET, global citizenship education, arts-based pedagogies. She lived and worked in different countries including in Nepal (a country she has developed a strong bond with), Tanzania, El Salvador, Italy and the UK. These experiences have reinforced her critical approach to international education and global development and to education as a catalyst for both inequalities, injustices, violence and more equitable social change and peace-building processes.

She served as Student Representative of the British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) from 2017 to 2019 and she is currently part of the college of reviewers of the editorial board of Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education.

Publications:

Aldinucci, A. (2022). Understanding aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to postschool trajectories in Chile. PhD thesis, University of Glasgow.
Aldinucci, A., Valiente, O., Hurrell S., and Zancajo, A. (2021). Understanding aspirations: Why do secondary TVET students aim so high in Chile? Journal of Vocational Education & Training.

Rawle, G., Riddle, N., Pettersson, G., Wallin, J., Bici, M., Jasper, P., Harb, J., Hebbar, M., Davis, J., Aldinucci, A., (2017), EQUIP-Tanzania Impact Evaluation. Midline Technical Report, Volume I and II. Oxford Policy Management.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Kabira is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. His research is funded by the Clarendon Fund.

Kabira is interested in improving learning outcomes for children in fragile and conflict – affected regions of the world, school health and nutrition programs, combatting gender-based violence and supporting children who are dealing with addiction.

His doctoral research focuses on education outcomes for young learners in Papua New Guinea who are addicted to psychoactive and carcinogenic betel quid.

Prior to moving to Oxford, Kabira was based in Washington DC, USA and worked for the World Bank and Save the Children on impact evaluations, learning assessments and improving the quality of education statistics in twenty-six countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, the Pacific, and the Middle East.

Kabira holds a Masters in Economics and Public Policy from Princeton University where he was a recipient of the Stokes’ Prize for exemplary academic achievement and public service leadership, a Masters in Development Economics from the School of Oriental and African Studies at London University where he graduated with distinction and an undergraduate degree in Economics and Statistics from St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai.

Research interests:

·       Education in conflict regions

·       Combatting school related gender-based violence (SRGBV)

·       School health and nutrition programs

·       Supporting children with addiction

 

Publications

Aliya teaches on the Comparative and International Education MSc programme at the Department of Education after having taught at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge. Her research focuses on how women in the South navigate their agency in highly constrained circumstances. Her specialised areas of interest are the capability approach, negative capability, epistemic paradoxicality and justice, and the promotion of knowledges (plural) and Southern epistemologies. Aliya actively engages in issues around the politics of representation and knowledge production in the academe. Aliya is currently accepting doctoral students with an interest in these areas.

 

Projects

‘Understanding the impact of COVID-19 on learning experiences of secondary school going age children among Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families’

Project summary:
COVID-19 related school disruption and closures have significantly impacted the lives of students. Notably, these disruptions have had a multi-fold impact on children living in ethnic minority families. Although ethnic and racial inequalities are persistent across contexts, this project particularly engages with young adults and other family members belonging to Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families living in England. Children in these families have been uniquely affected by the pandemic (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020), given the higher rates of prevalence of COVID among these communities and also greater and persistent structural inequalities.

Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families have been identified as a focus of this research because firstly, these particular groups have been strongly impacted by COVID (Platt & Warwick, 2020; Trivedy et al., 2020) and secondly, their socio cultural specificities make them more susceptible to disadvantage during COVID related school closures (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020). Our particular focus is on secondary school children whose learning has been majorly disrupted due to national lockdowns and uncertainty regarding national assessments.

Therefore, this project aims to address the unique situation and experiences of these BAME families with secondary school age children to understand how COVID-related challenges are shaping their learning experiences, household dynamics and future aspirations.

This is an exploratory, project which fills an important gap in existing knowledge by taking a strong cultural lens to understanding how learning among Bangladeshi and Pakistani families could be supported, drawing on a deeper understanding of their lived realities and contextualised understanding of the challenges they face. The aim is not simply to reproduce a deficit discourse (which tends to be associated with families from these ethnic minority groups), but to understand family dynamics and the opportunities offered herein.

Funded by:

Cambridge Humanities Research Grants Scheme

Research team:

Professor Nidhi Singal and Dr Aliya Khalid

 

‘Bridging the Local and Global: Women’s Spaces and Collectives’

Project summary:
While globalisation aims to connect the world equitably, global perspectives are often privileged over the local. Often the voices of women from the South (metaphor for marginalised) are least heard. This project acknowledges that any ‘Global’ ideology of (Dis)order needs to include local women’s voices by studying how they have generated order/disorder to create ‘spaces of action’/reflection (defined as collectives). We propose a multi-phase, multi-method study of women’s ‘collective spaces’. We first explore how ‘collectives’ have been understood. We will learn from women themselves by conducting two interview based case studies on (i) access to reproductive healthcare (Northern Ireland/Ireland) and (ii) mothers’ collective experiences of educating their children during a pandemic (ethnic minority families in England). In bringing together law and education, archives and interviews, reproductive healthcare and education, this project offers a novel way of understanding – and recording – collective responses to local/global challenges.

Funded by:

Virtual Sandpits, The British Academy

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid, Dr Jane Rooney and Dr Ruth Houghton, Dr Kate spencer-Bennet, Alana Farrel Kate Spencer-Bennett

 

‘Gendered Inequalities in Education and Capability Spaces for Women/Girls (and others) in Pakistan During Covid’

Project summary: This project explores the cumulative intersectional experiences of women/girls (and others) that are shaped by multidimensional inequalities existing in their physical (urban/rural) and social (market, society, community and family) settings. In particular, how gender interacts with the different vectors of disadvantage (for example, economic, technological, social, cultural and political) within the perimeters of their location (urban/rural) and setting (labour market, society and family) is to be explored. We refer to what we call ‘spaces of action/reflection’ that provide unique gendered experiences of seeking education. This project will thus conceptualise ‘spaces’ as those gendered experiences marked by economic, technological, social, cultural and political disadvantages that girls (and others) face in their locations (physical and social) as they seek education in the times of the pandemic. Hence, ‘space’ not only refers to the physical (urban/rural), but also, the social (community, family), cultural (society) and personal (psychological) aspects within which girls/women (and others) live and seek education.

This research aims to identify how these ‘spaces’ generate opportunities and constraints for girls/women (and others) in Pakistan. This exploration is essential today when Covid-19 has created ruptures in the supportive structures of educational provision. In this regard, it is essential to understand the limits and opportunities for girls/women’s (and that of others) education in Pakistan within these ‘spaces’ that have come about as a result of Covid-19 related educational and social restructuring of opportunities. In sum, the aim of the project is to contribute to international education by creating a deeper understanding of the gendered vulnerabilities that intersect with disadvantages and placement (physical and social) vectors to produce gendered experiences for the most marginalised in the context of Pakistan.

Funded by:

British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) Seedcorn Fund

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid and Dr Soufia Siddiqui

 

Publications

Khalid, A. (forthcoming). ‘Hearing their silences: Mothers agency as they support their daughters’ education in rural Punjab Pakistan’, Gender and Education.

Khalid, A., & Rose, P. (forthcoming). Mothers’ Capability to Influence their Daughters’ Education in Pakistan: Interconnections between mothers’ value of education, negative capability and agency. Journal of Human Development and Capabilities.

Khalid, A. (in preparation) ‘Comparisons of hope, education, and aspirations between Pakistani mothers and revolutionaries: The being and becoming of agents in the contexts of change’. Comparative Education

Khalid, A. & Singal, N. (in preparation) ”It’s made us stronger as a family’: Ethnic minority parenting experiences of educating children in England during Covid’. Journal of Family Studies

Singal, N. & Khalid, A. (in preparation) ”Time moves fast but it also goes slow’: Secondary school children’s experiences of ‘preparing’ for exams during lockdown in England. Children and Society

Khalid, A., Parpart, J. & Holmes, G. (Eds.) (in preparation) ‘ From the silence/voice binary to liminal spaces: Understanding gender, agency and power in a changing world’. Routledge

Khalid, A. & Siddiqi, S. (in preparation). Human Development Report 2022: Gendered inequalities in education and capability spaces for women/girls (and others) in Pakistan during Covid’. South Asia: Human Development Report UNDP

Alice Aldinucci is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford, Department of Education. She is part of the team working on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani, and she is a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group.

She holds a PhD in Education from the University of Glasgow (UK) where she was awarded the LKAS Interdisciplinary Scholarship. Her thesis applies a longitudinal qualitative research design and draws on the combination of Critical Realism and Capability Approach to explore aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to adulthood in Chile. Prior to her PhD, she completed a MA in International Education and Development from the University of Sussex (UK) where she was awarded the Centre for International Education Prize for the best overall MA performance. For her MA at Sussex, she conducted an empirical dissertation on the meaning making of Inclusive Education in Nepal. She holds a MA in Languages and Cultures for International Communication and Cooperation from the University of Milan (Italy) with a fieldwork research on tensions between policy and practice in bilingual multicultural education for indigenous students in Higher Education in Peru; and a BA in Languages and Intercultural Mediation from the University of Arezzo (Italy).

Alice’s research interests are interdisciplinary and relate to the critical linkages between intersecting inequalities, education, individual/societal development, and social justice at local and global levels, motivated by the question what education for what/whose development?

Areas, theoretical approaches and methodologies of interests:
• Sociology of education including aspirations in post-school transitions
• Cultural political economy of education and life chances/human flourishing/social justice
• Tensions between global educational frameworks and local knowledge and practices
• Critical Realism
• Capability Approach
• Qualitative and participatory methodologies
• Digital storytelling for social change

Besides her work in academia, Alice has gained experience as researcher, development practitioner and educator working in projects including early childhood education programmes, refugees’ education, girls’ education, SEN and inclusive education, TVET, global citizenship education, arts-based pedagogies. She lived and worked in different countries including in Nepal (a country she has developed a strong bond with), Tanzania, El Salvador, Italy and the UK. These experiences have reinforced her critical approach to international education and global development and to education as a catalyst for both inequalities, injustices, violence and more equitable social change and peace-building processes.

She served as Student Representative of the British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) from 2017 to 2019 and she is currently part of the college of reviewers of the editorial board of Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education.

Publications:

Aldinucci, A. (2022). Understanding aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to postschool trajectories in Chile. PhD thesis, University of Glasgow.
Aldinucci, A., Valiente, O., Hurrell S., and Zancajo, A. (2021). Understanding aspirations: Why do secondary TVET students aim so high in Chile? Journal of Vocational Education & Training.

Rawle, G., Riddle, N., Pettersson, G., Wallin, J., Bici, M., Jasper, P., Harb, J., Hebbar, M., Davis, J., Aldinucci, A., (2017), EQUIP-Tanzania Impact Evaluation. Midline Technical Report, Volume I and II. Oxford Policy Management.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Kabira is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. His research is funded by the Clarendon Fund.

Kabira is interested in improving learning outcomes for children in fragile and conflict – affected regions of the world, school health and nutrition programs, combatting gender-based violence and supporting children who are dealing with addiction.

His doctoral research focuses on education outcomes for young learners in Papua New Guinea who are addicted to psychoactive and carcinogenic betel quid.

Prior to moving to Oxford, Kabira was based in Washington DC, USA and worked for the World Bank and Save the Children on impact evaluations, learning assessments and improving the quality of education statistics in twenty-six countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, the Pacific, and the Middle East.

Kabira holds a Masters in Economics and Public Policy from Princeton University where he was a recipient of the Stokes’ Prize for exemplary academic achievement and public service leadership, a Masters in Development Economics from the School of Oriental and African Studies at London University where he graduated with distinction and an undergraduate degree in Economics and Statistics from St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai.

Research interests:

·       Education in conflict regions

·       Combatting school related gender-based violence (SRGBV)

·       School health and nutrition programs

·       Supporting children with addiction

 

Publications

Aliya teaches on the Comparative and International Education MSc programme at the Department of Education after having taught at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge. Her research focuses on how women in the South navigate their agency in highly constrained circumstances. Her specialised areas of interest are the capability approach, negative capability, epistemic paradoxicality and justice, and the promotion of knowledges (plural) and Southern epistemologies. Aliya actively engages in issues around the politics of representation and knowledge production in the academe. Aliya is currently accepting doctoral students with an interest in these areas.

 

Projects

‘Understanding the impact of COVID-19 on learning experiences of secondary school going age children among Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families’

Project summary:
COVID-19 related school disruption and closures have significantly impacted the lives of students. Notably, these disruptions have had a multi-fold impact on children living in ethnic minority families. Although ethnic and racial inequalities are persistent across contexts, this project particularly engages with young adults and other family members belonging to Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families living in England. Children in these families have been uniquely affected by the pandemic (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020), given the higher rates of prevalence of COVID among these communities and also greater and persistent structural inequalities.

Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families have been identified as a focus of this research because firstly, these particular groups have been strongly impacted by COVID (Platt & Warwick, 2020; Trivedy et al., 2020) and secondly, their socio cultural specificities make them more susceptible to disadvantage during COVID related school closures (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020). Our particular focus is on secondary school children whose learning has been majorly disrupted due to national lockdowns and uncertainty regarding national assessments.

Therefore, this project aims to address the unique situation and experiences of these BAME families with secondary school age children to understand how COVID-related challenges are shaping their learning experiences, household dynamics and future aspirations.

This is an exploratory, project which fills an important gap in existing knowledge by taking a strong cultural lens to understanding how learning among Bangladeshi and Pakistani families could be supported, drawing on a deeper understanding of their lived realities and contextualised understanding of the challenges they face. The aim is not simply to reproduce a deficit discourse (which tends to be associated with families from these ethnic minority groups), but to understand family dynamics and the opportunities offered herein.

Funded by:

Cambridge Humanities Research Grants Scheme

Research team:

Professor Nidhi Singal and Dr Aliya Khalid

 

‘Bridging the Local and Global: Women’s Spaces and Collectives’

Project summary:
While globalisation aims to connect the world equitably, global perspectives are often privileged over the local. Often the voices of women from the South (metaphor for marginalised) are least heard. This project acknowledges that any ‘Global’ ideology of (Dis)order needs to include local women’s voices by studying how they have generated order/disorder to create ‘spaces of action’/reflection (defined as collectives). We propose a multi-phase, multi-method study of women’s ‘collective spaces’. We first explore how ‘collectives’ have been understood. We will learn from women themselves by conducting two interview based case studies on (i) access to reproductive healthcare (Northern Ireland/Ireland) and (ii) mothers’ collective experiences of educating their children during a pandemic (ethnic minority families in England). In bringing together law and education, archives and interviews, reproductive healthcare and education, this project offers a novel way of understanding – and recording – collective responses to local/global challenges.

Funded by:

Virtual Sandpits, The British Academy

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid, Dr Jane Rooney and Dr Ruth Houghton, Dr Kate spencer-Bennet, Alana Farrel Kate Spencer-Bennett

 

‘Gendered Inequalities in Education and Capability Spaces for Women/Girls (and others) in Pakistan During Covid’

Project summary: This project explores the cumulative intersectional experiences of women/girls (and others) that are shaped by multidimensional inequalities existing in their physical (urban/rural) and social (market, society, community and family) settings. In particular, how gender interacts with the different vectors of disadvantage (for example, economic, technological, social, cultural and political) within the perimeters of their location (urban/rural) and setting (labour market, society and family) is to be explored. We refer to what we call ‘spaces of action/reflection’ that provide unique gendered experiences of seeking education. This project will thus conceptualise ‘spaces’ as those gendered experiences marked by economic, technological, social, cultural and political disadvantages that girls (and others) face in their locations (physical and social) as they seek education in the times of the pandemic. Hence, ‘space’ not only refers to the physical (urban/rural), but also, the social (community, family), cultural (society) and personal (psychological) aspects within which girls/women (and others) live and seek education.

This research aims to identify how these ‘spaces’ generate opportunities and constraints for girls/women (and others) in Pakistan. This exploration is essential today when Covid-19 has created ruptures in the supportive structures of educational provision. In this regard, it is essential to understand the limits and opportunities for girls/women’s (and that of others) education in Pakistan within these ‘spaces’ that have come about as a result of Covid-19 related educational and social restructuring of opportunities. In sum, the aim of the project is to contribute to international education by creating a deeper understanding of the gendered vulnerabilities that intersect with disadvantages and placement (physical and social) vectors to produce gendered experiences for the most marginalised in the context of Pakistan.

Funded by:

British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) Seedcorn Fund

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid and Dr Soufia Siddiqui

 

Publications

Khalid, A. (forthcoming). ‘Hearing their silences: Mothers agency as they support their daughters’ education in rural Punjab Pakistan’, Gender and Education.

Khalid, A., & Rose, P. (forthcoming). Mothers’ Capability to Influence their Daughters’ Education in Pakistan: Interconnections between mothers’ value of education, negative capability and agency. Journal of Human Development and Capabilities.

Khalid, A. (in preparation) ‘Comparisons of hope, education, and aspirations between Pakistani mothers and revolutionaries: The being and becoming of agents in the contexts of change’. Comparative Education

Khalid, A. & Singal, N. (in preparation) ”It’s made us stronger as a family’: Ethnic minority parenting experiences of educating children in England during Covid’. Journal of Family Studies

Singal, N. & Khalid, A. (in preparation) ”Time moves fast but it also goes slow’: Secondary school children’s experiences of ‘preparing’ for exams during lockdown in England. Children and Society

Khalid, A., Parpart, J. & Holmes, G. (Eds.) (in preparation) ‘ From the silence/voice binary to liminal spaces: Understanding gender, agency and power in a changing world’. Routledge

Khalid, A. & Siddiqi, S. (in preparation). Human Development Report 2022: Gendered inequalities in education and capability spaces for women/girls (and others) in Pakistan during Covid’. South Asia: Human Development Report UNDP

Alice Aldinucci is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford, Department of Education. She is part of the team working on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani, and she is a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group.

She holds a PhD in Education from the University of Glasgow (UK) where she was awarded the LKAS Interdisciplinary Scholarship. Her thesis applies a longitudinal qualitative research design and draws on the combination of Critical Realism and Capability Approach to explore aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to adulthood in Chile. Prior to her PhD, she completed a MA in International Education and Development from the University of Sussex (UK) where she was awarded the Centre for International Education Prize for the best overall MA performance. For her MA at Sussex, she conducted an empirical dissertation on the meaning making of Inclusive Education in Nepal. She holds a MA in Languages and Cultures for International Communication and Cooperation from the University of Milan (Italy) with a fieldwork research on tensions between policy and practice in bilingual multicultural education for indigenous students in Higher Education in Peru; and a BA in Languages and Intercultural Mediation from the University of Arezzo (Italy).

Alice’s research interests are interdisciplinary and relate to the critical linkages between intersecting inequalities, education, individual/societal development, and social justice at local and global levels, motivated by the question what education for what/whose development?

Areas, theoretical approaches and methodologies of interests:
• Sociology of education including aspirations in post-school transitions
• Cultural political economy of education and life chances/human flourishing/social justice
• Tensions between global educational frameworks and local knowledge and practices
• Critical Realism
• Capability Approach
• Qualitative and participatory methodologies
• Digital storytelling for social change

Besides her work in academia, Alice has gained experience as researcher, development practitioner and educator working in projects including early childhood education programmes, refugees’ education, girls’ education, SEN and inclusive education, TVET, global citizenship education, arts-based pedagogies. She lived and worked in different countries including in Nepal (a country she has developed a strong bond with), Tanzania, El Salvador, Italy and the UK. These experiences have reinforced her critical approach to international education and global development and to education as a catalyst for both inequalities, injustices, violence and more equitable social change and peace-building processes.

