Department of Education

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Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education

Joint seminars organised by the Department of Education and St Edmund Hall, University of Oxford.

Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education address themes of major interest to academics, practitioners, and policy-makers working in the field of education globally. These seminars aim to illuminate the role of education in societal development, with a focus on understanding changes in education policy, discourse, and practice, and how these changes influence individual opportunities and shape the development of educational institutions around the world. Seminars will zoom into the local and zoom out into the national and supranational spaces, flows, and influences on education.

The series will be chaired by Maia Chankseliani, Associate Professor of Comparative and International Education.

 

The seminar programme:

*Please note that all seminars have a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

 

Wed 5 May at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Breaking gender, sex and sexuality borders: The case of comprehensive sexuality education in South Africa’

– Thabo Msibi, Dean and Head of School, School of Education, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

 

Wed 19 May at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Global Middle-Class families – comparative study of travel trajectories and imagined futures’

– Miri Yemini, Senior Lecturer, Tel Aviv University, Israel

 

Wed 2 June at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Equal’ Transnational Partnerships in Higher Education: Sino-Foreign Case Studies’

– Miguel Antonio Lim, Senior Lecturer in Education, University of Manchester, UK

 

Wed 16 June at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Why did policymakers in India and Mexico adopt the Germanic model of dual apprenticeships?’

– Oscar Valiente, Senior Lecturer University of Glasgow, UK

 

Wed 7th July at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Governing education by partnership: the GPE in the context of other sectors’ global financing partnerships.’

– Moira V. Faul, Executive Director, NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva

 

Wed 28th July at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

A comparison of the transition of returning scholars to domestic research environments in Kazakhstan, Malaysia and Cambodia.’

– Aliya Kuzhabekova, Associate Professor, Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Aliya Kuzhabekova is Associate Professor at Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan.

In this talk, Aliya Kuzhabekova will report on the results of a collaborative project exploring how individuals, who received Ph.D. degrees abroad transition to research environment in their home countries.

In particular, the aim of the comparative study was to develop a better understanding about how returnees, who obtained degrees in countries with high levels of research capacity re-integrated in the research environment of countries with lower levels of research capacities.

In addition, the project team tried to reveal the extent to which the returnees served as change agents transforming the research environment in their countries. The study allowed to obtain comparative insights about cross-country and program-related variations in the returnees’ adjustment experiences.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Moira V. Faul is Executive Director of NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva. 

The Global Partnership for Education (GPE) is one of a recent proliferation of pooled financing mechanisms in sustainable development. Despite a policy narrative of inclusive and egalitarian partnering, differences between public, private and voluntary sectors are assumed to affect relations between partners, and the effectiveness of partnerships.

We theorise global financing partnerships as a social ‘space between fields’ that is generated and structured by relationships between the actors mobilised into partnership boards from different fields. We move beyond the conventional focus on sectoral factions to investigate the potential of other aspects of diversity to affect partnership outcomes.

We empirically investigate the structuring of the space of global financing partnerships, comparing the GPE with climate change and health, by analysing a new dataset of 188 board members of ten global financing partnerships. First, network analyses reveal that donors (whether states, international organisations or private sector) are systematically privileged in this partnership space.

Secondly, faultline analytical tools reveal that despite a narrative of additional financing from the private sector, donors are significantly associated with the public sector. Furthermore, donors (public and private sector) are significantly associated with an economic logic of action and non-donors with an issue-specific framing.

Examining the multiple diversities that come into play in partnership board composition and structuring enables an improved theorisation of partnership effectiveness; it also holds important implications for board decisions and the sustainability and educational impacts that these partnerships are purported to deliver.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Oscar Valiente is Senior Lecturer in Educational Leadership & Policy at the University of Glasgow, Scotland. 

While most comparative education studies have focused on the historical processes that gave birth to the dual model in Germanic countries, our research aims to elucidate the drivers that explain why policymakers embrace the dual apprenticeship idea and how they re-contextualize it in their own educational context.

Drawing on a constructivist political economy framework, our study specifically investigates the reasons of policymakers in India and Mexico to adopt the dual model and how their different institutional conditions explain variations in the way the two countries have re-contextualized this global policy idea.

The selected cases are particularly interesting for the comparison because of the broad ambitions of their national reforms and the significant differences in the type of dual model of apprenticeships finally retained in the two countries.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Miguel Antonio Lim is Senior Lecturer in Education at the University of Manchester, UK, with special focus on Education and International Development at the University’s School of Environment, Education, and Development (SEED).

At this seminar, the evolving role of transnational higher education (TNHE) as part of wider national development policy will be discussed.

Using the case of Sino-foreign educational partnerships, Dr Lim will outline several features of the evolution of policies to govern and achieve more ‘equal’ partnerships.

In China, TNHE partnerships are seen as an important part of its drive to build ‘World Class Universities’. Its case shows an increasing orientation towards quality over quantity of partnerships and a growing role for urban and regional geopolitics in the choice of its HE partnerships.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Thabo Msibi is Associate Professor in Curriculum Studies in the School of Education at the University of KwaZulu-Natal, where he is also the Dean and Head of the School of Education.   

Professor Msibi’s scholarship is on the interface of gender and sexuality issues, particularly as they relate to education.  He also is interested in theory building as it relates to African sexualities.  He has published research in South African and international journals on these subjects, and has co-edited six journal special issues.

Thabo has also published numerous book chapters looking at the educational experiences of individuals who claim same-sex identities.  His recent monograph entitled Hidden Sexualities of South African Teachers: Black Male Educators and Same-sex Desire is published by Routledge.

This seminar reflects on the public uproar that has come with the expansion of the comprehensive sexuality education programme by the Department of Basic Education in South Africa.

Touted globally by the UNESCO and other international organisations as a critical vehicle for the promotion of positive sexual behaviour amongst young people, comprehensive sexuality education has recently received significant international fanfare.  This focus follows the release of the revised International technical guidance on sexuality education by UNESCO in 2018.  Some African countries, including South Africa, have used the revisions to update their curriculum offerings on sexuality education.

Section nine of the South African Constitution, known as the Equality Clause, explicitly provides protections against unfair discrimination on the basis of race, gender, sex, pregnancy, marital status, ethnic or social origin, colour, sexual orientation, age, disability, religion, conscience, belief, culture, language and birth.

It was through this constitutional guarantee that the country sought to revise its comprehensive curriculum offering, leading to significant backlash from the traditional, religious and conservative organisations. Front-page media articles screamed that the Minister of Education was trying to teach young children about how to have sex, and that she was effectively sexualising young children. The Ministry was also accused of imposing a Western ideals on African people.

The seminar will analyse the transnational and local reasons for the conservative backlash in South Africa. It will argue that the response largely follows a coordinated international movement that has sought to undermine sexuality education and reverse the gains already made by sexual rights organisations.  It will showcase how local sexual politics reflect a transnational mobility of ideas that are reconfigured at a local level in order to attain legitimacy.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Miri Yemini is a tenured Senior Lecturer in the School of Education at Tel Aviv University.

At Tel Aviv Dr. Yemini teaches graduate and undergraduate modules in education, including Internationalisation in Education, Education and Globalisation, Entrepreneurship in Education and Project Management in Schools.

Dr. Yemini serves as a co-Chair of UNESCO chair for Technology and Internationalisation in Education. Recently (April 2018) she was awarded (with Prof. Dr. Nina Kolleck) by the Max Plank Foundation the Award for Research Cooperation and High Excellence in Science (ARCHES), to develop research in the field of school-NGO interactions. This year (2021) Dr. Yemini secured funding from Israeli Science Foundation (150,000 Euro) for her project on education trajectories of Global Middle Class families.

Increasing numbers of highly educated and skilled professionals are internationally mobile for work. Some are transferred by employers; some proactively seek out new positions in different countries.

The currently estimated size of this group (known as globally mobile professionals, ‘global expatriates’ or members of a global middle class) is 66.2 million, which is predicted to rise to 87.5 million by 2022.

The increasing number, but also growing cultural diversity of this group (originating from all parts of the world), and the extent to which/frequency they relocate is an important articulation of newer forms of transnationalism that encompass the movement of people and ideas, and changing economic and social relations.

This seminar aims to map out and theorise the everyday practices of these globally middle professional families and to consider how their presence in key cities around the world might be re-shaping political, social, economic and education structures.

In particular, we will discuss how these families experience mobility and what motivates these relocations; how families create a sense of identity while ‘on the move’; what short-term and longer term aspirations the professionals, their partners and their children have; what education and extra-curricular choices are made; how different cultural contexts are negotiated etc.

Critically, we will discuss how these middle class families work to reproduce and extend their privilege, and so engage in ‘class-making’ practices.  Ultimately, this work offers a much-needed empirical basis to examine the theoretical proposition that there is now a ‘global’ middle class that is somehow different to nationally-located middle class groups.

The Department of Education and St Edmunds Hall are delighted to announce a new Public Seminar series which will take place online in Trinity Term on Wednesdays from 3pm-4pm (UK time) between 5th May and 28th July.

 

The Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education will address themes of major interest to academics, practitioners, and policy-makers working in the field of education globally. These seminars aim to illuminate the role of education in societal development, with a focus on understanding changes in education policy, discourse, and practice, and how these changes influence individual opportunities and shape the development of educational institutions around the world. Seminars will zoom into the local and zoom out into the national and supranational spaces, flows, and influences on education.

The series will be chaired by Maia Chankseliani, Associate Professor of Comparative and International Education, and will feature the following speakers:

Thabo Msibi, Dean and Head of School, School of Education, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

Miri Yemini, Senior Lecturer, Tel Aviv University, Israel

Miguel Antonio Lim, Senior Lecturer in Education, University of Manchester, United Kingdom

Oscar Valiente, Senior Lecturer University of Glasgow, United Kingdom

Moira Faul, Executive Director, NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva, Switzerland

Aliya Kuzhabekova, Associate Professor, Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan

 

To view the full programme of seminars, please click here.

Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education

Joint seminars organised by the Department of Education and St Edmund Hall, University of Oxford.

Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education address themes of major interest to academics, practitioners, and policy-makers working in the field of education globally. These seminars aim to illuminate the role of education in societal development, with a focus on understanding changes in education policy, discourse, and practice, and how these changes influence individual opportunities and shape the development of educational institutions around the world. Seminars will zoom into the local and zoom out into the national and supranational spaces, flows, and influences on education.

The series will be chaired by Maia Chankseliani, Associate Professor of Comparative and International Education.

 

The seminar programme:

*Please note that all seminars have a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

 

Wed 5 May at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Breaking gender, sex and sexuality borders: The case of comprehensive sexuality education in South Africa’

– Thabo Msibi, Dean and Head of School, School of Education, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

 

Wed 19 May at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Global Middle-Class families – comparative study of travel trajectories and imagined futures’

– Miri Yemini, Senior Lecturer, Tel Aviv University, Israel

 

Wed 2 June at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Equal’ Transnational Partnerships in Higher Education: Sino-Foreign Case Studies’

– Miguel Antonio Lim, Senior Lecturer in Education, University of Manchester, UK

 

Wed 16 June at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Why did policymakers in India and Mexico adopt the Germanic model of dual apprenticeships?’

– Oscar Valiente, Senior Lecturer University of Glasgow, UK

 

Wed 7th July at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Governing education by partnership: the GPE in the context of other sectors’ global financing partnerships.’

– Moira V. Faul, Executive Director, NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva

 

Wed 28th July at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

A comparison of the transition of returning scholars to domestic research environments in Kazakhstan, Malaysia and Cambodia.’

– Aliya Kuzhabekova, Associate Professor, Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Aliya Kuzhabekova is Associate Professor at Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan.

In this talk, Aliya Kuzhabekova will report on the results of a collaborative project exploring how individuals, who received Ph.D. degrees abroad transition to research environment in their home countries.

In particular, the aim of the comparative study was to develop a better understanding about how returnees, who obtained degrees in countries with high levels of research capacity re-integrated in the research environment of countries with lower levels of research capacities.

In addition, the project team tried to reveal the extent to which the returnees served as change agents transforming the research environment in their countries. The study allowed to obtain comparative insights about cross-country and program-related variations in the returnees’ adjustment experiences.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Moira V. Faul is Executive Director of NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva. 

The Global Partnership for Education (GPE) is one of a recent proliferation of pooled financing mechanisms in sustainable development. Despite a policy narrative of inclusive and egalitarian partnering, differences between public, private and voluntary sectors are assumed to affect relations between partners, and the effectiveness of partnerships.

We theorise global financing partnerships as a social ‘space between fields’ that is generated and structured by relationships between the actors mobilised into partnership boards from different fields. We move beyond the conventional focus on sectoral factions to investigate the potential of other aspects of diversity to affect partnership outcomes.

We empirically investigate the structuring of the space of global financing partnerships, comparing the GPE with climate change and health, by analysing a new dataset of 188 board members of ten global financing partnerships. First, network analyses reveal that donors (whether states, international organisations or private sector) are systematically privileged in this partnership space.

Secondly, faultline analytical tools reveal that despite a narrative of additional financing from the private sector, donors are significantly associated with the public sector. Furthermore, donors (public and private sector) are significantly associated with an economic logic of action and non-donors with an issue-specific framing.

Examining the multiple diversities that come into play in partnership board composition and structuring enables an improved theorisation of partnership effectiveness; it also holds important implications for board decisions and the sustainability and educational impacts that these partnerships are purported to deliver.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Oscar Valiente is Senior Lecturer in Educational Leadership & Policy at the University of Glasgow, Scotland. 

While most comparative education studies have focused on the historical processes that gave birth to the dual model in Germanic countries, our research aims to elucidate the drivers that explain why policymakers embrace the dual apprenticeship idea and how they re-contextualize it in their own educational context.

Drawing on a constructivist political economy framework, our study specifically investigates the reasons of policymakers in India and Mexico to adopt the dual model and how their different institutional conditions explain variations in the way the two countries have re-contextualized this global policy idea.

The selected cases are particularly interesting for the comparison because of the broad ambitions of their national reforms and the significant differences in the type of dual model of apprenticeships finally retained in the two countries.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Miguel Antonio Lim is Senior Lecturer in Education at the University of Manchester, UK, with special focus on Education and International Development at the University’s School of Environment, Education, and Development (SEED).

At this seminar, the evolving role of transnational higher education (TNHE) as part of wider national development policy will be discussed.

Using the case of Sino-foreign educational partnerships, Dr Lim will outline several features of the evolution of policies to govern and achieve more ‘equal’ partnerships.

In China, TNHE partnerships are seen as an important part of its drive to build ‘World Class Universities’. Its case shows an increasing orientation towards quality over quantity of partnerships and a growing role for urban and regional geopolitics in the choice of its HE partnerships.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Thabo Msibi is Associate Professor in Curriculum Studies in the School of Education at the University of KwaZulu-Natal, where he is also the Dean and Head of the School of Education.   

Professor Msibi’s scholarship is on the interface of gender and sexuality issues, particularly as they relate to education.  He also is interested in theory building as it relates to African sexualities.  He has published research in South African and international journals on these subjects, and has co-edited six journal special issues.

Thabo has also published numerous book chapters looking at the educational experiences of individuals who claim same-sex identities.  His recent monograph entitled Hidden Sexualities of South African Teachers: Black Male Educators and Same-sex Desire is published by Routledge.

This seminar reflects on the public uproar that has come with the expansion of the comprehensive sexuality education programme by the Department of Basic Education in South Africa.

Touted globally by the UNESCO and other international organisations as a critical vehicle for the promotion of positive sexual behaviour amongst young people, comprehensive sexuality education has recently received significant international fanfare.  This focus follows the release of the revised International technical guidance on sexuality education by UNESCO in 2018.  Some African countries, including South Africa, have used the revisions to update their curriculum offerings on sexuality education.

Section nine of the South African Constitution, known as the Equality Clause, explicitly provides protections against unfair discrimination on the basis of race, gender, sex, pregnancy, marital status, ethnic or social origin, colour, sexual orientation, age, disability, religion, conscience, belief, culture, language and birth.

It was through this constitutional guarantee that the country sought to revise its comprehensive curriculum offering, leading to significant backlash from the traditional, religious and conservative organisations. Front-page media articles screamed that the Minister of Education was trying to teach young children about how to have sex, and that she was effectively sexualising young children. The Ministry was also accused of imposing a Western ideals on African people.

The seminar will analyse the transnational and local reasons for the conservative backlash in South Africa. It will argue that the response largely follows a coordinated international movement that has sought to undermine sexuality education and reverse the gains already made by sexual rights organisations.  It will showcase how local sexual politics reflect a transnational mobility of ideas that are reconfigured at a local level in order to attain legitimacy.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Miri Yemini is a tenured Senior Lecturer in the School of Education at Tel Aviv University.

At Tel Aviv Dr. Yemini teaches graduate and undergraduate modules in education, including Internationalisation in Education, Education and Globalisation, Entrepreneurship in Education and Project Management in Schools.

Dr. Yemini serves as a co-Chair of UNESCO chair for Technology and Internationalisation in Education. Recently (April 2018) she was awarded (with Prof. Dr. Nina Kolleck) by the Max Plank Foundation the Award for Research Cooperation and High Excellence in Science (ARCHES), to develop research in the field of school-NGO interactions. This year (2021) Dr. Yemini secured funding from Israeli Science Foundation (150,000 Euro) for her project on education trajectories of Global Middle Class families.

Increasing numbers of highly educated and skilled professionals are internationally mobile for work. Some are transferred by employers; some proactively seek out new positions in different countries.

The currently estimated size of this group (known as globally mobile professionals, ‘global expatriates’ or members of a global middle class) is 66.2 million, which is predicted to rise to 87.5 million by 2022.

The increasing number, but also growing cultural diversity of this group (originating from all parts of the world), and the extent to which/frequency they relocate is an important articulation of newer forms of transnationalism that encompass the movement of people and ideas, and changing economic and social relations.

This seminar aims to map out and theorise the everyday practices of these globally middle professional families and to consider how their presence in key cities around the world might be re-shaping political, social, economic and education structures.

In particular, we will discuss how these families experience mobility and what motivates these relocations; how families create a sense of identity while ‘on the move’; what short-term and longer term aspirations the professionals, their partners and their children have; what education and extra-curricular choices are made; how different cultural contexts are negotiated etc.

Critically, we will discuss how these middle class families work to reproduce and extend their privilege, and so engage in ‘class-making’ practices.  Ultimately, this work offers a much-needed empirical basis to examine the theoretical proposition that there is now a ‘global’ middle class that is somehow different to nationally-located middle class groups.

The Department of Education and St Edmunds Hall are delighted to announce a new Public Seminar series which will take place online in Trinity Term on Wednesdays from 3pm-4pm (UK time) between 5th May and 28th July.

 

The Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education will address themes of major interest to academics, practitioners, and policy-makers working in the field of education globally. These seminars aim to illuminate the role of education in societal development, with a focus on understanding changes in education policy, discourse, and practice, and how these changes influence individual opportunities and shape the development of educational institutions around the world. Seminars will zoom into the local and zoom out into the national and supranational spaces, flows, and influences on education.

The series will be chaired by Maia Chankseliani, Associate Professor of Comparative and International Education, and will feature the following speakers:

Thabo Msibi, Dean and Head of School, School of Education, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

Miri Yemini, Senior Lecturer, Tel Aviv University, Israel

Miguel Antonio Lim, Senior Lecturer in Education, University of Manchester, United Kingdom

Oscar Valiente, Senior Lecturer University of Glasgow, United Kingdom

Moira Faul, Executive Director, NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva, Switzerland

Aliya Kuzhabekova, Associate Professor, Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan

 

To view the full programme of seminars, please click here.

Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education

Joint seminars organised by the Department of Education and St Edmund Hall, University of Oxford.

Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education address themes of major interest to academics, practitioners, and policy-makers working in the field of education globally. These seminars aim to illuminate the role of education in societal development, with a focus on understanding changes in education policy, discourse, and practice, and how these changes influence individual opportunities and shape the development of educational institutions around the world. Seminars will zoom into the local and zoom out into the national and supranational spaces, flows, and influences on education.

The series will be chaired by Maia Chankseliani, Associate Professor of Comparative and International Education.

 

The seminar programme:

*Please note that all seminars have a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

 

Wed 5 May at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Breaking gender, sex and sexuality borders: The case of comprehensive sexuality education in South Africa’

– Thabo Msibi, Dean and Head of School, School of Education, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

 

Wed 19 May at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Global Middle-Class families – comparative study of travel trajectories and imagined futures’

– Miri Yemini, Senior Lecturer, Tel Aviv University, Israel

 

Wed 2 June at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Equal’ Transnational Partnerships in Higher Education: Sino-Foreign Case Studies’

– Miguel Antonio Lim, Senior Lecturer in Education, University of Manchester, UK

 

Wed 16 June at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Why did policymakers in India and Mexico adopt the Germanic model of dual apprenticeships?’

– Oscar Valiente, Senior Lecturer University of Glasgow, UK

 

Wed 7th July at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Governing education by partnership: the GPE in the context of other sectors’ global financing partnerships.’

– Moira V. Faul, Executive Director, NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva

 

Wed 28th July at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

A comparison of the transition of returning scholars to domestic research environments in Kazakhstan, Malaysia and Cambodia.’

– Aliya Kuzhabekova, Associate Professor, Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Aliya Kuzhabekova is Associate Professor at Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan.

In this talk, Aliya Kuzhabekova will report on the results of a collaborative project exploring how individuals, who received Ph.D. degrees abroad transition to research environment in their home countries.

In particular, the aim of the comparative study was to develop a better understanding about how returnees, who obtained degrees in countries with high levels of research capacity re-integrated in the research environment of countries with lower levels of research capacities.

In addition, the project team tried to reveal the extent to which the returnees served as change agents transforming the research environment in their countries. The study allowed to obtain comparative insights about cross-country and program-related variations in the returnees’ adjustment experiences.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Moira V. Faul is Executive Director of NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva. 

The Global Partnership for Education (GPE) is one of a recent proliferation of pooled financing mechanisms in sustainable development. Despite a policy narrative of inclusive and egalitarian partnering, differences between public, private and voluntary sectors are assumed to affect relations between partners, and the effectiveness of partnerships.

We theorise global financing partnerships as a social ‘space between fields’ that is generated and structured by relationships between the actors mobilised into partnership boards from different fields. We move beyond the conventional focus on sectoral factions to investigate the potential of other aspects of diversity to affect partnership outcomes.

We empirically investigate the structuring of the space of global financing partnerships, comparing the GPE with climate change and health, by analysing a new dataset of 188 board members of ten global financing partnerships. First, network analyses reveal that donors (whether states, international organisations or private sector) are systematically privileged in this partnership space.

Secondly, faultline analytical tools reveal that despite a narrative of additional financing from the private sector, donors are significantly associated with the public sector. Furthermore, donors (public and private sector) are significantly associated with an economic logic of action and non-donors with an issue-specific framing.

Examining the multiple diversities that come into play in partnership board composition and structuring enables an improved theorisation of partnership effectiveness; it also holds important implications for board decisions and the sustainability and educational impacts that these partnerships are purported to deliver.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Oscar Valiente is Senior Lecturer in Educational Leadership & Policy at the University of Glasgow, Scotland. 

While most comparative education studies have focused on the historical processes that gave birth to the dual model in Germanic countries, our research aims to elucidate the drivers that explain why policymakers embrace the dual apprenticeship idea and how they re-contextualize it in their own educational context.

Drawing on a constructivist political economy framework, our study specifically investigates the reasons of policymakers in India and Mexico to adopt the dual model and how their different institutional conditions explain variations in the way the two countries have re-contextualized this global policy idea.

The selected cases are particularly interesting for the comparison because of the broad ambitions of their national reforms and the significant differences in the type of dual model of apprenticeships finally retained in the two countries.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Miguel Antonio Lim is Senior Lecturer in Education at the University of Manchester, UK, with special focus on Education and International Development at the University’s School of Environment, Education, and Development (SEED).

At this seminar, the evolving role of transnational higher education (TNHE) as part of wider national development policy will be discussed.

Using the case of Sino-foreign educational partnerships, Dr Lim will outline several features of the evolution of policies to govern and achieve more ‘equal’ partnerships.

In China, TNHE partnerships are seen as an important part of its drive to build ‘World Class Universities’. Its case shows an increasing orientation towards quality over quantity of partnerships and a growing role for urban and regional geopolitics in the choice of its HE partnerships.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Thabo Msibi is Associate Professor in Curriculum Studies in the School of Education at the University of KwaZulu-Natal, where he is also the Dean and Head of the School of Education.   

Professor Msibi’s scholarship is on the interface of gender and sexuality issues, particularly as they relate to education.  He also is interested in theory building as it relates to African sexualities.  He has published research in South African and international journals on these subjects, and has co-edited six journal special issues.

Thabo has also published numerous book chapters looking at the educational experiences of individuals who claim same-sex identities.  His recent monograph entitled Hidden Sexualities of South African Teachers: Black Male Educators and Same-sex Desire is published by Routledge.

This seminar reflects on the public uproar that has come with the expansion of the comprehensive sexuality education programme by the Department of Basic Education in South Africa.

Touted globally by the UNESCO and other international organisations as a critical vehicle for the promotion of positive sexual behaviour amongst young people, comprehensive sexuality education has recently received significant international fanfare.  This focus follows the release of the revised International technical guidance on sexuality education by UNESCO in 2018.  Some African countries, including South Africa, have used the revisions to update their curriculum offerings on sexuality education.

Section nine of the South African Constitution, known as the Equality Clause, explicitly provides protections against unfair discrimination on the basis of race, gender, sex, pregnancy, marital status, ethnic or social origin, colour, sexual orientation, age, disability, religion, conscience, belief, culture, language and birth.

It was through this constitutional guarantee that the country sought to revise its comprehensive curriculum offering, leading to significant backlash from the traditional, religious and conservative organisations. Front-page media articles screamed that the Minister of Education was trying to teach young children about how to have sex, and that she was effectively sexualising young children. The Ministry was also accused of imposing a Western ideals on African people.

The seminar will analyse the transnational and local reasons for the conservative backlash in South Africa. It will argue that the response largely follows a coordinated international movement that has sought to undermine sexuality education and reverse the gains already made by sexual rights organisations.  It will showcase how local sexual politics reflect a transnational mobility of ideas that are reconfigured at a local level in order to attain legitimacy.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Miri Yemini is a tenured Senior Lecturer in the School of Education at Tel Aviv University.

At Tel Aviv Dr. Yemini teaches graduate and undergraduate modules in education, including Internationalisation in Education, Education and Globalisation, Entrepreneurship in Education and Project Management in Schools.

Dr. Yemini serves as a co-Chair of UNESCO chair for Technology and Internationalisation in Education. Recently (April 2018) she was awarded (with Prof. Dr. Nina Kolleck) by the Max Plank Foundation the Award for Research Cooperation and High Excellence in Science (ARCHES), to develop research in the field of school-NGO interactions. This year (2021) Dr. Yemini secured funding from Israeli Science Foundation (150,000 Euro) for her project on education trajectories of Global Middle Class families.

Increasing numbers of highly educated and skilled professionals are internationally mobile for work. Some are transferred by employers; some proactively seek out new positions in different countries.

The currently estimated size of this group (known as globally mobile professionals, ‘global expatriates’ or members of a global middle class) is 66.2 million, which is predicted to rise to 87.5 million by 2022.

The increasing number, but also growing cultural diversity of this group (originating from all parts of the world), and the extent to which/frequency they relocate is an important articulation of newer forms of transnationalism that encompass the movement of people and ideas, and changing economic and social relations.

This seminar aims to map out and theorise the everyday practices of these globally middle professional families and to consider how their presence in key cities around the world might be re-shaping political, social, economic and education structures.

In particular, we will discuss how these families experience mobility and what motivates these relocations; how families create a sense of identity while ‘on the move’; what short-term and longer term aspirations the professionals, their partners and their children have; what education and extra-curricular choices are made; how different cultural contexts are negotiated etc.