She served as Student Representative of the British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) from 2017 to 2019 and she is currently part of the college of reviewers of the editorial board of Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education.

Publications:

Aldinucci, A. (2022). Understanding aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to postschool trajectories in Chile. PhD thesis, University of Glasgow.
Aldinucci, A., Valiente, O., Hurrell S., and Zancajo, A. (2021). Understanding aspirations: Why do secondary TVET students aim so high in Chile? Journal of Vocational Education & Training.

Rawle, G., Riddle, N., Pettersson, G., Wallin, J., Bici, M., Jasper, P., Harb, J., Hebbar, M., Davis, J., Aldinucci, A., (2017), EQUIP-Tanzania Impact Evaluation. Midline Technical Report, Volume I and II. Oxford Policy Management.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Kabira is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. His research is funded by the Clarendon Fund.

Kabira is interested in improving learning outcomes for children in fragile and conflict – affected regions of the world, school health and nutrition programs, combatting gender-based violence and supporting children who are dealing with addiction.

His doctoral research focuses on education outcomes for young learners in Papua New Guinea who are addicted to psychoactive and carcinogenic betel quid.

Prior to moving to Oxford, Kabira was based in Washington DC, USA and worked for the World Bank and Save the Children on impact evaluations, learning assessments and improving the quality of education statistics in twenty-six countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, the Pacific, and the Middle East.

Kabira holds a Masters in Economics and Public Policy from Princeton University where he was a recipient of the Stokes’ Prize for exemplary academic achievement and public service leadership, a Masters in Development Economics from the School of Oriental and African Studies at London University where he graduated with distinction and an undergraduate degree in Economics and Statistics from St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai.

Research interests:

·       Education in conflict regions

·       Combatting school related gender-based violence (SRGBV)

·       School health and nutrition programs

·       Supporting children with addiction

 

Publications

Aliya teaches on the Comparative and International Education MSc programme at the Department of Education after having taught at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge. Her research focuses on how women in the South navigate their agency in highly constrained circumstances. Her specialised areas of interest are the capability approach, negative capability, epistemic paradoxicality and justice, and the promotion of knowledges (plural) and Southern epistemologies. Aliya actively engages in issues around the politics of representation and knowledge production in the academe. Aliya is currently accepting doctoral students with an interest in these areas.

 

Projects

‘Understanding the impact of COVID-19 on learning experiences of secondary school going age children among Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families’

Project summary:
COVID-19 related school disruption and closures have significantly impacted the lives of students. Notably, these disruptions have had a multi-fold impact on children living in ethnic minority families. Although ethnic and racial inequalities are persistent across contexts, this project particularly engages with young adults and other family members belonging to Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families living in England. Children in these families have been uniquely affected by the pandemic (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020), given the higher rates of prevalence of COVID among these communities and also greater and persistent structural inequalities.

Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families have been identified as a focus of this research because firstly, these particular groups have been strongly impacted by COVID (Platt & Warwick, 2020; Trivedy et al., 2020) and secondly, their socio cultural specificities make them more susceptible to disadvantage during COVID related school closures (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020). Our particular focus is on secondary school children whose learning has been majorly disrupted due to national lockdowns and uncertainty regarding national assessments.

Therefore, this project aims to address the unique situation and experiences of these BAME families with secondary school age children to understand how COVID-related challenges are shaping their learning experiences, household dynamics and future aspirations.

This is an exploratory, project which fills an important gap in existing knowledge by taking a strong cultural lens to understanding how learning among Bangladeshi and Pakistani families could be supported, drawing on a deeper understanding of their lived realities and contextualised understanding of the challenges they face. The aim is not simply to reproduce a deficit discourse (which tends to be associated with families from these ethnic minority groups), but to understand family dynamics and the opportunities offered herein.

Funded by:

Cambridge Humanities Research Grants Scheme

Research team:

Professor Nidhi Singal and Dr Aliya Khalid

 

‘Bridging the Local and Global: Women’s Spaces and Collectives’

Project summary:
While globalisation aims to connect the world equitably, global perspectives are often privileged over the local. Often the voices of women from the South (metaphor for marginalised) are least heard. This project acknowledges that any ‘Global’ ideology of (Dis)order needs to include local women’s voices by studying how they have generated order/disorder to create ‘spaces of action’/reflection (defined as collectives). We propose a multi-phase, multi-method study of women’s ‘collective spaces’. We first explore how ‘collectives’ have been understood. We will learn from women themselves by conducting two interview based case studies on (i) access to reproductive healthcare (Northern Ireland/Ireland) and (ii) mothers’ collective experiences of educating their children during a pandemic (ethnic minority families in England). In bringing together law and education, archives and interviews, reproductive healthcare and education, this project offers a novel way of understanding – and recording – collective responses to local/global challenges.

Funded by:

Virtual Sandpits, The British Academy

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid, Dr Jane Rooney and Dr Ruth Houghton, Dr Kate spencer-Bennet, Alana Farrel Kate Spencer-Bennett

 

‘Gendered Inequalities in Education and Capability Spaces for Women/Girls (and others) in Pakistan During Covid’

Project summary: This project explores the cumulative intersectional experiences of women/girls (and others) that are shaped by multidimensional inequalities existing in their physical (urban/rural) and social (market, society, community and family) settings. In particular, how gender interacts with the different vectors of disadvantage (for example, economic, technological, social, cultural and political) within the perimeters of their location (urban/rural) and setting (labour market, society and family) is to be explored. We refer to what we call ‘spaces of action/reflection’ that provide unique gendered experiences of seeking education. This project will thus conceptualise ‘spaces’ as those gendered experiences marked by economic, technological, social, cultural and political disadvantages that girls (and others) face in their locations (physical and social) as they seek education in the times of the pandemic. Hence, ‘space’ not only refers to the physical (urban/rural), but also, the social (community, family), cultural (society) and personal (psychological) aspects within which girls/women (and others) live and seek education.

This research aims to identify how these ‘spaces’ generate opportunities and constraints for girls/women (and others) in Pakistan. This exploration is essential today when Covid-19 has created ruptures in the supportive structures of educational provision. In this regard, it is essential to understand the limits and opportunities for girls/women’s (and that of others) education in Pakistan within these ‘spaces’ that have come about as a result of Covid-19 related educational and social restructuring of opportunities. In sum, the aim of the project is to contribute to international education by creating a deeper understanding of the gendered vulnerabilities that intersect with disadvantages and placement (physical and social) vectors to produce gendered experiences for the most marginalised in the context of Pakistan.

Funded by:

British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) Seedcorn Fund

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid and Dr Soufia Siddiqui

 

Publications

Khalid, A. (forthcoming). ‘Hearing their silences: Mothers agency as they support their daughters’ education in rural Punjab Pakistan’, Gender and Education.

Khalid, A., & Rose, P. (forthcoming). Mothers’ Capability to Influence their Daughters’ Education in Pakistan: Interconnections between mothers’ value of education, negative capability and agency. Journal of Human Development and Capabilities.

Khalid, A. (in preparation) ‘Comparisons of hope, education, and aspirations between Pakistani mothers and revolutionaries: The being and becoming of agents in the contexts of change’. Comparative Education

Khalid, A. & Singal, N. (in preparation) ”It’s made us stronger as a family’: Ethnic minority parenting experiences of educating children in England during Covid’. Journal of Family Studies

Singal, N. & Khalid, A. (in preparation) ”Time moves fast but it also goes slow’: Secondary school children’s experiences of ‘preparing’ for exams during lockdown in England. Children and Society

Khalid, A., Parpart, J. & Holmes, G. (Eds.) (in preparation) ‘ From the silence/voice binary to liminal spaces: Understanding gender, agency and power in a changing world’. Routledge

Khalid, A. & Siddiqi, S. (in preparation). Human Development Report 2022: Gendered inequalities in education and capability spaces for women/girls (and others) in Pakistan during Covid’. South Asia: Human Development Report UNDP

Alice Aldinucci is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford, Department of Education. She is part of the team working on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani, and she is a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group.

She holds a PhD in Education from the University of Glasgow (UK) where she was awarded the LKAS Interdisciplinary Scholarship. Her thesis applies a longitudinal qualitative research design and draws on the combination of Critical Realism and Capability Approach to explore aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to adulthood in Chile. Prior to her PhD, she completed a MA in International Education and Development from the University of Sussex (UK) where she was awarded the Centre for International Education Prize for the best overall MA performance. For her MA at Sussex, she conducted an empirical dissertation on the meaning making of Inclusive Education in Nepal. She holds a MA in Languages and Cultures for International Communication and Cooperation from the University of Milan (Italy) with a fieldwork research on tensions between policy and practice in bilingual multicultural education for indigenous students in Higher Education in Peru; and a BA in Languages and Intercultural Mediation from the University of Arezzo (Italy).

Alice’s research interests are interdisciplinary and relate to the critical linkages between intersecting inequalities, education, individual/societal development, and social justice at local and global levels, motivated by the question what education for what/whose development?

Areas, theoretical approaches and methodologies of interests:
• Sociology of education including aspirations in post-school transitions
• Cultural political economy of education and life chances/human flourishing/social justice
• Tensions between global educational frameworks and local knowledge and practices
• Critical Realism
• Capability Approach
• Qualitative and participatory methodologies
• Digital storytelling for social change

Besides her work in academia, Alice has gained experience as researcher, development practitioner and educator working in projects including early childhood education programmes, refugees’ education, girls’ education, SEN and inclusive education, TVET, global citizenship education, arts-based pedagogies. She lived and worked in different countries including in Nepal (a country she has developed a strong bond with), Tanzania, El Salvador, Italy and the UK. These experiences have reinforced her critical approach to international education and global development and to education as a catalyst for both inequalities, injustices, violence and more equitable social change and peace-building processes.

She served as Student Representative of the British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) from 2017 to 2019 and she is currently part of the college of reviewers of the editorial board of Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education.

Publications:

Aldinucci, A. (2022). Understanding aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to postschool trajectories in Chile. PhD thesis, University of Glasgow.
Aldinucci, A., Valiente, O., Hurrell S., and Zancajo, A. (2021). Understanding aspirations: Why do secondary TVET students aim so high in Chile? Journal of Vocational Education & Training.

Rawle, G., Riddle, N., Pettersson, G., Wallin, J., Bici, M., Jasper, P., Harb, J., Hebbar, M., Davis, J., Aldinucci, A., (2017), EQUIP-Tanzania Impact Evaluation. Midline Technical Report, Volume I and II. Oxford Policy Management.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Kabira is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. His research is funded by the Clarendon Fund.

Kabira is interested in improving learning outcomes for children in fragile and conflict – affected regions of the world, school health and nutrition programs, combatting gender-based violence and supporting children who are dealing with addiction.

His doctoral research focuses on education outcomes for young learners in Papua New Guinea who are addicted to psychoactive and carcinogenic betel quid.

Prior to moving to Oxford, Kabira was based in Washington DC, USA and worked for the World Bank and Save the Children on impact evaluations, learning assessments and improving the quality of education statistics in twenty-six countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, the Pacific, and the Middle East.

Kabira holds a Masters in Economics and Public Policy from Princeton University where he was a recipient of the Stokes’ Prize for exemplary academic achievement and public service leadership, a Masters in Development Economics from the School of Oriental and African Studies at London University where he graduated with distinction and an undergraduate degree in Economics and Statistics from St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai.

Research interests:

·       Education in conflict regions

·       Combatting school related gender-based violence (SRGBV)

·       School health and nutrition programs

·       Supporting children with addiction

 

Publications

Aliya teaches on the Comparative and International Education MSc programme at the Department of Education after having taught at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge. Her research focuses on how women in the South navigate their agency in highly constrained circumstances. Her specialised areas of interest are the capability approach, negative capability, epistemic paradoxicality and justice, and the promotion of knowledges (plural) and Southern epistemologies. Aliya actively engages in issues around the politics of representation and knowledge production in the academe. Aliya is currently accepting doctoral students with an interest in these areas.

 

Projects

‘Understanding the impact of COVID-19 on learning experiences of secondary school going age children among Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families’

Project summary:
COVID-19 related school disruption and closures have significantly impacted the lives of students. Notably, these disruptions have had a multi-fold impact on children living in ethnic minority families. Although ethnic and racial inequalities are persistent across contexts, this project particularly engages with young adults and other family members belonging to Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families living in England. Children in these families have been uniquely affected by the pandemic (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020), given the higher rates of prevalence of COVID among these communities and also greater and persistent structural inequalities.

Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families have been identified as a focus of this research because firstly, these particular groups have been strongly impacted by COVID (Platt & Warwick, 2020; Trivedy et al., 2020) and secondly, their socio cultural specificities make them more susceptible to disadvantage during COVID related school closures (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020). Our particular focus is on secondary school children whose learning has been majorly disrupted due to national lockdowns and uncertainty regarding national assessments.

Therefore, this project aims to address the unique situation and experiences of these BAME families with secondary school age children to understand how COVID-related challenges are shaping their learning experiences, household dynamics and future aspirations.

This is an exploratory, project which fills an important gap in existing knowledge by taking a strong cultural lens to understanding how learning among Bangladeshi and Pakistani families could be supported, drawing on a deeper understanding of their lived realities and contextualised understanding of the challenges they face. The aim is not simply to reproduce a deficit discourse (which tends to be associated with families from these ethnic minority groups), but to understand family dynamics and the opportunities offered herein.

Funded by:

Cambridge Humanities Research Grants Scheme

Research team:

Professor Nidhi Singal and Dr Aliya Khalid

 

‘Bridging the Local and Global: Women’s Spaces and Collectives’

Project summary:
While globalisation aims to connect the world equitably, global perspectives are often privileged over the local. Often the voices of women from the South (metaphor for marginalised) are least heard. This project acknowledges that any ‘Global’ ideology of (Dis)order needs to include local women’s voices by studying how they have generated order/disorder to create ‘spaces of action’/reflection (defined as collectives). We propose a multi-phase, multi-method study of women’s ‘collective spaces’. We first explore how ‘collectives’ have been understood. We will learn from women themselves by conducting two interview based case studies on (i) access to reproductive healthcare (Northern Ireland/Ireland) and (ii) mothers’ collective experiences of educating their children during a pandemic (ethnic minority families in England). In bringing together law and education, archives and interviews, reproductive healthcare and education, this project offers a novel way of understanding – and recording – collective responses to local/global challenges.

Funded by:

Virtual Sandpits, The British Academy

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid, Dr Jane Rooney and Dr Ruth Houghton, Dr Kate spencer-Bennet, Alana Farrel Kate Spencer-Bennett

 

‘Gendered Inequalities in Education and Capability Spaces for Women/Girls (and others) in Pakistan During Covid’

Project summary: This project explores the cumulative intersectional experiences of women/girls (and others) that are shaped by multidimensional inequalities existing in their physical (urban/rural) and social (market, society, community and family) settings. In particular, how gender interacts with the different vectors of disadvantage (for example, economic, technological, social, cultural and political) within the perimeters of their location (urban/rural) and setting (labour market, society and family) is to be explored. We refer to what we call ‘spaces of action/reflection’ that provide unique gendered experiences of seeking education. This project will thus conceptualise ‘spaces’ as those gendered experiences marked by economic, technological, social, cultural and political disadvantages that girls (and others) face in their locations (physical and social) as they seek education in the times of the pandemic. Hence, ‘space’ not only refers to the physical (urban/rural), but also, the social (community, family), cultural (society) and personal (psychological) aspects within which girls/women (and others) live and seek education.

This research aims to identify how these ‘spaces’ generate opportunities and constraints for girls/women (and others) in Pakistan. This exploration is essential today when Covid-19 has created ruptures in the supportive structures of educational provision. In this regard, it is essential to understand the limits and opportunities for girls/women’s (and that of others) education in Pakistan within these ‘spaces’ that have come about as a result of Covid-19 related educational and social restructuring of opportunities. In sum, the aim of the project is to contribute to international education by creating a deeper understanding of the gendered vulnerabilities that intersect with disadvantages and placement (physical and social) vectors to produce gendered experiences for the most marginalised in the context of Pakistan.

Funded by:

British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) Seedcorn Fund

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid and Dr Soufia Siddiqui

 

Publications

Khalid, A. (forthcoming). ‘Hearing their silences: Mothers agency as they support their daughters’ education in rural Punjab Pakistan’, Gender and Education.

Khalid, A., & Rose, P. (forthcoming). Mothers’ Capability to Influence their Daughters’ Education in Pakistan: Interconnections between mothers’ value of education, negative capability and agency. Journal of Human Development and Capabilities.

Khalid, A. (in preparation) ‘Comparisons of hope, education, and aspirations between Pakistani mothers and revolutionaries: The being and becoming of agents in the contexts of change’. Comparative Education

Khalid, A. & Singal, N. (in preparation) ”It’s made us stronger as a family’: Ethnic minority parenting experiences of educating children in England during Covid’. Journal of Family Studies

Singal, N. & Khalid, A. (in preparation) ”Time moves fast but it also goes slow’: Secondary school children’s experiences of ‘preparing’ for exams during lockdown in England. Children and Society

Khalid, A., Parpart, J. & Holmes, G. (Eds.) (in preparation) ‘ From the silence/voice binary to liminal spaces: Understanding gender, agency and power in a changing world’. Routledge

Khalid, A. & Siddiqi, S. (in preparation). Human Development Report 2022: Gendered inequalities in education and capability spaces for women/girls (and others) in Pakistan during Covid’. South Asia: Human Development Report UNDP

Alice Aldinucci is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford, Department of Education. She is part of the team working on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani, and she is a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group.

She holds a PhD in Education from the University of Glasgow (UK) where she was awarded the LKAS Interdisciplinary Scholarship. Her thesis applies a longitudinal qualitative research design and draws on the combination of Critical Realism and Capability Approach to explore aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to adulthood in Chile. Prior to her PhD, she completed a MA in International Education and Development from the University of Sussex (UK) where she was awarded the Centre for International Education Prize for the best overall MA performance. For her MA at Sussex, she conducted an empirical dissertation on the meaning making of Inclusive Education in Nepal. She holds a MA in Languages and Cultures for International Communication and Cooperation from the University of Milan (Italy) with a fieldwork research on tensions between policy and practice in bilingual multicultural education for indigenous students in Higher Education in Peru; and a BA in Languages and Intercultural Mediation from the University of Arezzo (Italy).

Alice’s research interests are interdisciplinary and relate to the critical linkages between intersecting inequalities, education, individual/societal development, and social justice at local and global levels, motivated by the question what education for what/whose development?

Areas, theoretical approaches and methodologies of interests:
• Sociology of education including aspirations in post-school transitions
• Cultural political economy of education and life chances/human flourishing/social justice
• Tensions between global educational frameworks and local knowledge and practices
• Critical Realism
• Capability Approach
• Qualitative and participatory methodologies
• Digital storytelling for social change

Besides her work in academia, Alice has gained experience as researcher, development practitioner and educator working in projects including early childhood education programmes, refugees’ education, girls’ education, SEN and inclusive education, TVET, global citizenship education, arts-based pedagogies. She lived and worked in different countries including in Nepal (a country she has developed a strong bond with), Tanzania, El Salvador, Italy and the UK. These experiences have reinforced her critical approach to international education and global development and to education as a catalyst for both inequalities, injustices, violence and more equitable social change and peace-building processes.

She served as Student Representative of the British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) from 2017 to 2019 and she is currently part of the college of reviewers of the editorial board of Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education.

Publications:

Aldinucci, A. (2022). Understanding aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to postschool trajectories in Chile. PhD thesis, University of Glasgow.
Aldinucci, A., Valiente, O., Hurrell S., and Zancajo, A. (2021). Understanding aspirations: Why do secondary TVET students aim so high in Chile? Journal of Vocational Education & Training.

Rawle, G., Riddle, N., Pettersson, G., Wallin, J., Bici, M., Jasper, P., Harb, J., Hebbar, M., Davis, J., Aldinucci, A., (2017), EQUIP-Tanzania Impact Evaluation. Midline Technical Report, Volume I and II. Oxford Policy Management.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Kabira is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. His research is funded by the Clarendon Fund.

Kabira is interested in improving learning outcomes for children in fragile and conflict – affected regions of the world, school health and nutrition programs, combatting gender-based violence and supporting children who are dealing with addiction.

His doctoral research focuses on education outcomes for young learners in Papua New Guinea who are addicted to psychoactive and carcinogenic betel quid.

Prior to moving to Oxford, Kabira was based in Washington DC, USA and worked for the World Bank and Save the Children on impact evaluations, learning assessments and improving the quality of education statistics in twenty-six countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, the Pacific, and the Middle East.

Kabira holds a Masters in Economics and Public Policy from Princeton University where he was a recipient of the Stokes’ Prize for exemplary academic achievement and public service leadership, a Masters in Development Economics from the School of Oriental and African Studies at London University where he graduated with distinction and an undergraduate degree in Economics and Statistics from St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai.

Research interests:

·       Education in conflict regions

·       Combatting school related gender-based violence (SRGBV)

·       School health and nutrition programs

·       Supporting children with addiction

 

Publications

Aliya teaches on the Comparative and International Education MSc programme at the Department of Education after having taught at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge. Her research focuses on how women in the South navigate their agency in highly constrained circumstances. Her specialised areas of interest are the capability approach, negative capability, epistemic paradoxicality and justice, and the promotion of knowledges (plural) and Southern epistemologies. Aliya actively engages in issues around the politics of representation and knowledge production in the academe. Aliya is currently accepting doctoral students with an interest in these areas.

 

Projects

‘Understanding the impact of COVID-19 on learning experiences of secondary school going age children among Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families’

Project summary:
COVID-19 related school disruption and closures have significantly impacted the lives of students. Notably, these disruptions have had a multi-fold impact on children living in ethnic minority families. Although ethnic and racial inequalities are persistent across contexts, this project particularly engages with young adults and other family members belonging to Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families living in England. Children in these families have been uniquely affected by the pandemic (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020), given the higher rates of prevalence of COVID among these communities and also greater and persistent structural inequalities.

Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families have been identified as a focus of this research because firstly, these particular groups have been strongly impacted by COVID (Platt & Warwick, 2020; Trivedy et al., 2020) and secondly, their socio cultural specificities make them more susceptible to disadvantage during COVID related school closures (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020). Our particular focus is on secondary school children whose learning has been majorly disrupted due to national lockdowns and uncertainty regarding national assessments.

Therefore, this project aims to address the unique situation and experiences of these BAME families with secondary school age children to understand how COVID-related challenges are shaping their learning experiences, household dynamics and future aspirations.

This is an exploratory, project which fills an important gap in existing knowledge by taking a strong cultural lens to understanding how learning among Bangladeshi and Pakistani families could be supported, drawing on a deeper understanding of their lived realities and contextualised understanding of the challenges they face. The aim is not simply to reproduce a deficit discourse (which tends to be associated with families from these ethnic minority groups), but to understand family dynamics and the opportunities offered herein.

Funded by:

Cambridge Humanities Research Grants Scheme

Research team:

Professor Nidhi Singal and Dr Aliya Khalid

 

‘Bridging the Local and Global: Women’s Spaces and Collectives’

Project summary:
While globalisation aims to connect the world equitably, global perspectives are often privileged over the local. Often the voices of women from the South (metaphor for marginalised) are least heard. This project acknowledges that any ‘Global’ ideology of (Dis)order needs to include local women’s voices by studying how they have generated order/disorder to create ‘spaces of action’/reflection (defined as collectives). We propose a multi-phase, multi-method study of women’s ‘collective spaces’. We first explore how ‘collectives’ have been understood. We will learn from women themselves by conducting two interview based case studies on (i) access to reproductive healthcare (Northern Ireland/Ireland) and (ii) mothers’ collective experiences of educating their children during a pandemic (ethnic minority families in England). In bringing together law and education, archives and interviews, reproductive healthcare and education, this project offers a novel way of understanding – and recording – collective responses to local/global challenges.

Funded by:

Virtual Sandpits, The British Academy

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid, Dr Jane Rooney and Dr Ruth Houghton, Dr Kate spencer-Bennet, Alana Farrel Kate Spencer-Bennett

 

‘Gendered Inequalities in Education and Capability Spaces for Women/Girls (and others) in Pakistan During Covid’

Project summary: This project explores the cumulative intersectional experiences of women/girls (and others) that are shaped by multidimensional inequalities existing in their physical (urban/rural) and social (market, society, community and family) settings. In particular, how gender interacts with the different vectors of disadvantage (for example, economic, technological, social, cultural and political) within the perimeters of their location (urban/rural) and setting (labour market, society and family) is to be explored. We refer to what we call ‘spaces of action/reflection’ that provide unique gendered experiences of seeking education. This project will thus conceptualise ‘spaces’ as those gendered experiences marked by economic, technological, social, cultural and political disadvantages that girls (and others) face in their locations (physical and social) as they seek education in the times of the pandemic. Hence, ‘space’ not only refers to the physical (urban/rural), but also, the social (community, family), cultural (society) and personal (psychological) aspects within which girls/women (and others) live and seek education.

This research aims to identify how these ‘spaces’ generate opportunities and constraints for girls/women (and others) in Pakistan. This exploration is essential today when Covid-19 has created ruptures in the supportive structures of educational provision. In this regard, it is essential to understand the limits and opportunities for girls/women’s (and that of others) education in Pakistan within these ‘spaces’ that have come about as a result of Covid-19 related educational and social restructuring of opportunities. In sum, the aim of the project is to contribute to international education by creating a deeper understanding of the gendered vulnerabilities that intersect with disadvantages and placement (physical and social) vectors to produce gendered experiences for the most marginalised in the context of Pakistan.

Funded by:

British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) Seedcorn Fund

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid and Dr Soufia Siddiqui

 

Publications

Khalid, A. (forthcoming). ‘Hearing their silences: Mothers agency as they support their daughters’ education in rural Punjab Pakistan’, Gender and Education.

Khalid, A., & Rose, P. (forthcoming). Mothers’ Capability to Influence their Daughters’ Education in Pakistan: Interconnections between mothers’ value of education, negative capability and agency. Journal of Human Development and Capabilities.

Khalid, A. (in preparation) ‘Comparisons of hope, education, and aspirations between Pakistani mothers and revolutionaries: The being and becoming of agents in the contexts of change’. Comparative Education

Khalid, A. & Singal, N. (in preparation) ”It’s made us stronger as a family’: Ethnic minority parenting experiences of educating children in England during Covid’. Journal of Family Studies

Singal, N. & Khalid, A. (in preparation) ”Time moves fast but it also goes slow’: Secondary school children’s experiences of ‘preparing’ for exams during lockdown in England. Children and Society

Khalid, A., Parpart, J. & Holmes, G. (Eds.) (in preparation) ‘ From the silence/voice binary to liminal spaces: Understanding gender, agency and power in a changing world’. Routledge

Khalid, A. & Siddiqi, S. (in preparation). Human Development Report 2022: Gendered inequalities in education and capability spaces for women/girls (and others) in Pakistan during Covid’. South Asia: Human Development Report UNDP

Alice Aldinucci is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford, Department of Education. She is part of the team working on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani, and she is a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group.

She holds a PhD in Education from the University of Glasgow (UK) where she was awarded the LKAS Interdisciplinary Scholarship. Her thesis applies a longitudinal qualitative research design and draws on the combination of Critical Realism and Capability Approach to explore aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to adulthood in Chile. Prior to her PhD, she completed a MA in International Education and Development from the University of Sussex (UK) where she was awarded the Centre for International Education Prize for the best overall MA performance. For her MA at Sussex, she conducted an empirical dissertation on the meaning making of Inclusive Education in Nepal. She holds a MA in Languages and Cultures for International Communication and Cooperation from the University of Milan (Italy) with a fieldwork research on tensions between policy and practice in bilingual multicultural education for indigenous students in Higher Education in Peru; and a BA in Languages and Intercultural Mediation from the University of Arezzo (Italy).

Alice’s research interests are interdisciplinary and relate to the critical linkages between intersecting inequalities, education, individual/societal development, and social justice at local and global levels, motivated by the question what education for what/whose development?

Areas, theoretical approaches and methodologies of interests:
• Sociology of education including aspirations in post-school transitions
• Cultural political economy of education and life chances/human flourishing/social justice
• Tensions between global educational frameworks and local knowledge and practices
• Critical Realism
• Capability Approach
• Qualitative and participatory methodologies
• Digital storytelling for social change

Besides her work in academia, Alice has gained experience as researcher, development practitioner and educator working in projects including early childhood education programmes, refugees’ education, girls’ education, SEN and inclusive education, TVET, global citizenship education, arts-based pedagogies. She lived and worked in different countries including in Nepal (a country she has developed a strong bond with), Tanzania, El Salvador, Italy and the UK. These experiences have reinforced her critical approach to international education and global development and to education as a catalyst for both inequalities, injustices, violence and more equitable social change and peace-building processes.

She served as Student Representative of the British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) from 2017 to 2019 and she is currently part of the college of reviewers of the editorial board of Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education.

Publications:

Aldinucci, A. (2022). Understanding aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to postschool trajectories in Chile. PhD thesis, University of Glasgow.
Aldinucci, A., Valiente, O., Hurrell S., and Zancajo, A. (2021). Understanding aspirations: Why do secondary TVET students aim so high in Chile? Journal of Vocational Education & Training.

Rawle, G., Riddle, N., Pettersson, G., Wallin, J., Bici, M., Jasper, P., Harb, J., Hebbar, M., Davis, J., Aldinucci, A., (2017), EQUIP-Tanzania Impact Evaluation. Midline Technical Report, Volume I and II. Oxford Policy Management.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Kabira is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. His research is funded by the Clarendon Fund.

Kabira is interested in improving learning outcomes for children in fragile and conflict – affected regions of the world, school health and nutrition programs, combatting gender-based violence and supporting children who are dealing with addiction.

His doctoral research focuses on education outcomes for young learners in Papua New Guinea who are addicted to psychoactive and carcinogenic betel quid.

Prior to moving to Oxford, Kabira was based in Washington DC, USA and worked for the World Bank and Save the Children on impact evaluations, learning assessments and improving the quality of education statistics in twenty-six countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, the Pacific, and the Middle East.

Kabira holds a Masters in Economics and Public Policy from Princeton University where he was a recipient of the Stokes’ Prize for exemplary academic achievement and public service leadership, a Masters in Development Economics from the School of Oriental and African Studies at London University where he graduated with distinction and an undergraduate degree in Economics and Statistics from St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai.

Research interests:

·       Education in conflict regions

·       Combatting school related gender-based violence (SRGBV)

·       School health and nutrition programs

·       Supporting children with addiction

 

Publications

Aliya teaches on the Comparative and International Education MSc programme at the Department of Education after having taught at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge. Her research focuses on how women in the South navigate their agency in highly constrained circumstances. Her specialised areas of interest are the capability approach, negative capability, epistemic paradoxicality and justice, and the promotion of knowledges (plural) and Southern epistemologies. Aliya actively engages in issues around the politics of representation and knowledge production in the academe. Aliya is currently accepting doctoral students with an interest in these areas.

 

Projects

‘Understanding the impact of COVID-19 on learning experiences of secondary school going age children among Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families’

Project summary:
COVID-19 related school disruption and closures have significantly impacted the lives of students. Notably, these disruptions have had a multi-fold impact on children living in ethnic minority families. Although ethnic and racial inequalities are persistent across contexts, this project particularly engages with young adults and other family members belonging to Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families living in England. Children in these families have been uniquely affected by the pandemic (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020), given the higher rates of prevalence of COVID among these communities and also greater and persistent structural inequalities.

Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families have been identified as a focus of this research because firstly, these particular groups have been strongly impacted by COVID (Platt & Warwick, 2020; Trivedy et al., 2020) and secondly, their socio cultural specificities make them more susceptible to disadvantage during COVID related school closures (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020). Our particular focus is on secondary school children whose learning has been majorly disrupted due to national lockdowns and uncertainty regarding national assessments.

Therefore, this project aims to address the unique situation and experiences of these BAME families with secondary school age children to understand how COVID-related challenges are shaping their learning experiences, household dynamics and future aspirations.

This is an exploratory, project which fills an important gap in existing knowledge by taking a strong cultural lens to understanding how learning among Bangladeshi and Pakistani families could be supported, drawing on a deeper understanding of their lived realities and contextualised understanding of the challenges they face. The aim is not simply to reproduce a deficit discourse (which tends to be associated with families from these ethnic minority groups), but to understand family dynamics and the opportunities offered herein.

Funded by:

Cambridge Humanities Research Grants Scheme

Research team:

Professor Nidhi Singal and Dr Aliya Khalid

 

‘Bridging the Local and Global: Women’s Spaces and Collectives’

Project summary:
While globalisation aims to connect the world equitably, global perspectives are often privileged over the local. Often the voices of women from the South (metaphor for marginalised) are least heard. This project acknowledges that any ‘Global’ ideology of (Dis)order needs to include local women’s voices by studying how they have generated order/disorder to create ‘spaces of action’/reflection (defined as collectives). We propose a multi-phase, multi-method study of women’s ‘collective spaces’. We first explore how ‘collectives’ have been understood. We will learn from women themselves by conducting two interview based case studies on (i) access to reproductive healthcare (Northern Ireland/Ireland) and (ii) mothers’ collective experiences of educating their children during a pandemic (ethnic minority families in England). In bringing together law and education, archives and interviews, reproductive healthcare and education, this project offers a novel way of understanding – and recording – collective responses to local/global challenges.

Funded by:

Virtual Sandpits, The British Academy

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid, Dr Jane Rooney and Dr Ruth Houghton, Dr Kate spencer-Bennet, Alana Farrel Kate Spencer-Bennett

 

‘Gendered Inequalities in Education and Capability Spaces for Women/Girls (and others) in Pakistan During Covid’

Project summary: This project explores the cumulative intersectional experiences of women/girls (and others) that are shaped by multidimensional inequalities existing in their physical (urban/rural) and social (market, society, community and family) settings. In particular, how gender interacts with the different vectors of disadvantage (for example, economic, technological, social, cultural and political) within the perimeters of their location (urban/rural) and setting (labour market, society and family) is to be explored. We refer to what we call ‘spaces of action/reflection’ that provide unique gendered experiences of seeking education. This project will thus conceptualise ‘spaces’ as those gendered experiences marked by economic, technological, social, cultural and political disadvantages that girls (and others) face in their locations (physical and social) as they seek education in the times of the pandemic. Hence, ‘space’ not only refers to the physical (urban/rural), but also, the social (community, family), cultural (society) and personal (psychological) aspects within which girls/women (and others) live and seek education.

This research aims to identify how these ‘spaces’ generate opportunities and constraints for girls/women (and others) in Pakistan. This exploration is essential today when Covid-19 has created ruptures in the supportive structures of educational provision. In this regard, it is essential to understand the limits and opportunities for girls/women’s (and that of others) education in Pakistan within these ‘spaces’ that have come about as a result of Covid-19 related educational and social restructuring of opportunities. In sum, the aim of the project is to contribute to international education by creating a deeper understanding of the gendered vulnerabilities that intersect with disadvantages and placement (physical and social) vectors to produce gendered experiences for the most marginalised in the context of Pakistan.

Funded by:

British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) Seedcorn Fund

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid and Dr Soufia Siddiqui

 

Publications

Khalid, A. (forthcoming). ‘Hearing their silences: Mothers agency as they support their daughters’ education in rural Punjab Pakistan’, Gender and Education.

Khalid, A., & Rose, P. (forthcoming). Mothers’ Capability to Influence their Daughters’ Education in Pakistan: Interconnections between mothers’ value of education, negative capability and agency. Journal of Human Development and Capabilities.

Khalid, A. (in preparation) ‘Comparisons of hope, education, and aspirations between Pakistani mothers and revolutionaries: The being and becoming of agents in the contexts of change’. Comparative Education

Khalid, A. & Singal, N. (in preparation) ”It’s made us stronger as a family’: Ethnic minority parenting experiences of educating children in England during Covid’. Journal of Family Studies

Singal, N. & Khalid, A. (in preparation) ”Time moves fast but it also goes slow’: Secondary school children’s experiences of ‘preparing’ for exams during lockdown in England. Children and Society

Khalid, A., Parpart, J. & Holmes, G. (Eds.) (in preparation) ‘ From the silence/voice binary to liminal spaces: Understanding gender, agency and power in a changing world’. Routledge

Khalid, A. & Siddiqi, S. (in preparation). Human Development Report 2022: Gendered inequalities in education and capability spaces for women/girls (and others) in Pakistan during Covid’. South Asia: Human Development Report UNDP

Alice Aldinucci is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford, Department of Education. She is part of the team working on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani, and she is a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group.

She holds a PhD in Education from the University of Glasgow (UK) where she was awarded the LKAS Interdisciplinary Scholarship. Her thesis applies a longitudinal qualitative research design and draws on the combination of Critical Realism and Capability Approach to explore aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to adulthood in Chile. Prior to her PhD, she completed a MA in International Education and Development from the University of Sussex (UK) where she was awarded the Centre for International Education Prize for the best overall MA performance. For her MA at Sussex, she conducted an empirical dissertation on the meaning making of Inclusive Education in Nepal. She holds a MA in Languages and Cultures for International Communication and Cooperation from the University of Milan (Italy) with a fieldwork research on tensions between policy and practice in bilingual multicultural education for indigenous students in Higher Education in Peru; and a BA in Languages and Intercultural Mediation from the University of Arezzo (Italy).

Alice’s research interests are interdisciplinary and relate to the critical linkages between intersecting inequalities, education, individual/societal development, and social justice at local and global levels, motivated by the question what education for what/whose development?

Areas, theoretical approaches and methodologies of interests:
• Sociology of education including aspirations in post-school transitions
• Cultural political economy of education and life chances/human flourishing/social justice
• Tensions between global educational frameworks and local knowledge and practices
• Critical Realism
• Capability Approach
• Qualitative and participatory methodologies
• Digital storytelling for social change

Besides her work in academia, Alice has gained experience as researcher, development practitioner and educator working in projects including early childhood education programmes, refugees’ education, girls’ education, SEN and inclusive education, TVET, global citizenship education, arts-based pedagogies. She lived and worked in different countries including in Nepal (a country she has developed a strong bond with), Tanzania, El Salvador, Italy and the UK. These experiences have reinforced her critical approach to international education and global development and to education as a catalyst for both inequalities, injustices, violence and more equitable social change and peace-building processes.

She served as Student Representative of the British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) from 2017 to 2019 and she is currently part of the college of reviewers of the editorial board of Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education.