Critically, we will discuss how these middle class families work to reproduce and extend their privilege, and so engage in ‘class-making’ practices.  Ultimately, this work offers a much-needed empirical basis to examine the theoretical proposition that there is now a ‘global’ middle class that is somehow different to nationally-located middle class groups.

The Department of Education and St Edmunds Hall are delighted to announce a new Public Seminar series which will take place online in Trinity Term on Wednesdays from 3pm-4pm (UK time) between 5th May and 28th July.

 

The Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education will address themes of major interest to academics, practitioners, and policy-makers working in the field of education globally. These seminars aim to illuminate the role of education in societal development, with a focus on understanding changes in education policy, discourse, and practice, and how these changes influence individual opportunities and shape the development of educational institutions around the world. Seminars will zoom into the local and zoom out into the national and supranational spaces, flows, and influences on education.

The series will be chaired by Maia Chankseliani, Associate Professor of Comparative and International Education, and will feature the following speakers:

Thabo Msibi, Dean and Head of School, School of Education, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

Miri Yemini, Senior Lecturer, Tel Aviv University, Israel

Miguel Antonio Lim, Senior Lecturer in Education, University of Manchester, United Kingdom

Oscar Valiente, Senior Lecturer University of Glasgow, United Kingdom

Moira Faul, Executive Director, NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva, Switzerland

Aliya Kuzhabekova, Associate Professor, Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan

 

To view the full programme of seminars, please click here.

Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education

Joint seminars organised by the Department of Education and St Edmund Hall, University of Oxford.

Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education address themes of major interest to academics, practitioners, and policy-makers working in the field of education globally. These seminars aim to illuminate the role of education in societal development, with a focus on understanding changes in education policy, discourse, and practice, and how these changes influence individual opportunities and shape the development of educational institutions around the world. Seminars will zoom into the local and zoom out into the national and supranational spaces, flows, and influences on education.

The series will be chaired by Maia Chankseliani, Associate Professor of Comparative and International Education.

 

The seminar programme:

*Please note that all seminars have a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

 

Wed 5 May at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Breaking gender, sex and sexuality borders: The case of comprehensive sexuality education in South Africa’

– Thabo Msibi, Dean and Head of School, School of Education, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

 

Wed 19 May at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Global Middle-Class families – comparative study of travel trajectories and imagined futures’

– Miri Yemini, Senior Lecturer, Tel Aviv University, Israel

 

Wed 2 June at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Equal’ Transnational Partnerships in Higher Education: Sino-Foreign Case Studies’

– Miguel Antonio Lim, Senior Lecturer in Education, University of Manchester, UK

 

Wed 16 June at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Why did policymakers in India and Mexico adopt the Germanic model of dual apprenticeships?’

– Oscar Valiente, Senior Lecturer University of Glasgow, UK

 

Wed 7th July at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Governing education by partnership: the GPE in the context of other sectors’ global financing partnerships.’

– Moira V. Faul, Executive Director, NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva

 

Wed 28th July at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

A comparison of the transition of returning scholars to domestic research environments in Kazakhstan, Malaysia and Cambodia.’

– Aliya Kuzhabekova, Associate Professor, Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Aliya Kuzhabekova is Associate Professor at Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan.

In this talk, Aliya Kuzhabekova will report on the results of a collaborative project exploring how individuals, who received Ph.D. degrees abroad transition to research environment in their home countries.

In particular, the aim of the comparative study was to develop a better understanding about how returnees, who obtained degrees in countries with high levels of research capacity re-integrated in the research environment of countries with lower levels of research capacities.

In addition, the project team tried to reveal the extent to which the returnees served as change agents transforming the research environment in their countries. The study allowed to obtain comparative insights about cross-country and program-related variations in the returnees’ adjustment experiences.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Moira V. Faul is Executive Director of NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva. 

The Global Partnership for Education (GPE) is one of a recent proliferation of pooled financing mechanisms in sustainable development. Despite a policy narrative of inclusive and egalitarian partnering, differences between public, private and voluntary sectors are assumed to affect relations between partners, and the effectiveness of partnerships.

We theorise global financing partnerships as a social ‘space between fields’ that is generated and structured by relationships between the actors mobilised into partnership boards from different fields. We move beyond the conventional focus on sectoral factions to investigate the potential of other aspects of diversity to affect partnership outcomes.

We empirically investigate the structuring of the space of global financing partnerships, comparing the GPE with climate change and health, by analysing a new dataset of 188 board members of ten global financing partnerships. First, network analyses reveal that donors (whether states, international organisations or private sector) are systematically privileged in this partnership space.

Secondly, faultline analytical tools reveal that despite a narrative of additional financing from the private sector, donors are significantly associated with the public sector. Furthermore, donors (public and private sector) are significantly associated with an economic logic of action and non-donors with an issue-specific framing.

Examining the multiple diversities that come into play in partnership board composition and structuring enables an improved theorisation of partnership effectiveness; it also holds important implications for board decisions and the sustainability and educational impacts that these partnerships are purported to deliver.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Oscar Valiente is Senior Lecturer in Educational Leadership & Policy at the University of Glasgow, Scotland. 

While most comparative education studies have focused on the historical processes that gave birth to the dual model in Germanic countries, our research aims to elucidate the drivers that explain why policymakers embrace the dual apprenticeship idea and how they re-contextualize it in their own educational context.

Drawing on a constructivist political economy framework, our study specifically investigates the reasons of policymakers in India and Mexico to adopt the dual model and how their different institutional conditions explain variations in the way the two countries have re-contextualized this global policy idea.

The selected cases are particularly interesting for the comparison because of the broad ambitions of their national reforms and the significant differences in the type of dual model of apprenticeships finally retained in the two countries.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Miguel Antonio Lim is Senior Lecturer in Education at the University of Manchester, UK, with special focus on Education and International Development at the University’s School of Environment, Education, and Development (SEED).

At this seminar, the evolving role of transnational higher education (TNHE) as part of wider national development policy will be discussed.

Using the case of Sino-foreign educational partnerships, Dr Lim will outline several features of the evolution of policies to govern and achieve more ‘equal’ partnerships.

In China, TNHE partnerships are seen as an important part of its drive to build ‘World Class Universities’. Its case shows an increasing orientation towards quality over quantity of partnerships and a growing role for urban and regional geopolitics in the choice of its HE partnerships.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Thabo Msibi is Associate Professor in Curriculum Studies in the School of Education at the University of KwaZulu-Natal, where he is also the Dean and Head of the School of Education.   

Professor Msibi’s scholarship is on the interface of gender and sexuality issues, particularly as they relate to education.  He also is interested in theory building as it relates to African sexualities.  He has published research in South African and international journals on these subjects, and has co-edited six journal special issues.

Thabo has also published numerous book chapters looking at the educational experiences of individuals who claim same-sex identities.  His recent monograph entitled Hidden Sexualities of South African Teachers: Black Male Educators and Same-sex Desire is published by Routledge.

This seminar reflects on the public uproar that has come with the expansion of the comprehensive sexuality education programme by the Department of Basic Education in South Africa.

Touted globally by the UNESCO and other international organisations as a critical vehicle for the promotion of positive sexual behaviour amongst young people, comprehensive sexuality education has recently received significant international fanfare.  This focus follows the release of the revised International technical guidance on sexuality education by UNESCO in 2018.  Some African countries, including South Africa, have used the revisions to update their curriculum offerings on sexuality education.

Section nine of the South African Constitution, known as the Equality Clause, explicitly provides protections against unfair discrimination on the basis of race, gender, sex, pregnancy, marital status, ethnic or social origin, colour, sexual orientation, age, disability, religion, conscience, belief, culture, language and birth.

It was through this constitutional guarantee that the country sought to revise its comprehensive curriculum offering, leading to significant backlash from the traditional, religious and conservative organisations. Front-page media articles screamed that the Minister of Education was trying to teach young children about how to have sex, and that she was effectively sexualising young children. The Ministry was also accused of imposing a Western ideals on African people.

The seminar will analyse the transnational and local reasons for the conservative backlash in South Africa. It will argue that the response largely follows a coordinated international movement that has sought to undermine sexuality education and reverse the gains already made by sexual rights organisations.  It will showcase how local sexual politics reflect a transnational mobility of ideas that are reconfigured at a local level in order to attain legitimacy.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Miri Yemini is a tenured Senior Lecturer in the School of Education at Tel Aviv University.

At Tel Aviv Dr. Yemini teaches graduate and undergraduate modules in education, including Internationalisation in Education, Education and Globalisation, Entrepreneurship in Education and Project Management in Schools.

Dr. Yemini serves as a co-Chair of UNESCO chair for Technology and Internationalisation in Education. Recently (April 2018) she was awarded (with Prof. Dr. Nina Kolleck) by the Max Plank Foundation the Award for Research Cooperation and High Excellence in Science (ARCHES), to develop research in the field of school-NGO interactions. This year (2021) Dr. Yemini secured funding from Israeli Science Foundation (150,000 Euro) for her project on education trajectories of Global Middle Class families.

Increasing numbers of highly educated and skilled professionals are internationally mobile for work. Some are transferred by employers; some proactively seek out new positions in different countries.

The currently estimated size of this group (known as globally mobile professionals, ‘global expatriates’ or members of a global middle class) is 66.2 million, which is predicted to rise to 87.5 million by 2022.

The increasing number, but also growing cultural diversity of this group (originating from all parts of the world), and the extent to which/frequency they relocate is an important articulation of newer forms of transnationalism that encompass the movement of people and ideas, and changing economic and social relations.

This seminar aims to map out and theorise the everyday practices of these globally middle professional families and to consider how their presence in key cities around the world might be re-shaping political, social, economic and education structures.

In particular, we will discuss how these families experience mobility and what motivates these relocations; how families create a sense of identity while ‘on the move’; what short-term and longer term aspirations the professionals, their partners and their children have; what education and extra-curricular choices are made; how different cultural contexts are negotiated etc.

Critically, we will discuss how these middle class families work to reproduce and extend their privilege, and so engage in ‘class-making’ practices.  Ultimately, this work offers a much-needed empirical basis to examine the theoretical proposition that there is now a ‘global’ middle class that is somehow different to nationally-located middle class groups.

The Department of Education and St Edmunds Hall are delighted to announce a new Public Seminar series which will take place online in Trinity Term on Wednesdays from 3pm-4pm (UK time) between 5th May and 28th July.

 

The Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education will address themes of major interest to academics, practitioners, and policy-makers working in the field of education globally. These seminars aim to illuminate the role of education in societal development, with a focus on understanding changes in education policy, discourse, and practice, and how these changes influence individual opportunities and shape the development of educational institutions around the world. Seminars will zoom into the local and zoom out into the national and supranational spaces, flows, and influences on education.

The series will be chaired by Maia Chankseliani, Associate Professor of Comparative and International Education, and will feature the following speakers:

Thabo Msibi, Dean and Head of School, School of Education, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

Miri Yemini, Senior Lecturer, Tel Aviv University, Israel

Miguel Antonio Lim, Senior Lecturer in Education, University of Manchester, United Kingdom

Oscar Valiente, Senior Lecturer University of Glasgow, United Kingdom

Moira Faul, Executive Director, NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva, Switzerland

Aliya Kuzhabekova, Associate Professor, Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan

 

To view the full programme of seminars, please click here.

Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education

Joint seminars organised by the Department of Education and St Edmund Hall, University of Oxford.

Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education address themes of major interest to academics, practitioners, and policy-makers working in the field of education globally. These seminars aim to illuminate the role of education in societal development, with a focus on understanding changes in education policy, discourse, and practice, and how these changes influence individual opportunities and shape the development of educational institutions around the world. Seminars will zoom into the local and zoom out into the national and supranational spaces, flows, and influences on education.

The series will be chaired by Maia Chankseliani, Associate Professor of Comparative and International Education.

 

The seminar programme:

*Please note that all seminars have a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

 

Wed 5 May at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Breaking gender, sex and sexuality borders: The case of comprehensive sexuality education in South Africa’

– Thabo Msibi, Dean and Head of School, School of Education, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

 

Wed 19 May at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Global Middle-Class families – comparative study of travel trajectories and imagined futures’

– Miri Yemini, Senior Lecturer, Tel Aviv University, Israel

 

Wed 2 June at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Equal’ Transnational Partnerships in Higher Education: Sino-Foreign Case Studies’

– Miguel Antonio Lim, Senior Lecturer in Education, University of Manchester, UK

 

Wed 16 June at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Why did policymakers in India and Mexico adopt the Germanic model of dual apprenticeships?’

– Oscar Valiente, Senior Lecturer University of Glasgow, UK

 

Wed 7th July at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Governing education by partnership: the GPE in the context of other sectors’ global financing partnerships.’

– Moira V. Faul, Executive Director, NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva

 

Wed 28th July at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

A comparison of the transition of returning scholars to domestic research environments in Kazakhstan, Malaysia and Cambodia.’

– Aliya Kuzhabekova, Associate Professor, Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Aliya Kuzhabekova is Associate Professor at Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan.

In this talk, Aliya Kuzhabekova will report on the results of a collaborative project exploring how individuals, who received Ph.D. degrees abroad transition to research environment in their home countries.

In particular, the aim of the comparative study was to develop a better understanding about how returnees, who obtained degrees in countries with high levels of research capacity re-integrated in the research environment of countries with lower levels of research capacities.

In addition, the project team tried to reveal the extent to which the returnees served as change agents transforming the research environment in their countries. The study allowed to obtain comparative insights about cross-country and program-related variations in the returnees’ adjustment experiences.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Moira V. Faul is Executive Director of NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva. 

The Global Partnership for Education (GPE) is one of a recent proliferation of pooled financing mechanisms in sustainable development. Despite a policy narrative of inclusive and egalitarian partnering, differences between public, private and voluntary sectors are assumed to affect relations between partners, and the effectiveness of partnerships.

We theorise global financing partnerships as a social ‘space between fields’ that is generated and structured by relationships between the actors mobilised into partnership boards from different fields. We move beyond the conventional focus on sectoral factions to investigate the potential of other aspects of diversity to affect partnership outcomes.

We empirically investigate the structuring of the space of global financing partnerships, comparing the GPE with climate change and health, by analysing a new dataset of 188 board members of ten global financing partnerships. First, network analyses reveal that donors (whether states, international organisations or private sector) are systematically privileged in this partnership space.

Secondly, faultline analytical tools reveal that despite a narrative of additional financing from the private sector, donors are significantly associated with the public sector. Furthermore, donors (public and private sector) are significantly associated with an economic logic of action and non-donors with an issue-specific framing.

Examining the multiple diversities that come into play in partnership board composition and structuring enables an improved theorisation of partnership effectiveness; it also holds important implications for board decisions and the sustainability and educational impacts that these partnerships are purported to deliver.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Oscar Valiente is Senior Lecturer in Educational Leadership & Policy at the University of Glasgow, Scotland. 

While most comparative education studies have focused on the historical processes that gave birth to the dual model in Germanic countries, our research aims to elucidate the drivers that explain why policymakers embrace the dual apprenticeship idea and how they re-contextualize it in their own educational context.

Drawing on a constructivist political economy framework, our study specifically investigates the reasons of policymakers in India and Mexico to adopt the dual model and how their different institutional conditions explain variations in the way the two countries have re-contextualized this global policy idea.

The selected cases are particularly interesting for the comparison because of the broad ambitions of their national reforms and the significant differences in the type of dual model of apprenticeships finally retained in the two countries.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Miguel Antonio Lim is Senior Lecturer in Education at the University of Manchester, UK, with special focus on Education and International Development at the University’s School of Environment, Education, and Development (SEED).

At this seminar, the evolving role of transnational higher education (TNHE) as part of wider national development policy will be discussed.

Using the case of Sino-foreign educational partnerships, Dr Lim will outline several features of the evolution of policies to govern and achieve more ‘equal’ partnerships.

In China, TNHE partnerships are seen as an important part of its drive to build ‘World Class Universities’. Its case shows an increasing orientation towards quality over quantity of partnerships and a growing role for urban and regional geopolitics in the choice of its HE partnerships.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Thabo Msibi is Associate Professor in Curriculum Studies in the School of Education at the University of KwaZulu-Natal, where he is also the Dean and Head of the School of Education.   

Professor Msibi’s scholarship is on the interface of gender and sexuality issues, particularly as they relate to education.  He also is interested in theory building as it relates to African sexualities.  He has published research in South African and international journals on these subjects, and has co-edited six journal special issues.

Thabo has also published numerous book chapters looking at the educational experiences of individuals who claim same-sex identities.  His recent monograph entitled Hidden Sexualities of South African Teachers: Black Male Educators and Same-sex Desire is published by Routledge.

This seminar reflects on the public uproar that has come with the expansion of the comprehensive sexuality education programme by the Department of Basic Education in South Africa.

Touted globally by the UNESCO and other international organisations as a critical vehicle for the promotion of positive sexual behaviour amongst young people, comprehensive sexuality education has recently received significant international fanfare.  This focus follows the release of the revised International technical guidance on sexuality education by UNESCO in 2018.  Some African countries, including South Africa, have used the revisions to update their curriculum offerings on sexuality education.

Section nine of the South African Constitution, known as the Equality Clause, explicitly provides protections against unfair discrimination on the basis of race, gender, sex, pregnancy, marital status, ethnic or social origin, colour, sexual orientation, age, disability, religion, conscience, belief, culture, language and birth.

It was through this constitutional guarantee that the country sought to revise its comprehensive curriculum offering, leading to significant backlash from the traditional, religious and conservative organisations. Front-page media articles screamed that the Minister of Education was trying to teach young children about how to have sex, and that she was effectively sexualising young children. The Ministry was also accused of imposing a Western ideals on African people.

The seminar will analyse the transnational and local reasons for the conservative backlash in South Africa. It will argue that the response largely follows a coordinated international movement that has sought to undermine sexuality education and reverse the gains already made by sexual rights organisations.  It will showcase how local sexual politics reflect a transnational mobility of ideas that are reconfigured at a local level in order to attain legitimacy.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Miri Yemini is a tenured Senior Lecturer in the School of Education at Tel Aviv University.

At Tel Aviv Dr. Yemini teaches graduate and undergraduate modules in education, including Internationalisation in Education, Education and Globalisation, Entrepreneurship in Education and Project Management in Schools.

Dr. Yemini serves as a co-Chair of UNESCO chair for Technology and Internationalisation in Education. Recently (April 2018) she was awarded (with Prof. Dr. Nina Kolleck) by the Max Plank Foundation the Award for Research Cooperation and High Excellence in Science (ARCHES), to develop research in the field of school-NGO interactions. This year (2021) Dr. Yemini secured funding from Israeli Science Foundation (150,000 Euro) for her project on education trajectories of Global Middle Class families.

Increasing numbers of highly educated and skilled professionals are internationally mobile for work. Some are transferred by employers; some proactively seek out new positions in different countries.

The currently estimated size of this group (known as globally mobile professionals, ‘global expatriates’ or members of a global middle class) is 66.2 million, which is predicted to rise to 87.5 million by 2022.

The increasing number, but also growing cultural diversity of this group (originating from all parts of the world), and the extent to which/frequency they relocate is an important articulation of newer forms of transnationalism that encompass the movement of people and ideas, and changing economic and social relations.

This seminar aims to map out and theorise the everyday practices of these globally middle professional families and to consider how their presence in key cities around the world might be re-shaping political, social, economic and education structures.

In particular, we will discuss how these families experience mobility and what motivates these relocations; how families create a sense of identity while ‘on the move’; what short-term and longer term aspirations the professionals, their partners and their children have; what education and extra-curricular choices are made; how different cultural contexts are negotiated etc.

Critically, we will discuss how these middle class families work to reproduce and extend their privilege, and so engage in ‘class-making’ practices.  Ultimately, this work offers a much-needed empirical basis to examine the theoretical proposition that there is now a ‘global’ middle class that is somehow different to nationally-located middle class groups.

The Department of Education and St Edmunds Hall are delighted to announce a new Public Seminar series which will take place online in Trinity Term on Wednesdays from 3pm-4pm (UK time) between 5th May and 28th July.

 

The Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education will address themes of major interest to academics, practitioners, and policy-makers working in the field of education globally. These seminars aim to illuminate the role of education in societal development, with a focus on understanding changes in education policy, discourse, and practice, and how these changes influence individual opportunities and shape the development of educational institutions around the world. Seminars will zoom into the local and zoom out into the national and supranational spaces, flows, and influences on education.

The series will be chaired by Maia Chankseliani, Associate Professor of Comparative and International Education, and will feature the following speakers:

Thabo Msibi, Dean and Head of School, School of Education, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

Miri Yemini, Senior Lecturer, Tel Aviv University, Israel

Miguel Antonio Lim, Senior Lecturer in Education, University of Manchester, United Kingdom

Oscar Valiente, Senior Lecturer University of Glasgow, United Kingdom

Moira Faul, Executive Director, NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva, Switzerland

Aliya Kuzhabekova, Associate Professor, Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan

 

To view the full programme of seminars, please click here.

Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education

Joint seminars organised by the Department of Education and St Edmund Hall, University of Oxford.

Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education address themes of major interest to academics, practitioners, and policy-makers working in the field of education globally. These seminars aim to illuminate the role of education in societal development, with a focus on understanding changes in education policy, discourse, and practice, and how these changes influence individual opportunities and shape the development of educational institutions around the world. Seminars will zoom into the local and zoom out into the national and supranational spaces, flows, and influences on education.

The series will be chaired by Maia Chankseliani, Associate Professor of Comparative and International Education.

 

The seminar programme:

*Please note that all seminars have a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

 

Wed 5 May at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Breaking gender, sex and sexuality borders: The case of comprehensive sexuality education in South Africa’

– Thabo Msibi, Dean and Head of School, School of Education, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

 

Wed 19 May at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Global Middle-Class families – comparative study of travel trajectories and imagined futures’

– Miri Yemini, Senior Lecturer, Tel Aviv University, Israel

 

Wed 2 June at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Equal’ Transnational Partnerships in Higher Education: Sino-Foreign Case Studies’

– Miguel Antonio Lim, Senior Lecturer in Education, University of Manchester, UK

 

Wed 16 June at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Why did policymakers in India and Mexico adopt the Germanic model of dual apprenticeships?’

– Oscar Valiente, Senior Lecturer University of Glasgow, UK

 

Wed 7th July at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Governing education by partnership: the GPE in the context of other sectors’ global financing partnerships.’

– Moira V. Faul, Executive Director, NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva

 

Wed 28th July at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

A comparison of the transition of returning scholars to domestic research environments in Kazakhstan, Malaysia and Cambodia.’

– Aliya Kuzhabekova, Associate Professor, Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Aliya Kuzhabekova is Associate Professor at Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan.

In this talk, Aliya Kuzhabekova will report on the results of a collaborative project exploring how individuals, who received Ph.D. degrees abroad transition to research environment in their home countries.

In particular, the aim of the comparative study was to develop a better understanding about how returnees, who obtained degrees in countries with high levels of research capacity re-integrated in the research environment of countries with lower levels of research capacities.

In addition, the project team tried to reveal the extent to which the returnees served as change agents transforming the research environment in their countries. The study allowed to obtain comparative insights about cross-country and program-related variations in the returnees’ adjustment experiences.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Moira V. Faul is Executive Director of NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva. 

The Global Partnership for Education (GPE) is one of a recent proliferation of pooled financing mechanisms in sustainable development. Despite a policy narrative of inclusive and egalitarian partnering, differences between public, private and voluntary sectors are assumed to affect relations between partners, and the effectiveness of partnerships.

We theorise global financing partnerships as a social ‘space between fields’ that is generated and structured by relationships between the actors mobilised into partnership boards from different fields. We move beyond the conventional focus on sectoral factions to investigate the potential of other aspects of diversity to affect partnership outcomes.

We empirically investigate the structuring of the space of global financing partnerships, comparing the GPE with climate change and health, by analysing a new dataset of 188 board members of ten global financing partnerships. First, network analyses reveal that donors (whether states, international organisations or private sector) are systematically privileged in this partnership space.

Secondly, faultline analytical tools reveal that despite a narrative of additional financing from the private sector, donors are significantly associated with the public sector. Furthermore, donors (public and private sector) are significantly associated with an economic logic of action and non-donors with an issue-specific framing.

Examining the multiple diversities that come into play in partnership board composition and structuring enables an improved theorisation of partnership effectiveness; it also holds important implications for board decisions and the sustainability and educational impacts that these partnerships are purported to deliver.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Oscar Valiente is Senior Lecturer in Educational Leadership & Policy at the University of Glasgow, Scotland. 

While most comparative education studies have focused on the historical processes that gave birth to the dual model in Germanic countries, our research aims to elucidate the drivers that explain why policymakers embrace the dual apprenticeship idea and how they re-contextualize it in their own educational context.

Drawing on a constructivist political economy framework, our study specifically investigates the reasons of policymakers in India and Mexico to adopt the dual model and how their different institutional conditions explain variations in the way the two countries have re-contextualized this global policy idea.

The selected cases are particularly interesting for the comparison because of the broad ambitions of their national reforms and the significant differences in the type of dual model of apprenticeships finally retained in the two countries.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Miguel Antonio Lim is Senior Lecturer in Education at the University of Manchester, UK, with special focus on Education and International Development at the University’s School of Environment, Education, and Development (SEED).

At this seminar, the evolving role of transnational higher education (TNHE) as part of wider national development policy will be discussed.

Using the case of Sino-foreign educational partnerships, Dr Lim will outline several features of the evolution of policies to govern and achieve more ‘equal’ partnerships.

In China, TNHE partnerships are seen as an important part of its drive to build ‘World Class Universities’. Its case shows an increasing orientation towards quality over quantity of partnerships and a growing role for urban and regional geopolitics in the choice of its HE partnerships.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Thabo Msibi is Associate Professor in Curriculum Studies in the School of Education at the University of KwaZulu-Natal, where he is also the Dean and Head of the School of Education.   

Professor Msibi’s scholarship is on the interface of gender and sexuality issues, particularly as they relate to education.  He also is interested in theory building as it relates to African sexualities.  He has published research in South African and international journals on these subjects, and has co-edited six journal special issues.

Thabo has also published numerous book chapters looking at the educational experiences of individuals who claim same-sex identities.  His recent monograph entitled Hidden Sexualities of South African Teachers: Black Male Educators and Same-sex Desire is published by Routledge.

This seminar reflects on the public uproar that has come with the expansion of the comprehensive sexuality education programme by the Department of Basic Education in South Africa.

Touted globally by the UNESCO and other international organisations as a critical vehicle for the promotion of positive sexual behaviour amongst young people, comprehensive sexuality education has recently received significant international fanfare.  This focus follows the release of the revised International technical guidance on sexuality education by UNESCO in 2018.  Some African countries, including South Africa, have used the revisions to update their curriculum offerings on sexuality education.

Section nine of the South African Constitution, known as the Equality Clause, explicitly provides protections against unfair discrimination on the basis of race, gender, sex, pregnancy, marital status, ethnic or social origin, colour, sexual orientation, age, disability, religion, conscience, belief, culture, language and birth.

It was through this constitutional guarantee that the country sought to revise its comprehensive curriculum offering, leading to significant backlash from the traditional, religious and conservative organisations. Front-page media articles screamed that the Minister of Education was trying to teach young children about how to have sex, and that she was effectively sexualising young children. The Ministry was also accused of imposing a Western ideals on African people.

The seminar will analyse the transnational and local reasons for the conservative backlash in South Africa. It will argue that the response largely follows a coordinated international movement that has sought to undermine sexuality education and reverse the gains already made by sexual rights organisations.  It will showcase how local sexual politics reflect a transnational mobility of ideas that are reconfigured at a local level in order to attain legitimacy.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Miri Yemini is a tenured Senior Lecturer in the School of Education at Tel Aviv University.