Publications:

Aldinucci, A. (2022). Understanding aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to postschool trajectories in Chile. PhD thesis, University of Glasgow.
Aldinucci, A., Valiente, O., Hurrell S., and Zancajo, A. (2021). Understanding aspirations: Why do secondary TVET students aim so high in Chile? Journal of Vocational Education & Training.

Rawle, G., Riddle, N., Pettersson, G., Wallin, J., Bici, M., Jasper, P., Harb, J., Hebbar, M., Davis, J., Aldinucci, A., (2017), EQUIP-Tanzania Impact Evaluation. Midline Technical Report, Volume I and II. Oxford Policy Management.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Kabira is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. His research is funded by the Clarendon Fund.

Kabira is interested in improving learning outcomes for children in fragile and conflict – affected regions of the world, school health and nutrition programs, combatting gender-based violence and supporting children who are dealing with addiction.

His doctoral research focuses on education outcomes for young learners in Papua New Guinea who are addicted to psychoactive and carcinogenic betel quid.

Prior to moving to Oxford, Kabira was based in Washington DC, USA and worked for the World Bank and Save the Children on impact evaluations, learning assessments and improving the quality of education statistics in twenty-six countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, the Pacific, and the Middle East.

Kabira holds a Masters in Economics and Public Policy from Princeton University where he was a recipient of the Stokes’ Prize for exemplary academic achievement and public service leadership, a Masters in Development Economics from the School of Oriental and African Studies at London University where he graduated with distinction and an undergraduate degree in Economics and Statistics from St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai.

Research interests:

·       Education in conflict regions

·       Combatting school related gender-based violence (SRGBV)

·       School health and nutrition programs

·       Supporting children with addiction

 

Publications

Aliya teaches on the Comparative and International Education MSc programme at the Department of Education after having taught at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge. Her research focuses on how women in the South navigate their agency in highly constrained circumstances. Her specialised areas of interest are the capability approach, negative capability, epistemic paradoxicality and justice, and the promotion of knowledges (plural) and Southern epistemologies. Aliya actively engages in issues around the politics of representation and knowledge production in the academe. Aliya is currently accepting doctoral students with an interest in these areas.

 

Projects

‘Understanding the impact of COVID-19 on learning experiences of secondary school going age children among Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families’

Project summary:
COVID-19 related school disruption and closures have significantly impacted the lives of students. Notably, these disruptions have had a multi-fold impact on children living in ethnic minority families. Although ethnic and racial inequalities are persistent across contexts, this project particularly engages with young adults and other family members belonging to Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families living in England. Children in these families have been uniquely affected by the pandemic (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020), given the higher rates of prevalence of COVID among these communities and also greater and persistent structural inequalities.

Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families have been identified as a focus of this research because firstly, these particular groups have been strongly impacted by COVID (Platt & Warwick, 2020; Trivedy et al., 2020) and secondly, their socio cultural specificities make them more susceptible to disadvantage during COVID related school closures (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020). Our particular focus is on secondary school children whose learning has been majorly disrupted due to national lockdowns and uncertainty regarding national assessments.

Therefore, this project aims to address the unique situation and experiences of these BAME families with secondary school age children to understand how COVID-related challenges are shaping their learning experiences, household dynamics and future aspirations.

This is an exploratory, project which fills an important gap in existing knowledge by taking a strong cultural lens to understanding how learning among Bangladeshi and Pakistani families could be supported, drawing on a deeper understanding of their lived realities and contextualised understanding of the challenges they face. The aim is not simply to reproduce a deficit discourse (which tends to be associated with families from these ethnic minority groups), but to understand family dynamics and the opportunities offered herein.

Funded by:

Cambridge Humanities Research Grants Scheme

Research team:

Professor Nidhi Singal and Dr Aliya Khalid

 

‘Bridging the Local and Global: Women’s Spaces and Collectives’

Project summary:
While globalisation aims to connect the world equitably, global perspectives are often privileged over the local. Often the voices of women from the South (metaphor for marginalised) are least heard. This project acknowledges that any ‘Global’ ideology of (Dis)order needs to include local women’s voices by studying how they have generated order/disorder to create ‘spaces of action’/reflection (defined as collectives). We propose a multi-phase, multi-method study of women’s ‘collective spaces’. We first explore how ‘collectives’ have been understood. We will learn from women themselves by conducting two interview based case studies on (i) access to reproductive healthcare (Northern Ireland/Ireland) and (ii) mothers’ collective experiences of educating their children during a pandemic (ethnic minority families in England). In bringing together law and education, archives and interviews, reproductive healthcare and education, this project offers a novel way of understanding – and recording – collective responses to local/global challenges.

Funded by:

Virtual Sandpits, The British Academy

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid, Dr Jane Rooney and Dr Ruth Houghton, Dr Kate spencer-Bennet, Alana Farrel Kate Spencer-Bennett

 

‘Gendered Inequalities in Education and Capability Spaces for Women/Girls (and others) in Pakistan During Covid’

Project summary: This project explores the cumulative intersectional experiences of women/girls (and others) that are shaped by multidimensional inequalities existing in their physical (urban/rural) and social (market, society, community and family) settings. In particular, how gender interacts with the different vectors of disadvantage (for example, economic, technological, social, cultural and political) within the perimeters of their location (urban/rural) and setting (labour market, society and family) is to be explored. We refer to what we call ‘spaces of action/reflection’ that provide unique gendered experiences of seeking education. This project will thus conceptualise ‘spaces’ as those gendered experiences marked by economic, technological, social, cultural and political disadvantages that girls (and others) face in their locations (physical and social) as they seek education in the times of the pandemic. Hence, ‘space’ not only refers to the physical (urban/rural), but also, the social (community, family), cultural (society) and personal (psychological) aspects within which girls/women (and others) live and seek education.

This research aims to identify how these ‘spaces’ generate opportunities and constraints for girls/women (and others) in Pakistan. This exploration is essential today when Covid-19 has created ruptures in the supportive structures of educational provision. In this regard, it is essential to understand the limits and opportunities for girls/women’s (and that of others) education in Pakistan within these ‘spaces’ that have come about as a result of Covid-19 related educational and social restructuring of opportunities. In sum, the aim of the project is to contribute to international education by creating a deeper understanding of the gendered vulnerabilities that intersect with disadvantages and placement (physical and social) vectors to produce gendered experiences for the most marginalised in the context of Pakistan.

Funded by:

British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) Seedcorn Fund

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid and Dr Soufia Siddiqui

 

Publications

Khalid, A. (forthcoming). ‘Hearing their silences: Mothers agency as they support their daughters’ education in rural Punjab Pakistan’, Gender and Education.

Khalid, A., & Rose, P. (forthcoming). Mothers’ Capability to Influence their Daughters’ Education in Pakistan: Interconnections between mothers’ value of education, negative capability and agency. Journal of Human Development and Capabilities.

Khalid, A. (in preparation) ‘Comparisons of hope, education, and aspirations between Pakistani mothers and revolutionaries: The being and becoming of agents in the contexts of change’. Comparative Education

Khalid, A. & Singal, N. (in preparation) ”It’s made us stronger as a family’: Ethnic minority parenting experiences of educating children in England during Covid’. Journal of Family Studies

Singal, N. & Khalid, A. (in preparation) ”Time moves fast but it also goes slow’: Secondary school children’s experiences of ‘preparing’ for exams during lockdown in England. Children and Society

Khalid, A., Parpart, J. & Holmes, G. (Eds.) (in preparation) ‘ From the silence/voice binary to liminal spaces: Understanding gender, agency and power in a changing world’. Routledge

Khalid, A. & Siddiqi, S. (in preparation). Human Development Report 2022: Gendered inequalities in education and capability spaces for women/girls (and others) in Pakistan during Covid’. South Asia: Human Development Report UNDP

Alice Aldinucci is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford, Department of Education. She is part of the team working on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani, and she is a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group.

She holds a PhD in Education from the University of Glasgow (UK) where she was awarded the LKAS Interdisciplinary Scholarship. Her thesis applies a longitudinal qualitative research design and draws on the combination of Critical Realism and Capability Approach to explore aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to adulthood in Chile. Prior to her PhD, she completed a MA in International Education and Development from the University of Sussex (UK) where she was awarded the Centre for International Education Prize for the best overall MA performance. For her MA at Sussex, she conducted an empirical dissertation on the meaning making of Inclusive Education in Nepal. She holds a MA in Languages and Cultures for International Communication and Cooperation from the University of Milan (Italy) with a fieldwork research on tensions between policy and practice in bilingual multicultural education for indigenous students in Higher Education in Peru; and a BA in Languages and Intercultural Mediation from the University of Arezzo (Italy).

Alice’s research interests are interdisciplinary and relate to the critical linkages between intersecting inequalities, education, individual/societal development, and social justice at local and global levels, motivated by the question what education for what/whose development?

Areas, theoretical approaches and methodologies of interests:
• Sociology of education including aspirations in post-school transitions
• Cultural political economy of education and life chances/human flourishing/social justice
• Tensions between global educational frameworks and local knowledge and practices
• Critical Realism
• Capability Approach
• Qualitative and participatory methodologies
• Digital storytelling for social change

Besides her work in academia, Alice has gained experience as researcher, development practitioner and educator working in projects including early childhood education programmes, refugees’ education, girls’ education, SEN and inclusive education, TVET, global citizenship education, arts-based pedagogies. She lived and worked in different countries including in Nepal (a country she has developed a strong bond with), Tanzania, El Salvador, Italy and the UK. These experiences have reinforced her critical approach to international education and global development and to education as a catalyst for both inequalities, injustices, violence and more equitable social change and peace-building processes.

She served as Student Representative of the British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) from 2017 to 2019 and she is currently part of the college of reviewers of the editorial board of Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education.

Publications:

Aldinucci, A. (2022). Understanding aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to postschool trajectories in Chile. PhD thesis, University of Glasgow.
Aldinucci, A., Valiente, O., Hurrell S., and Zancajo, A. (2021). Understanding aspirations: Why do secondary TVET students aim so high in Chile? Journal of Vocational Education & Training.

Rawle, G., Riddle, N., Pettersson, G., Wallin, J., Bici, M., Jasper, P., Harb, J., Hebbar, M., Davis, J., Aldinucci, A., (2017), EQUIP-Tanzania Impact Evaluation. Midline Technical Report, Volume I and II. Oxford Policy Management.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Kabira is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. His research is funded by the Clarendon Fund.

Kabira is interested in improving learning outcomes for children in fragile and conflict – affected regions of the world, school health and nutrition programs, combatting gender-based violence and supporting children who are dealing with addiction.

His doctoral research focuses on education outcomes for young learners in Papua New Guinea who are addicted to psychoactive and carcinogenic betel quid.

Prior to moving to Oxford, Kabira was based in Washington DC, USA and worked for the World Bank and Save the Children on impact evaluations, learning assessments and improving the quality of education statistics in twenty-six countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, the Pacific, and the Middle East.

Kabira holds a Masters in Economics and Public Policy from Princeton University where he was a recipient of the Stokes’ Prize for exemplary academic achievement and public service leadership, a Masters in Development Economics from the School of Oriental and African Studies at London University where he graduated with distinction and an undergraduate degree in Economics and Statistics from St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai.

Research interests:

·       Education in conflict regions

·       Combatting school related gender-based violence (SRGBV)

·       School health and nutrition programs

·       Supporting children with addiction

 

Publications

Aliya teaches on the Comparative and International Education MSc programme at the Department of Education after having taught at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge. Her research focuses on how women in the South navigate their agency in highly constrained circumstances. Her specialised areas of interest are the capability approach, negative capability, epistemic paradoxicality and justice, and the promotion of knowledges (plural) and Southern epistemologies. Aliya actively engages in issues around the politics of representation and knowledge production in the academe. Aliya is currently accepting doctoral students with an interest in these areas.

 

Projects

‘Understanding the impact of COVID-19 on learning experiences of secondary school going age children among Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families’

Project summary:
COVID-19 related school disruption and closures have significantly impacted the lives of students. Notably, these disruptions have had a multi-fold impact on children living in ethnic minority families. Although ethnic and racial inequalities are persistent across contexts, this project particularly engages with young adults and other family members belonging to Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families living in England. Children in these families have been uniquely affected by the pandemic (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020), given the higher rates of prevalence of COVID among these communities and also greater and persistent structural inequalities.

Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families have been identified as a focus of this research because firstly, these particular groups have been strongly impacted by COVID (Platt & Warwick, 2020; Trivedy et al., 2020) and secondly, their socio cultural specificities make them more susceptible to disadvantage during COVID related school closures (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020). Our particular focus is on secondary school children whose learning has been majorly disrupted due to national lockdowns and uncertainty regarding national assessments.

Therefore, this project aims to address the unique situation and experiences of these BAME families with secondary school age children to understand how COVID-related challenges are shaping their learning experiences, household dynamics and future aspirations.

This is an exploratory, project which fills an important gap in existing knowledge by taking a strong cultural lens to understanding how learning among Bangladeshi and Pakistani families could be supported, drawing on a deeper understanding of their lived realities and contextualised understanding of the challenges they face. The aim is not simply to reproduce a deficit discourse (which tends to be associated with families from these ethnic minority groups), but to understand family dynamics and the opportunities offered herein.

Funded by:

Cambridge Humanities Research Grants Scheme

Research team:

Professor Nidhi Singal and Dr Aliya Khalid

 

‘Bridging the Local and Global: Women’s Spaces and Collectives’

Project summary:
While globalisation aims to connect the world equitably, global perspectives are often privileged over the local. Often the voices of women from the South (metaphor for marginalised) are least heard. This project acknowledges that any ‘Global’ ideology of (Dis)order needs to include local women’s voices by studying how they have generated order/disorder to create ‘spaces of action’/reflection (defined as collectives). We propose a multi-phase, multi-method study of women’s ‘collective spaces’. We first explore how ‘collectives’ have been understood. We will learn from women themselves by conducting two interview based case studies on (i) access to reproductive healthcare (Northern Ireland/Ireland) and (ii) mothers’ collective experiences of educating their children during a pandemic (ethnic minority families in England). In bringing together law and education, archives and interviews, reproductive healthcare and education, this project offers a novel way of understanding – and recording – collective responses to local/global challenges.

Funded by:

Virtual Sandpits, The British Academy

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid, Dr Jane Rooney and Dr Ruth Houghton, Dr Kate spencer-Bennet, Alana Farrel Kate Spencer-Bennett

 

‘Gendered Inequalities in Education and Capability Spaces for Women/Girls (and others) in Pakistan During Covid’

Project summary: This project explores the cumulative intersectional experiences of women/girls (and others) that are shaped by multidimensional inequalities existing in their physical (urban/rural) and social (market, society, community and family) settings. In particular, how gender interacts with the different vectors of disadvantage (for example, economic, technological, social, cultural and political) within the perimeters of their location (urban/rural) and setting (labour market, society and family) is to be explored. We refer to what we call ‘spaces of action/reflection’ that provide unique gendered experiences of seeking education. This project will thus conceptualise ‘spaces’ as those gendered experiences marked by economic, technological, social, cultural and political disadvantages that girls (and others) face in their locations (physical and social) as they seek education in the times of the pandemic. Hence, ‘space’ not only refers to the physical (urban/rural), but also, the social (community, family), cultural (society) and personal (psychological) aspects within which girls/women (and others) live and seek education.

This research aims to identify how these ‘spaces’ generate opportunities and constraints for girls/women (and others) in Pakistan. This exploration is essential today when Covid-19 has created ruptures in the supportive structures of educational provision. In this regard, it is essential to understand the limits and opportunities for girls/women’s (and that of others) education in Pakistan within these ‘spaces’ that have come about as a result of Covid-19 related educational and social restructuring of opportunities. In sum, the aim of the project is to contribute to international education by creating a deeper understanding of the gendered vulnerabilities that intersect with disadvantages and placement (physical and social) vectors to produce gendered experiences for the most marginalised in the context of Pakistan.

Funded by:

British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) Seedcorn Fund

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid and Dr Soufia Siddiqui

 

Publications

Khalid, A. (forthcoming). ‘Hearing their silences: Mothers agency as they support their daughters’ education in rural Punjab Pakistan’, Gender and Education.

Khalid, A., & Rose, P. (forthcoming). Mothers’ Capability to Influence their Daughters’ Education in Pakistan: Interconnections between mothers’ value of education, negative capability and agency. Journal of Human Development and Capabilities.

Khalid, A. (in preparation) ‘Comparisons of hope, education, and aspirations between Pakistani mothers and revolutionaries: The being and becoming of agents in the contexts of change’. Comparative Education

Khalid, A. & Singal, N. (in preparation) ”It’s made us stronger as a family’: Ethnic minority parenting experiences of educating children in England during Covid’. Journal of Family Studies

Singal, N. & Khalid, A. (in preparation) ”Time moves fast but it also goes slow’: Secondary school children’s experiences of ‘preparing’ for exams during lockdown in England. Children and Society

Khalid, A., Parpart, J. & Holmes, G. (Eds.) (in preparation) ‘ From the silence/voice binary to liminal spaces: Understanding gender, agency and power in a changing world’. Routledge

Khalid, A. & Siddiqi, S. (in preparation). Human Development Report 2022: Gendered inequalities in education and capability spaces for women/girls (and others) in Pakistan during Covid’. South Asia: Human Development Report UNDP

Alice Aldinucci is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford, Department of Education. She is part of the team working on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani, and she is a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group.

She holds a PhD in Education from the University of Glasgow (UK) where she was awarded the LKAS Interdisciplinary Scholarship. Her thesis applies a longitudinal qualitative research design and draws on the combination of Critical Realism and Capability Approach to explore aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to adulthood in Chile. Prior to her PhD, she completed a MA in International Education and Development from the University of Sussex (UK) where she was awarded the Centre for International Education Prize for the best overall MA performance. For her MA at Sussex, she conducted an empirical dissertation on the meaning making of Inclusive Education in Nepal. She holds a MA in Languages and Cultures for International Communication and Cooperation from the University of Milan (Italy) with a fieldwork research on tensions between policy and practice in bilingual multicultural education for indigenous students in Higher Education in Peru; and a BA in Languages and Intercultural Mediation from the University of Arezzo (Italy).

Alice’s research interests are interdisciplinary and relate to the critical linkages between intersecting inequalities, education, individual/societal development, and social justice at local and global levels, motivated by the question what education for what/whose development?

Areas, theoretical approaches and methodologies of interests:
• Sociology of education including aspirations in post-school transitions
• Cultural political economy of education and life chances/human flourishing/social justice
• Tensions between global educational frameworks and local knowledge and practices
• Critical Realism
• Capability Approach
• Qualitative and participatory methodologies
• Digital storytelling for social change

Besides her work in academia, Alice has gained experience as researcher, development practitioner and educator working in projects including early childhood education programmes, refugees’ education, girls’ education, SEN and inclusive education, TVET, global citizenship education, arts-based pedagogies. She lived and worked in different countries including in Nepal (a country she has developed a strong bond with), Tanzania, El Salvador, Italy and the UK. These experiences have reinforced her critical approach to international education and global development and to education as a catalyst for both inequalities, injustices, violence and more equitable social change and peace-building processes.

She served as Student Representative of the British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) from 2017 to 2019 and she is currently part of the college of reviewers of the editorial board of Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education.