At Tel Aviv Dr. Yemini teaches graduate and undergraduate modules in education, including Internationalisation in Education, Education and Globalisation, Entrepreneurship in Education and Project Management in Schools.

Dr. Yemini serves as a co-Chair of UNESCO chair for Technology and Internationalisation in Education. Recently (April 2018) she was awarded (with Prof. Dr. Nina Kolleck) by the Max Plank Foundation the Award for Research Cooperation and High Excellence in Science (ARCHES), to develop research in the field of school-NGO interactions. This year (2021) Dr. Yemini secured funding from Israeli Science Foundation (150,000 Euro) for her project on education trajectories of Global Middle Class families.

Increasing numbers of highly educated and skilled professionals are internationally mobile for work. Some are transferred by employers; some proactively seek out new positions in different countries.

The currently estimated size of this group (known as globally mobile professionals, ‘global expatriates’ or members of a global middle class) is 66.2 million, which is predicted to rise to 87.5 million by 2022.

The increasing number, but also growing cultural diversity of this group (originating from all parts of the world), and the extent to which/frequency they relocate is an important articulation of newer forms of transnationalism that encompass the movement of people and ideas, and changing economic and social relations.

This seminar aims to map out and theorise the everyday practices of these globally middle professional families and to consider how their presence in key cities around the world might be re-shaping political, social, economic and education structures.

In particular, we will discuss how these families experience mobility and what motivates these relocations; how families create a sense of identity while ‘on the move’; what short-term and longer term aspirations the professionals, their partners and their children have; what education and extra-curricular choices are made; how different cultural contexts are negotiated etc.

Critically, we will discuss how these middle class families work to reproduce and extend their privilege, and so engage in ‘class-making’ practices.  Ultimately, this work offers a much-needed empirical basis to examine the theoretical proposition that there is now a ‘global’ middle class that is somehow different to nationally-located middle class groups.

The Department of Education and St Edmunds Hall are delighted to announce a new Public Seminar series which will take place online in Trinity Term on Wednesdays from 3pm-4pm (UK time) between 5th May and 28th July.

 

The Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education will address themes of major interest to academics, practitioners, and policy-makers working in the field of education globally. These seminars aim to illuminate the role of education in societal development, with a focus on understanding changes in education policy, discourse, and practice, and how these changes influence individual opportunities and shape the development of educational institutions around the world. Seminars will zoom into the local and zoom out into the national and supranational spaces, flows, and influences on education.

The series will be chaired by Maia Chankseliani, Associate Professor of Comparative and International Education, and will feature the following speakers:

Thabo Msibi, Dean and Head of School, School of Education, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

Miri Yemini, Senior Lecturer, Tel Aviv University, Israel

Miguel Antonio Lim, Senior Lecturer in Education, University of Manchester, United Kingdom

Oscar Valiente, Senior Lecturer University of Glasgow, United Kingdom

Moira Faul, Executive Director, NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva, Switzerland

Aliya Kuzhabekova, Associate Professor, Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan

 

To view the full programme of seminars, please click here.

Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education

Joint seminars organised by the Department of Education and St Edmund Hall, University of Oxford.

Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education address themes of major interest to academics, practitioners, and policy-makers working in the field of education globally. These seminars aim to illuminate the role of education in societal development, with a focus on understanding changes in education policy, discourse, and practice, and how these changes influence individual opportunities and shape the development of educational institutions around the world. Seminars will zoom into the local and zoom out into the national and supranational spaces, flows, and influences on education.

The series will be chaired by Maia Chankseliani, Associate Professor of Comparative and International Education.

 

The seminar programme:

*Please note that all seminars have a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

 

Wed 5 May at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Breaking gender, sex and sexuality borders: The case of comprehensive sexuality education in South Africa’

– Thabo Msibi, Dean and Head of School, School of Education, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

 

Wed 19 May at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Global Middle-Class families – comparative study of travel trajectories and imagined futures’

– Miri Yemini, Senior Lecturer, Tel Aviv University, Israel

 

Wed 2 June at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Equal’ Transnational Partnerships in Higher Education: Sino-Foreign Case Studies’

– Miguel Antonio Lim, Senior Lecturer in Education, University of Manchester, UK

 

Wed 16 June at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Why did policymakers in India and Mexico adopt the Germanic model of dual apprenticeships?’

– Oscar Valiente, Senior Lecturer University of Glasgow, UK

 

Wed 7th July at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Governing education by partnership: the GPE in the context of other sectors’ global financing partnerships.’

– Moira V. Faul, Executive Director, NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva

 

Wed 28th July at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

A comparison of the transition of returning scholars to domestic research environments in Kazakhstan, Malaysia and Cambodia.’

– Aliya Kuzhabekova, Associate Professor, Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Aliya Kuzhabekova is Associate Professor at Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan.

In this talk, Aliya Kuzhabekova will report on the results of a collaborative project exploring how individuals, who received Ph.D. degrees abroad transition to research environment in their home countries.

In particular, the aim of the comparative study was to develop a better understanding about how returnees, who obtained degrees in countries with high levels of research capacity re-integrated in the research environment of countries with lower levels of research capacities.

In addition, the project team tried to reveal the extent to which the returnees served as change agents transforming the research environment in their countries. The study allowed to obtain comparative insights about cross-country and program-related variations in the returnees’ adjustment experiences.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Moira V. Faul is Executive Director of NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva. 

The Global Partnership for Education (GPE) is one of a recent proliferation of pooled financing mechanisms in sustainable development. Despite a policy narrative of inclusive and egalitarian partnering, differences between public, private and voluntary sectors are assumed to affect relations between partners, and the effectiveness of partnerships.

We theorise global financing partnerships as a social ‘space between fields’ that is generated and structured by relationships between the actors mobilised into partnership boards from different fields. We move beyond the conventional focus on sectoral factions to investigate the potential of other aspects of diversity to affect partnership outcomes.

We empirically investigate the structuring of the space of global financing partnerships, comparing the GPE with climate change and health, by analysing a new dataset of 188 board members of ten global financing partnerships. First, network analyses reveal that donors (whether states, international organisations or private sector) are systematically privileged in this partnership space.

Secondly, faultline analytical tools reveal that despite a narrative of additional financing from the private sector, donors are significantly associated with the public sector. Furthermore, donors (public and private sector) are significantly associated with an economic logic of action and non-donors with an issue-specific framing.

Examining the multiple diversities that come into play in partnership board composition and structuring enables an improved theorisation of partnership effectiveness; it also holds important implications for board decisions and the sustainability and educational impacts that these partnerships are purported to deliver.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Oscar Valiente is Senior Lecturer in Educational Leadership & Policy at the University of Glasgow, Scotland. 

While most comparative education studies have focused on the historical processes that gave birth to the dual model in Germanic countries, our research aims to elucidate the drivers that explain why policymakers embrace the dual apprenticeship idea and how they re-contextualize it in their own educational context.

Drawing on a constructivist political economy framework, our study specifically investigates the reasons of policymakers in India and Mexico to adopt the dual model and how their different institutional conditions explain variations in the way the two countries have re-contextualized this global policy idea.

The selected cases are particularly interesting for the comparison because of the broad ambitions of their national reforms and the significant differences in the type of dual model of apprenticeships finally retained in the two countries.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Miguel Antonio Lim is Senior Lecturer in Education at the University of Manchester, UK, with special focus on Education and International Development at the University’s School of Environment, Education, and Development (SEED).

At this seminar, the evolving role of transnational higher education (TNHE) as part of wider national development policy will be discussed.

Using the case of Sino-foreign educational partnerships, Dr Lim will outline several features of the evolution of policies to govern and achieve more ‘equal’ partnerships.

In China, TNHE partnerships are seen as an important part of its drive to build ‘World Class Universities’. Its case shows an increasing orientation towards quality over quantity of partnerships and a growing role for urban and regional geopolitics in the choice of its HE partnerships.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Thabo Msibi is Associate Professor in Curriculum Studies in the School of Education at the University of KwaZulu-Natal, where he is also the Dean and Head of the School of Education.   

Professor Msibi’s scholarship is on the interface of gender and sexuality issues, particularly as they relate to education.  He also is interested in theory building as it relates to African sexualities.  He has published research in South African and international journals on these subjects, and has co-edited six journal special issues.

Thabo has also published numerous book chapters looking at the educational experiences of individuals who claim same-sex identities.  His recent monograph entitled Hidden Sexualities of South African Teachers: Black Male Educators and Same-sex Desire is published by Routledge.

This seminar reflects on the public uproar that has come with the expansion of the comprehensive sexuality education programme by the Department of Basic Education in South Africa.

Touted globally by the UNESCO and other international organisations as a critical vehicle for the promotion of positive sexual behaviour amongst young people, comprehensive sexuality education has recently received significant international fanfare.  This focus follows the release of the revised International technical guidance on sexuality education by UNESCO in 2018.  Some African countries, including South Africa, have used the revisions to update their curriculum offerings on sexuality education.

Section nine of the South African Constitution, known as the Equality Clause, explicitly provides protections against unfair discrimination on the basis of race, gender, sex, pregnancy, marital status, ethnic or social origin, colour, sexual orientation, age, disability, religion, conscience, belief, culture, language and birth.

It was through this constitutional guarantee that the country sought to revise its comprehensive curriculum offering, leading to significant backlash from the traditional, religious and conservative organisations. Front-page media articles screamed that the Minister of Education was trying to teach young children about how to have sex, and that she was effectively sexualising young children. The Ministry was also accused of imposing a Western ideals on African people.

The seminar will analyse the transnational and local reasons for the conservative backlash in South Africa. It will argue that the response largely follows a coordinated international movement that has sought to undermine sexuality education and reverse the gains already made by sexual rights organisations.  It will showcase how local sexual politics reflect a transnational mobility of ideas that are reconfigured at a local level in order to attain legitimacy.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Miri Yemini is a tenured Senior Lecturer in the School of Education at Tel Aviv University.

At Tel Aviv Dr. Yemini teaches graduate and undergraduate modules in education, including Internationalisation in Education, Education and Globalisation, Entrepreneurship in Education and Project Management in Schools.

Dr. Yemini serves as a co-Chair of UNESCO chair for Technology and Internationalisation in Education. Recently (April 2018) she was awarded (with Prof. Dr. Nina Kolleck) by the Max Plank Foundation the Award for Research Cooperation and High Excellence in Science (ARCHES), to develop research in the field of school-NGO interactions. This year (2021) Dr. Yemini secured funding from Israeli Science Foundation (150,000 Euro) for her project on education trajectories of Global Middle Class families.

Increasing numbers of highly educated and skilled professionals are internationally mobile for work. Some are transferred by employers; some proactively seek out new positions in different countries.

The currently estimated size of this group (known as globally mobile professionals, ‘global expatriates’ or members of a global middle class) is 66.2 million, which is predicted to rise to 87.5 million by 2022.

The increasing number, but also growing cultural diversity of this group (originating from all parts of the world), and the extent to which/frequency they relocate is an important articulation of newer forms of transnationalism that encompass the movement of people and ideas, and changing economic and social relations.

This seminar aims to map out and theorise the everyday practices of these globally middle professional families and to consider how their presence in key cities around the world might be re-shaping political, social, economic and education structures.

In particular, we will discuss how these families experience mobility and what motivates these relocations; how families create a sense of identity while ‘on the move’; what short-term and longer term aspirations the professionals, their partners and their children have; what education and extra-curricular choices are made; how different cultural contexts are negotiated etc.

Critically, we will discuss how these middle class families work to reproduce and extend their privilege, and so engage in ‘class-making’ practices.  Ultimately, this work offers a much-needed empirical basis to examine the theoretical proposition that there is now a ‘global’ middle class that is somehow different to nationally-located middle class groups.

The Department of Education and St Edmunds Hall are delighted to announce a new Public Seminar series which will take place online in Trinity Term on Wednesdays from 3pm-4pm (UK time) between 5th May and 28th July.

 

The Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education will address themes of major interest to academics, practitioners, and policy-makers working in the field of education globally. These seminars aim to illuminate the role of education in societal development, with a focus on understanding changes in education policy, discourse, and practice, and how these changes influence individual opportunities and shape the development of educational institutions around the world. Seminars will zoom into the local and zoom out into the national and supranational spaces, flows, and influences on education.

The series will be chaired by Maia Chankseliani, Associate Professor of Comparative and International Education, and will feature the following speakers:

Thabo Msibi, Dean and Head of School, School of Education, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

Miri Yemini, Senior Lecturer, Tel Aviv University, Israel

Miguel Antonio Lim, Senior Lecturer in Education, University of Manchester, United Kingdom

Oscar Valiente, Senior Lecturer University of Glasgow, United Kingdom

Moira Faul, Executive Director, NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva, Switzerland

Aliya Kuzhabekova, Associate Professor, Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan

 

To view the full programme of seminars, please click here.

Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education

Joint seminars organised by the Department of Education and St Edmund Hall, University of Oxford.

Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education address themes of major interest to academics, practitioners, and policy-makers working in the field of education globally. These seminars aim to illuminate the role of education in societal development, with a focus on understanding changes in education policy, discourse, and practice, and how these changes influence individual opportunities and shape the development of educational institutions around the world. Seminars will zoom into the local and zoom out into the national and supranational spaces, flows, and influences on education.

The series will be chaired by Maia Chankseliani, Associate Professor of Comparative and International Education.

 

The seminar programme:

*Please note that all seminars have a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

 

Wed 5 May at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Breaking gender, sex and sexuality borders: The case of comprehensive sexuality education in South Africa’

– Thabo Msibi, Dean and Head of School, School of Education, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

 

Wed 19 May at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Global Middle-Class families – comparative study of travel trajectories and imagined futures’

– Miri Yemini, Senior Lecturer, Tel Aviv University, Israel

 

Wed 2 June at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Equal’ Transnational Partnerships in Higher Education: Sino-Foreign Case Studies’

– Miguel Antonio Lim, Senior Lecturer in Education, University of Manchester, UK

 

Wed 16 June at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Why did policymakers in India and Mexico adopt the Germanic model of dual apprenticeships?’

– Oscar Valiente, Senior Lecturer University of Glasgow, UK

 

Wed 7th July at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Governing education by partnership: the GPE in the context of other sectors’ global financing partnerships.’

– Moira V. Faul, Executive Director, NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva

 

Wed 28th July at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

A comparison of the transition of returning scholars to domestic research environments in Kazakhstan, Malaysia and Cambodia.’

– Aliya Kuzhabekova, Associate Professor, Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Aliya Kuzhabekova is Associate Professor at Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan.

In this talk, Aliya Kuzhabekova will report on the results of a collaborative project exploring how individuals, who received Ph.D. degrees abroad transition to research environment in their home countries.

In particular, the aim of the comparative study was to develop a better understanding about how returnees, who obtained degrees in countries with high levels of research capacity re-integrated in the research environment of countries with lower levels of research capacities.

In addition, the project team tried to reveal the extent to which the returnees served as change agents transforming the research environment in their countries. The study allowed to obtain comparative insights about cross-country and program-related variations in the returnees’ adjustment experiences.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Moira V. Faul is Executive Director of NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva. 

The Global Partnership for Education (GPE) is one of a recent proliferation of pooled financing mechanisms in sustainable development. Despite a policy narrative of inclusive and egalitarian partnering, differences between public, private and voluntary sectors are assumed to affect relations between partners, and the effectiveness of partnerships.

We theorise global financing partnerships as a social ‘space between fields’ that is generated and structured by relationships between the actors mobilised into partnership boards from different fields. We move beyond the conventional focus on sectoral factions to investigate the potential of other aspects of diversity to affect partnership outcomes.

We empirically investigate the structuring of the space of global financing partnerships, comparing the GPE with climate change and health, by analysing a new dataset of 188 board members of ten global financing partnerships. First, network analyses reveal that donors (whether states, international organisations or private sector) are systematically privileged in this partnership space.

Secondly, faultline analytical tools reveal that despite a narrative of additional financing from the private sector, donors are significantly associated with the public sector. Furthermore, donors (public and private sector) are significantly associated with an economic logic of action and non-donors with an issue-specific framing.

Examining the multiple diversities that come into play in partnership board composition and structuring enables an improved theorisation of partnership effectiveness; it also holds important implications for board decisions and the sustainability and educational impacts that these partnerships are purported to deliver.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Oscar Valiente is Senior Lecturer in Educational Leadership & Policy at the University of Glasgow, Scotland. 

While most comparative education studies have focused on the historical processes that gave birth to the dual model in Germanic countries, our research aims to elucidate the drivers that explain why policymakers embrace the dual apprenticeship idea and how they re-contextualize it in their own educational context.

Drawing on a constructivist political economy framework, our study specifically investigates the reasons of policymakers in India and Mexico to adopt the dual model and how their different institutional conditions explain variations in the way the two countries have re-contextualized this global policy idea.

The selected cases are particularly interesting for the comparison because of the broad ambitions of their national reforms and the significant differences in the type of dual model of apprenticeships finally retained in the two countries.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Miguel Antonio Lim is Senior Lecturer in Education at the University of Manchester, UK, with special focus on Education and International Development at the University’s School of Environment, Education, and Development (SEED).

At this seminar, the evolving role of transnational higher education (TNHE) as part of wider national development policy will be discussed.

Using the case of Sino-foreign educational partnerships, Dr Lim will outline several features of the evolution of policies to govern and achieve more ‘equal’ partnerships.

In China, TNHE partnerships are seen as an important part of its drive to build ‘World Class Universities’. Its case shows an increasing orientation towards quality over quantity of partnerships and a growing role for urban and regional geopolitics in the choice of its HE partnerships.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Thabo Msibi is Associate Professor in Curriculum Studies in the School of Education at the University of KwaZulu-Natal, where he is also the Dean and Head of the School of Education.   

Professor Msibi’s scholarship is on the interface of gender and sexuality issues, particularly as they relate to education.  He also is interested in theory building as it relates to African sexualities.  He has published research in South African and international journals on these subjects, and has co-edited six journal special issues.

Thabo has also published numerous book chapters looking at the educational experiences of individuals who claim same-sex identities.  His recent monograph entitled Hidden Sexualities of South African Teachers: Black Male Educators and Same-sex Desire is published by Routledge.

This seminar reflects on the public uproar that has come with the expansion of the comprehensive sexuality education programme by the Department of Basic Education in South Africa.

Touted globally by the UNESCO and other international organisations as a critical vehicle for the promotion of positive sexual behaviour amongst young people, comprehensive sexuality education has recently received significant international fanfare.  This focus follows the release of the revised International technical guidance on sexuality education by UNESCO in 2018.  Some African countries, including South Africa, have used the revisions to update their curriculum offerings on sexuality education.

Section nine of the South African Constitution, known as the Equality Clause, explicitly provides protections against unfair discrimination on the basis of race, gender, sex, pregnancy, marital status, ethnic or social origin, colour, sexual orientation, age, disability, religion, conscience, belief, culture, language and birth.

It was through this constitutional guarantee that the country sought to revise its comprehensive curriculum offering, leading to significant backlash from the traditional, religious and conservative organisations. Front-page media articles screamed that the Minister of Education was trying to teach young children about how to have sex, and that she was effectively sexualising young children. The Ministry was also accused of imposing a Western ideals on African people.

The seminar will analyse the transnational and local reasons for the conservative backlash in South Africa. It will argue that the response largely follows a coordinated international movement that has sought to undermine sexuality education and reverse the gains already made by sexual rights organisations.  It will showcase how local sexual politics reflect a transnational mobility of ideas that are reconfigured at a local level in order to attain legitimacy.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Miri Yemini is a tenured Senior Lecturer in the School of Education at Tel Aviv University.

At Tel Aviv Dr. Yemini teaches graduate and undergraduate modules in education, including Internationalisation in Education, Education and Globalisation, Entrepreneurship in Education and Project Management in Schools.

Dr. Yemini serves as a co-Chair of UNESCO chair for Technology and Internationalisation in Education. Recently (April 2018) she was awarded (with Prof. Dr. Nina Kolleck) by the Max Plank Foundation the Award for Research Cooperation and High Excellence in Science (ARCHES), to develop research in the field of school-NGO interactions. This year (2021) Dr. Yemini secured funding from Israeli Science Foundation (150,000 Euro) for her project on education trajectories of Global Middle Class families.

Increasing numbers of highly educated and skilled professionals are internationally mobile for work. Some are transferred by employers; some proactively seek out new positions in different countries.

The currently estimated size of this group (known as globally mobile professionals, ‘global expatriates’ or members of a global middle class) is 66.2 million, which is predicted to rise to 87.5 million by 2022.

The increasing number, but also growing cultural diversity of this group (originating from all parts of the world), and the extent to which/frequency they relocate is an important articulation of newer forms of transnationalism that encompass the movement of people and ideas, and changing economic and social relations.

This seminar aims to map out and theorise the everyday practices of these globally middle professional families and to consider how their presence in key cities around the world might be re-shaping political, social, economic and education structures.

In particular, we will discuss how these families experience mobility and what motivates these relocations; how families create a sense of identity while ‘on the move’; what short-term and longer term aspirations the professionals, their partners and their children have; what education and extra-curricular choices are made; how different cultural contexts are negotiated etc.

Critically, we will discuss how these middle class families work to reproduce and extend their privilege, and so engage in ‘class-making’ practices.  Ultimately, this work offers a much-needed empirical basis to examine the theoretical proposition that there is now a ‘global’ middle class that is somehow different to nationally-located middle class groups.

The Department of Education and St Edmunds Hall are delighted to announce a new Public Seminar series which will take place online in Trinity Term on Wednesdays from 3pm-4pm (UK time) between 5th May and 28th July.

 

The Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education will address themes of major interest to academics, practitioners, and policy-makers working in the field of education globally. These seminars aim to illuminate the role of education in societal development, with a focus on understanding changes in education policy, discourse, and practice, and how these changes influence individual opportunities and shape the development of educational institutions around the world. Seminars will zoom into the local and zoom out into the national and supranational spaces, flows, and influences on education.

The series will be chaired by Maia Chankseliani, Associate Professor of Comparative and International Education, and will feature the following speakers:

Thabo Msibi, Dean and Head of School, School of Education, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

Miri Yemini, Senior Lecturer, Tel Aviv University, Israel

Miguel Antonio Lim, Senior Lecturer in Education, University of Manchester, United Kingdom

Oscar Valiente, Senior Lecturer University of Glasgow, United Kingdom

Moira Faul, Executive Director, NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva, Switzerland

Aliya Kuzhabekova, Associate Professor, Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan

 

To view the full programme of seminars, please click here.

Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education

Joint seminars organised by the Department of Education and St Edmund Hall, University of Oxford.

Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education address themes of major interest to academics, practitioners, and policy-makers working in the field of education globally. These seminars aim to illuminate the role of education in societal development, with a focus on understanding changes in education policy, discourse, and practice, and how these changes influence individual opportunities and shape the development of educational institutions around the world. Seminars will zoom into the local and zoom out into the national and supranational spaces, flows, and influences on education.

The series will be chaired by Maia Chankseliani, Associate Professor of Comparative and International Education.

 

The seminar programme:

*Please note that all seminars have a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

 

Wed 5 May at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Breaking gender, sex and sexuality borders: The case of comprehensive sexuality education in South Africa’

– Thabo Msibi, Dean and Head of School, School of Education, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

 

Wed 19 May at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Global Middle-Class families – comparative study of travel trajectories and imagined futures’

– Miri Yemini, Senior Lecturer, Tel Aviv University, Israel

 

Wed 2 June at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Equal’ Transnational Partnerships in Higher Education: Sino-Foreign Case Studies’

– Miguel Antonio Lim, Senior Lecturer in Education, University of Manchester, UK

 

Wed 16 June at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Why did policymakers in India and Mexico adopt the Germanic model of dual apprenticeships?’

– Oscar Valiente, Senior Lecturer University of Glasgow, UK

 

Wed 7th July at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Governing education by partnership: the GPE in the context of other sectors’ global financing partnerships.’

– Moira V. Faul, Executive Director, NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva

 

Wed 28th July at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

A comparison of the transition of returning scholars to domestic research environments in Kazakhstan, Malaysia and Cambodia.’

– Aliya Kuzhabekova, Associate Professor, Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Aliya Kuzhabekova is Associate Professor at Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan.

In this talk, Aliya Kuzhabekova will report on the results of a collaborative project exploring how individuals, who received Ph.D. degrees abroad transition to research environment in their home countries.

In particular, the aim of the comparative study was to develop a better understanding about how returnees, who obtained degrees in countries with high levels of research capacity re-integrated in the research environment of countries with lower levels of research capacities.

In addition, the project team tried to reveal the extent to which the returnees served as change agents transforming the research environment in their countries. The study allowed to obtain comparative insights about cross-country and program-related variations in the returnees’ adjustment experiences.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Moira V. Faul is Executive Director of NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva. 

The Global Partnership for Education (GPE) is one of a recent proliferation of pooled financing mechanisms in sustainable development. Despite a policy narrative of inclusive and egalitarian partnering, differences between public, private and voluntary sectors are assumed to affect relations between partners, and the effectiveness of partnerships.

We theorise global financing partnerships as a social ‘space between fields’ that is generated and structured by relationships between the actors mobilised into partnership boards from different fields. We move beyond the conventional focus on sectoral factions to investigate the potential of other aspects of diversity to affect partnership outcomes.

We empirically investigate the structuring of the space of global financing partnerships, comparing the GPE with climate change and health, by analysing a new dataset of 188 board members of ten global financing partnerships. First, network analyses reveal that donors (whether states, international organisations or private sector) are systematically privileged in this partnership space.

Secondly, faultline analytical tools reveal that despite a narrative of additional financing from the private sector, donors are significantly associated with the public sector. Furthermore, donors (public and private sector) are significantly associated with an economic logic of action and non-donors with an issue-specific framing.

Examining the multiple diversities that come into play in partnership board composition and structuring enables an improved theorisation of partnership effectiveness; it also holds important implications for board decisions and the sustainability and educational impacts that these partnerships are purported to deliver.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Oscar Valiente is Senior Lecturer in Educational Leadership & Policy at the University of Glasgow, Scotland. 

While most comparative education studies have focused on the historical processes that gave birth to the dual model in Germanic countries, our research aims to elucidate the drivers that explain why policymakers embrace the dual apprenticeship idea and how they re-contextualize it in their own educational context.

Drawing on a constructivist political economy framework, our study specifically investigates the reasons of policymakers in India and Mexico to adopt the dual model and how their different institutional conditions explain variations in the way the two countries have re-contextualized this global policy idea.

The selected cases are particularly interesting for the comparison because of the broad ambitions of their national reforms and the significant differences in the type of dual model of apprenticeships finally retained in the two countries.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Miguel Antonio Lim is Senior Lecturer in Education at the University of Manchester, UK, with special focus on Education and International Development at the University’s School of Environment, Education, and Development (SEED).

At this seminar, the evolving role of transnational higher education (TNHE) as part of wider national development policy will be discussed.

Using the case of Sino-foreign educational partnerships, Dr Lim will outline several features of the evolution of policies to govern and achieve more ‘equal’ partnerships.

In China, TNHE partnerships are seen as an important part of its drive to build ‘World Class Universities’. Its case shows an increasing orientation towards quality over quantity of partnerships and a growing role for urban and regional geopolitics in the choice of its HE partnerships.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Thabo Msibi is Associate Professor in Curriculum Studies in the School of Education at the University of KwaZulu-Natal, where he is also the Dean and Head of the School of Education.   

Professor Msibi’s scholarship is on the interface of gender and sexuality issues, particularly as they relate to education.  He also is interested in theory building as it relates to African sexualities.  He has published research in South African and international journals on these subjects, and has co-edited six journal special issues.

Thabo has also published numerous book chapters looking at the educational experiences of individuals who claim same-sex identities.  His recent monograph entitled Hidden Sexualities of South African Teachers: Black Male Educators and Same-sex Desire is published by Routledge.

This seminar reflects on the public uproar that has come with the expansion of the comprehensive sexuality education programme by the Department of Basic Education in South Africa.

Touted globally by the UNESCO and other international organisations as a critical vehicle for the promotion of positive sexual behaviour amongst young people, comprehensive sexuality education has recently received significant international fanfare.  This focus follows the release of the revised International technical guidance on sexuality education by UNESCO in 2018.  Some African countries, including South Africa, have used the revisions to update their curriculum offerings on sexuality education.

Section nine of the South African Constitution, known as the Equality Clause, explicitly provides protections against unfair discrimination on the basis of race, gender, sex, pregnancy, marital status, ethnic or social origin, colour, sexual orientation, age, disability, religion, conscience, belief, culture, language and birth.

It was through this constitutional guarantee that the country sought to revise its comprehensive curriculum offering, leading to significant backlash from the traditional, religious and conservative organisations. Front-page media articles screamed that the Minister of Education was trying to teach young children about how to have sex, and that she was effectively sexualising young children. The Ministry was also accused of imposing a Western ideals on African people.

The seminar will analyse the transnational and local reasons for the conservative backlash in South Africa. It will argue that the response largely follows a coordinated international movement that has sought to undermine sexuality education and reverse the gains already made by sexual rights organisations.  It will showcase how local sexual politics reflect a transnational mobility of ideas that are reconfigured at a local level in order to attain legitimacy.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Miri Yemini is a tenured Senior Lecturer in the School of Education at Tel Aviv University.

At Tel Aviv Dr. Yemini teaches graduate and undergraduate modules in education, including Internationalisation in Education, Education and Globalisation, Entrepreneurship in Education and Project Management in Schools.

Dr. Yemini serves as a co-Chair of UNESCO chair for Technology and Internationalisation in Education. Recently (April 2018) she was awarded (with Prof. Dr. Nina Kolleck) by the Max Plank Foundation the Award for Research Cooperation and High Excellence in Science (ARCHES), to develop research in the field of school-NGO interactions. This year (2021) Dr. Yemini secured funding from Israeli Science Foundation (150,000 Euro) for her project on education trajectories of Global Middle Class families.

Increasing numbers of highly educated and skilled professionals are internationally mobile for work. Some are transferred by employers; some proactively seek out new positions in different countries.

The currently estimated size of this group (known as globally mobile professionals, ‘global expatriates’ or members of a global middle class) is 66.2 million, which is predicted to rise to 87.5 million by 2022.

The increasing number, but also growing cultural diversity of this group (originating from all parts of the world), and the extent to which/frequency they relocate is an important articulation of newer forms of transnationalism that encompass the movement of people and ideas, and changing economic and social relations.

This seminar aims to map out and theorise the everyday practices of these globally middle professional families and to consider how their presence in key cities around the world might be re-shaping political, social, economic and education structures.

In particular, we will discuss how these families experience mobility and what motivates these relocations; how families create a sense of identity while ‘on the move’; what short-term and longer term aspirations the professionals, their partners and their children have; what education and extra-curricular choices are made; how different cultural contexts are negotiated etc.

Critically, we will discuss how these middle class families work to reproduce and extend their privilege, and so engage in ‘class-making’ practices.  Ultimately, this work offers a much-needed empirical basis to examine the theoretical proposition that there is now a ‘global’ middle class that is somehow different to nationally-located middle class groups.

The Department of Education and St Edmunds Hall are delighted to announce a new Public Seminar series which will take place online in Trinity Term on Wednesdays from 3pm-4pm (UK time) between 5th May and 28th July.

 

The Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education will address themes of major interest to academics, practitioners, and policy-makers working in the field of education globally. These seminars aim to illuminate the role of education in societal development, with a focus on understanding changes in education policy, discourse, and practice, and how these changes influence individual opportunities and shape the development of educational institutions around the world. Seminars will zoom into the local and zoom out into the national and supranational spaces, flows, and influences on education.

The series will be chaired by Maia Chankseliani, Associate Professor of Comparative and International Education, and will feature the following speakers:

Thabo Msibi, Dean and Head of School, School of Education, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

Miri Yemini, Senior Lecturer, Tel Aviv University, Israel

Miguel Antonio Lim, Senior Lecturer in Education, University of Manchester, United Kingdom

Oscar Valiente, Senior Lecturer University of Glasgow, United Kingdom

Moira Faul, Executive Director, NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva, Switzerland

Aliya Kuzhabekova, Associate Professor, Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan

 

To view the full programme of seminars, please click here.

Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education

Joint seminars organised by the Department of Education and St Edmund Hall, University of Oxford.

Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education address themes of major interest to academics, practitioners, and policy-makers working in the field of education globally. These seminars aim to illuminate the role of education in societal development, with a focus on understanding changes in education policy, discourse, and practice, and how these changes influence individual opportunities and shape the development of educational institutions around the world. Seminars will zoom into the local and zoom out into the national and supranational spaces, flows, and influences on education.

The series will be chaired by Maia Chankseliani, Associate Professor of Comparative and International Education.

 

The seminar programme:

*Please note that all seminars have a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

 

Wed 5 May at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Breaking gender, sex and sexuality borders: The case of comprehensive sexuality education in South Africa’

– Thabo Msibi, Dean and Head of School, School of Education, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

 

Wed 19 May at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Global Middle-Class families – comparative study of travel trajectories and imagined futures’

– Miri Yemini, Senior Lecturer, Tel Aviv University, Israel

 

Wed 2 June at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Equal’ Transnational Partnerships in Higher Education: Sino-Foreign Case Studies’

– Miguel Antonio Lim, Senior Lecturer in Education, University of Manchester, UK

 

Wed 16 June at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Why did policymakers in India and Mexico adopt the Germanic model of dual apprenticeships?’

– Oscar Valiente, Senior Lecturer University of Glasgow, UK

 

Wed 7th July at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Governing education by partnership: the GPE in the context of other sectors’ global financing partnerships.’

– Moira V. Faul, Executive Director, NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva

 

Wed 28th July at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

A comparison of the transition of returning scholars to domestic research environments in Kazakhstan, Malaysia and Cambodia.’

– Aliya Kuzhabekova, Associate Professor, Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Aliya Kuzhabekova is Associate Professor at Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan.

In this talk, Aliya Kuzhabekova will report on the results of a collaborative project exploring how individuals, who received Ph.D. degrees abroad transition to research environment in their home countries.

In particular, the aim of the comparative study was to develop a better understanding about how returnees, who obtained degrees in countries with high levels of research capacity re-integrated in the research environment of countries with lower levels of research capacities.

In addition, the project team tried to reveal the extent to which the returnees served as change agents transforming the research environment in their countries. The study allowed to obtain comparative insights about cross-country and program-related variations in the returnees’ adjustment experiences.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Moira V. Faul is Executive Director of NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva. 

The Global Partnership for Education (GPE) is one of a recent proliferation of pooled financing mechanisms in sustainable development. Despite a policy narrative of inclusive and egalitarian partnering, differences between public, private and voluntary sectors are assumed to affect relations between partners, and the effectiveness of partnerships.

We theorise global financing partnerships as a social ‘space between fields’ that is generated and structured by relationships between the actors mobilised into partnership boards from different fields. We move beyond the conventional focus on sectoral factions to investigate the potential of other aspects of diversity to affect partnership outcomes.

We empirically investigate the structuring of the space of global financing partnerships, comparing the GPE with climate change and health, by analysing a new dataset of 188 board members of ten global financing partnerships. First, network analyses reveal that donors (whether states, international organisations or private sector) are systematically privileged in this partnership space.

Secondly, faultline analytical tools reveal that despite a narrative of additional financing from the private sector, donors are significantly associated with the public sector. Furthermore, donors (public and private sector) are significantly associated with an economic logic of action and non-donors with an issue-specific framing.

Examining the multiple diversities that come into play in partnership board composition and structuring enables an improved theorisation of partnership effectiveness; it also holds important implications for board decisions and the sustainability and educational impacts that these partnerships are purported to deliver.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Oscar Valiente is Senior Lecturer in Educational Leadership & Policy at the University of Glasgow, Scotland. 

While most comparative education studies have focused on the historical processes that gave birth to the dual model in Germanic countries, our research aims to elucidate the drivers that explain why policymakers embrace the dual apprenticeship idea and how they re-contextualize it in their own educational context.

Drawing on a constructivist political economy framework, our study specifically investigates the reasons of policymakers in India and Mexico to adopt the dual model and how their different institutional conditions explain variations in the way the two countries have re-contextualized this global policy idea.

The selected cases are particularly interesting for the comparison because of the broad ambitions of their national reforms and the significant differences in the type of dual model of apprenticeships finally retained in the two countries.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Miguel Antonio Lim is Senior Lecturer in Education at the University of Manchester, UK, with special focus on Education and International Development at the University’s School of Environment, Education, and Development (SEED).

At this seminar, the evolving role of transnational higher education (TNHE) as part of wider national development policy will be discussed.

Using the case of Sino-foreign educational partnerships, Dr Lim will outline several features of the evolution of policies to govern and achieve more ‘equal’ partnerships.

In China, TNHE partnerships are seen as an important part of its drive to build ‘World Class Universities’. Its case shows an increasing orientation towards quality over quantity of partnerships and a growing role for urban and regional geopolitics in the choice of its HE partnerships.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Thabo Msibi is Associate Professor in Curriculum Studies in the School of Education at the University of KwaZulu-Natal, where he is also the Dean and Head of the School of Education.   

Professor Msibi’s scholarship is on the interface of gender and sexuality issues, particularly as they relate to education.  He also is interested in theory building as it relates to African sexualities.  He has published research in South African and international journals on these subjects, and has co-edited six journal special issues.

Thabo has also published numerous book chapters looking at the educational experiences of individuals who claim same-sex identities.  His recent monograph entitled Hidden Sexualities of South African Teachers: Black Male Educators and Same-sex Desire is published by Routledge.

This seminar reflects on the public uproar that has come with the expansion of the comprehensive sexuality education programme by the Department of Basic Education in South Africa.

Touted globally by the UNESCO and other international organisations as a critical vehicle for the promotion of positive sexual behaviour amongst young people, comprehensive sexuality education has recently received significant international fanfare.  This focus follows the release of the revised International technical guidance on sexuality education by UNESCO in 2018.  Some African countries, including South Africa, have used the revisions to update their curriculum offerings on sexuality education.

Section nine of the South African Constitution, known as the Equality Clause, explicitly provides protections against unfair discrimination on the basis of race, gender, sex, pregnancy, marital status, ethnic or social origin, colour, sexual orientation, age, disability, religion, conscience, belief, culture, language and birth.

It was through this constitutional guarantee that the country sought to revise its comprehensive curriculum offering, leading to significant backlash from the traditional, religious and conservative organisations. Front-page media articles screamed that the Minister of Education was trying to teach young children about how to have sex, and that she was effectively sexualising young children. The Ministry was also accused of imposing a Western ideals on African people.

The seminar will analyse the transnational and local reasons for the conservative backlash in South Africa. It will argue that the response largely follows a coordinated international movement that has sought to undermine sexuality education and reverse the gains already made by sexual rights organisations.  It will showcase how local sexual politics reflect a transnational mobility of ideas that are reconfigured at a local level in order to attain legitimacy.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Miri Yemini is a tenured Senior Lecturer in the School of Education at Tel Aviv University.

At Tel Aviv Dr. Yemini teaches graduate and undergraduate modules in education, including Internationalisation in Education, Education and Globalisation, Entrepreneurship in Education and Project Management in Schools.

Dr. Yemini serves as a co-Chair of UNESCO chair for Technology and Internationalisation in Education. Recently (April 2018) she was awarded (with Prof. Dr. Nina Kolleck) by the Max Plank Foundation the Award for Research Cooperation and High Excellence in Science (ARCHES), to develop research in the field of school-NGO interactions. This year (2021) Dr. Yemini secured funding from Israeli Science Foundation (150,000 Euro) for her project on education trajectories of Global Middle Class families.

Increasing numbers of highly educated and skilled professionals are internationally mobile for work. Some are transferred by employers; some proactively seek out new positions in different countries.

The currently estimated size of this group (known as globally mobile professionals, ‘global expatriates’ or members of a global middle class) is 66.2 million, which is predicted to rise to 87.5 million by 2022.

The increasing number, but also growing cultural diversity of this group (originating from all parts of the world), and the extent to which/frequency they relocate is an important articulation of newer forms of transnationalism that encompass the movement of people and ideas, and changing economic and social relations.

This seminar aims to map out and theorise the everyday practices of these globally middle professional families and to consider how their presence in key cities around the world might be re-shaping political, social, economic and education structures.

In particular, we will discuss how these families experience mobility and what motivates these relocations; how families create a sense of identity while ‘on the move’; what short-term and longer term aspirations the professionals, their partners and their children have; what education and extra-curricular choices are made; how different cultural contexts are negotiated etc.

Critically, we will discuss how these middle class families work to reproduce and extend their privilege, and so engage in ‘class-making’ practices.  Ultimately, this work offers a much-needed empirical basis to examine the theoretical proposition that there is now a ‘global’ middle class that is somehow different to nationally-located middle class groups.

The Department of Education and St Edmunds Hall are delighted to announce a new Public Seminar series which will take place online in Trinity Term on Wednesdays from 3pm-4pm (UK time) between 5th May and 28th July.

 

The Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education will address themes of major interest to academics, practitioners, and policy-makers working in the field of education globally. These seminars aim to illuminate the role of education in societal development, with a focus on understanding changes in education policy, discourse, and practice, and how these changes influence individual opportunities and shape the development of educational institutions around the world. Seminars will zoom into the local and zoom out into the national and supranational spaces, flows, and influences on education.

The series will be chaired by Maia Chankseliani, Associate Professor of Comparative and International Education, and will feature the following speakers:

Thabo Msibi, Dean and Head of School, School of Education, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

Miri Yemini, Senior Lecturer, Tel Aviv University, Israel

Miguel Antonio Lim, Senior Lecturer in Education, University of Manchester, United Kingdom

Oscar Valiente, Senior Lecturer University of Glasgow, United Kingdom

Moira Faul, Executive Director, NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva, Switzerland

Aliya Kuzhabekova, Associate Professor, Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan

 

To view the full programme of seminars, please click here.

Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education

Joint seminars organised by the Department of Education and St Edmund Hall, University of Oxford.

Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education address themes of major interest to academics, practitioners, and policy-makers working in the field of education globally. These seminars aim to illuminate the role of education in societal development, with a focus on understanding changes in education policy, discourse, and practice, and how these changes influence individual opportunities and shape the development of educational institutions around the world. Seminars will zoom into the local and zoom out into the national and supranational spaces, flows, and influences on education.

The series will be chaired by Maia Chankseliani, Associate Professor of Comparative and International Education.

 

The seminar programme:

*Please note that all seminars have a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

 

Wed 5 May at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Breaking gender, sex and sexuality borders: The case of comprehensive sexuality education in South Africa’

– Thabo Msibi, Dean and Head of School, School of Education, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

 

Wed 19 May at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Global Middle-Class families – comparative study of travel trajectories and imagined futures’

– Miri Yemini, Senior Lecturer, Tel Aviv University, Israel

 

Wed 2 June at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Equal’ Transnational Partnerships in Higher Education: Sino-Foreign Case Studies’

– Miguel Antonio Lim, Senior Lecturer in Education, University of Manchester, UK

 

Wed 16 June at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Why did policymakers in India and Mexico adopt the Germanic model of dual apprenticeships?’

– Oscar Valiente, Senior Lecturer University of Glasgow, UK

 

Wed 7th July at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Governing education by partnership: the GPE in the context of other sectors’ global financing partnerships.’

– Moira V. Faul, Executive Director, NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva

 

Wed 28th July at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

A comparison of the transition of returning scholars to domestic research environments in Kazakhstan, Malaysia and Cambodia.’

– Aliya Kuzhabekova, Associate Professor, Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Aliya Kuzhabekova is Associate Professor at Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan.

In this talk, Aliya Kuzhabekova will report on the results of a collaborative project exploring how individuals, who received Ph.D. degrees abroad transition to research environment in their home countries.

In particular, the aim of the comparative study was to develop a better understanding about how returnees, who obtained degrees in countries with high levels of research capacity re-integrated in the research environment of countries with lower levels of research capacities.

In addition, the project team tried to reveal the extent to which the returnees served as change agents transforming the research environment in their countries. The study allowed to obtain comparative insights about cross-country and program-related variations in the returnees’ adjustment experiences.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Moira V. Faul is Executive Director of NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva. 

The Global Partnership for Education (GPE) is one of a recent proliferation of pooled financing mechanisms in sustainable development. Despite a policy narrative of inclusive and egalitarian partnering, differences between public, private and voluntary sectors are assumed to affect relations between partners, and the effectiveness of partnerships.

We theorise global financing partnerships as a social ‘space between fields’ that is generated and structured by relationships between the actors mobilised into partnership boards from different fields. We move beyond the conventional focus on sectoral factions to investigate the potential of other aspects of diversity to affect partnership outcomes.

We empirically investigate the structuring of the space of global financing partnerships, comparing the GPE with climate change and health, by analysing a new dataset of 188 board members of ten global financing partnerships. First, network analyses reveal that donors (whether states, international organisations or private sector) are systematically privileged in this partnership space.

Secondly, faultline analytical tools reveal that despite a narrative of additional financing from the private sector, donors are significantly associated with the public sector. Furthermore, donors (public and private sector) are significantly associated with an economic logic of action and non-donors with an issue-specific framing.

Examining the multiple diversities that come into play in partnership board composition and structuring enables an improved theorisation of partnership effectiveness; it also holds important implications for board decisions and the sustainability and educational impacts that these partnerships are purported to deliver.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Oscar Valiente is Senior Lecturer in Educational Leadership & Policy at the University of Glasgow, Scotland. 

While most comparative education studies have focused on the historical processes that gave birth to the dual model in Germanic countries, our research aims to elucidate the drivers that explain why policymakers embrace the dual apprenticeship idea and how they re-contextualize it in their own educational context.

Drawing on a constructivist political economy framework, our study specifically investigates the reasons of policymakers in India and Mexico to adopt the dual model and how their different institutional conditions explain variations in the way the two countries have re-contextualized this global policy idea.

The selected cases are particularly interesting for the comparison because of the broad ambitions of their national reforms and the significant differences in the type of dual model of apprenticeships finally retained in the two countries.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Miguel Antonio Lim is Senior Lecturer in Education at the University of Manchester, UK, with special focus on Education and International Development at the University’s School of Environment, Education, and Development (SEED).

At this seminar, the evolving role of transnational higher education (TNHE) as part of wider national development policy will be discussed.

Using the case of Sino-foreign educational partnerships, Dr Lim will outline several features of the evolution of policies to govern and achieve more ‘equal’ partnerships.

In China, TNHE partnerships are seen as an important part of its drive to build ‘World Class Universities’. Its case shows an increasing orientation towards quality over quantity of partnerships and a growing role for urban and regional geopolitics in the choice of its HE partnerships.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Thabo Msibi is Associate Professor in Curriculum Studies in the School of Education at the University of KwaZulu-Natal, where he is also the Dean and Head of the School of Education.   

Professor Msibi’s scholarship is on the interface of gender and sexuality issues, particularly as they relate to education.  He also is interested in theory building as it relates to African sexualities.  He has published research in South African and international journals on these subjects, and has co-edited six journal special issues.

Thabo has also published numerous book chapters looking at the educational experiences of individuals who claim same-sex identities.  His recent monograph entitled Hidden Sexualities of South African Teachers: Black Male Educators and Same-sex Desire is published by Routledge.

This seminar reflects on the public uproar that has come with the expansion of the comprehensive sexuality education programme by the Department of Basic Education in South Africa.

Touted globally by the UNESCO and other international organisations as a critical vehicle for the promotion of positive sexual behaviour amongst young people, comprehensive sexuality education has recently received significant international fanfare.  This focus follows the release of the revised International technical guidance on sexuality education by UNESCO in 2018.  Some African countries, including South Africa, have used the revisions to update their curriculum offerings on sexuality education.

Section nine of the South African Constitution, known as the Equality Clause, explicitly provides protections against unfair discrimination on the basis of race, gender, sex, pregnancy, marital status, ethnic or social origin, colour, sexual orientation, age, disability, religion, conscience, belief, culture, language and birth.

It was through this constitutional guarantee that the country sought to revise its comprehensive curriculum offering, leading to significant backlash from the traditional, religious and conservative organisations. Front-page media articles screamed that the Minister of Education was trying to teach young children about how to have sex, and that she was effectively sexualising young children. The Ministry was also accused of imposing a Western ideals on African people.

The seminar will analyse the transnational and local reasons for the conservative backlash in South Africa. It will argue that the response largely follows a coordinated international movement that has sought to undermine sexuality education and reverse the gains already made by sexual rights organisations.  It will showcase how local sexual politics reflect a transnational mobility of ideas that are reconfigured at a local level in order to attain legitimacy.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Miri Yemini is a tenured Senior Lecturer in the School of Education at Tel Aviv University.

At Tel Aviv Dr. Yemini teaches graduate and undergraduate modules in education, including Internationalisation in Education, Education and Globalisation, Entrepreneurship in Education and Project Management in Schools.

Dr. Yemini serves as a co-Chair of UNESCO chair for Technology and Internationalisation in Education. Recently (April 2018) she was awarded (with Prof. Dr. Nina Kolleck) by the Max Plank Foundation the Award for Research Cooperation and High Excellence in Science (ARCHES), to develop research in the field of school-NGO interactions. This year (2021) Dr. Yemini secured funding from Israeli Science Foundation (150,000 Euro) for her project on education trajectories of Global Middle Class families.

Increasing numbers of highly educated and skilled professionals are internationally mobile for work. Some are transferred by employers; some proactively seek out new positions in different countries.

The currently estimated size of this group (known as globally mobile professionals, ‘global expatriates’ or members of a global middle class) is 66.2 million, which is predicted to rise to 87.5 million by 2022.

The increasing number, but also growing cultural diversity of this group (originating from all parts of the world), and the extent to which/frequency they relocate is an important articulation of newer forms of transnationalism that encompass the movement of people and ideas, and changing economic and social relations.

This seminar aims to map out and theorise the everyday practices of these globally middle professional families and to consider how their presence in key cities around the world might be re-shaping political, social, economic and education structures.

In particular, we will discuss how these families experience mobility and what motivates these relocations; how families create a sense of identity while ‘on the move’; what short-term and longer term aspirations the professionals, their partners and their children have; what education and extra-curricular choices are made; how different cultural contexts are negotiated etc.

Critically, we will discuss how these middle class families work to reproduce and extend their privilege, and so engage in ‘class-making’ practices.  Ultimately, this work offers a much-needed empirical basis to examine the theoretical proposition that there is now a ‘global’ middle class that is somehow different to nationally-located middle class groups.

The Department of Education and St Edmunds Hall are delighted to announce a new Public Seminar series which will take place online in Trinity Term on Wednesdays from 3pm-4pm (UK time) between 5th May and 28th July.

 

The Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education will address themes of major interest to academics, practitioners, and policy-makers working in the field of education globally. These seminars aim to illuminate the role of education in societal development, with a focus on understanding changes in education policy, discourse, and practice, and how these changes influence individual opportunities and shape the development of educational institutions around the world. Seminars will zoom into the local and zoom out into the national and supranational spaces, flows, and influences on education.

The series will be chaired by Maia Chankseliani, Associate Professor of Comparative and International Education, and will feature the following speakers:

Thabo Msibi, Dean and Head of School, School of Education, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

Miri Yemini, Senior Lecturer, Tel Aviv University, Israel

Miguel Antonio Lim, Senior Lecturer in Education, University of Manchester, United Kingdom

Oscar Valiente, Senior Lecturer University of Glasgow, United Kingdom

Moira Faul, Executive Director, NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva, Switzerland

Aliya Kuzhabekova, Associate Professor, Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan

 

To view the full programme of seminars, please click here.

Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education

Joint seminars organised by the Department of Education and St Edmund Hall, University of Oxford.

Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education address themes of major interest to academics, practitioners, and policy-makers working in the field of education globally. These seminars aim to illuminate the role of education in societal development, with a focus on understanding changes in education policy, discourse, and practice, and how these changes influence individual opportunities and shape the development of educational institutions around the world. Seminars will zoom into the local and zoom out into the national and supranational spaces, flows, and influences on education.

The series will be chaired by Maia Chankseliani, Associate Professor of Comparative and International Education.

 

The seminar programme:

*Please note that all seminars have a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

 

Wed 5 May at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Breaking gender, sex and sexuality borders: The case of comprehensive sexuality education in South Africa’

– Thabo Msibi, Dean and Head of School, School of Education, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

 

Wed 19 May at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Global Middle-Class families – comparative study of travel trajectories and imagined futures’

– Miri Yemini, Senior Lecturer, Tel Aviv University, Israel

 

Wed 2 June at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Equal’ Transnational Partnerships in Higher Education: Sino-Foreign Case Studies’

– Miguel Antonio Lim, Senior Lecturer in Education, University of Manchester, UK

 

Wed 16 June at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Why did policymakers in India and Mexico adopt the Germanic model of dual apprenticeships?’

– Oscar Valiente, Senior Lecturer University of Glasgow, UK

 

Wed 7th July at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Governing education by partnership: the GPE in the context of other sectors’ global financing partnerships.’

– Moira V. Faul, Executive Director, NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva

 

Wed 28th July at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

A comparison of the transition of returning scholars to domestic research environments in Kazakhstan, Malaysia and Cambodia.’

– Aliya Kuzhabekova, Associate Professor, Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Aliya Kuzhabekova is Associate Professor at Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan.

In this talk, Aliya Kuzhabekova will report on the results of a collaborative project exploring how individuals, who received Ph.D. degrees abroad transition to research environment in their home countries.

In particular, the aim of the comparative study was to develop a better understanding about how returnees, who obtained degrees in countries with high levels of research capacity re-integrated in the research environment of countries with lower levels of research capacities.

In addition, the project team tried to reveal the extent to which the returnees served as change agents transforming the research environment in their countries. The study allowed to obtain comparative insights about cross-country and program-related variations in the returnees’ adjustment experiences.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Moira V. Faul is Executive Director of NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva. 

The Global Partnership for Education (GPE) is one of a recent proliferation of pooled financing mechanisms in sustainable development. Despite a policy narrative of inclusive and egalitarian partnering, differences between public, private and voluntary sectors are assumed to affect relations between partners, and the effectiveness of partnerships.

We theorise global financing partnerships as a social ‘space between fields’ that is generated and structured by relationships between the actors mobilised into partnership boards from different fields. We move beyond the conventional focus on sectoral factions to investigate the potential of other aspects of diversity to affect partnership outcomes.

We empirically investigate the structuring of the space of global financing partnerships, comparing the GPE with climate change and health, by analysing a new dataset of 188 board members of ten global financing partnerships. First, network analyses reveal that donors (whether states, international organisations or private sector) are systematically privileged in this partnership space.

Secondly, faultline analytical tools reveal that despite a narrative of additional financing from the private sector, donors are significantly associated with the public sector. Furthermore, donors (public and private sector) are significantly associated with an economic logic of action and non-donors with an issue-specific framing.

Examining the multiple diversities that come into play in partnership board composition and structuring enables an improved theorisation of partnership effectiveness; it also holds important implications for board decisions and the sustainability and educational impacts that these partnerships are purported to deliver.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Oscar Valiente is Senior Lecturer in Educational Leadership & Policy at the University of Glasgow, Scotland. 

While most comparative education studies have focused on the historical processes that gave birth to the dual model in Germanic countries, our research aims to elucidate the drivers that explain why policymakers embrace the dual apprenticeship idea and how they re-contextualize it in their own educational context.

Drawing on a constructivist political economy framework, our study specifically investigates the reasons of policymakers in India and Mexico to adopt the dual model and how their different institutional conditions explain variations in the way the two countries have re-contextualized this global policy idea.