Publications:

Aldinucci, A. (2022). Understanding aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to postschool trajectories in Chile. PhD thesis, University of Glasgow.
Aldinucci, A., Valiente, O., Hurrell S., and Zancajo, A. (2021). Understanding aspirations: Why do secondary TVET students aim so high in Chile? Journal of Vocational Education & Training.

Rawle, G., Riddle, N., Pettersson, G., Wallin, J., Bici, M., Jasper, P., Harb, J., Hebbar, M., Davis, J., Aldinucci, A., (2017), EQUIP-Tanzania Impact Evaluation. Midline Technical Report, Volume I and II. Oxford Policy Management.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Kabira is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. His research is funded by the Clarendon Fund.

Kabira is interested in improving learning outcomes for children in fragile and conflict – affected regions of the world, school health and nutrition programs, combatting gender-based violence and supporting children who are dealing with addiction.

His doctoral research focuses on education outcomes for young learners in Papua New Guinea who are addicted to psychoactive and carcinogenic betel quid.

Prior to moving to Oxford, Kabira was based in Washington DC, USA and worked for the World Bank and Save the Children on impact evaluations, learning assessments and improving the quality of education statistics in twenty-six countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, the Pacific, and the Middle East.

Kabira holds a Masters in Economics and Public Policy from Princeton University where he was a recipient of the Stokes’ Prize for exemplary academic achievement and public service leadership, a Masters in Development Economics from the School of Oriental and African Studies at London University where he graduated with distinction and an undergraduate degree in Economics and Statistics from St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai.

Research interests:

·       Education in conflict regions

·       Combatting school related gender-based violence (SRGBV)

·       School health and nutrition programs

·       Supporting children with addiction

 

Publications

Aliya teaches on the Comparative and International Education MSc programme at the Department of Education after having taught at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge. Her research focuses on how women in the South navigate their agency in highly constrained circumstances. Her specialised areas of interest are the capability approach, negative capability, epistemic paradoxicality and justice, and the promotion of knowledges (plural) and Southern epistemologies. Aliya actively engages in issues around the politics of representation and knowledge production in the academe. Aliya is currently accepting doctoral students with an interest in these areas.

 

Projects

‘Understanding the impact of COVID-19 on learning experiences of secondary school going age children among Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families’

Project summary:
COVID-19 related school disruption and closures have significantly impacted the lives of students. Notably, these disruptions have had a multi-fold impact on children living in ethnic minority families. Although ethnic and racial inequalities are persistent across contexts, this project particularly engages with young adults and other family members belonging to Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families living in England. Children in these families have been uniquely affected by the pandemic (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020), given the higher rates of prevalence of COVID among these communities and also greater and persistent structural inequalities.

Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families have been identified as a focus of this research because firstly, these particular groups have been strongly impacted by COVID (Platt & Warwick, 2020; Trivedy et al., 2020) and secondly, their socio cultural specificities make them more susceptible to disadvantage during COVID related school closures (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020). Our particular focus is on secondary school children whose learning has been majorly disrupted due to national lockdowns and uncertainty regarding national assessments.

Therefore, this project aims to address the unique situation and experiences of these BAME families with secondary school age children to understand how COVID-related challenges are shaping their learning experiences, household dynamics and future aspirations.

This is an exploratory, project which fills an important gap in existing knowledge by taking a strong cultural lens to understanding how learning among Bangladeshi and Pakistani families could be supported, drawing on a deeper understanding of their lived realities and contextualised understanding of the challenges they face. The aim is not simply to reproduce a deficit discourse (which tends to be associated with families from these ethnic minority groups), but to understand family dynamics and the opportunities offered herein.

Funded by:

Cambridge Humanities Research Grants Scheme

Research team:

Professor Nidhi Singal and Dr Aliya Khalid

 

‘Bridging the Local and Global: Women’s Spaces and Collectives’

Project summary:
While globalisation aims to connect the world equitably, global perspectives are often privileged over the local. Often the voices of women from the South (metaphor for marginalised) are least heard. This project acknowledges that any ‘Global’ ideology of (Dis)order needs to include local women’s voices by studying how they have generated order/disorder to create ‘spaces of action’/reflection (defined as collectives). We propose a multi-phase, multi-method study of women’s ‘collective spaces’. We first explore how ‘collectives’ have been understood. We will learn from women themselves by conducting two interview based case studies on (i) access to reproductive healthcare (Northern Ireland/Ireland) and (ii) mothers’ collective experiences of educating their children during a pandemic (ethnic minority families in England). In bringing together law and education, archives and interviews, reproductive healthcare and education, this project offers a novel way of understanding – and recording – collective responses to local/global challenges.

Funded by:

Virtual Sandpits, The British Academy

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid, Dr Jane Rooney and Dr Ruth Houghton, Dr Kate spencer-Bennet, Alana Farrel Kate Spencer-Bennett

 

‘Gendered Inequalities in Education and Capability Spaces for Women/Girls (and others) in Pakistan During Covid’

Project summary: This project explores the cumulative intersectional experiences of women/girls (and others) that are shaped by multidimensional inequalities existing in their physical (urban/rural) and social (market, society, community and family) settings. In particular, how gender interacts with the different vectors of disadvantage (for example, economic, technological, social, cultural and political) within the perimeters of their location (urban/rural) and setting (labour market, society and family) is to be explored. We refer to what we call ‘spaces of action/reflection’ that provide unique gendered experiences of seeking education. This project will thus conceptualise ‘spaces’ as those gendered experiences marked by economic, technological, social, cultural and political disadvantages that girls (and others) face in their locations (physical and social) as they seek education in the times of the pandemic. Hence, ‘space’ not only refers to the physical (urban/rural), but also, the social (community, family), cultural (society) and personal (psychological) aspects within which girls/women (and others) live and seek education.

This research aims to identify how these ‘spaces’ generate opportunities and constraints for girls/women (and others) in Pakistan. This exploration is essential today when Covid-19 has created ruptures in the supportive structures of educational provision. In this regard, it is essential to understand the limits and opportunities for girls/women’s (and that of others) education in Pakistan within these ‘spaces’ that have come about as a result of Covid-19 related educational and social restructuring of opportunities. In sum, the aim of the project is to contribute to international education by creating a deeper understanding of the gendered vulnerabilities that intersect with disadvantages and placement (physical and social) vectors to produce gendered experiences for the most marginalised in the context of Pakistan.

Funded by:

British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) Seedcorn Fund

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid and Dr Soufia Siddiqui

 

Publications

Khalid, A. (forthcoming). ‘Hearing their silences: Mothers agency as they support their daughters’ education in rural Punjab Pakistan’, Gender and Education.

Khalid, A., & Rose, P. (forthcoming). Mothers’ Capability to Influence their Daughters’ Education in Pakistan: Interconnections between mothers’ value of education, negative capability and agency. Journal of Human Development and Capabilities.

Khalid, A. (in preparation) ‘Comparisons of hope, education, and aspirations between Pakistani mothers and revolutionaries: The being and becoming of agents in the contexts of change’. Comparative Education

Khalid, A. & Singal, N. (in preparation) ”It’s made us stronger as a family’: Ethnic minority parenting experiences of educating children in England during Covid’. Journal of Family Studies

Singal, N. & Khalid, A. (in preparation) ”Time moves fast but it also goes slow’: Secondary school children’s experiences of ‘preparing’ for exams during lockdown in England. Children and Society

Khalid, A., Parpart, J. & Holmes, G. (Eds.) (in preparation) ‘ From the silence/voice binary to liminal spaces: Understanding gender, agency and power in a changing world’. Routledge

Khalid, A. & Siddiqi, S. (in preparation). Human Development Report 2022: Gendered inequalities in education and capability spaces for women/girls (and others) in Pakistan during Covid’. South Asia: Human Development Report UNDP

Alice Aldinucci is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford, Department of Education. She is part of the team working on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani, and she is a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group.

She holds a PhD in Education from the University of Glasgow (UK) where she was awarded the LKAS Interdisciplinary Scholarship. Her thesis applies a longitudinal qualitative research design and draws on the combination of Critical Realism and Capability Approach to explore aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to adulthood in Chile. Prior to her PhD, she completed a MA in International Education and Development from the University of Sussex (UK) where she was awarded the Centre for International Education Prize for the best overall MA performance. For her MA at Sussex, she conducted an empirical dissertation on the meaning making of Inclusive Education in Nepal. She holds a MA in Languages and Cultures for International Communication and Cooperation from the University of Milan (Italy) with a fieldwork research on tensions between policy and practice in bilingual multicultural education for indigenous students in Higher Education in Peru; and a BA in Languages and Intercultural Mediation from the University of Arezzo (Italy).

Alice’s research interests are interdisciplinary and relate to the critical linkages between intersecting inequalities, education, individual/societal development, and social justice at local and global levels, motivated by the question what education for what/whose development?

Areas, theoretical approaches and methodologies of interests:
• Sociology of education including aspirations in post-school transitions
• Cultural political economy of education and life chances/human flourishing/social justice
• Tensions between global educational frameworks and local knowledge and practices
• Critical Realism
• Capability Approach
• Qualitative and participatory methodologies
• Digital storytelling for social change

Besides her work in academia, Alice has gained experience as researcher, development practitioner and educator working in projects including early childhood education programmes, refugees’ education, girls’ education, SEN and inclusive education, TVET, global citizenship education, arts-based pedagogies. She lived and worked in different countries including in Nepal (a country she has developed a strong bond with), Tanzania, El Salvador, Italy and the UK. These experiences have reinforced her critical approach to international education and global development and to education as a catalyst for both inequalities, injustices, violence and more equitable social change and peace-building processes.

She served as Student Representative of the British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) from 2017 to 2019 and she is currently part of the college of reviewers of the editorial board of Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education.

Publications:

Aldinucci, A. (2022). Understanding aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to postschool trajectories in Chile. PhD thesis, University of Glasgow.
Aldinucci, A., Valiente, O., Hurrell S., and Zancajo, A. (2021). Understanding aspirations: Why do secondary TVET students aim so high in Chile? Journal of Vocational Education & Training.

Rawle, G., Riddle, N., Pettersson, G., Wallin, J., Bici, M., Jasper, P., Harb, J., Hebbar, M., Davis, J., Aldinucci, A., (2017), EQUIP-Tanzania Impact Evaluation. Midline Technical Report, Volume I and II. Oxford Policy Management.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Kabira is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. His research is funded by the Clarendon Fund.

Kabira is interested in improving learning outcomes for children in fragile and conflict – affected regions of the world, school health and nutrition programs, combatting gender-based violence and supporting children who are dealing with addiction.

His doctoral research focuses on education outcomes for young learners in Papua New Guinea who are addicted to psychoactive and carcinogenic betel quid.

Prior to moving to Oxford, Kabira was based in Washington DC, USA and worked for the World Bank and Save the Children on impact evaluations, learning assessments and improving the quality of education statistics in twenty-six countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, the Pacific, and the Middle East.

Kabira holds a Masters in Economics and Public Policy from Princeton University where he was a recipient of the Stokes’ Prize for exemplary academic achievement and public service leadership, a Masters in Development Economics from the School of Oriental and African Studies at London University where he graduated with distinction and an undergraduate degree in Economics and Statistics from St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai.

Research interests:

·       Education in conflict regions

·       Combatting school related gender-based violence (SRGBV)

·       School health and nutrition programs

·       Supporting children with addiction

 

Publications

Aliya teaches on the Comparative and International Education MSc programme at the Department of Education after having taught at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge. Her research focuses on how women in the South navigate their agency in highly constrained circumstances. Her specialised areas of interest are the capability approach, negative capability, epistemic paradoxicality and justice, and the promotion of knowledges (plural) and Southern epistemologies. Aliya actively engages in issues around the politics of representation and knowledge production in the academe. Aliya is currently accepting doctoral students with an interest in these areas.

 

Projects

‘Understanding the impact of COVID-19 on learning experiences of secondary school going age children among Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families’

Project summary:
COVID-19 related school disruption and closures have significantly impacted the lives of students. Notably, these disruptions have had a multi-fold impact on children living in ethnic minority families. Although ethnic and racial inequalities are persistent across contexts, this project particularly engages with young adults and other family members belonging to Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families living in England. Children in these families have been uniquely affected by the pandemic (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020), given the higher rates of prevalence of COVID among these communities and also greater and persistent structural inequalities.

Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families have been identified as a focus of this research because firstly, these particular groups have been strongly impacted by COVID (Platt & Warwick, 2020; Trivedy et al., 2020) and secondly, their socio cultural specificities make them more susceptible to disadvantage during COVID related school closures (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020). Our particular focus is on secondary school children whose learning has been majorly disrupted due to national lockdowns and uncertainty regarding national assessments.

Therefore, this project aims to address the unique situation and experiences of these BAME families with secondary school age children to understand how COVID-related challenges are shaping their learning experiences, household dynamics and future aspirations.

This is an exploratory, project which fills an important gap in existing knowledge by taking a strong cultural lens to understanding how learning among Bangladeshi and Pakistani families could be supported, drawing on a deeper understanding of their lived realities and contextualised understanding of the challenges they face. The aim is not simply to reproduce a deficit discourse (which tends to be associated with families from these ethnic minority groups), but to understand family dynamics and the opportunities offered herein.

Funded by:

Cambridge Humanities Research Grants Scheme

Research team:

Professor Nidhi Singal and Dr Aliya Khalid

 

‘Bridging the Local and Global: Women’s Spaces and Collectives’

Project summary:
While globalisation aims to connect the world equitably, global perspectives are often privileged over the local. Often the voices of women from the South (metaphor for marginalised) are least heard. This project acknowledges that any ‘Global’ ideology of (Dis)order needs to include local women’s voices by studying how they have generated order/disorder to create ‘spaces of action’/reflection (defined as collectives). We propose a multi-phase, multi-method study of women’s ‘collective spaces’. We first explore how ‘collectives’ have been understood. We will learn from women themselves by conducting two interview based case studies on (i) access to reproductive healthcare (Northern Ireland/Ireland) and (ii) mothers’ collective experiences of educating their children during a pandemic (ethnic minority families in England). In bringing together law and education, archives and interviews, reproductive healthcare and education, this project offers a novel way of understanding – and recording – collective responses to local/global challenges.

Funded by:

Virtual Sandpits, The British Academy

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid, Dr Jane Rooney and Dr Ruth Houghton, Dr Kate spencer-Bennet, Alana Farrel Kate Spencer-Bennett

 

‘Gendered Inequalities in Education and Capability Spaces for Women/Girls (and others) in Pakistan During Covid’

Project summary: This project explores the cumulative intersectional experiences of women/girls (and others) that are shaped by multidimensional inequalities existing in their physical (urban/rural) and social (market, society, community and family) settings. In particular, how gender interacts with the different vectors of disadvantage (for example, economic, technological, social, cultural and political) within the perimeters of their location (urban/rural) and setting (labour market, society and family) is to be explored. We refer to what we call ‘spaces of action/reflection’ that provide unique gendered experiences of seeking education. This project will thus conceptualise ‘spaces’ as those gendered experiences marked by economic, technological, social, cultural and political disadvantages that girls (and others) face in their locations (physical and social) as they seek education in the times of the pandemic. Hence, ‘space’ not only refers to the physical (urban/rural), but also, the social (community, family), cultural (society) and personal (psychological) aspects within which girls/women (and others) live and seek education.

This research aims to identify how these ‘spaces’ generate opportunities and constraints for girls/women (and others) in Pakistan. This exploration is essential today when Covid-19 has created ruptures in the supportive structures of educational provision. In this regard, it is essential to understand the limits and opportunities for girls/women’s (and that of others) education in Pakistan within these ‘spaces’ that have come about as a result of Covid-19 related educational and social restructuring of opportunities. In sum, the aim of the project is to contribute to international education by creating a deeper understanding of the gendered vulnerabilities that intersect with disadvantages and placement (physical and social) vectors to produce gendered experiences for the most marginalised in the context of Pakistan.

Funded by:

British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) Seedcorn Fund

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid and Dr Soufia Siddiqui

 

Publications

Khalid, A. (forthcoming). ‘Hearing their silences: Mothers agency as they support their daughters’ education in rural Punjab Pakistan’, Gender and Education.

Khalid, A., & Rose, P. (forthcoming). Mothers’ Capability to Influence their Daughters’ Education in Pakistan: Interconnections between mothers’ value of education, negative capability and agency. Journal of Human Development and Capabilities.

Khalid, A. (in preparation) ‘Comparisons of hope, education, and aspirations between Pakistani mothers and revolutionaries: The being and becoming of agents in the contexts of change’. Comparative Education

Khalid, A. & Singal, N. (in preparation) ”It’s made us stronger as a family’: Ethnic minority parenting experiences of educating children in England during Covid’. Journal of Family Studies

Singal, N. & Khalid, A. (in preparation) ”Time moves fast but it also goes slow’: Secondary school children’s experiences of ‘preparing’ for exams during lockdown in England. Children and Society

Khalid, A., Parpart, J. & Holmes, G. (Eds.) (in preparation) ‘ From the silence/voice binary to liminal spaces: Understanding gender, agency and power in a changing world’. Routledge

Khalid, A. & Siddiqi, S. (in preparation). Human Development Report 2022: Gendered inequalities in education and capability spaces for women/girls (and others) in Pakistan during Covid’. South Asia: Human Development Report UNDP

Alice Aldinucci is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford, Department of Education. She is part of the team working on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani, and she is a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group.

She holds a PhD in Education from the University of Glasgow (UK) where she was awarded the LKAS Interdisciplinary Scholarship. Her thesis applies a longitudinal qualitative research design and draws on the combination of Critical Realism and Capability Approach to explore aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to adulthood in Chile. Prior to her PhD, she completed a MA in International Education and Development from the University of Sussex (UK) where she was awarded the Centre for International Education Prize for the best overall MA performance. For her MA at Sussex, she conducted an empirical dissertation on the meaning making of Inclusive Education in Nepal. She holds a MA in Languages and Cultures for International Communication and Cooperation from the University of Milan (Italy) with a fieldwork research on tensions between policy and practice in bilingual multicultural education for indigenous students in Higher Education in Peru; and a BA in Languages and Intercultural Mediation from the University of Arezzo (Italy).

Alice’s research interests are interdisciplinary and relate to the critical linkages between intersecting inequalities, education, individual/societal development, and social justice at local and global levels, motivated by the question what education for what/whose development?

Areas, theoretical approaches and methodologies of interests:
• Sociology of education including aspirations in post-school transitions
• Cultural political economy of education and life chances/human flourishing/social justice
• Tensions between global educational frameworks and local knowledge and practices
• Critical Realism
• Capability Approach
• Qualitative and participatory methodologies
• Digital storytelling for social change

Besides her work in academia, Alice has gained experience as researcher, development practitioner and educator working in projects including early childhood education programmes, refugees’ education, girls’ education, SEN and inclusive education, TVET, global citizenship education, arts-based pedagogies. She lived and worked in different countries including in Nepal (a country she has developed a strong bond with), Tanzania, El Salvador, Italy and the UK. These experiences have reinforced her critical approach to international education and global development and to education as a catalyst for both inequalities, injustices, violence and more equitable social change and peace-building processes.

She served as Student Representative of the British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) from 2017 to 2019 and she is currently part of the college of reviewers of the editorial board of Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education.

Publications:

Aldinucci, A. (2022). Understanding aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to postschool trajectories in Chile. PhD thesis, University of Glasgow.
Aldinucci, A., Valiente, O., Hurrell S., and Zancajo, A. (2021). Understanding aspirations: Why do secondary TVET students aim so high in Chile? Journal of Vocational Education & Training.