The selected cases are particularly interesting for the comparison because of the broad ambitions of their national reforms and the significant differences in the type of dual model of apprenticeships finally retained in the two countries.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Miguel Antonio Lim is Senior Lecturer in Education at the University of Manchester, UK, with special focus on Education and International Development at the University’s School of Environment, Education, and Development (SEED).

At this seminar, the evolving role of transnational higher education (TNHE) as part of wider national development policy will be discussed.

Using the case of Sino-foreign educational partnerships, Dr Lim will outline several features of the evolution of policies to govern and achieve more ‘equal’ partnerships.

In China, TNHE partnerships are seen as an important part of its drive to build ‘World Class Universities’. Its case shows an increasing orientation towards quality over quantity of partnerships and a growing role for urban and regional geopolitics in the choice of its HE partnerships.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Thabo Msibi is Associate Professor in Curriculum Studies in the School of Education at the University of KwaZulu-Natal, where he is also the Dean and Head of the School of Education.   

Professor Msibi’s scholarship is on the interface of gender and sexuality issues, particularly as they relate to education.  He also is interested in theory building as it relates to African sexualities.  He has published research in South African and international journals on these subjects, and has co-edited six journal special issues.

Thabo has also published numerous book chapters looking at the educational experiences of individuals who claim same-sex identities.  His recent monograph entitled Hidden Sexualities of South African Teachers: Black Male Educators and Same-sex Desire is published by Routledge.

This seminar reflects on the public uproar that has come with the expansion of the comprehensive sexuality education programme by the Department of Basic Education in South Africa.

Touted globally by the UNESCO and other international organisations as a critical vehicle for the promotion of positive sexual behaviour amongst young people, comprehensive sexuality education has recently received significant international fanfare.  This focus follows the release of the revised International technical guidance on sexuality education by UNESCO in 2018.  Some African countries, including South Africa, have used the revisions to update their curriculum offerings on sexuality education.

Section nine of the South African Constitution, known as the Equality Clause, explicitly provides protections against unfair discrimination on the basis of race, gender, sex, pregnancy, marital status, ethnic or social origin, colour, sexual orientation, age, disability, religion, conscience, belief, culture, language and birth.

It was through this constitutional guarantee that the country sought to revise its comprehensive curriculum offering, leading to significant backlash from the traditional, religious and conservative organisations. Front-page media articles screamed that the Minister of Education was trying to teach young children about how to have sex, and that she was effectively sexualising young children. The Ministry was also accused of imposing a Western ideals on African people.

The seminar will analyse the transnational and local reasons for the conservative backlash in South Africa. It will argue that the response largely follows a coordinated international movement that has sought to undermine sexuality education and reverse the gains already made by sexual rights organisations.  It will showcase how local sexual politics reflect a transnational mobility of ideas that are reconfigured at a local level in order to attain legitimacy.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Miri Yemini is a tenured Senior Lecturer in the School of Education at Tel Aviv University.

At Tel Aviv Dr. Yemini teaches graduate and undergraduate modules in education, including Internationalisation in Education, Education and Globalisation, Entrepreneurship in Education and Project Management in Schools.

Dr. Yemini serves as a co-Chair of UNESCO chair for Technology and Internationalisation in Education. Recently (April 2018) she was awarded (with Prof. Dr. Nina Kolleck) by the Max Plank Foundation the Award for Research Cooperation and High Excellence in Science (ARCHES), to develop research in the field of school-NGO interactions. This year (2021) Dr. Yemini secured funding from Israeli Science Foundation (150,000 Euro) for her project on education trajectories of Global Middle Class families.

Increasing numbers of highly educated and skilled professionals are internationally mobile for work. Some are transferred by employers; some proactively seek out new positions in different countries.

The currently estimated size of this group (known as globally mobile professionals, ‘global expatriates’ or members of a global middle class) is 66.2 million, which is predicted to rise to 87.5 million by 2022.

The increasing number, but also growing cultural diversity of this group (originating from all parts of the world), and the extent to which/frequency they relocate is an important articulation of newer forms of transnationalism that encompass the movement of people and ideas, and changing economic and social relations.

This seminar aims to map out and theorise the everyday practices of these globally middle professional families and to consider how their presence in key cities around the world might be re-shaping political, social, economic and education structures.

In particular, we will discuss how these families experience mobility and what motivates these relocations; how families create a sense of identity while ‘on the move’; what short-term and longer term aspirations the professionals, their partners and their children have; what education and extra-curricular choices are made; how different cultural contexts are negotiated etc.

Critically, we will discuss how these middle class families work to reproduce and extend their privilege, and so engage in ‘class-making’ practices.  Ultimately, this work offers a much-needed empirical basis to examine the theoretical proposition that there is now a ‘global’ middle class that is somehow different to nationally-located middle class groups.

The Department of Education and St Edmunds Hall are delighted to announce a new Public Seminar series which will take place online in Trinity Term on Wednesdays from 3pm-4pm (UK time) between 5th May and 28th July.

 

The Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education will address themes of major interest to academics, practitioners, and policy-makers working in the field of education globally. These seminars aim to illuminate the role of education in societal development, with a focus on understanding changes in education policy, discourse, and practice, and how these changes influence individual opportunities and shape the development of educational institutions around the world. Seminars will zoom into the local and zoom out into the national and supranational spaces, flows, and influences on education.

The series will be chaired by Maia Chankseliani, Associate Professor of Comparative and International Education, and will feature the following speakers:

Thabo Msibi, Dean and Head of School, School of Education, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

Miri Yemini, Senior Lecturer, Tel Aviv University, Israel

Miguel Antonio Lim, Senior Lecturer in Education, University of Manchester, United Kingdom

Oscar Valiente, Senior Lecturer University of Glasgow, United Kingdom

Moira Faul, Executive Director, NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva, Switzerland

Aliya Kuzhabekova, Associate Professor, Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan

 

To view the full programme of seminars, please click here.

Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education

Joint seminars organised by the Department of Education and St Edmund Hall, University of Oxford.

Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education address themes of major interest to academics, practitioners, and policy-makers working in the field of education globally. These seminars aim to illuminate the role of education in societal development, with a focus on understanding changes in education policy, discourse, and practice, and how these changes influence individual opportunities and shape the development of educational institutions around the world. Seminars will zoom into the local and zoom out into the national and supranational spaces, flows, and influences on education.

The series will be chaired by Maia Chankseliani, Associate Professor of Comparative and International Education.

 

The seminar programme:

*Please note that all seminars have a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

 

Wed 5 May at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Breaking gender, sex and sexuality borders: The case of comprehensive sexuality education in South Africa’

– Thabo Msibi, Dean and Head of School, School of Education, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

 

Wed 19 May at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Global Middle-Class families – comparative study of travel trajectories and imagined futures’

– Miri Yemini, Senior Lecturer, Tel Aviv University, Israel

 

Wed 2 June at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Equal’ Transnational Partnerships in Higher Education: Sino-Foreign Case Studies’

– Miguel Antonio Lim, Senior Lecturer in Education, University of Manchester, UK

 

Wed 16 June at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Why did policymakers in India and Mexico adopt the Germanic model of dual apprenticeships?’

– Oscar Valiente, Senior Lecturer University of Glasgow, UK

 

Wed 7th July at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Governing education by partnership: the GPE in the context of other sectors’ global financing partnerships.’

– Moira V. Faul, Executive Director, NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva

 

Wed 28th July at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

A comparison of the transition of returning scholars to domestic research environments in Kazakhstan, Malaysia and Cambodia.’

– Aliya Kuzhabekova, Associate Professor, Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Aliya Kuzhabekova is Associate Professor at Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan.

In this talk, Aliya Kuzhabekova will report on the results of a collaborative project exploring how individuals, who received Ph.D. degrees abroad transition to research environment in their home countries.

In particular, the aim of the comparative study was to develop a better understanding about how returnees, who obtained degrees in countries with high levels of research capacity re-integrated in the research environment of countries with lower levels of research capacities.

In addition, the project team tried to reveal the extent to which the returnees served as change agents transforming the research environment in their countries. The study allowed to obtain comparative insights about cross-country and program-related variations in the returnees’ adjustment experiences.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Moira V. Faul is Executive Director of NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva. 

The Global Partnership for Education (GPE) is one of a recent proliferation of pooled financing mechanisms in sustainable development. Despite a policy narrative of inclusive and egalitarian partnering, differences between public, private and voluntary sectors are assumed to affect relations between partners, and the effectiveness of partnerships.

We theorise global financing partnerships as a social ‘space between fields’ that is generated and structured by relationships between the actors mobilised into partnership boards from different fields. We move beyond the conventional focus on sectoral factions to investigate the potential of other aspects of diversity to affect partnership outcomes.

We empirically investigate the structuring of the space of global financing partnerships, comparing the GPE with climate change and health, by analysing a new dataset of 188 board members of ten global financing partnerships. First, network analyses reveal that donors (whether states, international organisations or private sector) are systematically privileged in this partnership space.

Secondly, faultline analytical tools reveal that despite a narrative of additional financing from the private sector, donors are significantly associated with the public sector. Furthermore, donors (public and private sector) are significantly associated with an economic logic of action and non-donors with an issue-specific framing.

Examining the multiple diversities that come into play in partnership board composition and structuring enables an improved theorisation of partnership effectiveness; it also holds important implications for board decisions and the sustainability and educational impacts that these partnerships are purported to deliver.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Oscar Valiente is Senior Lecturer in Educational Leadership & Policy at the University of Glasgow, Scotland. 

While most comparative education studies have focused on the historical processes that gave birth to the dual model in Germanic countries, our research aims to elucidate the drivers that explain why policymakers embrace the dual apprenticeship idea and how they re-contextualize it in their own educational context.

Drawing on a constructivist political economy framework, our study specifically investigates the reasons of policymakers in India and Mexico to adopt the dual model and how their different institutional conditions explain variations in the way the two countries have re-contextualized this global policy idea.

The selected cases are particularly interesting for the comparison because of the broad ambitions of their national reforms and the significant differences in the type of dual model of apprenticeships finally retained in the two countries.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Miguel Antonio Lim is Senior Lecturer in Education at the University of Manchester, UK, with special focus on Education and International Development at the University’s School of Environment, Education, and Development (SEED).

At this seminar, the evolving role of transnational higher education (TNHE) as part of wider national development policy will be discussed.

Using the case of Sino-foreign educational partnerships, Dr Lim will outline several features of the evolution of policies to govern and achieve more ‘equal’ partnerships.

In China, TNHE partnerships are seen as an important part of its drive to build ‘World Class Universities’. Its case shows an increasing orientation towards quality over quantity of partnerships and a growing role for urban and regional geopolitics in the choice of its HE partnerships.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Thabo Msibi is Associate Professor in Curriculum Studies in the School of Education at the University of KwaZulu-Natal, where he is also the Dean and Head of the School of Education.   

Professor Msibi’s scholarship is on the interface of gender and sexuality issues, particularly as they relate to education.  He also is interested in theory building as it relates to African sexualities.  He has published research in South African and international journals on these subjects, and has co-edited six journal special issues.

Thabo has also published numerous book chapters looking at the educational experiences of individuals who claim same-sex identities.  His recent monograph entitled Hidden Sexualities of South African Teachers: Black Male Educators and Same-sex Desire is published by Routledge.

This seminar reflects on the public uproar that has come with the expansion of the comprehensive sexuality education programme by the Department of Basic Education in South Africa.

Touted globally by the UNESCO and other international organisations as a critical vehicle for the promotion of positive sexual behaviour amongst young people, comprehensive sexuality education has recently received significant international fanfare.  This focus follows the release of the revised International technical guidance on sexuality education by UNESCO in 2018.  Some African countries, including South Africa, have used the revisions to update their curriculum offerings on sexuality education.

Section nine of the South African Constitution, known as the Equality Clause, explicitly provides protections against unfair discrimination on the basis of race, gender, sex, pregnancy, marital status, ethnic or social origin, colour, sexual orientation, age, disability, religion, conscience, belief, culture, language and birth.

It was through this constitutional guarantee that the country sought to revise its comprehensive curriculum offering, leading to significant backlash from the traditional, religious and conservative organisations. Front-page media articles screamed that the Minister of Education was trying to teach young children about how to have sex, and that she was effectively sexualising young children. The Ministry was also accused of imposing a Western ideals on African people.

The seminar will analyse the transnational and local reasons for the conservative backlash in South Africa. It will argue that the response largely follows a coordinated international movement that has sought to undermine sexuality education and reverse the gains already made by sexual rights organisations.  It will showcase how local sexual politics reflect a transnational mobility of ideas that are reconfigured at a local level in order to attain legitimacy.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Miri Yemini is a tenured Senior Lecturer in the School of Education at Tel Aviv University.

At Tel Aviv Dr. Yemini teaches graduate and undergraduate modules in education, including Internationalisation in Education, Education and Globalisation, Entrepreneurship in Education and Project Management in Schools.

Dr. Yemini serves as a co-Chair of UNESCO chair for Technology and Internationalisation in Education. Recently (April 2018) she was awarded (with Prof. Dr. Nina Kolleck) by the Max Plank Foundation the Award for Research Cooperation and High Excellence in Science (ARCHES), to develop research in the field of school-NGO interactions. This year (2021) Dr. Yemini secured funding from Israeli Science Foundation (150,000 Euro) for her project on education trajectories of Global Middle Class families.

Increasing numbers of highly educated and skilled professionals are internationally mobile for work. Some are transferred by employers; some proactively seek out new positions in different countries.

The currently estimated size of this group (known as globally mobile professionals, ‘global expatriates’ or members of a global middle class) is 66.2 million, which is predicted to rise to 87.5 million by 2022.

The increasing number, but also growing cultural diversity of this group (originating from all parts of the world), and the extent to which/frequency they relocate is an important articulation of newer forms of transnationalism that encompass the movement of people and ideas, and changing economic and social relations.

This seminar aims to map out and theorise the everyday practices of these globally middle professional families and to consider how their presence in key cities around the world might be re-shaping political, social, economic and education structures.

In particular, we will discuss how these families experience mobility and what motivates these relocations; how families create a sense of identity while ‘on the move’; what short-term and longer term aspirations the professionals, their partners and their children have; what education and extra-curricular choices are made; how different cultural contexts are negotiated etc.

Critically, we will discuss how these middle class families work to reproduce and extend their privilege, and so engage in ‘class-making’ practices.  Ultimately, this work offers a much-needed empirical basis to examine the theoretical proposition that there is now a ‘global’ middle class that is somehow different to nationally-located middle class groups.

The Department of Education and St Edmunds Hall are delighted to announce a new Public Seminar series which will take place online in Trinity Term on Wednesdays from 3pm-4pm (UK time) between 5th May and 28th July.

 

The Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education will address themes of major interest to academics, practitioners, and policy-makers working in the field of education globally. These seminars aim to illuminate the role of education in societal development, with a focus on understanding changes in education policy, discourse, and practice, and how these changes influence individual opportunities and shape the development of educational institutions around the world. Seminars will zoom into the local and zoom out into the national and supranational spaces, flows, and influences on education.

The series will be chaired by Maia Chankseliani, Associate Professor of Comparative and International Education, and will feature the following speakers:

Thabo Msibi, Dean and Head of School, School of Education, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

Miri Yemini, Senior Lecturer, Tel Aviv University, Israel

Miguel Antonio Lim, Senior Lecturer in Education, University of Manchester, United Kingdom

Oscar Valiente, Senior Lecturer University of Glasgow, United Kingdom

Moira Faul, Executive Director, NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva, Switzerland

Aliya Kuzhabekova, Associate Professor, Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan

 

To view the full programme of seminars, please click here.

Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education

Joint seminars organised by the Department of Education and St Edmund Hall, University of Oxford.

Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education address themes of major interest to academics, practitioners, and policy-makers working in the field of education globally. These seminars aim to illuminate the role of education in societal development, with a focus on understanding changes in education policy, discourse, and practice, and how these changes influence individual opportunities and shape the development of educational institutions around the world. Seminars will zoom into the local and zoom out into the national and supranational spaces, flows, and influences on education.

The series will be chaired by Maia Chankseliani, Associate Professor of Comparative and International Education.

 

The seminar programme:

*Please note that all seminars have a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

 

Wed 5 May at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Breaking gender, sex and sexuality borders: The case of comprehensive sexuality education in South Africa’

– Thabo Msibi, Dean and Head of School, School of Education, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

 

Wed 19 May at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Global Middle-Class families – comparative study of travel trajectories and imagined futures’

– Miri Yemini, Senior Lecturer, Tel Aviv University, Israel

 

Wed 2 June at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Equal’ Transnational Partnerships in Higher Education: Sino-Foreign Case Studies’

– Miguel Antonio Lim, Senior Lecturer in Education, University of Manchester, UK

 

Wed 16 June at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Why did policymakers in India and Mexico adopt the Germanic model of dual apprenticeships?’

– Oscar Valiente, Senior Lecturer University of Glasgow, UK

 

Wed 7th July at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Governing education by partnership: the GPE in the context of other sectors’ global financing partnerships.’

– Moira V. Faul, Executive Director, NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva

 

Wed 28th July at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

A comparison of the transition of returning scholars to domestic research environments in Kazakhstan, Malaysia and Cambodia.’

– Aliya Kuzhabekova, Associate Professor, Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Aliya Kuzhabekova is Associate Professor at Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan.

In this talk, Aliya Kuzhabekova will report on the results of a collaborative project exploring how individuals, who received Ph.D. degrees abroad transition to research environment in their home countries.

In particular, the aim of the comparative study was to develop a better understanding about how returnees, who obtained degrees in countries with high levels of research capacity re-integrated in the research environment of countries with lower levels of research capacities.

In addition, the project team tried to reveal the extent to which the returnees served as change agents transforming the research environment in their countries. The study allowed to obtain comparative insights about cross-country and program-related variations in the returnees’ adjustment experiences.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Moira V. Faul is Executive Director of NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva. 

The Global Partnership for Education (GPE) is one of a recent proliferation of pooled financing mechanisms in sustainable development. Despite a policy narrative of inclusive and egalitarian partnering, differences between public, private and voluntary sectors are assumed to affect relations between partners, and the effectiveness of partnerships.

We theorise global financing partnerships as a social ‘space between fields’ that is generated and structured by relationships between the actors mobilised into partnership boards from different fields. We move beyond the conventional focus on sectoral factions to investigate the potential of other aspects of diversity to affect partnership outcomes.

We empirically investigate the structuring of the space of global financing partnerships, comparing the GPE with climate change and health, by analysing a new dataset of 188 board members of ten global financing partnerships. First, network analyses reveal that donors (whether states, international organisations or private sector) are systematically privileged in this partnership space.

Secondly, faultline analytical tools reveal that despite a narrative of additional financing from the private sector, donors are significantly associated with the public sector. Furthermore, donors (public and private sector) are significantly associated with an economic logic of action and non-donors with an issue-specific framing.

Examining the multiple diversities that come into play in partnership board composition and structuring enables an improved theorisation of partnership effectiveness; it also holds important implications for board decisions and the sustainability and educational impacts that these partnerships are purported to deliver.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Oscar Valiente is Senior Lecturer in Educational Leadership & Policy at the University of Glasgow, Scotland. 

While most comparative education studies have focused on the historical processes that gave birth to the dual model in Germanic countries, our research aims to elucidate the drivers that explain why policymakers embrace the dual apprenticeship idea and how they re-contextualize it in their own educational context.

Drawing on a constructivist political economy framework, our study specifically investigates the reasons of policymakers in India and Mexico to adopt the dual model and how their different institutional conditions explain variations in the way the two countries have re-contextualized this global policy idea.

The selected cases are particularly interesting for the comparison because of the broad ambitions of their national reforms and the significant differences in the type of dual model of apprenticeships finally retained in the two countries.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Miguel Antonio Lim is Senior Lecturer in Education at the University of Manchester, UK, with special focus on Education and International Development at the University’s School of Environment, Education, and Development (SEED).

At this seminar, the evolving role of transnational higher education (TNHE) as part of wider national development policy will be discussed.

Using the case of Sino-foreign educational partnerships, Dr Lim will outline several features of the evolution of policies to govern and achieve more ‘equal’ partnerships.

In China, TNHE partnerships are seen as an important part of its drive to build ‘World Class Universities’. Its case shows an increasing orientation towards quality over quantity of partnerships and a growing role for urban and regional geopolitics in the choice of its HE partnerships.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Thabo Msibi is Associate Professor in Curriculum Studies in the School of Education at the University of KwaZulu-Natal, where he is also the Dean and Head of the School of Education.   

Professor Msibi’s scholarship is on the interface of gender and sexuality issues, particularly as they relate to education.  He also is interested in theory building as it relates to African sexualities.  He has published research in South African and international journals on these subjects, and has co-edited six journal special issues.

Thabo has also published numerous book chapters looking at the educational experiences of individuals who claim same-sex identities.  His recent monograph entitled Hidden Sexualities of South African Teachers: Black Male Educators and Same-sex Desire is published by Routledge.

This seminar reflects on the public uproar that has come with the expansion of the comprehensive sexuality education programme by the Department of Basic Education in South Africa.

Touted globally by the UNESCO and other international organisations as a critical vehicle for the promotion of positive sexual behaviour amongst young people, comprehensive sexuality education has recently received significant international fanfare.  This focus follows the release of the revised International technical guidance on sexuality education by UNESCO in 2018.  Some African countries, including South Africa, have used the revisions to update their curriculum offerings on sexuality education.

Section nine of the South African Constitution, known as the Equality Clause, explicitly provides protections against unfair discrimination on the basis of race, gender, sex, pregnancy, marital status, ethnic or social origin, colour, sexual orientation, age, disability, religion, conscience, belief, culture, language and birth.

It was through this constitutional guarantee that the country sought to revise its comprehensive curriculum offering, leading to significant backlash from the traditional, religious and conservative organisations. Front-page media articles screamed that the Minister of Education was trying to teach young children about how to have sex, and that she was effectively sexualising young children. The Ministry was also accused of imposing a Western ideals on African people.

The seminar will analyse the transnational and local reasons for the conservative backlash in South Africa. It will argue that the response largely follows a coordinated international movement that has sought to undermine sexuality education and reverse the gains already made by sexual rights organisations.  It will showcase how local sexual politics reflect a transnational mobility of ideas that are reconfigured at a local level in order to attain legitimacy.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Miri Yemini is a tenured Senior Lecturer in the School of Education at Tel Aviv University.

At Tel Aviv Dr. Yemini teaches graduate and undergraduate modules in education, including Internationalisation in Education, Education and Globalisation, Entrepreneurship in Education and Project Management in Schools.

Dr. Yemini serves as a co-Chair of UNESCO chair for Technology and Internationalisation in Education. Recently (April 2018) she was awarded (with Prof. Dr. Nina Kolleck) by the Max Plank Foundation the Award for Research Cooperation and High Excellence in Science (ARCHES), to develop research in the field of school-NGO interactions. This year (2021) Dr. Yemini secured funding from Israeli Science Foundation (150,000 Euro) for her project on education trajectories of Global Middle Class families.

Increasing numbers of highly educated and skilled professionals are internationally mobile for work. Some are transferred by employers; some proactively seek out new positions in different countries.

The currently estimated size of this group (known as globally mobile professionals, ‘global expatriates’ or members of a global middle class) is 66.2 million, which is predicted to rise to 87.5 million by 2022.

The increasing number, but also growing cultural diversity of this group (originating from all parts of the world), and the extent to which/frequency they relocate is an important articulation of newer forms of transnationalism that encompass the movement of people and ideas, and changing economic and social relations.

This seminar aims to map out and theorise the everyday practices of these globally middle professional families and to consider how their presence in key cities around the world might be re-shaping political, social, economic and education structures.

In particular, we will discuss how these families experience mobility and what motivates these relocations; how families create a sense of identity while ‘on the move’; what short-term and longer term aspirations the professionals, their partners and their children have; what education and extra-curricular choices are made; how different cultural contexts are negotiated etc.

Critically, we will discuss how these middle class families work to reproduce and extend their privilege, and so engage in ‘class-making’ practices.  Ultimately, this work offers a much-needed empirical basis to examine the theoretical proposition that there is now a ‘global’ middle class that is somehow different to nationally-located middle class groups.

The Department of Education and St Edmunds Hall are delighted to announce a new Public Seminar series which will take place online in Trinity Term on Wednesdays from 3pm-4pm (UK time) between 5th May and 28th July.

 

The Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education will address themes of major interest to academics, practitioners, and policy-makers working in the field of education globally. These seminars aim to illuminate the role of education in societal development, with a focus on understanding changes in education policy, discourse, and practice, and how these changes influence individual opportunities and shape the development of educational institutions around the world. Seminars will zoom into the local and zoom out into the national and supranational spaces, flows, and influences on education.

The series will be chaired by Maia Chankseliani, Associate Professor of Comparative and International Education, and will feature the following speakers:

Thabo Msibi, Dean and Head of School, School of Education, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

Miri Yemini, Senior Lecturer, Tel Aviv University, Israel

Miguel Antonio Lim, Senior Lecturer in Education, University of Manchester, United Kingdom

Oscar Valiente, Senior Lecturer University of Glasgow, United Kingdom

Moira Faul, Executive Director, NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva, Switzerland

Aliya Kuzhabekova, Associate Professor, Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan

 

To view the full programme of seminars, please click here.

Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education

Joint seminars organised by the Department of Education and St Edmund Hall, University of Oxford.

Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education address themes of major interest to academics, practitioners, and policy-makers working in the field of education globally. These seminars aim to illuminate the role of education in societal development, with a focus on understanding changes in education policy, discourse, and practice, and how these changes influence individual opportunities and shape the development of educational institutions around the world. Seminars will zoom into the local and zoom out into the national and supranational spaces, flows, and influences on education.

The series will be chaired by Maia Chankseliani, Associate Professor of Comparative and International Education.

 

The seminar programme:

*Please note that all seminars have a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

 

Wed 5 May at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Breaking gender, sex and sexuality borders: The case of comprehensive sexuality education in South Africa’

– Thabo Msibi, Dean and Head of School, School of Education, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

 

Wed 19 May at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Global Middle-Class families – comparative study of travel trajectories and imagined futures’

– Miri Yemini, Senior Lecturer, Tel Aviv University, Israel

 

Wed 2 June at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Equal’ Transnational Partnerships in Higher Education: Sino-Foreign Case Studies’

– Miguel Antonio Lim, Senior Lecturer in Education, University of Manchester, UK

 

Wed 16 June at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Why did policymakers in India and Mexico adopt the Germanic model of dual apprenticeships?’

– Oscar Valiente, Senior Lecturer University of Glasgow, UK

 

Wed 7th July at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Governing education by partnership: the GPE in the context of other sectors’ global financing partnerships.’

– Moira V. Faul, Executive Director, NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva

 

Wed 28th July at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

A comparison of the transition of returning scholars to domestic research environments in Kazakhstan, Malaysia and Cambodia.’

– Aliya Kuzhabekova, Associate Professor, Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Aliya Kuzhabekova is Associate Professor at Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan.

In this talk, Aliya Kuzhabekova will report on the results of a collaborative project exploring how individuals, who received Ph.D. degrees abroad transition to research environment in their home countries.

In particular, the aim of the comparative study was to develop a better understanding about how returnees, who obtained degrees in countries with high levels of research capacity re-integrated in the research environment of countries with lower levels of research capacities.

In addition, the project team tried to reveal the extent to which the returnees served as change agents transforming the research environment in their countries. The study allowed to obtain comparative insights about cross-country and program-related variations in the returnees’ adjustment experiences.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Moira V. Faul is Executive Director of NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva. 

The Global Partnership for Education (GPE) is one of a recent proliferation of pooled financing mechanisms in sustainable development. Despite a policy narrative of inclusive and egalitarian partnering, differences between public, private and voluntary sectors are assumed to affect relations between partners, and the effectiveness of partnerships.