Rawle, G., Riddle, N., Pettersson, G., Wallin, J., Bici, M., Jasper, P., Harb, J., Hebbar, M., Davis, J., Aldinucci, A., (2017), EQUIP-Tanzania Impact Evaluation. Midline Technical Report, Volume I and II. Oxford Policy Management.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Kabira is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. His research is funded by the Clarendon Fund.

Kabira is interested in improving learning outcomes for children in fragile and conflict – affected regions of the world, school health and nutrition programs, combatting gender-based violence and supporting children who are dealing with addiction.

His doctoral research focuses on education outcomes for young learners in Papua New Guinea who are addicted to psychoactive and carcinogenic betel quid.

Prior to moving to Oxford, Kabira was based in Washington DC, USA and worked for the World Bank and Save the Children on impact evaluations, learning assessments and improving the quality of education statistics in twenty-six countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, the Pacific, and the Middle East.

Kabira holds a Masters in Economics and Public Policy from Princeton University where he was a recipient of the Stokes’ Prize for exemplary academic achievement and public service leadership, a Masters in Development Economics from the School of Oriental and African Studies at London University where he graduated with distinction and an undergraduate degree in Economics and Statistics from St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai.

Research interests:

·       Education in conflict regions

·       Combatting school related gender-based violence (SRGBV)

·       School health and nutrition programs

·       Supporting children with addiction

 

Publications

Aliya teaches on the Comparative and International Education MSc programme at the Department of Education after having taught at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge. Her research focuses on how women in the South navigate their agency in highly constrained circumstances. Her specialised areas of interest are the capability approach, negative capability, epistemic paradoxicality and justice, and the promotion of knowledges (plural) and Southern epistemologies. Aliya actively engages in issues around the politics of representation and knowledge production in the academe. Aliya is currently accepting doctoral students with an interest in these areas.

 

Projects

‘Understanding the impact of COVID-19 on learning experiences of secondary school going age children among Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families’

Project summary:
COVID-19 related school disruption and closures have significantly impacted the lives of students. Notably, these disruptions have had a multi-fold impact on children living in ethnic minority families. Although ethnic and racial inequalities are persistent across contexts, this project particularly engages with young adults and other family members belonging to Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families living in England. Children in these families have been uniquely affected by the pandemic (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020), given the higher rates of prevalence of COVID among these communities and also greater and persistent structural inequalities.

Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families have been identified as a focus of this research because firstly, these particular groups have been strongly impacted by COVID (Platt & Warwick, 2020; Trivedy et al., 2020) and secondly, their socio cultural specificities make them more susceptible to disadvantage during COVID related school closures (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020). Our particular focus is on secondary school children whose learning has been majorly disrupted due to national lockdowns and uncertainty regarding national assessments.

Therefore, this project aims to address the unique situation and experiences of these BAME families with secondary school age children to understand how COVID-related challenges are shaping their learning experiences, household dynamics and future aspirations.

This is an exploratory, project which fills an important gap in existing knowledge by taking a strong cultural lens to understanding how learning among Bangladeshi and Pakistani families could be supported, drawing on a deeper understanding of their lived realities and contextualised understanding of the challenges they face. The aim is not simply to reproduce a deficit discourse (which tends to be associated with families from these ethnic minority groups), but to understand family dynamics and the opportunities offered herein.

Funded by:

Cambridge Humanities Research Grants Scheme

Research team:

Professor Nidhi Singal and Dr Aliya Khalid

 

‘Bridging the Local and Global: Women’s Spaces and Collectives’

Project summary:
While globalisation aims to connect the world equitably, global perspectives are often privileged over the local. Often the voices of women from the South (metaphor for marginalised) are least heard. This project acknowledges that any ‘Global’ ideology of (Dis)order needs to include local women’s voices by studying how they have generated order/disorder to create ‘spaces of action’/reflection (defined as collectives). We propose a multi-phase, multi-method study of women’s ‘collective spaces’. We first explore how ‘collectives’ have been understood. We will learn from women themselves by conducting two interview based case studies on (i) access to reproductive healthcare (Northern Ireland/Ireland) and (ii) mothers’ collective experiences of educating their children during a pandemic (ethnic minority families in England). In bringing together law and education, archives and interviews, reproductive healthcare and education, this project offers a novel way of understanding – and recording – collective responses to local/global challenges.

Funded by:

Virtual Sandpits, The British Academy

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid, Dr Jane Rooney and Dr Ruth Houghton, Dr Kate spencer-Bennet, Alana Farrel Kate Spencer-Bennett

 

‘Gendered Inequalities in Education and Capability Spaces for Women/Girls (and others) in Pakistan During Covid’

Project summary: This project explores the cumulative intersectional experiences of women/girls (and others) that are shaped by multidimensional inequalities existing in their physical (urban/rural) and social (market, society, community and family) settings. In particular, how gender interacts with the different vectors of disadvantage (for example, economic, technological, social, cultural and political) within the perimeters of their location (urban/rural) and setting (labour market, society and family) is to be explored. We refer to what we call ‘spaces of action/reflection’ that provide unique gendered experiences of seeking education. This project will thus conceptualise ‘spaces’ as those gendered experiences marked by economic, technological, social, cultural and political disadvantages that girls (and others) face in their locations (physical and social) as they seek education in the times of the pandemic. Hence, ‘space’ not only refers to the physical (urban/rural), but also, the social (community, family), cultural (society) and personal (psychological) aspects within which girls/women (and others) live and seek education.

This research aims to identify how these ‘spaces’ generate opportunities and constraints for girls/women (and others) in Pakistan. This exploration is essential today when Covid-19 has created ruptures in the supportive structures of educational provision. In this regard, it is essential to understand the limits and opportunities for girls/women’s (and that of others) education in Pakistan within these ‘spaces’ that have come about as a result of Covid-19 related educational and social restructuring of opportunities. In sum, the aim of the project is to contribute to international education by creating a deeper understanding of the gendered vulnerabilities that intersect with disadvantages and placement (physical and social) vectors to produce gendered experiences for the most marginalised in the context of Pakistan.

Funded by:

British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) Seedcorn Fund

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid and Dr Soufia Siddiqui

 

Publications

Khalid, A. (forthcoming). ‘Hearing their silences: Mothers agency as they support their daughters’ education in rural Punjab Pakistan’, Gender and Education.

Khalid, A., & Rose, P. (forthcoming). Mothers’ Capability to Influence their Daughters’ Education in Pakistan: Interconnections between mothers’ value of education, negative capability and agency. Journal of Human Development and Capabilities.

Khalid, A. (in preparation) ‘Comparisons of hope, education, and aspirations between Pakistani mothers and revolutionaries: The being and becoming of agents in the contexts of change’. Comparative Education

Khalid, A. & Singal, N. (in preparation) ”It’s made us stronger as a family’: Ethnic minority parenting experiences of educating children in England during Covid’. Journal of Family Studies

Singal, N. & Khalid, A. (in preparation) ”Time moves fast but it also goes slow’: Secondary school children’s experiences of ‘preparing’ for exams during lockdown in England. Children and Society

Khalid, A., Parpart, J. & Holmes, G. (Eds.) (in preparation) ‘ From the silence/voice binary to liminal spaces: Understanding gender, agency and power in a changing world’. Routledge

Khalid, A. & Siddiqi, S. (in preparation). Human Development Report 2022: Gendered inequalities in education and capability spaces for women/girls (and others) in Pakistan during Covid’. South Asia: Human Development Report UNDP

Alice Aldinucci is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford, Department of Education. She is part of the team working on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani, and she is a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group.

She holds a PhD in Education from the University of Glasgow (UK) where she was awarded the LKAS Interdisciplinary Scholarship. Her thesis applies a longitudinal qualitative research design and draws on the combination of Critical Realism and Capability Approach to explore aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to adulthood in Chile. Prior to her PhD, she completed a MA in International Education and Development from the University of Sussex (UK) where she was awarded the Centre for International Education Prize for the best overall MA performance. For her MA at Sussex, she conducted an empirical dissertation on the meaning making of Inclusive Education in Nepal. She holds a MA in Languages and Cultures for International Communication and Cooperation from the University of Milan (Italy) with a fieldwork research on tensions between policy and practice in bilingual multicultural education for indigenous students in Higher Education in Peru; and a BA in Languages and Intercultural Mediation from the University of Arezzo (Italy).

Alice’s research interests are interdisciplinary and relate to the critical linkages between intersecting inequalities, education, individual/societal development, and social justice at local and global levels, motivated by the question what education for what/whose development?

Areas, theoretical approaches and methodologies of interests:
• Sociology of education including aspirations in post-school transitions
• Cultural political economy of education and life chances/human flourishing/social justice
• Tensions between global educational frameworks and local knowledge and practices
• Critical Realism
• Capability Approach
• Qualitative and participatory methodologies
• Digital storytelling for social change

Besides her work in academia, Alice has gained experience as researcher, development practitioner and educator working in projects including early childhood education programmes, refugees’ education, girls’ education, SEN and inclusive education, TVET, global citizenship education, arts-based pedagogies. She lived and worked in different countries including in Nepal (a country she has developed a strong bond with), Tanzania, El Salvador, Italy and the UK. These experiences have reinforced her critical approach to international education and global development and to education as a catalyst for both inequalities, injustices, violence and more equitable social change and peace-building processes.

She served as Student Representative of the British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) from 2017 to 2019 and she is currently part of the college of reviewers of the editorial board of Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education.

Publications:

Aldinucci, A. (2022). Understanding aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to postschool trajectories in Chile. PhD thesis, University of Glasgow.
Aldinucci, A., Valiente, O., Hurrell S., and Zancajo, A. (2021). Understanding aspirations: Why do secondary TVET students aim so high in Chile? Journal of Vocational Education & Training.

Rawle, G., Riddle, N., Pettersson, G., Wallin, J., Bici, M., Jasper, P., Harb, J., Hebbar, M., Davis, J., Aldinucci, A., (2017), EQUIP-Tanzania Impact Evaluation. Midline Technical Report, Volume I and II. Oxford Policy Management.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Kabira is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. His research is funded by the Clarendon Fund.

Kabira is interested in improving learning outcomes for children in fragile and conflict – affected regions of the world, school health and nutrition programs, combatting gender-based violence and supporting children who are dealing with addiction.

His doctoral research focuses on education outcomes for young learners in Papua New Guinea who are addicted to psychoactive and carcinogenic betel quid.

Prior to moving to Oxford, Kabira was based in Washington DC, USA and worked for the World Bank and Save the Children on impact evaluations, learning assessments and improving the quality of education statistics in twenty-six countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, the Pacific, and the Middle East.

Kabira holds a Masters in Economics and Public Policy from Princeton University where he was a recipient of the Stokes’ Prize for exemplary academic achievement and public service leadership, a Masters in Development Economics from the School of Oriental and African Studies at London University where he graduated with distinction and an undergraduate degree in Economics and Statistics from St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai.

Research interests:

·       Education in conflict regions

·       Combatting school related gender-based violence (SRGBV)

·       School health and nutrition programs

·       Supporting children with addiction

 

Publications

Aliya teaches on the Comparative and International Education MSc programme at the Department of Education after having taught at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge. Her research focuses on how women in the South navigate their agency in highly constrained circumstances. Her specialised areas of interest are the capability approach, negative capability, epistemic paradoxicality and justice, and the promotion of knowledges (plural) and Southern epistemologies. Aliya actively engages in issues around the politics of representation and knowledge production in the academe. Aliya is currently accepting doctoral students with an interest in these areas.

 

Projects

‘Understanding the impact of COVID-19 on learning experiences of secondary school going age children among Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families’

Project summary:
COVID-19 related school disruption and closures have significantly impacted the lives of students. Notably, these disruptions have had a multi-fold impact on children living in ethnic minority families. Although ethnic and racial inequalities are persistent across contexts, this project particularly engages with young adults and other family members belonging to Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families living in England. Children in these families have been uniquely affected by the pandemic (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020), given the higher rates of prevalence of COVID among these communities and also greater and persistent structural inequalities.

Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families have been identified as a focus of this research because firstly, these particular groups have been strongly impacted by COVID (Platt & Warwick, 2020; Trivedy et al., 2020) and secondly, their socio cultural specificities make them more susceptible to disadvantage during COVID related school closures (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020). Our particular focus is on secondary school children whose learning has been majorly disrupted due to national lockdowns and uncertainty regarding national assessments.

Therefore, this project aims to address the unique situation and experiences of these BAME families with secondary school age children to understand how COVID-related challenges are shaping their learning experiences, household dynamics and future aspirations.

This is an exploratory, project which fills an important gap in existing knowledge by taking a strong cultural lens to understanding how learning among Bangladeshi and Pakistani families could be supported, drawing on a deeper understanding of their lived realities and contextualised understanding of the challenges they face. The aim is not simply to reproduce a deficit discourse (which tends to be associated with families from these ethnic minority groups), but to understand family dynamics and the opportunities offered herein.

Funded by:

Cambridge Humanities Research Grants Scheme

Research team:

Professor Nidhi Singal and Dr Aliya Khalid

 

‘Bridging the Local and Global: Women’s Spaces and Collectives’

Project summary:
While globalisation aims to connect the world equitably, global perspectives are often privileged over the local. Often the voices of women from the South (metaphor for marginalised) are least heard. This project acknowledges that any ‘Global’ ideology of (Dis)order needs to include local women’s voices by studying how they have generated order/disorder to create ‘spaces of action’/reflection (defined as collectives). We propose a multi-phase, multi-method study of women’s ‘collective spaces’. We first explore how ‘collectives’ have been understood. We will learn from women themselves by conducting two interview based case studies on (i) access to reproductive healthcare (Northern Ireland/Ireland) and (ii) mothers’ collective experiences of educating their children during a pandemic (ethnic minority families in England). In bringing together law and education, archives and interviews, reproductive healthcare and education, this project offers a novel way of understanding – and recording – collective responses to local/global challenges.

Funded by:

Virtual Sandpits, The British Academy

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid, Dr Jane Rooney and Dr Ruth Houghton, Dr Kate spencer-Bennet, Alana Farrel Kate Spencer-Bennett

 

‘Gendered Inequalities in Education and Capability Spaces for Women/Girls (and others) in Pakistan During Covid’

Project summary: This project explores the cumulative intersectional experiences of women/girls (and others) that are shaped by multidimensional inequalities existing in their physical (urban/rural) and social (market, society, community and family) settings. In particular, how gender interacts with the different vectors of disadvantage (for example, economic, technological, social, cultural and political) within the perimeters of their location (urban/rural) and setting (labour market, society and family) is to be explored. We refer to what we call ‘spaces of action/reflection’ that provide unique gendered experiences of seeking education. This project will thus conceptualise ‘spaces’ as those gendered experiences marked by economic, technological, social, cultural and political disadvantages that girls (and others) face in their locations (physical and social) as they seek education in the times of the pandemic. Hence, ‘space’ not only refers to the physical (urban/rural), but also, the social (community, family), cultural (society) and personal (psychological) aspects within which girls/women (and others) live and seek education.

This research aims to identify how these ‘spaces’ generate opportunities and constraints for girls/women (and others) in Pakistan. This exploration is essential today when Covid-19 has created ruptures in the supportive structures of educational provision. In this regard, it is essential to understand the limits and opportunities for girls/women’s (and that of others) education in Pakistan within these ‘spaces’ that have come about as a result of Covid-19 related educational and social restructuring of opportunities. In sum, the aim of the project is to contribute to international education by creating a deeper understanding of the gendered vulnerabilities that intersect with disadvantages and placement (physical and social) vectors to produce gendered experiences for the most marginalised in the context of Pakistan.

Funded by:

British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) Seedcorn Fund

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid and Dr Soufia Siddiqui

 

Publications

Khalid, A. (forthcoming). ‘Hearing their silences: Mothers agency as they support their daughters’ education in rural Punjab Pakistan’, Gender and Education.

Khalid, A., & Rose, P. (forthcoming). Mothers’ Capability to Influence their Daughters’ Education in Pakistan: Interconnections between mothers’ value of education, negative capability and agency. Journal of Human Development and Capabilities.

Khalid, A. (in preparation) ‘Comparisons of hope, education, and aspirations between Pakistani mothers and revolutionaries: The being and becoming of agents in the contexts of change’. Comparative Education

Khalid, A. & Singal, N. (in preparation) ”It’s made us stronger as a family’: Ethnic minority parenting experiences of educating children in England during Covid’. Journal of Family Studies

Singal, N. & Khalid, A. (in preparation) ”Time moves fast but it also goes slow’: Secondary school children’s experiences of ‘preparing’ for exams during lockdown in England. Children and Society

Khalid, A., Parpart, J. & Holmes, G. (Eds.) (in preparation) ‘ From the silence/voice binary to liminal spaces: Understanding gender, agency and power in a changing world’. Routledge

Khalid, A. & Siddiqi, S. (in preparation). Human Development Report 2022: Gendered inequalities in education and capability spaces for women/girls (and others) in Pakistan during Covid’. South Asia: Human Development Report UNDP

Alice Aldinucci is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford, Department of Education. She is part of the team working on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani, and she is a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group.

She holds a PhD in Education from the University of Glasgow (UK) where she was awarded the LKAS Interdisciplinary Scholarship. Her thesis applies a longitudinal qualitative research design and draws on the combination of Critical Realism and Capability Approach to explore aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to adulthood in Chile. Prior to her PhD, she completed a MA in International Education and Development from the University of Sussex (UK) where she was awarded the Centre for International Education Prize for the best overall MA performance. For her MA at Sussex, she conducted an empirical dissertation on the meaning making of Inclusive Education in Nepal. She holds a MA in Languages and Cultures for International Communication and Cooperation from the University of Milan (Italy) with a fieldwork research on tensions between policy and practice in bilingual multicultural education for indigenous students in Higher Education in Peru; and a BA in Languages and Intercultural Mediation from the University of Arezzo (Italy).

Alice’s research interests are interdisciplinary and relate to the critical linkages between intersecting inequalities, education, individual/societal development, and social justice at local and global levels, motivated by the question what education for what/whose development?

Areas, theoretical approaches and methodologies of interests:
• Sociology of education including aspirations in post-school transitions
• Cultural political economy of education and life chances/human flourishing/social justice
• Tensions between global educational frameworks and local knowledge and practices
• Critical Realism
• Capability Approach
• Qualitative and participatory methodologies
• Digital storytelling for social change

Besides her work in academia, Alice has gained experience as researcher, development practitioner and educator working in projects including early childhood education programmes, refugees’ education, girls’ education, SEN and inclusive education, TVET, global citizenship education, arts-based pedagogies. She lived and worked in different countries including in Nepal (a country she has developed a strong bond with), Tanzania, El Salvador, Italy and the UK. These experiences have reinforced her critical approach to international education and global development and to education as a catalyst for both inequalities, injustices, violence and more equitable social change and peace-building processes.

She served as Student Representative of the British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) from 2017 to 2019 and she is currently part of the college of reviewers of the editorial board of Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education.

Publications:

Aldinucci, A. (2022). Understanding aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to postschool trajectories in Chile. PhD thesis, University of Glasgow.
Aldinucci, A., Valiente, O., Hurrell S., and Zancajo, A. (2021). Understanding aspirations: Why do secondary TVET students aim so high in Chile? Journal of Vocational Education & Training.

Rawle, G., Riddle, N., Pettersson, G., Wallin, J., Bici, M., Jasper, P., Harb, J., Hebbar, M., Davis, J., Aldinucci, A., (2017), EQUIP-Tanzania Impact Evaluation. Midline Technical Report, Volume I and II. Oxford Policy Management.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Kabira is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. His research is funded by the Clarendon Fund.

Kabira is interested in improving learning outcomes for children in fragile and conflict – affected regions of the world, school health and nutrition programs, combatting gender-based violence and supporting children who are dealing with addiction.

His doctoral research focuses on education outcomes for young learners in Papua New Guinea who are addicted to psychoactive and carcinogenic betel quid.

Prior to moving to Oxford, Kabira was based in Washington DC, USA and worked for the World Bank and Save the Children on impact evaluations, learning assessments and improving the quality of education statistics in twenty-six countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, the Pacific, and the Middle East.

Kabira holds a Masters in Economics and Public Policy from Princeton University where he was a recipient of the Stokes’ Prize for exemplary academic achievement and public service leadership, a Masters in Development Economics from the School of Oriental and African Studies at London University where he graduated with distinction and an undergraduate degree in Economics and Statistics from St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai.

Research interests:

·       Education in conflict regions

·       Combatting school related gender-based violence (SRGBV)

·       School health and nutrition programs

·       Supporting children with addiction

 

Publications

Aliya teaches on the Comparative and International Education MSc programme at the Department of Education after having taught at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge. Her research focuses on how women in the South navigate their agency in highly constrained circumstances. Her specialised areas of interest are the capability approach, negative capability, epistemic paradoxicality and justice, and the promotion of knowledges (plural) and Southern epistemologies. Aliya actively engages in issues around the politics of representation and knowledge production in the academe. Aliya is currently accepting doctoral students with an interest in these areas.

 

Projects

‘Understanding the impact of COVID-19 on learning experiences of secondary school going age children among Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families’

Project summary:
COVID-19 related school disruption and closures have significantly impacted the lives of students. Notably, these disruptions have had a multi-fold impact on children living in ethnic minority families. Although ethnic and racial inequalities are persistent across contexts, this project particularly engages with young adults and other family members belonging to Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families living in England. Children in these families have been uniquely affected by the pandemic (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020), given the higher rates of prevalence of COVID among these communities and also greater and persistent structural inequalities.

Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families have been identified as a focus of this research because firstly, these particular groups have been strongly impacted by COVID (Platt & Warwick, 2020; Trivedy et al., 2020) and secondly, their socio cultural specificities make them more susceptible to disadvantage during COVID related school closures (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020). Our particular focus is on secondary school children whose learning has been majorly disrupted due to national lockdowns and uncertainty regarding national assessments.

Therefore, this project aims to address the unique situation and experiences of these BAME families with secondary school age children to understand how COVID-related challenges are shaping their learning experiences, household dynamics and future aspirations.

This is an exploratory, project which fills an important gap in existing knowledge by taking a strong cultural lens to understanding how learning among Bangladeshi and Pakistani families could be supported, drawing on a deeper understanding of their lived realities and contextualised understanding of the challenges they face. The aim is not simply to reproduce a deficit discourse (which tends to be associated with families from these ethnic minority groups), but to understand family dynamics and the opportunities offered herein.

Funded by:

Cambridge Humanities Research Grants Scheme

Research team:

Professor Nidhi Singal and Dr Aliya Khalid

 

‘Bridging the Local and Global: Women’s Spaces and Collectives’

Project summary:
While globalisation aims to connect the world equitably, global perspectives are often privileged over the local. Often the voices of women from the South (metaphor for marginalised) are least heard. This project acknowledges that any ‘Global’ ideology of (Dis)order needs to include local women’s voices by studying how they have generated order/disorder to create ‘spaces of action’/reflection (defined as collectives). We propose a multi-phase, multi-method study of women’s ‘collective spaces’. We first explore how ‘collectives’ have been understood. We will learn from women themselves by conducting two interview based case studies on (i) access to reproductive healthcare (Northern Ireland/Ireland) and (ii) mothers’ collective experiences of educating their children during a pandemic (ethnic minority families in England). In bringing together law and education, archives and interviews, reproductive healthcare and education, this project offers a novel way of understanding – and recording – collective responses to local/global challenges.

Funded by:

Virtual Sandpits, The British Academy

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid, Dr Jane Rooney and Dr Ruth Houghton, Dr Kate spencer-Bennet, Alana Farrel Kate Spencer-Bennett

 

‘Gendered Inequalities in Education and Capability Spaces for Women/Girls (and others) in Pakistan During Covid’

Project summary: This project explores the cumulative intersectional experiences of women/girls (and others) that are shaped by multidimensional inequalities existing in their physical (urban/rural) and social (market, society, community and family) settings. In particular, how gender interacts with the different vectors of disadvantage (for example, economic, technological, social, cultural and political) within the perimeters of their location (urban/rural) and setting (labour market, society and family) is to be explored. We refer to what we call ‘spaces of action/reflection’ that provide unique gendered experiences of seeking education. This project will thus conceptualise ‘spaces’ as those gendered experiences marked by economic, technological, social, cultural and political disadvantages that girls (and others) face in their locations (physical and social) as they seek education in the times of the pandemic. Hence, ‘space’ not only refers to the physical (urban/rural), but also, the social (community, family), cultural (society) and personal (psychological) aspects within which girls/women (and others) live and seek education.

This research aims to identify how these ‘spaces’ generate opportunities and constraints for girls/women (and others) in Pakistan. This exploration is essential today when Covid-19 has created ruptures in the supportive structures of educational provision. In this regard, it is essential to understand the limits and opportunities for girls/women’s (and that of others) education in Pakistan within these ‘spaces’ that have come about as a result of Covid-19 related educational and social restructuring of opportunities. In sum, the aim of the project is to contribute to international education by creating a deeper understanding of the gendered vulnerabilities that intersect with disadvantages and placement (physical and social) vectors to produce gendered experiences for the most marginalised in the context of Pakistan.

Funded by:

British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) Seedcorn Fund

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid and Dr Soufia Siddiqui

 

Publications

Khalid, A. (forthcoming). ‘Hearing their silences: Mothers agency as they support their daughters’ education in rural Punjab Pakistan’, Gender and Education.

Khalid, A., & Rose, P. (forthcoming). Mothers’ Capability to Influence their Daughters’ Education in Pakistan: Interconnections between mothers’ value of education, negative capability and agency. Journal of Human Development and Capabilities.

Khalid, A. (in preparation) ‘Comparisons of hope, education, and aspirations between Pakistani mothers and revolutionaries: The being and becoming of agents in the contexts of change’. Comparative Education

Khalid, A. & Singal, N. (in preparation) ”It’s made us stronger as a family’: Ethnic minority parenting experiences of educating children in England during Covid’. Journal of Family Studies

Singal, N. & Khalid, A. (in preparation) ”Time moves fast but it also goes slow’: Secondary school children’s experiences of ‘preparing’ for exams during lockdown in England. Children and Society

Khalid, A., Parpart, J. & Holmes, G. (Eds.) (in preparation) ‘ From the silence/voice binary to liminal spaces: Understanding gender, agency and power in a changing world’. Routledge

Khalid, A. & Siddiqi, S. (in preparation). Human Development Report 2022: Gendered inequalities in education and capability spaces for women/girls (and others) in Pakistan during Covid’. South Asia: Human Development Report UNDP

Alice Aldinucci is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford, Department of Education. She is part of the team working on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani, and she is a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group.

She holds a PhD in Education from the University of Glasgow (UK) where she was awarded the LKAS Interdisciplinary Scholarship. Her thesis applies a longitudinal qualitative research design and draws on the combination of Critical Realism and Capability Approach to explore aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to adulthood in Chile. Prior to her PhD, she completed a MA in International Education and Development from the University of Sussex (UK) where she was awarded the Centre for International Education Prize for the best overall MA performance. For her MA at Sussex, she conducted an empirical dissertation on the meaning making of Inclusive Education in Nepal. She holds a MA in Languages and Cultures for International Communication and Cooperation from the University of Milan (Italy) with a fieldwork research on tensions between policy and practice in bilingual multicultural education for indigenous students in Higher Education in Peru; and a BA in Languages and Intercultural Mediation from the University of Arezzo (Italy).

Alice’s research interests are interdisciplinary and relate to the critical linkages between intersecting inequalities, education, individual/societal development, and social justice at local and global levels, motivated by the question what education for what/whose development?

Areas, theoretical approaches and methodologies of interests:
• Sociology of education including aspirations in post-school transitions
• Cultural political economy of education and life chances/human flourishing/social justice
• Tensions between global educational frameworks and local knowledge and practices
• Critical Realism
• Capability Approach
• Qualitative and participatory methodologies
• Digital storytelling for social change

Besides her work in academia, Alice has gained experience as researcher, development practitioner and educator working in projects including early childhood education programmes, refugees’ education, girls’ education, SEN and inclusive education, TVET, global citizenship education, arts-based pedagogies. She lived and worked in different countries including in Nepal (a country she has developed a strong bond with), Tanzania, El Salvador, Italy and the UK. These experiences have reinforced her critical approach to international education and global development and to education as a catalyst for both inequalities, injustices, violence and more equitable social change and peace-building processes.

She served as Student Representative of the British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) from 2017 to 2019 and she is currently part of the college of reviewers of the editorial board of Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education.

Publications:

Aldinucci, A. (2022). Understanding aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to postschool trajectories in Chile. PhD thesis, University of Glasgow.
Aldinucci, A., Valiente, O., Hurrell S., and Zancajo, A. (2021). Understanding aspirations: Why do secondary TVET students aim so high in Chile? Journal of Vocational Education & Training.

Rawle, G., Riddle, N., Pettersson, G., Wallin, J., Bici, M., Jasper, P., Harb, J., Hebbar, M., Davis, J., Aldinucci, A., (2017), EQUIP-Tanzania Impact Evaluation. Midline Technical Report, Volume I and II. Oxford Policy Management.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Kabira is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. His research is funded by the Clarendon Fund.

Kabira is interested in improving learning outcomes for children in fragile and conflict – affected regions of the world, school health and nutrition programs, combatting gender-based violence and supporting children who are dealing with addiction.

His doctoral research focuses on education outcomes for young learners in Papua New Guinea who are addicted to psychoactive and carcinogenic betel quid.

Prior to moving to Oxford, Kabira was based in Washington DC, USA and worked for the World Bank and Save the Children on impact evaluations, learning assessments and improving the quality of education statistics in twenty-six countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, the Pacific, and the Middle East.

Kabira holds a Masters in Economics and Public Policy from Princeton University where he was a recipient of the Stokes’ Prize for exemplary academic achievement and public service leadership, a Masters in Development Economics from the School of Oriental and African Studies at London University where he graduated with distinction and an undergraduate degree in Economics and Statistics from St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai.

Research interests:

·       Education in conflict regions

·       Combatting school related gender-based violence (SRGBV)

·       School health and nutrition programs

·       Supporting children with addiction

 

Publications

Aliya teaches on the Comparative and International Education MSc programme at the Department of Education after having taught at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge. Her research focuses on how women in the South navigate their agency in highly constrained circumstances. Her specialised areas of interest are the capability approach, negative capability, epistemic paradoxicality and justice, and the promotion of knowledges (plural) and Southern epistemologies. Aliya actively engages in issues around the politics of representation and knowledge production in the academe. Aliya is currently accepting doctoral students with an interest in these areas.

 

Projects

‘Understanding the impact of COVID-19 on learning experiences of secondary school going age children among Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families’

Project summary:
COVID-19 related school disruption and closures have significantly impacted the lives of students. Notably, these disruptions have had a multi-fold impact on children living in ethnic minority families. Although ethnic and racial inequalities are persistent across contexts, this project particularly engages with young adults and other family members belonging to Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families living in England. Children in these families have been uniquely affected by the pandemic (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020), given the higher rates of prevalence of COVID among these communities and also greater and persistent structural inequalities.

Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families have been identified as a focus of this research because firstly, these particular groups have been strongly impacted by COVID (Platt & Warwick, 2020; Trivedy et al., 2020) and secondly, their socio cultural specificities make them more susceptible to disadvantage during COVID related school closures (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020). Our particular focus is on secondary school children whose learning has been majorly disrupted due to national lockdowns and uncertainty regarding national assessments.

Therefore, this project aims to address the unique situation and experiences of these BAME families with secondary school age children to understand how COVID-related challenges are shaping their learning experiences, household dynamics and future aspirations.

This is an exploratory, project which fills an important gap in existing knowledge by taking a strong cultural lens to understanding how learning among Bangladeshi and Pakistani families could be supported, drawing on a deeper understanding of their lived realities and contextualised understanding of the challenges they face. The aim is not simply to reproduce a deficit discourse (which tends to be associated with families from these ethnic minority groups), but to understand family dynamics and the opportunities offered herein.

Funded by:

Cambridge Humanities Research Grants Scheme

Research team:

Professor Nidhi Singal and Dr Aliya Khalid

 

‘Bridging the Local and Global: Women’s Spaces and Collectives’

Project summary:
While globalisation aims to connect the world equitably, global perspectives are often privileged over the local. Often the voices of women from the South (metaphor for marginalised) are least heard. This project acknowledges that any ‘Global’ ideology of (Dis)order needs to include local women’s voices by studying how they have generated order/disorder to create ‘spaces of action’/reflection (defined as collectives). We propose a multi-phase, multi-method study of women’s ‘collective spaces’. We first explore how ‘collectives’ have been understood. We will learn from women themselves by conducting two interview based case studies on (i) access to reproductive healthcare (Northern Ireland/Ireland) and (ii) mothers’ collective experiences of educating their children during a pandemic (ethnic minority families in England). In bringing together law and education, archives and interviews, reproductive healthcare and education, this project offers a novel way of understanding – and recording – collective responses to local/global challenges.

Funded by:

Virtual Sandpits, The British Academy

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid, Dr Jane Rooney and Dr Ruth Houghton, Dr Kate spencer-Bennet, Alana Farrel Kate Spencer-Bennett

 

‘Gendered Inequalities in Education and Capability Spaces for Women/Girls (and others) in Pakistan During Covid’

Project summary: This project explores the cumulative intersectional experiences of women/girls (and others) that are shaped by multidimensional inequalities existing in their physical (urban/rural) and social (market, society, community and family) settings. In particular, how gender interacts with the different vectors of disadvantage (for example, economic, technological, social, cultural and political) within the perimeters of their location (urban/rural) and setting (labour market, society and family) is to be explored. We refer to what we call ‘spaces of action/reflection’ that provide unique gendered experiences of seeking education. This project will thus conceptualise ‘spaces’ as those gendered experiences marked by economic, technological, social, cultural and political disadvantages that girls (and others) face in their locations (physical and social) as they seek education in the times of the pandemic. Hence, ‘space’ not only refers to the physical (urban/rural), but also, the social (community, family), cultural (society) and personal (psychological) aspects within which girls/women (and others) live and seek education.

This research aims to identify how these ‘spaces’ generate opportunities and constraints for girls/women (and others) in Pakistan. This exploration is essential today when Covid-19 has created ruptures in the supportive structures of educational provision. In this regard, it is essential to understand the limits and opportunities for girls/women’s (and that of others) education in Pakistan within these ‘spaces’ that have come about as a result of Covid-19 related educational and social restructuring of opportunities. In sum, the aim of the project is to contribute to international education by creating a deeper understanding of the gendered vulnerabilities that intersect with disadvantages and placement (physical and social) vectors to produce gendered experiences for the most marginalised in the context of Pakistan.

Funded by:

British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) Seedcorn Fund

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid and Dr Soufia Siddiqui

 

Publications

Khalid, A. (forthcoming). ‘Hearing their silences: Mothers agency as they support their daughters’ education in rural Punjab Pakistan’, Gender and Education.

Khalid, A., & Rose, P. (forthcoming). Mothers’ Capability to Influence their Daughters’ Education in Pakistan: Interconnections between mothers’ value of education, negative capability and agency. Journal of Human Development and Capabilities.

Khalid, A. (in preparation) ‘Comparisons of hope, education, and aspirations between Pakistani mothers and revolutionaries: The being and becoming of agents in the contexts of change’. Comparative Education

Khalid, A. & Singal, N. (in preparation) ”It’s made us stronger as a family’: Ethnic minority parenting experiences of educating children in England during Covid’. Journal of Family Studies

Singal, N. & Khalid, A. (in preparation) ”Time moves fast but it also goes slow’: Secondary school children’s experiences of ‘preparing’ for exams during lockdown in England. Children and Society

Khalid, A., Parpart, J. & Holmes, G. (Eds.) (in preparation) ‘ From the silence/voice binary to liminal spaces: Understanding gender, agency and power in a changing world’. Routledge

Khalid, A. & Siddiqi, S. (in preparation). Human Development Report 2022: Gendered inequalities in education and capability spaces for women/girls (and others) in Pakistan during Covid’. South Asia: Human Development Report UNDP

Alice Aldinucci is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford, Department of Education. She is part of the team working on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani, and she is a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group.

She holds a PhD in Education from the University of Glasgow (UK) where she was awarded the LKAS Interdisciplinary Scholarship. Her thesis applies a longitudinal qualitative research design and draws on the combination of Critical Realism and Capability Approach to explore aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to adulthood in Chile. Prior to her PhD, she completed a MA in International Education and Development from the University of Sussex (UK) where she was awarded the Centre for International Education Prize for the best overall MA performance. For her MA at Sussex, she conducted an empirical dissertation on the meaning making of Inclusive Education in Nepal. She holds a MA in Languages and Cultures for International Communication and Cooperation from the University of Milan (Italy) with a fieldwork research on tensions between policy and practice in bilingual multicultural education for indigenous students in Higher Education in Peru; and a BA in Languages and Intercultural Mediation from the University of Arezzo (Italy).

Alice’s research interests are interdisciplinary and relate to the critical linkages between intersecting inequalities, education, individual/societal development, and social justice at local and global levels, motivated by the question what education for what/whose development?

Areas, theoretical approaches and methodologies of interests:
• Sociology of education including aspirations in post-school transitions
• Cultural political economy of education and life chances/human flourishing/social justice
• Tensions between global educational frameworks and local knowledge and practices
• Critical Realism
• Capability Approach
• Qualitative and participatory methodologies
• Digital storytelling for social change

Besides her work in academia, Alice has gained experience as researcher, development practitioner and educator working in projects including early childhood education programmes, refugees’ education, girls’ education, SEN and inclusive education, TVET, global citizenship education, arts-based pedagogies. She lived and worked in different countries including in Nepal (a country she has developed a strong bond with), Tanzania, El Salvador, Italy and the UK. These experiences have reinforced her critical approach to international education and global development and to education as a catalyst for both inequalities, injustices, violence and more equitable social change and peace-building processes.

She served as Student Representative of the British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) from 2017 to 2019 and she is currently part of the college of reviewers of the editorial board of Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education.

Publications:

Aldinucci, A. (2022). Understanding aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to postschool trajectories in Chile. PhD thesis, University of Glasgow.
Aldinucci, A., Valiente, O., Hurrell S., and Zancajo, A. (2021). Understanding aspirations: Why do secondary TVET students aim so high in Chile? Journal of Vocational Education & Training.