We theorise global financing partnerships as a social ‘space between fields’ that is generated and structured by relationships between the actors mobilised into partnership boards from different fields. We move beyond the conventional focus on sectoral factions to investigate the potential of other aspects of diversity to affect partnership outcomes.

We empirically investigate the structuring of the space of global financing partnerships, comparing the GPE with climate change and health, by analysing a new dataset of 188 board members of ten global financing partnerships. First, network analyses reveal that donors (whether states, international organisations or private sector) are systematically privileged in this partnership space.

Secondly, faultline analytical tools reveal that despite a narrative of additional financing from the private sector, donors are significantly associated with the public sector. Furthermore, donors (public and private sector) are significantly associated with an economic logic of action and non-donors with an issue-specific framing.

Examining the multiple diversities that come into play in partnership board composition and structuring enables an improved theorisation of partnership effectiveness; it also holds important implications for board decisions and the sustainability and educational impacts that these partnerships are purported to deliver.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Oscar Valiente is Senior Lecturer in Educational Leadership & Policy at the University of Glasgow, Scotland. 

While most comparative education studies have focused on the historical processes that gave birth to the dual model in Germanic countries, our research aims to elucidate the drivers that explain why policymakers embrace the dual apprenticeship idea and how they re-contextualize it in their own educational context.

Drawing on a constructivist political economy framework, our study specifically investigates the reasons of policymakers in India and Mexico to adopt the dual model and how their different institutional conditions explain variations in the way the two countries have re-contextualized this global policy idea.

The selected cases are particularly interesting for the comparison because of the broad ambitions of their national reforms and the significant differences in the type of dual model of apprenticeships finally retained in the two countries.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Miguel Antonio Lim is Senior Lecturer in Education at the University of Manchester, UK, with special focus on Education and International Development at the University’s School of Environment, Education, and Development (SEED).

At this seminar, the evolving role of transnational higher education (TNHE) as part of wider national development policy will be discussed.

Using the case of Sino-foreign educational partnerships, Dr Lim will outline several features of the evolution of policies to govern and achieve more ‘equal’ partnerships.

In China, TNHE partnerships are seen as an important part of its drive to build ‘World Class Universities’. Its case shows an increasing orientation towards quality over quantity of partnerships and a growing role for urban and regional geopolitics in the choice of its HE partnerships.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Thabo Msibi is Associate Professor in Curriculum Studies in the School of Education at the University of KwaZulu-Natal, where he is also the Dean and Head of the School of Education.   

Professor Msibi’s scholarship is on the interface of gender and sexuality issues, particularly as they relate to education.  He also is interested in theory building as it relates to African sexualities.  He has published research in South African and international journals on these subjects, and has co-edited six journal special issues.

Thabo has also published numerous book chapters looking at the educational experiences of individuals who claim same-sex identities.  His recent monograph entitled Hidden Sexualities of South African Teachers: Black Male Educators and Same-sex Desire is published by Routledge.

This seminar reflects on the public uproar that has come with the expansion of the comprehensive sexuality education programme by the Department of Basic Education in South Africa.

Touted globally by the UNESCO and other international organisations as a critical vehicle for the promotion of positive sexual behaviour amongst young people, comprehensive sexuality education has recently received significant international fanfare.  This focus follows the release of the revised International technical guidance on sexuality education by UNESCO in 2018.  Some African countries, including South Africa, have used the revisions to update their curriculum offerings on sexuality education.

Section nine of the South African Constitution, known as the Equality Clause, explicitly provides protections against unfair discrimination on the basis of race, gender, sex, pregnancy, marital status, ethnic or social origin, colour, sexual orientation, age, disability, religion, conscience, belief, culture, language and birth.

It was through this constitutional guarantee that the country sought to revise its comprehensive curriculum offering, leading to significant backlash from the traditional, religious and conservative organisations. Front-page media articles screamed that the Minister of Education was trying to teach young children about how to have sex, and that she was effectively sexualising young children. The Ministry was also accused of imposing a Western ideals on African people.

The seminar will analyse the transnational and local reasons for the conservative backlash in South Africa. It will argue that the response largely follows a coordinated international movement that has sought to undermine sexuality education and reverse the gains already made by sexual rights organisations.  It will showcase how local sexual politics reflect a transnational mobility of ideas that are reconfigured at a local level in order to attain legitimacy.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Miri Yemini is a tenured Senior Lecturer in the School of Education at Tel Aviv University.

At Tel Aviv Dr. Yemini teaches graduate and undergraduate modules in education, including Internationalisation in Education, Education and Globalisation, Entrepreneurship in Education and Project Management in Schools.

Dr. Yemini serves as a co-Chair of UNESCO chair for Technology and Internationalisation in Education. Recently (April 2018) she was awarded (with Prof. Dr. Nina Kolleck) by the Max Plank Foundation the Award for Research Cooperation and High Excellence in Science (ARCHES), to develop research in the field of school-NGO interactions. This year (2021) Dr. Yemini secured funding from Israeli Science Foundation (150,000 Euro) for her project on education trajectories of Global Middle Class families.

Increasing numbers of highly educated and skilled professionals are internationally mobile for work. Some are transferred by employers; some proactively seek out new positions in different countries.

The currently estimated size of this group (known as globally mobile professionals, ‘global expatriates’ or members of a global middle class) is 66.2 million, which is predicted to rise to 87.5 million by 2022.

The increasing number, but also growing cultural diversity of this group (originating from all parts of the world), and the extent to which/frequency they relocate is an important articulation of newer forms of transnationalism that encompass the movement of people and ideas, and changing economic and social relations.

This seminar aims to map out and theorise the everyday practices of these globally middle professional families and to consider how their presence in key cities around the world might be re-shaping political, social, economic and education structures.

In particular, we will discuss how these families experience mobility and what motivates these relocations; how families create a sense of identity while ‘on the move’; what short-term and longer term aspirations the professionals, their partners and their children have; what education and extra-curricular choices are made; how different cultural contexts are negotiated etc.

Critically, we will discuss how these middle class families work to reproduce and extend their privilege, and so engage in ‘class-making’ practices.  Ultimately, this work offers a much-needed empirical basis to examine the theoretical proposition that there is now a ‘global’ middle class that is somehow different to nationally-located middle class groups.

The Department of Education and St Edmunds Hall are delighted to announce a new Public Seminar series which will take place online in Trinity Term on Wednesdays from 3pm-4pm (UK time) between 5th May and 28th July.

 

The Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education will address themes of major interest to academics, practitioners, and policy-makers working in the field of education globally. These seminars aim to illuminate the role of education in societal development, with a focus on understanding changes in education policy, discourse, and practice, and how these changes influence individual opportunities and shape the development of educational institutions around the world. Seminars will zoom into the local and zoom out into the national and supranational spaces, flows, and influences on education.

The series will be chaired by Maia Chankseliani, Associate Professor of Comparative and International Education, and will feature the following speakers:

Thabo Msibi, Dean and Head of School, School of Education, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

Miri Yemini, Senior Lecturer, Tel Aviv University, Israel

Miguel Antonio Lim, Senior Lecturer in Education, University of Manchester, United Kingdom

Oscar Valiente, Senior Lecturer University of Glasgow, United Kingdom

Moira Faul, Executive Director, NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva, Switzerland

Aliya Kuzhabekova, Associate Professor, Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan

 

To view the full programme of seminars, please click here.

Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education

Joint seminars organised by the Department of Education and St Edmund Hall, University of Oxford.

Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education address themes of major interest to academics, practitioners, and policy-makers working in the field of education globally. These seminars aim to illuminate the role of education in societal development, with a focus on understanding changes in education policy, discourse, and practice, and how these changes influence individual opportunities and shape the development of educational institutions around the world. Seminars will zoom into the local and zoom out into the national and supranational spaces, flows, and influences on education.

The series will be chaired by Maia Chankseliani, Associate Professor of Comparative and International Education.

 

The seminar programme:

*Please note that all seminars have a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

 

Wed 5 May at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Breaking gender, sex and sexuality borders: The case of comprehensive sexuality education in South Africa’

– Thabo Msibi, Dean and Head of School, School of Education, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

 

Wed 19 May at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Global Middle-Class families – comparative study of travel trajectories and imagined futures’

– Miri Yemini, Senior Lecturer, Tel Aviv University, Israel

 

Wed 2 June at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Equal’ Transnational Partnerships in Higher Education: Sino-Foreign Case Studies’

– Miguel Antonio Lim, Senior Lecturer in Education, University of Manchester, UK

 

Wed 16 June at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Why did policymakers in India and Mexico adopt the Germanic model of dual apprenticeships?’

– Oscar Valiente, Senior Lecturer University of Glasgow, UK

 

Wed 7th July at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Governing education by partnership: the GPE in the context of other sectors’ global financing partnerships.’

– Moira V. Faul, Executive Director, NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva

 

Wed 28th July at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

A comparison of the transition of returning scholars to domestic research environments in Kazakhstan, Malaysia and Cambodia.’

– Aliya Kuzhabekova, Associate Professor, Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Aliya Kuzhabekova is Associate Professor at Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan.

In this talk, Aliya Kuzhabekova will report on the results of a collaborative project exploring how individuals, who received Ph.D. degrees abroad transition to research environment in their home countries.

In particular, the aim of the comparative study was to develop a better understanding about how returnees, who obtained degrees in countries with high levels of research capacity re-integrated in the research environment of countries with lower levels of research capacities.

In addition, the project team tried to reveal the extent to which the returnees served as change agents transforming the research environment in their countries. The study allowed to obtain comparative insights about cross-country and program-related variations in the returnees’ adjustment experiences.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Moira V. Faul is Executive Director of NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva. 

The Global Partnership for Education (GPE) is one of a recent proliferation of pooled financing mechanisms in sustainable development. Despite a policy narrative of inclusive and egalitarian partnering, differences between public, private and voluntary sectors are assumed to affect relations between partners, and the effectiveness of partnerships.

We theorise global financing partnerships as a social ‘space between fields’ that is generated and structured by relationships between the actors mobilised into partnership boards from different fields. We move beyond the conventional focus on sectoral factions to investigate the potential of other aspects of diversity to affect partnership outcomes.

We empirically investigate the structuring of the space of global financing partnerships, comparing the GPE with climate change and health, by analysing a new dataset of 188 board members of ten global financing partnerships. First, network analyses reveal that donors (whether states, international organisations or private sector) are systematically privileged in this partnership space.

Secondly, faultline analytical tools reveal that despite a narrative of additional financing from the private sector, donors are significantly associated with the public sector. Furthermore, donors (public and private sector) are significantly associated with an economic logic of action and non-donors with an issue-specific framing.

Examining the multiple diversities that come into play in partnership board composition and structuring enables an improved theorisation of partnership effectiveness; it also holds important implications for board decisions and the sustainability and educational impacts that these partnerships are purported to deliver.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Oscar Valiente is Senior Lecturer in Educational Leadership & Policy at the University of Glasgow, Scotland. 

While most comparative education studies have focused on the historical processes that gave birth to the dual model in Germanic countries, our research aims to elucidate the drivers that explain why policymakers embrace the dual apprenticeship idea and how they re-contextualize it in their own educational context.

Drawing on a constructivist political economy framework, our study specifically investigates the reasons of policymakers in India and Mexico to adopt the dual model and how their different institutional conditions explain variations in the way the two countries have re-contextualized this global policy idea.

The selected cases are particularly interesting for the comparison because of the broad ambitions of their national reforms and the significant differences in the type of dual model of apprenticeships finally retained in the two countries.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Miguel Antonio Lim is Senior Lecturer in Education at the University of Manchester, UK, with special focus on Education and International Development at the University’s School of Environment, Education, and Development (SEED).

At this seminar, the evolving role of transnational higher education (TNHE) as part of wider national development policy will be discussed.

Using the case of Sino-foreign educational partnerships, Dr Lim will outline several features of the evolution of policies to govern and achieve more ‘equal’ partnerships.

In China, TNHE partnerships are seen as an important part of its drive to build ‘World Class Universities’. Its case shows an increasing orientation towards quality over quantity of partnerships and a growing role for urban and regional geopolitics in the choice of its HE partnerships.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Thabo Msibi is Associate Professor in Curriculum Studies in the School of Education at the University of KwaZulu-Natal, where he is also the Dean and Head of the School of Education.   

Professor Msibi’s scholarship is on the interface of gender and sexuality issues, particularly as they relate to education.  He also is interested in theory building as it relates to African sexualities.  He has published research in South African and international journals on these subjects, and has co-edited six journal special issues.

Thabo has also published numerous book chapters looking at the educational experiences of individuals who claim same-sex identities.  His recent monograph entitled Hidden Sexualities of South African Teachers: Black Male Educators and Same-sex Desire is published by Routledge.

This seminar reflects on the public uproar that has come with the expansion of the comprehensive sexuality education programme by the Department of Basic Education in South Africa.

Touted globally by the UNESCO and other international organisations as a critical vehicle for the promotion of positive sexual behaviour amongst young people, comprehensive sexuality education has recently received significant international fanfare.  This focus follows the release of the revised International technical guidance on sexuality education by UNESCO in 2018.  Some African countries, including South Africa, have used the revisions to update their curriculum offerings on sexuality education.

Section nine of the South African Constitution, known as the Equality Clause, explicitly provides protections against unfair discrimination on the basis of race, gender, sex, pregnancy, marital status, ethnic or social origin, colour, sexual orientation, age, disability, religion, conscience, belief, culture, language and birth.

It was through this constitutional guarantee that the country sought to revise its comprehensive curriculum offering, leading to significant backlash from the traditional, religious and conservative organisations. Front-page media articles screamed that the Minister of Education was trying to teach young children about how to have sex, and that she was effectively sexualising young children. The Ministry was also accused of imposing a Western ideals on African people.

The seminar will analyse the transnational and local reasons for the conservative backlash in South Africa. It will argue that the response largely follows a coordinated international movement that has sought to undermine sexuality education and reverse the gains already made by sexual rights organisations.  It will showcase how local sexual politics reflect a transnational mobility of ideas that are reconfigured at a local level in order to attain legitimacy.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Miri Yemini is a tenured Senior Lecturer in the School of Education at Tel Aviv University.

At Tel Aviv Dr. Yemini teaches graduate and undergraduate modules in education, including Internationalisation in Education, Education and Globalisation, Entrepreneurship in Education and Project Management in Schools.

Dr. Yemini serves as a co-Chair of UNESCO chair for Technology and Internationalisation in Education. Recently (April 2018) she was awarded (with Prof. Dr. Nina Kolleck) by the Max Plank Foundation the Award for Research Cooperation and High Excellence in Science (ARCHES), to develop research in the field of school-NGO interactions. This year (2021) Dr. Yemini secured funding from Israeli Science Foundation (150,000 Euro) for her project on education trajectories of Global Middle Class families.

Increasing numbers of highly educated and skilled professionals are internationally mobile for work. Some are transferred by employers; some proactively seek out new positions in different countries.

The currently estimated size of this group (known as globally mobile professionals, ‘global expatriates’ or members of a global middle class) is 66.2 million, which is predicted to rise to 87.5 million by 2022.

The increasing number, but also growing cultural diversity of this group (originating from all parts of the world), and the extent to which/frequency they relocate is an important articulation of newer forms of transnationalism that encompass the movement of people and ideas, and changing economic and social relations.

This seminar aims to map out and theorise the everyday practices of these globally middle professional families and to consider how their presence in key cities around the world might be re-shaping political, social, economic and education structures.

In particular, we will discuss how these families experience mobility and what motivates these relocations; how families create a sense of identity while ‘on the move’; what short-term and longer term aspirations the professionals, their partners and their children have; what education and extra-curricular choices are made; how different cultural contexts are negotiated etc.

Critically, we will discuss how these middle class families work to reproduce and extend their privilege, and so engage in ‘class-making’ practices.  Ultimately, this work offers a much-needed empirical basis to examine the theoretical proposition that there is now a ‘global’ middle class that is somehow different to nationally-located middle class groups.

The Department of Education and St Edmunds Hall are delighted to announce a new Public Seminar series which will take place online in Trinity Term on Wednesdays from 3pm-4pm (UK time) between 5th May and 28th July.

 

The Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education will address themes of major interest to academics, practitioners, and policy-makers working in the field of education globally. These seminars aim to illuminate the role of education in societal development, with a focus on understanding changes in education policy, discourse, and practice, and how these changes influence individual opportunities and shape the development of educational institutions around the world. Seminars will zoom into the local and zoom out into the national and supranational spaces, flows, and influences on education.

The series will be chaired by Maia Chankseliani, Associate Professor of Comparative and International Education, and will feature the following speakers:

Thabo Msibi, Dean and Head of School, School of Education, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

Miri Yemini, Senior Lecturer, Tel Aviv University, Israel

Miguel Antonio Lim, Senior Lecturer in Education, University of Manchester, United Kingdom

Oscar Valiente, Senior Lecturer University of Glasgow, United Kingdom

Moira Faul, Executive Director, NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva, Switzerland

Aliya Kuzhabekova, Associate Professor, Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan

 

To view the full programme of seminars, please click here.

Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education

Joint seminars organised by the Department of Education and St Edmund Hall, University of Oxford.

Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education address themes of major interest to academics, practitioners, and policy-makers working in the field of education globally. These seminars aim to illuminate the role of education in societal development, with a focus on understanding changes in education policy, discourse, and practice, and how these changes influence individual opportunities and shape the development of educational institutions around the world. Seminars will zoom into the local and zoom out into the national and supranational spaces, flows, and influences on education.

The series will be chaired by Maia Chankseliani, Associate Professor of Comparative and International Education.

 

The seminar programme:

*Please note that all seminars have a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

 

Wed 5 May at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Breaking gender, sex and sexuality borders: The case of comprehensive sexuality education in South Africa’

– Thabo Msibi, Dean and Head of School, School of Education, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

 

Wed 19 May at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Global Middle-Class families – comparative study of travel trajectories and imagined futures’

– Miri Yemini, Senior Lecturer, Tel Aviv University, Israel

 

Wed 2 June at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Equal’ Transnational Partnerships in Higher Education: Sino-Foreign Case Studies’

– Miguel Antonio Lim, Senior Lecturer in Education, University of Manchester, UK

 

Wed 16 June at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Why did policymakers in India and Mexico adopt the Germanic model of dual apprenticeships?’

– Oscar Valiente, Senior Lecturer University of Glasgow, UK

 

Wed 7th July at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Governing education by partnership: the GPE in the context of other sectors’ global financing partnerships.’

– Moira V. Faul, Executive Director, NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva

 

Wed 28th July at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

A comparison of the transition of returning scholars to domestic research environments in Kazakhstan, Malaysia and Cambodia.’

– Aliya Kuzhabekova, Associate Professor, Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Aliya Kuzhabekova is Associate Professor at Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan.

In this talk, Aliya Kuzhabekova will report on the results of a collaborative project exploring how individuals, who received Ph.D. degrees abroad transition to research environment in their home countries.

In particular, the aim of the comparative study was to develop a better understanding about how returnees, who obtained degrees in countries with high levels of research capacity re-integrated in the research environment of countries with lower levels of research capacities.

In addition, the project team tried to reveal the extent to which the returnees served as change agents transforming the research environment in their countries. The study allowed to obtain comparative insights about cross-country and program-related variations in the returnees’ adjustment experiences.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Moira V. Faul is Executive Director of NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva. 

The Global Partnership for Education (GPE) is one of a recent proliferation of pooled financing mechanisms in sustainable development. Despite a policy narrative of inclusive and egalitarian partnering, differences between public, private and voluntary sectors are assumed to affect relations between partners, and the effectiveness of partnerships.

We theorise global financing partnerships as a social ‘space between fields’ that is generated and structured by relationships between the actors mobilised into partnership boards from different fields. We move beyond the conventional focus on sectoral factions to investigate the potential of other aspects of diversity to affect partnership outcomes.

We empirically investigate the structuring of the space of global financing partnerships, comparing the GPE with climate change and health, by analysing a new dataset of 188 board members of ten global financing partnerships. First, network analyses reveal that donors (whether states, international organisations or private sector) are systematically privileged in this partnership space.

Secondly, faultline analytical tools reveal that despite a narrative of additional financing from the private sector, donors are significantly associated with the public sector. Furthermore, donors (public and private sector) are significantly associated with an economic logic of action and non-donors with an issue-specific framing.

Examining the multiple diversities that come into play in partnership board composition and structuring enables an improved theorisation of partnership effectiveness; it also holds important implications for board decisions and the sustainability and educational impacts that these partnerships are purported to deliver.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Oscar Valiente is Senior Lecturer in Educational Leadership & Policy at the University of Glasgow, Scotland. 

While most comparative education studies have focused on the historical processes that gave birth to the dual model in Germanic countries, our research aims to elucidate the drivers that explain why policymakers embrace the dual apprenticeship idea and how they re-contextualize it in their own educational context.

Drawing on a constructivist political economy framework, our study specifically investigates the reasons of policymakers in India and Mexico to adopt the dual model and how their different institutional conditions explain variations in the way the two countries have re-contextualized this global policy idea.

The selected cases are particularly interesting for the comparison because of the broad ambitions of their national reforms and the significant differences in the type of dual model of apprenticeships finally retained in the two countries.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Miguel Antonio Lim is Senior Lecturer in Education at the University of Manchester, UK, with special focus on Education and International Development at the University’s School of Environment, Education, and Development (SEED).

At this seminar, the evolving role of transnational higher education (TNHE) as part of wider national development policy will be discussed.

Using the case of Sino-foreign educational partnerships, Dr Lim will outline several features of the evolution of policies to govern and achieve more ‘equal’ partnerships.

In China, TNHE partnerships are seen as an important part of its drive to build ‘World Class Universities’. Its case shows an increasing orientation towards quality over quantity of partnerships and a growing role for urban and regional geopolitics in the choice of its HE partnerships.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Thabo Msibi is Associate Professor in Curriculum Studies in the School of Education at the University of KwaZulu-Natal, where he is also the Dean and Head of the School of Education.   

Professor Msibi’s scholarship is on the interface of gender and sexuality issues, particularly as they relate to education.  He also is interested in theory building as it relates to African sexualities.  He has published research in South African and international journals on these subjects, and has co-edited six journal special issues.

Thabo has also published numerous book chapters looking at the educational experiences of individuals who claim same-sex identities.  His recent monograph entitled Hidden Sexualities of South African Teachers: Black Male Educators and Same-sex Desire is published by Routledge.

This seminar reflects on the public uproar that has come with the expansion of the comprehensive sexuality education programme by the Department of Basic Education in South Africa.

Touted globally by the UNESCO and other international organisations as a critical vehicle for the promotion of positive sexual behaviour amongst young people, comprehensive sexuality education has recently received significant international fanfare.  This focus follows the release of the revised International technical guidance on sexuality education by UNESCO in 2018.  Some African countries, including South Africa, have used the revisions to update their curriculum offerings on sexuality education.

Section nine of the South African Constitution, known as the Equality Clause, explicitly provides protections against unfair discrimination on the basis of race, gender, sex, pregnancy, marital status, ethnic or social origin, colour, sexual orientation, age, disability, religion, conscience, belief, culture, language and birth.

It was through this constitutional guarantee that the country sought to revise its comprehensive curriculum offering, leading to significant backlash from the traditional, religious and conservative organisations. Front-page media articles screamed that the Minister of Education was trying to teach young children about how to have sex, and that she was effectively sexualising young children. The Ministry was also accused of imposing a Western ideals on African people.

The seminar will analyse the transnational and local reasons for the conservative backlash in South Africa. It will argue that the response largely follows a coordinated international movement that has sought to undermine sexuality education and reverse the gains already made by sexual rights organisations.  It will showcase how local sexual politics reflect a transnational mobility of ideas that are reconfigured at a local level in order to attain legitimacy.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Miri Yemini is a tenured Senior Lecturer in the School of Education at Tel Aviv University.

At Tel Aviv Dr. Yemini teaches graduate and undergraduate modules in education, including Internationalisation in Education, Education and Globalisation, Entrepreneurship in Education and Project Management in Schools.

Dr. Yemini serves as a co-Chair of UNESCO chair for Technology and Internationalisation in Education. Recently (April 2018) she was awarded (with Prof. Dr. Nina Kolleck) by the Max Plank Foundation the Award for Research Cooperation and High Excellence in Science (ARCHES), to develop research in the field of school-NGO interactions. This year (2021) Dr. Yemini secured funding from Israeli Science Foundation (150,000 Euro) for her project on education trajectories of Global Middle Class families.

Increasing numbers of highly educated and skilled professionals are internationally mobile for work. Some are transferred by employers; some proactively seek out new positions in different countries.

The currently estimated size of this group (known as globally mobile professionals, ‘global expatriates’ or members of a global middle class) is 66.2 million, which is predicted to rise to 87.5 million by 2022.

The increasing number, but also growing cultural diversity of this group (originating from all parts of the world), and the extent to which/frequency they relocate is an important articulation of newer forms of transnationalism that encompass the movement of people and ideas, and changing economic and social relations.

This seminar aims to map out and theorise the everyday practices of these globally middle professional families and to consider how their presence in key cities around the world might be re-shaping political, social, economic and education structures.

In particular, we will discuss how these families experience mobility and what motivates these relocations; how families create a sense of identity while ‘on the move’; what short-term and longer term aspirations the professionals, their partners and their children have; what education and extra-curricular choices are made; how different cultural contexts are negotiated etc.

Critically, we will discuss how these middle class families work to reproduce and extend their privilege, and so engage in ‘class-making’ practices.  Ultimately, this work offers a much-needed empirical basis to examine the theoretical proposition that there is now a ‘global’ middle class that is somehow different to nationally-located middle class groups.

The Department of Education and St Edmunds Hall are delighted to announce a new Public Seminar series which will take place online in Trinity Term on Wednesdays from 3pm-4pm (UK time) between 5th May and 28th July.

 

The Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education will address themes of major interest to academics, practitioners, and policy-makers working in the field of education globally. These seminars aim to illuminate the role of education in societal development, with a focus on understanding changes in education policy, discourse, and practice, and how these changes influence individual opportunities and shape the development of educational institutions around the world. Seminars will zoom into the local and zoom out into the national and supranational spaces, flows, and influences on education.

The series will be chaired by Maia Chankseliani, Associate Professor of Comparative and International Education, and will feature the following speakers:

Thabo Msibi, Dean and Head of School, School of Education, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

Miri Yemini, Senior Lecturer, Tel Aviv University, Israel

Miguel Antonio Lim, Senior Lecturer in Education, University of Manchester, United Kingdom

Oscar Valiente, Senior Lecturer University of Glasgow, United Kingdom

Moira Faul, Executive Director, NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva, Switzerland

Aliya Kuzhabekova, Associate Professor, Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan

 

To view the full programme of seminars, please click here.

Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education

Joint seminars organised by the Department of Education and St Edmund Hall, University of Oxford.

Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education address themes of major interest to academics, practitioners, and policy-makers working in the field of education globally. These seminars aim to illuminate the role of education in societal development, with a focus on understanding changes in education policy, discourse, and practice, and how these changes influence individual opportunities and shape the development of educational institutions around the world. Seminars will zoom into the local and zoom out into the national and supranational spaces, flows, and influences on education.

The series will be chaired by Maia Chankseliani, Associate Professor of Comparative and International Education.

 

The seminar programme:

*Please note that all seminars have a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

 

Wed 5 May at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Breaking gender, sex and sexuality borders: The case of comprehensive sexuality education in South Africa’

– Thabo Msibi, Dean and Head of School, School of Education, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

 

Wed 19 May at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Global Middle-Class families – comparative study of travel trajectories and imagined futures’

– Miri Yemini, Senior Lecturer, Tel Aviv University, Israel

 

Wed 2 June at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Equal’ Transnational Partnerships in Higher Education: Sino-Foreign Case Studies’

– Miguel Antonio Lim, Senior Lecturer in Education, University of Manchester, UK

 

Wed 16 June at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Why did policymakers in India and Mexico adopt the Germanic model of dual apprenticeships?’