Rawle, G., Riddle, N., Pettersson, G., Wallin, J., Bici, M., Jasper, P., Harb, J., Hebbar, M., Davis, J., Aldinucci, A., (2017), EQUIP-Tanzania Impact Evaluation. Midline Technical Report, Volume I and II. Oxford Policy Management.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Kabira is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. His research is funded by the Clarendon Fund.

Kabira is interested in improving learning outcomes for children in fragile and conflict – affected regions of the world, school health and nutrition programs, combatting gender-based violence and supporting children who are dealing with addiction.

His doctoral research focuses on education outcomes for young learners in Papua New Guinea who are addicted to psychoactive and carcinogenic betel quid.

Prior to moving to Oxford, Kabira was based in Washington DC, USA and worked for the World Bank and Save the Children on impact evaluations, learning assessments and improving the quality of education statistics in twenty-six countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, the Pacific, and the Middle East.

Kabira holds a Masters in Economics and Public Policy from Princeton University where he was a recipient of the Stokes’ Prize for exemplary academic achievement and public service leadership, a Masters in Development Economics from the School of Oriental and African Studies at London University where he graduated with distinction and an undergraduate degree in Economics and Statistics from St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai.

Research interests:

·       Education in conflict regions

·       Combatting school related gender-based violence (SRGBV)

·       School health and nutrition programs

·       Supporting children with addiction

 

Publications

Aliya teaches on the Comparative and International Education MSc programme at the Department of Education after having taught at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge. Her research focuses on how women in the South navigate their agency in highly constrained circumstances. Her specialised areas of interest are the capability approach, negative capability, epistemic paradoxicality and justice, and the promotion of knowledges (plural) and Southern epistemologies. Aliya actively engages in issues around the politics of representation and knowledge production in the academe. Aliya is currently accepting doctoral students with an interest in these areas.

 

Projects

‘Understanding the impact of COVID-19 on learning experiences of secondary school going age children among Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families’

Project summary:
COVID-19 related school disruption and closures have significantly impacted the lives of students. Notably, these disruptions have had a multi-fold impact on children living in ethnic minority families. Although ethnic and racial inequalities are persistent across contexts, this project particularly engages with young adults and other family members belonging to Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families living in England. Children in these families have been uniquely affected by the pandemic (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020), given the higher rates of prevalence of COVID among these communities and also greater and persistent structural inequalities.

Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families have been identified as a focus of this research because firstly, these particular groups have been strongly impacted by COVID (Platt & Warwick, 2020; Trivedy et al., 2020) and secondly, their socio cultural specificities make them more susceptible to disadvantage during COVID related school closures (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020). Our particular focus is on secondary school children whose learning has been majorly disrupted due to national lockdowns and uncertainty regarding national assessments.

Therefore, this project aims to address the unique situation and experiences of these BAME families with secondary school age children to understand how COVID-related challenges are shaping their learning experiences, household dynamics and future aspirations.

This is an exploratory, project which fills an important gap in existing knowledge by taking a strong cultural lens to understanding how learning among Bangladeshi and Pakistani families could be supported, drawing on a deeper understanding of their lived realities and contextualised understanding of the challenges they face. The aim is not simply to reproduce a deficit discourse (which tends to be associated with families from these ethnic minority groups), but to understand family dynamics and the opportunities offered herein.

Funded by:

Cambridge Humanities Research Grants Scheme

Research team:

Professor Nidhi Singal and Dr Aliya Khalid

 

‘Bridging the Local and Global: Women’s Spaces and Collectives’

Project summary:
While globalisation aims to connect the world equitably, global perspectives are often privileged over the local. Often the voices of women from the South (metaphor for marginalised) are least heard. This project acknowledges that any ‘Global’ ideology of (Dis)order needs to include local women’s voices by studying how they have generated order/disorder to create ‘spaces of action’/reflection (defined as collectives). We propose a multi-phase, multi-method study of women’s ‘collective spaces’. We first explore how ‘collectives’ have been understood. We will learn from women themselves by conducting two interview based case studies on (i) access to reproductive healthcare (Northern Ireland/Ireland) and (ii) mothers’ collective experiences of educating their children during a pandemic (ethnic minority families in England). In bringing together law and education, archives and interviews, reproductive healthcare and education, this project offers a novel way of understanding – and recording – collective responses to local/global challenges.

Funded by:

Virtual Sandpits, The British Academy

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid, Dr Jane Rooney and Dr Ruth Houghton, Dr Kate spencer-Bennet, Alana Farrel Kate Spencer-Bennett

 

‘Gendered Inequalities in Education and Capability Spaces for Women/Girls (and others) in Pakistan During Covid’

Project summary: This project explores the cumulative intersectional experiences of women/girls (and others) that are shaped by multidimensional inequalities existing in their physical (urban/rural) and social (market, society, community and family) settings. In particular, how gender interacts with the different vectors of disadvantage (for example, economic, technological, social, cultural and political) within the perimeters of their location (urban/rural) and setting (labour market, society and family) is to be explored. We refer to what we call ‘spaces of action/reflection’ that provide unique gendered experiences of seeking education. This project will thus conceptualise ‘spaces’ as those gendered experiences marked by economic, technological, social, cultural and political disadvantages that girls (and others) face in their locations (physical and social) as they seek education in the times of the pandemic. Hence, ‘space’ not only refers to the physical (urban/rural), but also, the social (community, family), cultural (society) and personal (psychological) aspects within which girls/women (and others) live and seek education.

This research aims to identify how these ‘spaces’ generate opportunities and constraints for girls/women (and others) in Pakistan. This exploration is essential today when Covid-19 has created ruptures in the supportive structures of educational provision. In this regard, it is essential to understand the limits and opportunities for girls/women’s (and that of others) education in Pakistan within these ‘spaces’ that have come about as a result of Covid-19 related educational and social restructuring of opportunities. In sum, the aim of the project is to contribute to international education by creating a deeper understanding of the gendered vulnerabilities that intersect with disadvantages and placement (physical and social) vectors to produce gendered experiences for the most marginalised in the context of Pakistan.

Funded by:

British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) Seedcorn Fund

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid and Dr Soufia Siddiqui

 

Publications

Khalid, A. (forthcoming). ‘Hearing their silences: Mothers agency as they support their daughters’ education in rural Punjab Pakistan’, Gender and Education.

Khalid, A., & Rose, P. (forthcoming). Mothers’ Capability to Influence their Daughters’ Education in Pakistan: Interconnections between mothers’ value of education, negative capability and agency. Journal of Human Development and Capabilities.

Khalid, A. (in preparation) ‘Comparisons of hope, education, and aspirations between Pakistani mothers and revolutionaries: The being and becoming of agents in the contexts of change’. Comparative Education

Khalid, A. & Singal, N. (in preparation) ”It’s made us stronger as a family’: Ethnic minority parenting experiences of educating children in England during Covid’. Journal of Family Studies

Singal, N. & Khalid, A. (in preparation) ”Time moves fast but it also goes slow’: Secondary school children’s experiences of ‘preparing’ for exams during lockdown in England. Children and Society

Khalid, A., Parpart, J. & Holmes, G. (Eds.) (in preparation) ‘ From the silence/voice binary to liminal spaces: Understanding gender, agency and power in a changing world’. Routledge

Khalid, A. & Siddiqi, S. (in preparation). Human Development Report 2022: Gendered inequalities in education and capability spaces for women/girls (and others) in Pakistan during Covid’. South Asia: Human Development Report UNDP

Alice Aldinucci is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford, Department of Education. She is part of the team working on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani, and she is a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group.

She holds a PhD in Education from the University of Glasgow (UK) where she was awarded the LKAS Interdisciplinary Scholarship. Her thesis applies a longitudinal qualitative research design and draws on the combination of Critical Realism and Capability Approach to explore aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to adulthood in Chile. Prior to her PhD, she completed a MA in International Education and Development from the University of Sussex (UK) where she was awarded the Centre for International Education Prize for the best overall MA performance. For her MA at Sussex, she conducted an empirical dissertation on the meaning making of Inclusive Education in Nepal. She holds a MA in Languages and Cultures for International Communication and Cooperation from the University of Milan (Italy) with a fieldwork research on tensions between policy and practice in bilingual multicultural education for indigenous students in Higher Education in Peru; and a BA in Languages and Intercultural Mediation from the University of Arezzo (Italy).

Alice’s research interests are interdisciplinary and relate to the critical linkages between intersecting inequalities, education, individual/societal development, and social justice at local and global levels, motivated by the question what education for what/whose development?

Areas, theoretical approaches and methodologies of interests:
• Sociology of education including aspirations in post-school transitions
• Cultural political economy of education and life chances/human flourishing/social justice
• Tensions between global educational frameworks and local knowledge and practices
• Critical Realism
• Capability Approach
• Qualitative and participatory methodologies
• Digital storytelling for social change

Besides her work in academia, Alice has gained experience as researcher, development practitioner and educator working in projects including early childhood education programmes, refugees’ education, girls’ education, SEN and inclusive education, TVET, global citizenship education, arts-based pedagogies. She lived and worked in different countries including in Nepal (a country she has developed a strong bond with), Tanzania, El Salvador, Italy and the UK. These experiences have reinforced her critical approach to international education and global development and to education as a catalyst for both inequalities, injustices, violence and more equitable social change and peace-building processes.

She served as Student Representative of the British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) from 2017 to 2019 and she is currently part of the college of reviewers of the editorial board of Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education.

Publications:

Aldinucci, A. (2022). Understanding aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to postschool trajectories in Chile. PhD thesis, University of Glasgow.
Aldinucci, A., Valiente, O., Hurrell S., and Zancajo, A. (2021). Understanding aspirations: Why do secondary TVET students aim so high in Chile? Journal of Vocational Education & Training.

Rawle, G., Riddle, N., Pettersson, G., Wallin, J., Bici, M., Jasper, P., Harb, J., Hebbar, M., Davis, J., Aldinucci, A., (2017), EQUIP-Tanzania Impact Evaluation. Midline Technical Report, Volume I and II. Oxford Policy Management.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Kabira is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. His research is funded by the Clarendon Fund.

Kabira is interested in improving learning outcomes for children in fragile and conflict – affected regions of the world, school health and nutrition programs, combatting gender-based violence and supporting children who are dealing with addiction.

His doctoral research focuses on education outcomes for young learners in Papua New Guinea who are addicted to psychoactive and carcinogenic betel quid.

Prior to moving to Oxford, Kabira was based in Washington DC, USA and worked for the World Bank and Save the Children on impact evaluations, learning assessments and improving the quality of education statistics in twenty-six countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, the Pacific, and the Middle East.

Kabira holds a Masters in Economics and Public Policy from Princeton University where he was a recipient of the Stokes’ Prize for exemplary academic achievement and public service leadership, a Masters in Development Economics from the School of Oriental and African Studies at London University where he graduated with distinction and an undergraduate degree in Economics and Statistics from St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai.

Research interests:

·       Education in conflict regions

·       Combatting school related gender-based violence (SRGBV)

·       School health and nutrition programs

·       Supporting children with addiction

 

Publications

Aliya teaches on the Comparative and International Education MSc programme at the Department of Education after having taught at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge. Her research focuses on how women in the South navigate their agency in highly constrained circumstances. Her specialised areas of interest are the capability approach, negative capability, epistemic paradoxicality and justice, and the promotion of knowledges (plural) and Southern epistemologies. Aliya actively engages in issues around the politics of representation and knowledge production in the academe. Aliya is currently accepting doctoral students with an interest in these areas.

 

Projects

‘Understanding the impact of COVID-19 on learning experiences of secondary school going age children among Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families’

Project summary:
COVID-19 related school disruption and closures have significantly impacted the lives of students. Notably, these disruptions have had a multi-fold impact on children living in ethnic minority families. Although ethnic and racial inequalities are persistent across contexts, this project particularly engages with young adults and other family members belonging to Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families living in England. Children in these families have been uniquely affected by the pandemic (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020), given the higher rates of prevalence of COVID among these communities and also greater and persistent structural inequalities.

Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families have been identified as a focus of this research because firstly, these particular groups have been strongly impacted by COVID (Platt & Warwick, 2020; Trivedy et al., 2020) and secondly, their socio cultural specificities make them more susceptible to disadvantage during COVID related school closures (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020). Our particular focus is on secondary school children whose learning has been majorly disrupted due to national lockdowns and uncertainty regarding national assessments.

Therefore, this project aims to address the unique situation and experiences of these BAME families with secondary school age children to understand how COVID-related challenges are shaping their learning experiences, household dynamics and future aspirations.

This is an exploratory, project which fills an important gap in existing knowledge by taking a strong cultural lens to understanding how learning among Bangladeshi and Pakistani families could be supported, drawing on a deeper understanding of their lived realities and contextualised understanding of the challenges they face. The aim is not simply to reproduce a deficit discourse (which tends to be associated with families from these ethnic minority groups), but to understand family dynamics and the opportunities offered herein.

Funded by:

Cambridge Humanities Research Grants Scheme

Research team:

Professor Nidhi Singal and Dr Aliya Khalid

 

‘Bridging the Local and Global: Women’s Spaces and Collectives’

Project summary:
While globalisation aims to connect the world equitably, global perspectives are often privileged over the local. Often the voices of women from the South (metaphor for marginalised) are least heard. This project acknowledges that any ‘Global’ ideology of (Dis)order needs to include local women’s voices by studying how they have generated order/disorder to create ‘spaces of action’/reflection (defined as collectives). We propose a multi-phase, multi-method study of women’s ‘collective spaces’. We first explore how ‘collectives’ have been understood. We will learn from women themselves by conducting two interview based case studies on (i) access to reproductive healthcare (Northern Ireland/Ireland) and (ii) mothers’ collective experiences of educating their children during a pandemic (ethnic minority families in England). In bringing together law and education, archives and interviews, reproductive healthcare and education, this project offers a novel way of understanding – and recording – collective responses to local/global challenges.

Funded by:

Virtual Sandpits, The British Academy

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid, Dr Jane Rooney and Dr Ruth Houghton, Dr Kate spencer-Bennet, Alana Farrel Kate Spencer-Bennett

 

‘Gendered Inequalities in Education and Capability Spaces for Women/Girls (and others) in Pakistan During Covid’

Project summary: This project explores the cumulative intersectional experiences of women/girls (and others) that are shaped by multidimensional inequalities existing in their physical (urban/rural) and social (market, society, community and family) settings. In particular, how gender interacts with the different vectors of disadvantage (for example, economic, technological, social, cultural and political) within the perimeters of their location (urban/rural) and setting (labour market, society and family) is to be explored. We refer to what we call ‘spaces of action/reflection’ that provide unique gendered experiences of seeking education. This project will thus conceptualise ‘spaces’ as those gendered experiences marked by economic, technological, social, cultural and political disadvantages that girls (and others) face in their locations (physical and social) as they seek education in the times of the pandemic. Hence, ‘space’ not only refers to the physical (urban/rural), but also, the social (community, family), cultural (society) and personal (psychological) aspects within which girls/women (and others) live and seek education.

This research aims to identify how these ‘spaces’ generate opportunities and constraints for girls/women (and others) in Pakistan. This exploration is essential today when Covid-19 has created ruptures in the supportive structures of educational provision. In this regard, it is essential to understand the limits and opportunities for girls/women’s (and that of others) education in Pakistan within these ‘spaces’ that have come about as a result of Covid-19 related educational and social restructuring of opportunities. In sum, the aim of the project is to contribute to international education by creating a deeper understanding of the gendered vulnerabilities that intersect with disadvantages and placement (physical and social) vectors to produce gendered experiences for the most marginalised in the context of Pakistan.

Funded by:

British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) Seedcorn Fund

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid and Dr Soufia Siddiqui

 

Publications

Khalid, A. (forthcoming). ‘Hearing their silences: Mothers agency as they support their daughters’ education in rural Punjab Pakistan’, Gender and Education.

Khalid, A., & Rose, P. (forthcoming). Mothers’ Capability to Influence their Daughters’ Education in Pakistan: Interconnections between mothers’ value of education, negative capability and agency. Journal of Human Development and Capabilities.

Khalid, A. (in preparation) ‘Comparisons of hope, education, and aspirations between Pakistani mothers and revolutionaries: The being and becoming of agents in the contexts of change’. Comparative Education

Khalid, A. & Singal, N. (in preparation) ”It’s made us stronger as a family’: Ethnic minority parenting experiences of educating children in England during Covid’. Journal of Family Studies

Singal, N. & Khalid, A. (in preparation) ”Time moves fast but it also goes slow’: Secondary school children’s experiences of ‘preparing’ for exams during lockdown in England. Children and Society

Khalid, A., Parpart, J. & Holmes, G. (Eds.) (in preparation) ‘ From the silence/voice binary to liminal spaces: Understanding gender, agency and power in a changing world’. Routledge

Khalid, A. & Siddiqi, S. (in preparation). Human Development Report 2022: Gendered inequalities in education and capability spaces for women/girls (and others) in Pakistan during Covid’. South Asia: Human Development Report UNDP

Alice Aldinucci is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford, Department of Education. She is part of the team working on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani, and she is a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group.

She holds a PhD in Education from the University of Glasgow (UK) where she was awarded the LKAS Interdisciplinary Scholarship. Her thesis applies a longitudinal qualitative research design and draws on the combination of Critical Realism and Capability Approach to explore aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to adulthood in Chile. Prior to her PhD, she completed a MA in International Education and Development from the University of Sussex (UK) where she was awarded the Centre for International Education Prize for the best overall MA performance. For her MA at Sussex, she conducted an empirical dissertation on the meaning making of Inclusive Education in Nepal. She holds a MA in Languages and Cultures for International Communication and Cooperation from the University of Milan (Italy) with a fieldwork research on tensions between policy and practice in bilingual multicultural education for indigenous students in Higher Education in Peru; and a BA in Languages and Intercultural Mediation from the University of Arezzo (Italy).

Alice’s research interests are interdisciplinary and relate to the critical linkages between intersecting inequalities, education, individual/societal development, and social justice at local and global levels, motivated by the question what education for what/whose development?

Areas, theoretical approaches and methodologies of interests:
• Sociology of education including aspirations in post-school transitions
• Cultural political economy of education and life chances/human flourishing/social justice
• Tensions between global educational frameworks and local knowledge and practices
• Critical Realism
• Capability Approach
• Qualitative and participatory methodologies
• Digital storytelling for social change

Besides her work in academia, Alice has gained experience as researcher, development practitioner and educator working in projects including early childhood education programmes, refugees’ education, girls’ education, SEN and inclusive education, TVET, global citizenship education, arts-based pedagogies. She lived and worked in different countries including in Nepal (a country she has developed a strong bond with), Tanzania, El Salvador, Italy and the UK. These experiences have reinforced her critical approach to international education and global development and to education as a catalyst for both inequalities, injustices, violence and more equitable social change and peace-building processes.

She served as Student Representative of the British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) from 2017 to 2019 and she is currently part of the college of reviewers of the editorial board of Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education.

Publications:

Aldinucci, A. (2022). Understanding aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to postschool trajectories in Chile. PhD thesis, University of Glasgow.
Aldinucci, A., Valiente, O., Hurrell S., and Zancajo, A. (2021). Understanding aspirations: Why do secondary TVET students aim so high in Chile? Journal of Vocational Education & Training.

Rawle, G., Riddle, N., Pettersson, G., Wallin, J., Bici, M., Jasper, P., Harb, J., Hebbar, M., Davis, J., Aldinucci, A., (2017), EQUIP-Tanzania Impact Evaluation. Midline Technical Report, Volume I and II. Oxford Policy Management.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education