– Oscar Valiente, Senior Lecturer University of Glasgow, UK

 

Wed 7th July at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Governing education by partnership: the GPE in the context of other sectors’ global financing partnerships.’

– Moira V. Faul, Executive Director, NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva

 

Wed 28th July at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

A comparison of the transition of returning scholars to domestic research environments in Kazakhstan, Malaysia and Cambodia.’

– Aliya Kuzhabekova, Associate Professor, Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Aliya Kuzhabekova is Associate Professor at Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan.

In this talk, Aliya Kuzhabekova will report on the results of a collaborative project exploring how individuals, who received Ph.D. degrees abroad transition to research environment in their home countries.

In particular, the aim of the comparative study was to develop a better understanding about how returnees, who obtained degrees in countries with high levels of research capacity re-integrated in the research environment of countries with lower levels of research capacities.

In addition, the project team tried to reveal the extent to which the returnees served as change agents transforming the research environment in their countries. The study allowed to obtain comparative insights about cross-country and program-related variations in the returnees’ adjustment experiences.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Moira V. Faul is Executive Director of NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva. 

The Global Partnership for Education (GPE) is one of a recent proliferation of pooled financing mechanisms in sustainable development. Despite a policy narrative of inclusive and egalitarian partnering, differences between public, private and voluntary sectors are assumed to affect relations between partners, and the effectiveness of partnerships.

We theorise global financing partnerships as a social ‘space between fields’ that is generated and structured by relationships between the actors mobilised into partnership boards from different fields. We move beyond the conventional focus on sectoral factions to investigate the potential of other aspects of diversity to affect partnership outcomes.

We empirically investigate the structuring of the space of global financing partnerships, comparing the GPE with climate change and health, by analysing a new dataset of 188 board members of ten global financing partnerships. First, network analyses reveal that donors (whether states, international organisations or private sector) are systematically privileged in this partnership space.

Secondly, faultline analytical tools reveal that despite a narrative of additional financing from the private sector, donors are significantly associated with the public sector. Furthermore, donors (public and private sector) are significantly associated with an economic logic of action and non-donors with an issue-specific framing.

Examining the multiple diversities that come into play in partnership board composition and structuring enables an improved theorisation of partnership effectiveness; it also holds important implications for board decisions and the sustainability and educational impacts that these partnerships are purported to deliver.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Oscar Valiente is Senior Lecturer in Educational Leadership & Policy at the University of Glasgow, Scotland. 

While most comparative education studies have focused on the historical processes that gave birth to the dual model in Germanic countries, our research aims to elucidate the drivers that explain why policymakers embrace the dual apprenticeship idea and how they re-contextualize it in their own educational context.

Drawing on a constructivist political economy framework, our study specifically investigates the reasons of policymakers in India and Mexico to adopt the dual model and how their different institutional conditions explain variations in the way the two countries have re-contextualized this global policy idea.

The selected cases are particularly interesting for the comparison because of the broad ambitions of their national reforms and the significant differences in the type of dual model of apprenticeships finally retained in the two countries.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Miguel Antonio Lim is Senior Lecturer in Education at the University of Manchester, UK, with special focus on Education and International Development at the University’s School of Environment, Education, and Development (SEED).

At this seminar, the evolving role of transnational higher education (TNHE) as part of wider national development policy will be discussed.

Using the case of Sino-foreign educational partnerships, Dr Lim will outline several features of the evolution of policies to govern and achieve more ‘equal’ partnerships.

In China, TNHE partnerships are seen as an important part of its drive to build ‘World Class Universities’. Its case shows an increasing orientation towards quality over quantity of partnerships and a growing role for urban and regional geopolitics in the choice of its HE partnerships.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Thabo Msibi is Associate Professor in Curriculum Studies in the School of Education at the University of KwaZulu-Natal, where he is also the Dean and Head of the School of Education.   

Professor Msibi’s scholarship is on the interface of gender and sexuality issues, particularly as they relate to education.  He also is interested in theory building as it relates to African sexualities.  He has published research in South African and international journals on these subjects, and has co-edited six journal special issues.

Thabo has also published numerous book chapters looking at the educational experiences of individuals who claim same-sex identities.  His recent monograph entitled Hidden Sexualities of South African Teachers: Black Male Educators and Same-sex Desire is published by Routledge.

This seminar reflects on the public uproar that has come with the expansion of the comprehensive sexuality education programme by the Department of Basic Education in South Africa.

Touted globally by the UNESCO and other international organisations as a critical vehicle for the promotion of positive sexual behaviour amongst young people, comprehensive sexuality education has recently received significant international fanfare.  This focus follows the release of the revised International technical guidance on sexuality education by UNESCO in 2018.  Some African countries, including South Africa, have used the revisions to update their curriculum offerings on sexuality education.

Section nine of the South African Constitution, known as the Equality Clause, explicitly provides protections against unfair discrimination on the basis of race, gender, sex, pregnancy, marital status, ethnic or social origin, colour, sexual orientation, age, disability, religion, conscience, belief, culture, language and birth.

It was through this constitutional guarantee that the country sought to revise its comprehensive curriculum offering, leading to significant backlash from the traditional, religious and conservative organisations. Front-page media articles screamed that the Minister of Education was trying to teach young children about how to have sex, and that she was effectively sexualising young children. The Ministry was also accused of imposing a Western ideals on African people.

The seminar will analyse the transnational and local reasons for the conservative backlash in South Africa. It will argue that the response largely follows a coordinated international movement that has sought to undermine sexuality education and reverse the gains already made by sexual rights organisations.  It will showcase how local sexual politics reflect a transnational mobility of ideas that are reconfigured at a local level in order to attain legitimacy.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Miri Yemini is a tenured Senior Lecturer in the School of Education at Tel Aviv University.

At Tel Aviv Dr. Yemini teaches graduate and undergraduate modules in education, including Internationalisation in Education, Education and Globalisation, Entrepreneurship in Education and Project Management in Schools.

Dr. Yemini serves as a co-Chair of UNESCO chair for Technology and Internationalisation in Education. Recently (April 2018) she was awarded (with Prof. Dr. Nina Kolleck) by the Max Plank Foundation the Award for Research Cooperation and High Excellence in Science (ARCHES), to develop research in the field of school-NGO interactions. This year (2021) Dr. Yemini secured funding from Israeli Science Foundation (150,000 Euro) for her project on education trajectories of Global Middle Class families.

Increasing numbers of highly educated and skilled professionals are internationally mobile for work. Some are transferred by employers; some proactively seek out new positions in different countries.

The currently estimated size of this group (known as globally mobile professionals, ‘global expatriates’ or members of a global middle class) is 66.2 million, which is predicted to rise to 87.5 million by 2022.

The increasing number, but also growing cultural diversity of this group (originating from all parts of the world), and the extent to which/frequency they relocate is an important articulation of newer forms of transnationalism that encompass the movement of people and ideas, and changing economic and social relations.

This seminar aims to map out and theorise the everyday practices of these globally middle professional families and to consider how their presence in key cities around the world might be re-shaping political, social, economic and education structures.

In particular, we will discuss how these families experience mobility and what motivates these relocations; how families create a sense of identity while ‘on the move’; what short-term and longer term aspirations the professionals, their partners and their children have; what education and extra-curricular choices are made; how different cultural contexts are negotiated etc.

Critically, we will discuss how these middle class families work to reproduce and extend their privilege, and so engage in ‘class-making’ practices.  Ultimately, this work offers a much-needed empirical basis to examine the theoretical proposition that there is now a ‘global’ middle class that is somehow different to nationally-located middle class groups.

The Department of Education and St Edmunds Hall are delighted to announce a new Public Seminar series which will take place online in Trinity Term on Wednesdays from 3pm-4pm (UK time) between 5th May and 28th July.

 

The Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education will address themes of major interest to academics, practitioners, and policy-makers working in the field of education globally. These seminars aim to illuminate the role of education in societal development, with a focus on understanding changes in education policy, discourse, and practice, and how these changes influence individual opportunities and shape the development of educational institutions around the world. Seminars will zoom into the local and zoom out into the national and supranational spaces, flows, and influences on education.

The series will be chaired by Maia Chankseliani, Associate Professor of Comparative and International Education, and will feature the following speakers:

Thabo Msibi, Dean and Head of School, School of Education, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

Miri Yemini, Senior Lecturer, Tel Aviv University, Israel

Miguel Antonio Lim, Senior Lecturer in Education, University of Manchester, United Kingdom

Oscar Valiente, Senior Lecturer University of Glasgow, United Kingdom

Moira Faul, Executive Director, NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva, Switzerland

Aliya Kuzhabekova, Associate Professor, Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan

 

To view the full programme of seminars, please click here.

Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education

Joint seminars organised by the Department of Education and St Edmund Hall, University of Oxford.

Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education address themes of major interest to academics, practitioners, and policy-makers working in the field of education globally. These seminars aim to illuminate the role of education in societal development, with a focus on understanding changes in education policy, discourse, and practice, and how these changes influence individual opportunities and shape the development of educational institutions around the world. Seminars will zoom into the local and zoom out into the national and supranational spaces, flows, and influences on education.

The series will be chaired by Maia Chankseliani, Associate Professor of Comparative and International Education.

 

The seminar programme:

*Please note that all seminars have a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

 

Wed 5 May at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Breaking gender, sex and sexuality borders: The case of comprehensive sexuality education in South Africa’

– Thabo Msibi, Dean and Head of School, School of Education, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

 

Wed 19 May at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Global Middle-Class families – comparative study of travel trajectories and imagined futures’

– Miri Yemini, Senior Lecturer, Tel Aviv University, Israel

 

Wed 2 June at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Equal’ Transnational Partnerships in Higher Education: Sino-Foreign Case Studies’

– Miguel Antonio Lim, Senior Lecturer in Education, University of Manchester, UK

 

Wed 16 June at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Why did policymakers in India and Mexico adopt the Germanic model of dual apprenticeships?’

– Oscar Valiente, Senior Lecturer University of Glasgow, UK

 

Wed 7th July at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Governing education by partnership: the GPE in the context of other sectors’ global financing partnerships.’

– Moira V. Faul, Executive Director, NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva

 

Wed 28th July at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

A comparison of the transition of returning scholars to domestic research environments in Kazakhstan, Malaysia and Cambodia.’

– Aliya Kuzhabekova, Associate Professor, Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Aliya Kuzhabekova is Associate Professor at Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan.

In this talk, Aliya Kuzhabekova will report on the results of a collaborative project exploring how individuals, who received Ph.D. degrees abroad transition to research environment in their home countries.

In particular, the aim of the comparative study was to develop a better understanding about how returnees, who obtained degrees in countries with high levels of research capacity re-integrated in the research environment of countries with lower levels of research capacities.

In addition, the project team tried to reveal the extent to which the returnees served as change agents transforming the research environment in their countries. The study allowed to obtain comparative insights about cross-country and program-related variations in the returnees’ adjustment experiences.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Moira V. Faul is Executive Director of NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva. 

The Global Partnership for Education (GPE) is one of a recent proliferation of pooled financing mechanisms in sustainable development. Despite a policy narrative of inclusive and egalitarian partnering, differences between public, private and voluntary sectors are assumed to affect relations between partners, and the effectiveness of partnerships.

We theorise global financing partnerships as a social ‘space between fields’ that is generated and structured by relationships between the actors mobilised into partnership boards from different fields. We move beyond the conventional focus on sectoral factions to investigate the potential of other aspects of diversity to affect partnership outcomes.

We empirically investigate the structuring of the space of global financing partnerships, comparing the GPE with climate change and health, by analysing a new dataset of 188 board members of ten global financing partnerships. First, network analyses reveal that donors (whether states, international organisations or private sector) are systematically privileged in this partnership space.

Secondly, faultline analytical tools reveal that despite a narrative of additional financing from the private sector, donors are significantly associated with the public sector. Furthermore, donors (public and private sector) are significantly associated with an economic logic of action and non-donors with an issue-specific framing.

Examining the multiple diversities that come into play in partnership board composition and structuring enables an improved theorisation of partnership effectiveness; it also holds important implications for board decisions and the sustainability and educational impacts that these partnerships are purported to deliver.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Oscar Valiente is Senior Lecturer in Educational Leadership & Policy at the University of Glasgow, Scotland. 

While most comparative education studies have focused on the historical processes that gave birth to the dual model in Germanic countries, our research aims to elucidate the drivers that explain why policymakers embrace the dual apprenticeship idea and how they re-contextualize it in their own educational context.

Drawing on a constructivist political economy framework, our study specifically investigates the reasons of policymakers in India and Mexico to adopt the dual model and how their different institutional conditions explain variations in the way the two countries have re-contextualized this global policy idea.

The selected cases are particularly interesting for the comparison because of the broad ambitions of their national reforms and the significant differences in the type of dual model of apprenticeships finally retained in the two countries.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Miguel Antonio Lim is Senior Lecturer in Education at the University of Manchester, UK, with special focus on Education and International Development at the University’s School of Environment, Education, and Development (SEED).

At this seminar, the evolving role of transnational higher education (TNHE) as part of wider national development policy will be discussed.

Using the case of Sino-foreign educational partnerships, Dr Lim will outline several features of the evolution of policies to govern and achieve more ‘equal’ partnerships.

In China, TNHE partnerships are seen as an important part of its drive to build ‘World Class Universities’. Its case shows an increasing orientation towards quality over quantity of partnerships and a growing role for urban and regional geopolitics in the choice of its HE partnerships.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Thabo Msibi is Associate Professor in Curriculum Studies in the School of Education at the University of KwaZulu-Natal, where he is also the Dean and Head of the School of Education.   

Professor Msibi’s scholarship is on the interface of gender and sexuality issues, particularly as they relate to education.  He also is interested in theory building as it relates to African sexualities.  He has published research in South African and international journals on these subjects, and has co-edited six journal special issues.

Thabo has also published numerous book chapters looking at the educational experiences of individuals who claim same-sex identities.  His recent monograph entitled Hidden Sexualities of South African Teachers: Black Male Educators and Same-sex Desire is published by Routledge.

This seminar reflects on the public uproar that has come with the expansion of the comprehensive sexuality education programme by the Department of Basic Education in South Africa.

Touted globally by the UNESCO and other international organisations as a critical vehicle for the promotion of positive sexual behaviour amongst young people, comprehensive sexuality education has recently received significant international fanfare.  This focus follows the release of the revised International technical guidance on sexuality education by UNESCO in 2018.  Some African countries, including South Africa, have used the revisions to update their curriculum offerings on sexuality education.

Section nine of the South African Constitution, known as the Equality Clause, explicitly provides protections against unfair discrimination on the basis of race, gender, sex, pregnancy, marital status, ethnic or social origin, colour, sexual orientation, age, disability, religion, conscience, belief, culture, language and birth.

It was through this constitutional guarantee that the country sought to revise its comprehensive curriculum offering, leading to significant backlash from the traditional, religious and conservative organisations. Front-page media articles screamed that the Minister of Education was trying to teach young children about how to have sex, and that she was effectively sexualising young children. The Ministry was also accused of imposing a Western ideals on African people.

The seminar will analyse the transnational and local reasons for the conservative backlash in South Africa. It will argue that the response largely follows a coordinated international movement that has sought to undermine sexuality education and reverse the gains already made by sexual rights organisations.  It will showcase how local sexual politics reflect a transnational mobility of ideas that are reconfigured at a local level in order to attain legitimacy.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Miri Yemini is a tenured Senior Lecturer in the School of Education at Tel Aviv University.

At Tel Aviv Dr. Yemini teaches graduate and undergraduate modules in education, including Internationalisation in Education, Education and Globalisation, Entrepreneurship in Education and Project Management in Schools.

Dr. Yemini serves as a co-Chair of UNESCO chair for Technology and Internationalisation in Education. Recently (April 2018) she was awarded (with Prof. Dr. Nina Kolleck) by the Max Plank Foundation the Award for Research Cooperation and High Excellence in Science (ARCHES), to develop research in the field of school-NGO interactions. This year (2021) Dr. Yemini secured funding from Israeli Science Foundation (150,000 Euro) for her project on education trajectories of Global Middle Class families.

Increasing numbers of highly educated and skilled professionals are internationally mobile for work. Some are transferred by employers; some proactively seek out new positions in different countries.

The currently estimated size of this group (known as globally mobile professionals, ‘global expatriates’ or members of a global middle class) is 66.2 million, which is predicted to rise to 87.5 million by 2022.

The increasing number, but also growing cultural diversity of this group (originating from all parts of the world), and the extent to which/frequency they relocate is an important articulation of newer forms of transnationalism that encompass the movement of people and ideas, and changing economic and social relations.

This seminar aims to map out and theorise the everyday practices of these globally middle professional families and to consider how their presence in key cities around the world might be re-shaping political, social, economic and education structures.

In particular, we will discuss how these families experience mobility and what motivates these relocations; how families create a sense of identity while ‘on the move’; what short-term and longer term aspirations the professionals, their partners and their children have; what education and extra-curricular choices are made; how different cultural contexts are negotiated etc.

Critically, we will discuss how these middle class families work to reproduce and extend their privilege, and so engage in ‘class-making’ practices.  Ultimately, this work offers a much-needed empirical basis to examine the theoretical proposition that there is now a ‘global’ middle class that is somehow different to nationally-located middle class groups.

The Department of Education and St Edmunds Hall are delighted to announce a new Public Seminar series which will take place online in Trinity Term on Wednesdays from 3pm-4pm (UK time) between 5th May and 28th July.

 

The Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education will address themes of major interest to academics, practitioners, and policy-makers working in the field of education globally. These seminars aim to illuminate the role of education in societal development, with a focus on understanding changes in education policy, discourse, and practice, and how these changes influence individual opportunities and shape the development of educational institutions around the world. Seminars will zoom into the local and zoom out into the national and supranational spaces, flows, and influences on education.

The series will be chaired by Maia Chankseliani, Associate Professor of Comparative and International Education, and will feature the following speakers:

Thabo Msibi, Dean and Head of School, School of Education, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

Miri Yemini, Senior Lecturer, Tel Aviv University, Israel

Miguel Antonio Lim, Senior Lecturer in Education, University of Manchester, United Kingdom

Oscar Valiente, Senior Lecturer University of Glasgow, United Kingdom

Moira Faul, Executive Director, NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva, Switzerland

Aliya Kuzhabekova, Associate Professor, Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan

 

To view the full programme of seminars, please click here.

Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education

Joint seminars organised by the Department of Education and St Edmund Hall, University of Oxford.

Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education address themes of major interest to academics, practitioners, and policy-makers working in the field of education globally. These seminars aim to illuminate the role of education in societal development, with a focus on understanding changes in education policy, discourse, and practice, and how these changes influence individual opportunities and shape the development of educational institutions around the world. Seminars will zoom into the local and zoom out into the national and supranational spaces, flows, and influences on education.

The series will be chaired by Maia Chankseliani, Associate Professor of Comparative and International Education.

 

The seminar programme:

*Please note that all seminars have a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

 

Wed 5 May at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Breaking gender, sex and sexuality borders: The case of comprehensive sexuality education in South Africa’

– Thabo Msibi, Dean and Head of School, School of Education, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

 

Wed 19 May at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Global Middle-Class families – comparative study of travel trajectories and imagined futures’

– Miri Yemini, Senior Lecturer, Tel Aviv University, Israel

 

Wed 2 June at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Equal’ Transnational Partnerships in Higher Education: Sino-Foreign Case Studies’

– Miguel Antonio Lim, Senior Lecturer in Education, University of Manchester, UK

 

Wed 16 June at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Why did policymakers in India and Mexico adopt the Germanic model of dual apprenticeships?’

– Oscar Valiente, Senior Lecturer University of Glasgow, UK

 

Wed 7th July at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Governing education by partnership: the GPE in the context of other sectors’ global financing partnerships.’

– Moira V. Faul, Executive Director, NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva

 

Wed 28th July at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

A comparison of the transition of returning scholars to domestic research environments in Kazakhstan, Malaysia and Cambodia.’

– Aliya Kuzhabekova, Associate Professor, Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Aliya Kuzhabekova is Associate Professor at Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan.

In this talk, Aliya Kuzhabekova will report on the results of a collaborative project exploring how individuals, who received Ph.D. degrees abroad transition to research environment in their home countries.

In particular, the aim of the comparative study was to develop a better understanding about how returnees, who obtained degrees in countries with high levels of research capacity re-integrated in the research environment of countries with lower levels of research capacities.

In addition, the project team tried to reveal the extent to which the returnees served as change agents transforming the research environment in their countries. The study allowed to obtain comparative insights about cross-country and program-related variations in the returnees’ adjustment experiences.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Moira V. Faul is Executive Director of NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva. 

The Global Partnership for Education (GPE) is one of a recent proliferation of pooled financing mechanisms in sustainable development. Despite a policy narrative of inclusive and egalitarian partnering, differences between public, private and voluntary sectors are assumed to affect relations between partners, and the effectiveness of partnerships.

We theorise global financing partnerships as a social ‘space between fields’ that is generated and structured by relationships between the actors mobilised into partnership boards from different fields. We move beyond the conventional focus on sectoral factions to investigate the potential of other aspects of diversity to affect partnership outcomes.

We empirically investigate the structuring of the space of global financing partnerships, comparing the GPE with climate change and health, by analysing a new dataset of 188 board members of ten global financing partnerships. First, network analyses reveal that donors (whether states, international organisations or private sector) are systematically privileged in this partnership space.

Secondly, faultline analytical tools reveal that despite a narrative of additional financing from the private sector, donors are significantly associated with the public sector. Furthermore, donors (public and private sector) are significantly associated with an economic logic of action and non-donors with an issue-specific framing.

Examining the multiple diversities that come into play in partnership board composition and structuring enables an improved theorisation of partnership effectiveness; it also holds important implications for board decisions and the sustainability and educational impacts that these partnerships are purported to deliver.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Oscar Valiente is Senior Lecturer in Educational Leadership & Policy at the University of Glasgow, Scotland. 

While most comparative education studies have focused on the historical processes that gave birth to the dual model in Germanic countries, our research aims to elucidate the drivers that explain why policymakers embrace the dual apprenticeship idea and how they re-contextualize it in their own educational context.

Drawing on a constructivist political economy framework, our study specifically investigates the reasons of policymakers in India and Mexico to adopt the dual model and how their different institutional conditions explain variations in the way the two countries have re-contextualized this global policy idea.

The selected cases are particularly interesting for the comparison because of the broad ambitions of their national reforms and the significant differences in the type of dual model of apprenticeships finally retained in the two countries.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Miguel Antonio Lim is Senior Lecturer in Education at the University of Manchester, UK, with special focus on Education and International Development at the University’s School of Environment, Education, and Development (SEED).

At this seminar, the evolving role of transnational higher education (TNHE) as part of wider national development policy will be discussed.

Using the case of Sino-foreign educational partnerships, Dr Lim will outline several features of the evolution of policies to govern and achieve more ‘equal’ partnerships.

In China, TNHE partnerships are seen as an important part of its drive to build ‘World Class Universities’. Its case shows an increasing orientation towards quality over quantity of partnerships and a growing role for urban and regional geopolitics in the choice of its HE partnerships.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Thabo Msibi is Associate Professor in Curriculum Studies in the School of Education at the University of KwaZulu-Natal, where he is also the Dean and Head of the School of Education.   

Professor Msibi’s scholarship is on the interface of gender and sexuality issues, particularly as they relate to education.  He also is interested in theory building as it relates to African sexualities.  He has published research in South African and international journals on these subjects, and has co-edited six journal special issues.

Thabo has also published numerous book chapters looking at the educational experiences of individuals who claim same-sex identities.  His recent monograph entitled Hidden Sexualities of South African Teachers: Black Male Educators and Same-sex Desire is published by Routledge.

This seminar reflects on the public uproar that has come with the expansion of the comprehensive sexuality education programme by the Department of Basic Education in South Africa.

Touted globally by the UNESCO and other international organisations as a critical vehicle for the promotion of positive sexual behaviour amongst young people, comprehensive sexuality education has recently received significant international fanfare.  This focus follows the release of the revised International technical guidance on sexuality education by UNESCO in 2018.  Some African countries, including South Africa, have used the revisions to update their curriculum offerings on sexuality education.

Section nine of the South African Constitution, known as the Equality Clause, explicitly provides protections against unfair discrimination on the basis of race, gender, sex, pregnancy, marital status, ethnic or social origin, colour, sexual orientation, age, disability, religion, conscience, belief, culture, language and birth.

It was through this constitutional guarantee that the country sought to revise its comprehensive curriculum offering, leading to significant backlash from the traditional, religious and conservative organisations. Front-page media articles screamed that the Minister of Education was trying to teach young children about how to have sex, and that she was effectively sexualising young children. The Ministry was also accused of imposing a Western ideals on African people.

The seminar will analyse the transnational and local reasons for the conservative backlash in South Africa. It will argue that the response largely follows a coordinated international movement that has sought to undermine sexuality education and reverse the gains already made by sexual rights organisations.  It will showcase how local sexual politics reflect a transnational mobility of ideas that are reconfigured at a local level in order to attain legitimacy.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Miri Yemini is a tenured Senior Lecturer in the School of Education at Tel Aviv University.

At Tel Aviv Dr. Yemini teaches graduate and undergraduate modules in education, including Internationalisation in Education, Education and Globalisation, Entrepreneurship in Education and Project Management in Schools.

Dr. Yemini serves as a co-Chair of UNESCO chair for Technology and Internationalisation in Education. Recently (April 2018) she was awarded (with Prof. Dr. Nina Kolleck) by the Max Plank Foundation the Award for Research Cooperation and High Excellence in Science (ARCHES), to develop research in the field of school-NGO interactions. This year (2021) Dr. Yemini secured funding from Israeli Science Foundation (150,000 Euro) for her project on education trajectories of Global Middle Class families.

Increasing numbers of highly educated and skilled professionals are internationally mobile for work. Some are transferred by employers; some proactively seek out new positions in different countries.

The currently estimated size of this group (known as globally mobile professionals, ‘global expatriates’ or members of a global middle class) is 66.2 million, which is predicted to rise to 87.5 million by 2022.

The increasing number, but also growing cultural diversity of this group (originating from all parts of the world), and the extent to which/frequency they relocate is an important articulation of newer forms of transnationalism that encompass the movement of people and ideas, and changing economic and social relations.

This seminar aims to map out and theorise the everyday practices of these globally middle professional families and to consider how their presence in key cities around the world might be re-shaping political, social, economic and education structures.

In particular, we will discuss how these families experience mobility and what motivates these relocations; how families create a sense of identity while ‘on the move’; what short-term and longer term aspirations the professionals, their partners and their children have; what education and extra-curricular choices are made; how different cultural contexts are negotiated etc.

Critically, we will discuss how these middle class families work to reproduce and extend their privilege, and so engage in ‘class-making’ practices.  Ultimately, this work offers a much-needed empirical basis to examine the theoretical proposition that there is now a ‘global’ middle class that is somehow different to nationally-located middle class groups.

The Department of Education and St Edmunds Hall are delighted to announce a new Public Seminar series which will take place online in Trinity Term on Wednesdays from 3pm-4pm (UK time) between 5th May and 28th July.

 

The Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education will address themes of major interest to academics, practitioners, and policy-makers working in the field of education globally. These seminars aim to illuminate the role of education in societal development, with a focus on understanding changes in education policy, discourse, and practice, and how these changes influence individual opportunities and shape the development of educational institutions around the world. Seminars will zoom into the local and zoom out into the national and supranational spaces, flows, and influences on education.

The series will be chaired by Maia Chankseliani, Associate Professor of Comparative and International Education, and will feature the following speakers:

Thabo Msibi, Dean and Head of School, School of Education, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

Miri Yemini, Senior Lecturer, Tel Aviv University, Israel

Miguel Antonio Lim, Senior Lecturer in Education, University of Manchester, United Kingdom

Oscar Valiente, Senior Lecturer University of Glasgow, United Kingdom

Moira Faul, Executive Director, NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva, Switzerland

Aliya Kuzhabekova, Associate Professor, Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan

 

To view the full programme of seminars, please click here.

Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education

Joint seminars organised by the Department of Education and St Edmund Hall, University of Oxford.

Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education address themes of major interest to academics, practitioners, and policy-makers working in the field of education globally. These seminars aim to illuminate the role of education in societal development, with a focus on understanding changes in education policy, discourse, and practice, and how these changes influence individual opportunities and shape the development of educational institutions around the world. Seminars will zoom into the local and zoom out into the national and supranational spaces, flows, and influences on education.

The series will be chaired by Maia Chankseliani, Associate Professor of Comparative and International Education.

 

The seminar programme:

*Please note that all seminars have a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

 

Wed 5 May at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Breaking gender, sex and sexuality borders: The case of comprehensive sexuality education in South Africa’

– Thabo Msibi, Dean and Head of School, School of Education, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

 

Wed 19 May at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Global Middle-Class families – comparative study of travel trajectories and imagined futures’

– Miri Yemini, Senior Lecturer, Tel Aviv University, Israel

 

Wed 2 June at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Equal’ Transnational Partnerships in Higher Education: Sino-Foreign Case Studies’

– Miguel Antonio Lim, Senior Lecturer in Education, University of Manchester, UK

 

Wed 16 June at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Why did policymakers in India and Mexico adopt the Germanic model of dual apprenticeships?’

– Oscar Valiente, Senior Lecturer University of Glasgow, UK

 

Wed 7th July at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Governing education by partnership: the GPE in the context of other sectors’ global financing partnerships.’

– Moira V. Faul, Executive Director, NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva

 

Wed 28th July at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

A comparison of the transition of returning scholars to domestic research environments in Kazakhstan, Malaysia and Cambodia.’

– Aliya Kuzhabekova, Associate Professor, Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Aliya Kuzhabekova is Associate Professor at Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan.

In this talk, Aliya Kuzhabekova will report on the results of a collaborative project exploring how individuals, who received Ph.D. degrees abroad transition to research environment in their home countries.

In particular, the aim of the comparative study was to develop a better understanding about how returnees, who obtained degrees in countries with high levels of research capacity re-integrated in the research environment of countries with lower levels of research capacities.

In addition, the project team tried to reveal the extent to which the returnees served as change agents transforming the research environment in their countries. The study allowed to obtain comparative insights about cross-country and program-related variations in the returnees’ adjustment experiences.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Moira V. Faul is Executive Director of NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva. 

The Global Partnership for Education (GPE) is one of a recent proliferation of pooled financing mechanisms in sustainable development. Despite a policy narrative of inclusive and egalitarian partnering, differences between public, private and voluntary sectors are assumed to affect relations between partners, and the effectiveness of partnerships.

We theorise global financing partnerships as a social ‘space between fields’ that is generated and structured by relationships between the actors mobilised into partnership boards from different fields. We move beyond the conventional focus on sectoral factions to investigate the potential of other aspects of diversity to affect partnership outcomes.

We empirically investigate the structuring of the space of global financing partnerships, comparing the GPE with climate change and health, by analysing a new dataset of 188 board members of ten global financing partnerships. First, network analyses reveal that donors (whether states, international organisations or private sector) are systematically privileged in this partnership space.

Secondly, faultline analytical tools reveal that despite a narrative of additional financing from the private sector, donors are significantly associated with the public sector. Furthermore, donors (public and private sector) are significantly associated with an economic logic of action and non-donors with an issue-specific framing.

Examining the multiple diversities that come into play in partnership board composition and structuring enables an improved theorisation of partnership effectiveness; it also holds important implications for board decisions and the sustainability and educational impacts that these partnerships are purported to deliver.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Oscar Valiente is Senior Lecturer in Educational Leadership & Policy at the University of Glasgow, Scotland. 

While most comparative education studies have focused on the historical processes that gave birth to the dual model in Germanic countries, our research aims to elucidate the drivers that explain why policymakers embrace the dual apprenticeship idea and how they re-contextualize it in their own educational context.

Drawing on a constructivist political economy framework, our study specifically investigates the reasons of policymakers in India and Mexico to adopt the dual model and how their different institutional conditions explain variations in the way the two countries have re-contextualized this global policy idea.

The selected cases are particularly interesting for the comparison because of the broad ambitions of their national reforms and the significant differences in the type of dual model of apprenticeships finally retained in the two countries.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Miguel Antonio Lim is Senior Lecturer in Education at the University of Manchester, UK, with special focus on Education and International Development at the University’s School of Environment, Education, and Development (SEED).

At this seminar, the evolving role of transnational higher education (TNHE) as part of wider national development policy will be discussed.

Using the case of Sino-foreign educational partnerships, Dr Lim will outline several features of the evolution of policies to govern and achieve more ‘equal’ partnerships.

In China, TNHE partnerships are seen as an important part of its drive to build ‘World Class Universities’. Its case shows an increasing orientation towards quality over quantity of partnerships and a growing role for urban and regional geopolitics in the choice of its HE partnerships.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Thabo Msibi is Associate Professor in Curriculum Studies in the School of Education at the University of KwaZulu-Natal, where he is also the Dean and Head of the School of Education.   

Professor Msibi’s scholarship is on the interface of gender and sexuality issues, particularly as they relate to education.  He also is interested in theory building as it relates to African sexualities.  He has published research in South African and international journals on these subjects, and has co-edited six journal special issues.

Thabo has also published numerous book chapters looking at the educational experiences of individuals who claim same-sex identities.  His recent monograph entitled Hidden Sexualities of South African Teachers: Black Male Educators and Same-sex Desire is published by Routledge.

This seminar reflects on the public uproar that has come with the expansion of the comprehensive sexuality education programme by the Department of Basic Education in South Africa.

Touted globally by the UNESCO and other international organisations as a critical vehicle for the promotion of positive sexual behaviour amongst young people, comprehensive sexuality education has recently received significant international fanfare.  This focus follows the release of the revised International technical guidance on sexuality education by UNESCO in 2018.  Some African countries, including South Africa, have used the revisions to update their curriculum offerings on sexuality education.

Section nine of the South African Constitution, known as the Equality Clause, explicitly provides protections against unfair discrimination on the basis of race, gender, sex, pregnancy, marital status, ethnic or social origin, colour, sexual orientation, age, disability, religion, conscience, belief, culture, language and birth.

It was through this constitutional guarantee that the country sought to revise its comprehensive curriculum offering, leading to significant backlash from the traditional, religious and conservative organisations. Front-page media articles screamed that the Minister of Education was trying to teach young children about how to have sex, and that she was effectively sexualising young children. The Ministry was also accused of imposing a Western ideals on African people.

The seminar will analyse the transnational and local reasons for the conservative backlash in South Africa. It will argue that the response largely follows a coordinated international movement that has sought to undermine sexuality education and reverse the gains already made by sexual rights organisations.  It will showcase how local sexual politics reflect a transnational mobility of ideas that are reconfigured at a local level in order to attain legitimacy.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Miri Yemini is a tenured Senior Lecturer in the School of Education at Tel Aviv University.

At Tel Aviv Dr. Yemini teaches graduate and undergraduate modules in education, including Internationalisation in Education, Education and Globalisation, Entrepreneurship in Education and Project Management in Schools.

Dr. Yemini serves as a co-Chair of UNESCO chair for Technology and Internationalisation in Education. Recently (April 2018) she was awarded (with Prof. Dr. Nina Kolleck) by the Max Plank Foundation the Award for Research Cooperation and High Excellence in Science (ARCHES), to develop research in the field of school-NGO interactions. This year (2021) Dr. Yemini secured funding from Israeli Science Foundation (150,000 Euro) for her project on education trajectories of Global Middle Class families.

Increasing numbers of highly educated and skilled professionals are internationally mobile for work. Some are transferred by employers; some proactively seek out new positions in different countries.

The currently estimated size of this group (known as globally mobile professionals, ‘global expatriates’ or members of a global middle class) is 66.2 million, which is predicted to rise to 87.5 million by 2022.

The increasing number, but also growing cultural diversity of this group (originating from all parts of the world), and the extent to which/frequency they relocate is an important articulation of newer forms of transnationalism that encompass the movement of people and ideas, and changing economic and social relations.

This seminar aims to map out and theorise the everyday practices of these globally middle professional families and to consider how their presence in key cities around the world might be re-shaping political, social, economic and education structures.

In particular, we will discuss how these families experience mobility and what motivates these relocations; how families create a sense of identity while ‘on the move’; what short-term and longer term aspirations the professionals, their partners and their children have; what education and extra-curricular choices are made; how different cultural contexts are negotiated etc.

Critically, we will discuss how these middle class families work to reproduce and extend their privilege, and so engage in ‘class-making’ practices.  Ultimately, this work offers a much-needed empirical basis to examine the theoretical proposition that there is now a ‘global’ middle class that is somehow different to nationally-located middle class groups.

The Department of Education and St Edmunds Hall are delighted to announce a new Public Seminar series which will take place online in Trinity Term on Wednesdays from 3pm-4pm (UK time) between 5th May and 28th July.

 

The Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education will address themes of major interest to academics, practitioners, and policy-makers working in the field of education globally. These seminars aim to illuminate the role of education in societal development, with a focus on understanding changes in education policy, discourse, and practice, and how these changes influence individual opportunities and shape the development of educational institutions around the world. Seminars will zoom into the local and zoom out into the national and supranational spaces, flows, and influences on education.

The series will be chaired by Maia Chankseliani, Associate Professor of Comparative and International Education, and will feature the following speakers:

Thabo Msibi, Dean and Head of School, School of Education, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

Miri Yemini, Senior Lecturer, Tel Aviv University, Israel

Miguel Antonio Lim, Senior Lecturer in Education, University of Manchester, United Kingdom

Oscar Valiente, Senior Lecturer University of Glasgow, United Kingdom

Moira Faul, Executive Director, NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva, Switzerland

Aliya Kuzhabekova, Associate Professor, Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan

 

To view the full programme of seminars, please click here.

Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education

Joint seminars organised by the Department of Education and St Edmund Hall, University of Oxford.

Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education address themes of major interest to academics, practitioners, and policy-makers working in the field of education globally. These seminars aim to illuminate the role of education in societal development, with a focus on understanding changes in education policy, discourse, and practice, and how these changes influence individual opportunities and shape the development of educational institutions around the world. Seminars will zoom into the local and zoom out into the national and supranational spaces, flows, and influences on education.

The series will be chaired by Maia Chankseliani, Associate Professor of Comparative and International Education.

 

The seminar programme:

*Please note that all seminars have a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

 

Wed 5 May at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Breaking gender, sex and sexuality borders: The case of comprehensive sexuality education in South Africa’

– Thabo Msibi, Dean and Head of School, School of Education, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

 

Wed 19 May at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Global Middle-Class families – comparative study of travel trajectories and imagined futures’

– Miri Yemini, Senior Lecturer, Tel Aviv University, Israel

 

Wed 2 June at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Equal’ Transnational Partnerships in Higher Education: Sino-Foreign Case Studies’

– Miguel Antonio Lim, Senior Lecturer in Education, University of Manchester, UK

 

Wed 16 June at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Why did policymakers in India and Mexico adopt the Germanic model of dual apprenticeships?’

– Oscar Valiente, Senior Lecturer University of Glasgow, UK

 

Wed 7th July at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Governing education by partnership: the GPE in the context of other sectors’ global financing partnerships.’

– Moira V. Faul, Executive Director, NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva

 

Wed 28th July at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

A comparison of the transition of returning scholars to domestic research environments in Kazakhstan, Malaysia and Cambodia.’

– Aliya Kuzhabekova, Associate Professor, Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Aliya Kuzhabekova is Associate Professor at Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan.

In this talk, Aliya Kuzhabekova will report on the results of a collaborative project exploring how individuals, who received Ph.D. degrees abroad transition to research environment in their home countries.

In particular, the aim of the comparative study was to develop a better understanding about how returnees, who obtained degrees in countries with high levels of research capacity re-integrated in the research environment of countries with lower levels of research capacities.

In addition, the project team tried to reveal the extent to which the returnees served as change agents transforming the research environment in their countries. The study allowed to obtain comparative insights about cross-country and program-related variations in the returnees’ adjustment experiences.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Moira V. Faul is Executive Director of NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva. 

The Global Partnership for Education (GPE) is one of a recent proliferation of pooled financing mechanisms in sustainable development. Despite a policy narrative of inclusive and egalitarian partnering, differences between public, private and voluntary sectors are assumed to affect relations between partners, and the effectiveness of partnerships.

We theorise global financing partnerships as a social ‘space between fields’ that is generated and structured by relationships between the actors mobilised into partnership boards from different fields. We move beyond the conventional focus on sectoral factions to investigate the potential of other aspects of diversity to affect partnership outcomes.

We empirically investigate the structuring of the space of global financing partnerships, comparing the GPE with climate change and health, by analysing a new dataset of 188 board members of ten global financing partnerships. First, network analyses reveal that donors (whether states, international organisations or private sector) are systematically privileged in this partnership space.

Secondly, faultline analytical tools reveal that despite a narrative of additional financing from the private sector, donors are significantly associated with the public sector. Furthermore, donors (public and private sector) are significantly associated with an economic logic of action and non-donors with an issue-specific framing.

Examining the multiple diversities that come into play in partnership board composition and structuring enables an improved theorisation of partnership effectiveness; it also holds important implications for board decisions and the sustainability and educational impacts that these partnerships are purported to deliver.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Oscar Valiente is Senior Lecturer in Educational Leadership & Policy at the University of Glasgow, Scotland. 

While most comparative education studies have focused on the historical processes that gave birth to the dual model in Germanic countries, our research aims to elucidate the drivers that explain why policymakers embrace the dual apprenticeship idea and how they re-contextualize it in their own educational context.

Drawing on a constructivist political economy framework, our study specifically investigates the reasons of policymakers in India and Mexico to adopt the dual model and how their different institutional conditions explain variations in the way the two countries have re-contextualized this global policy idea.

The selected cases are particularly interesting for the comparison because of the broad ambitions of their national reforms and the significant differences in the type of dual model of apprenticeships finally retained in the two countries.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Miguel Antonio Lim is Senior Lecturer in Education at the University of Manchester, UK, with special focus on Education and International Development at the University’s School of Environment, Education, and Development (SEED).

At this seminar, the evolving role of transnational higher education (TNHE) as part of wider national development policy will be discussed.

Using the case of Sino-foreign educational partnerships, Dr Lim will outline several features of the evolution of policies to govern and achieve more ‘equal’ partnerships.

In China, TNHE partnerships are seen as an important part of its drive to build ‘World Class Universities’. Its case shows an increasing orientation towards quality over quantity of partnerships and a growing role for urban and regional geopolitics in the choice of its HE partnerships.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Thabo Msibi is Associate Professor in Curriculum Studies in the School of Education at the University of KwaZulu-Natal, where he is also the Dean and Head of the School of Education.   

Professor Msibi’s scholarship is on the interface of gender and sexuality issues, particularly as they relate to education.  He also is interested in theory building as it relates to African sexualities.  He has published research in South African and international journals on these subjects, and has co-edited six journal special issues.

Thabo has also published numerous book chapters looking at the educational experiences of individuals who claim same-sex identities.  His recent monograph entitled Hidden Sexualities of South African Teachers: Black Male Educators and Same-sex Desire is published by Routledge.

This seminar reflects on the public uproar that has come with the expansion of the comprehensive sexuality education programme by the Department of Basic Education in South Africa.

Touted globally by the UNESCO and other international organisations as a critical vehicle for the promotion of positive sexual behaviour amongst young people, comprehensive sexuality education has recently received significant international fanfare.  This focus follows the release of the revised International technical guidance on sexuality education by UNESCO in 2018.  Some African countries, including South Africa, have used the revisions to update their curriculum offerings on sexuality education.

Section nine of the South African Constitution, known as the Equality Clause, explicitly provides protections against unfair discrimination on the basis of race, gender, sex, pregnancy, marital status, ethnic or social origin, colour, sexual orientation, age, disability, religion, conscience, belief, culture, language and birth.

It was through this constitutional guarantee that the country sought to revise its comprehensive curriculum offering, leading to significant backlash from the traditional, religious and conservative organisations. Front-page media articles screamed that the Minister of Education was trying to teach young children about how to have sex, and that she was effectively sexualising young children. The Ministry was also accused of imposing a Western ideals on African people.

The seminar will analyse the transnational and local reasons for the conservative backlash in South Africa. It will argue that the response largely follows a coordinated international movement that has sought to undermine sexuality education and reverse the gains already made by sexual rights organisations.  It will showcase how local sexual politics reflect a transnational mobility of ideas that are reconfigured at a local level in order to attain legitimacy.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Miri Yemini is a tenured Senior Lecturer in the School of Education at Tel Aviv University.

At Tel Aviv Dr. Yemini teaches graduate and undergraduate modules in education, including Internationalisation in Education, Education and Globalisation, Entrepreneurship in Education and Project Management in Schools.

Dr. Yemini serves as a co-Chair of UNESCO chair for Technology and Internationalisation in Education. Recently (April 2018) she was awarded (with Prof. Dr. Nina Kolleck) by the Max Plank Foundation the Award for Research Cooperation and High Excellence in Science (ARCHES), to develop research in the field of school-NGO interactions. This year (2021) Dr. Yemini secured funding from Israeli Science Foundation (150,000 Euro) for her project on education trajectories of Global Middle Class families.

Increasing numbers of highly educated and skilled professionals are internationally mobile for work. Some are transferred by employers; some proactively seek out new positions in different countries.

The currently estimated size of this group (known as globally mobile professionals, ‘global expatriates’ or members of a global middle class) is 66.2 million, which is predicted to rise to 87.5 million by 2022.

The increasing number, but also growing cultural diversity of this group (originating from all parts of the world), and the extent to which/frequency they relocate is an important articulation of newer forms of transnationalism that encompass the movement of people and ideas, and changing economic and social relations.

This seminar aims to map out and theorise the everyday practices of these globally middle professional families and to consider how their presence in key cities around the world might be re-shaping political, social, economic and education structures.

In particular, we will discuss how these families experience mobility and what motivates these relocations; how families create a sense of identity while ‘on the move’; what short-term and longer term aspirations the professionals, their partners and their children have; what education and extra-curricular choices are made; how different cultural contexts are negotiated etc.

Critically, we will discuss how these middle class families work to reproduce and extend their privilege, and so engage in ‘class-making’ practices.  Ultimately, this work offers a much-needed empirical basis to examine the theoretical proposition that there is now a ‘global’ middle class that is somehow different to nationally-located middle class groups.

The Department of Education and St Edmunds Hall are delighted to announce a new Public Seminar series which will take place online in Trinity Term on Wednesdays from 3pm-4pm (UK time) between 5th May and 28th July.

 

The Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education will address themes of major interest to academics, practitioners, and policy-makers working in the field of education globally. These seminars aim to illuminate the role of education in societal development, with a focus on understanding changes in education policy, discourse, and practice, and how these changes influence individual opportunities and shape the development of educational institutions around the world. Seminars will zoom into the local and zoom out into the national and supranational spaces, flows, and influences on education.

The series will be chaired by Maia Chankseliani, Associate Professor of Comparative and International Education, and will feature the following speakers:

Thabo Msibi, Dean and Head of School, School of Education, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

Miri Yemini, Senior Lecturer, Tel Aviv University, Israel

Miguel Antonio Lim, Senior Lecturer in Education, University of Manchester, United Kingdom

Oscar Valiente, Senior Lecturer University of Glasgow, United Kingdom

Moira Faul, Executive Director, NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva, Switzerland

Aliya Kuzhabekova, Associate Professor, Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan

 

To view the full programme of seminars, please click here.

Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education

Joint seminars organised by the Department of Education and St Edmund Hall, University of Oxford.

Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education address themes of major interest to academics, practitioners, and policy-makers working in the field of education globally. These seminars aim to illuminate the role of education in societal development, with a focus on understanding changes in education policy, discourse, and practice, and how these changes influence individual opportunities and shape the development of educational institutions around the world. Seminars will zoom into the local and zoom out into the national and supranational spaces, flows, and influences on education.

The series will be chaired by Maia Chankseliani, Associate Professor of Comparative and International Education.

 

The seminar programme:

*Please note that all seminars have a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

 

Wed 5 May at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Breaking gender, sex and sexuality borders: The case of comprehensive sexuality education in South Africa’

– Thabo Msibi, Dean and Head of School, School of Education, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

 

Wed 19 May at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Global Middle-Class families – comparative study of travel trajectories and imagined futures’

– Miri Yemini, Senior Lecturer, Tel Aviv University, Israel

 

Wed 2 June at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Equal’ Transnational Partnerships in Higher Education: Sino-Foreign Case Studies’

– Miguel Antonio Lim, Senior Lecturer in Education, University of Manchester, UK

 

Wed 16 June at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Why did policymakers in India and Mexico adopt the Germanic model of dual apprenticeships?’

– Oscar Valiente, Senior Lecturer University of Glasgow, UK

 

Wed 7th July at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Governing education by partnership: the GPE in the context of other sectors’ global financing partnerships.’

– Moira V. Faul, Executive Director, NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva

 

Wed 28th July at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

A comparison of the transition of returning scholars to domestic research environments in Kazakhstan, Malaysia and Cambodia.’

– Aliya Kuzhabekova, Associate Professor, Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Aliya Kuzhabekova is Associate Professor at Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan.

In this talk, Aliya Kuzhabekova will report on the results of a collaborative project exploring how individuals, who received Ph.D. degrees abroad transition to research environment in their home countries.

In particular, the aim of the comparative study was to develop a better understanding about how returnees, who obtained degrees in countries with high levels of research capacity re-integrated in the research environment of countries with lower levels of research capacities.

In addition, the project team tried to reveal the extent to which the returnees served as change agents transforming the research environment in their countries. The study allowed to obtain comparative insights about cross-country and program-related variations in the returnees’ adjustment experiences.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Moira V. Faul is Executive Director of NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva. 

The Global Partnership for Education (GPE) is one of a recent proliferation of pooled financing mechanisms in sustainable development. Despite a policy narrative of inclusive and egalitarian partnering, differences between public, private and voluntary sectors are assumed to affect relations between partners, and the effectiveness of partnerships.

We theorise global financing partnerships as a social ‘space between fields’ that is generated and structured by relationships between the actors mobilised into partnership boards from different fields. We move beyond the conventional focus on sectoral factions to investigate the potential of other aspects of diversity to affect partnership outcomes.

We empirically investigate the structuring of the space of global financing partnerships, comparing the GPE with climate change and health, by analysing a new dataset of 188 board members of ten global financing partnerships. First, network analyses reveal that donors (whether states, international organisations or private sector) are systematically privileged in this partnership space.

Secondly, faultline analytical tools reveal that despite a narrative of additional financing from the private sector, donors are significantly associated with the public sector. Furthermore, donors (public and private sector) are significantly associated with an economic logic of action and non-donors with an issue-specific framing.

Examining the multiple diversities that come into play in partnership board composition and structuring enables an improved theorisation of partnership effectiveness; it also holds important implications for board decisions and the sustainability and educational impacts that these partnerships are purported to deliver.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Oscar Valiente is Senior Lecturer in Educational Leadership & Policy at the University of Glasgow, Scotland. 

While most comparative education studies have focused on the historical processes that gave birth to the dual model in Germanic countries, our research aims to elucidate the drivers that explain why policymakers embrace the dual apprenticeship idea and how they re-contextualize it in their own educational context.

Drawing on a constructivist political economy framework, our study specifically investigates the reasons of policymakers in India and Mexico to adopt the dual model and how their different institutional conditions explain variations in the way the two countries have re-contextualized this global policy idea.

The selected cases are particularly interesting for the comparison because of the broad ambitions of their national reforms and the significant differences in the type of dual model of apprenticeships finally retained in the two countries.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Miguel Antonio Lim is Senior Lecturer in Education at the University of Manchester, UK, with special focus on Education and International Development at the University’s School of Environment, Education, and Development (SEED).

At this seminar, the evolving role of transnational higher education (TNHE) as part of wider national development policy will be discussed.

Using the case of Sino-foreign educational partnerships, Dr Lim will outline several features of the evolution of policies to govern and achieve more ‘equal’ partnerships.

In China, TNHE partnerships are seen as an important part of its drive to build ‘World Class Universities’. Its case shows an increasing orientation towards quality over quantity of partnerships and a growing role for urban and regional geopolitics in the choice of its HE partnerships.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Thabo Msibi is Associate Professor in Curriculum Studies in the School of Education at the University of KwaZulu-Natal, where he is also the Dean and Head of the School of Education.   

Professor Msibi’s scholarship is on the interface of gender and sexuality issues, particularly as they relate to education.  He also is interested in theory building as it relates to African sexualities.  He has published research in South African and international journals on these subjects, and has co-edited six journal special issues.

Thabo has also published numerous book chapters looking at the educational experiences of individuals who claim same-sex identities.  His recent monograph entitled Hidden Sexualities of South African Teachers: Black Male Educators and Same-sex Desire is published by Routledge.

This seminar reflects on the public uproar that has come with the expansion of the comprehensive sexuality education programme by the Department of Basic Education in South Africa.

Touted globally by the UNESCO and other international organisations as a critical vehicle for the promotion of positive sexual behaviour amongst young people, comprehensive sexuality education has recently received significant international fanfare.  This focus follows the release of the revised International technical guidance on sexuality education by UNESCO in 2018.  Some African countries, including South Africa, have used the revisions to update their curriculum offerings on sexuality education.

Section nine of the South African Constitution, known as the Equality Clause, explicitly provides protections against unfair discrimination on the basis of race, gender, sex, pregnancy, marital status, ethnic or social origin, colour, sexual orientation, age, disability, religion, conscience, belief, culture, language and birth.

It was through this constitutional guarantee that the country sought to revise its comprehensive curriculum offering, leading to significant backlash from the traditional, religious and conservative organisations. Front-page media articles screamed that the Minister of Education was trying to teach young children about how to have sex, and that she was effectively sexualising young children. The Ministry was also accused of imposing a Western ideals on African people.

The seminar will analyse the transnational and local reasons for the conservative backlash in South Africa. It will argue that the response largely follows a coordinated international movement that has sought to undermine sexuality education and reverse the gains already made by sexual rights organisations.  It will showcase how local sexual politics reflect a transnational mobility of ideas that are reconfigured at a local level in order to attain legitimacy.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Miri Yemini is a tenured Senior Lecturer in the School of Education at Tel Aviv University.

At Tel Aviv Dr. Yemini teaches graduate and undergraduate modules in education, including Internationalisation in Education, Education and Globalisation, Entrepreneurship in Education and Project Management in Schools.

Dr. Yemini serves as a co-Chair of UNESCO chair for Technology and Internationalisation in Education. Recently (April 2018) she was awarded (with Prof. Dr. Nina Kolleck) by the Max Plank Foundation the Award for Research Cooperation and High Excellence in Science (ARCHES), to develop research in the field of school-NGO interactions. This year (2021) Dr. Yemini secured funding from Israeli Science Foundation (150,000 Euro) for her project on education trajectories of Global Middle Class families.

Increasing numbers of highly educated and skilled professionals are internationally mobile for work. Some are transferred by employers; some proactively seek out new positions in different countries.

The currently estimated size of this group (known as globally mobile professionals, ‘global expatriates’ or members of a global middle class) is 66.2 million, which is predicted to rise to 87.5 million by 2022.

The increasing number, but also growing cultural diversity of this group (originating from all parts of the world), and the extent to which/frequency they relocate is an important articulation of newer forms of transnationalism that encompass the movement of people and ideas, and changing economic and social relations.

This seminar aims to map out and theorise the everyday practices of these globally middle professional families and to consider how their presence in key cities around the world might be re-shaping political, social, economic and education structures.

In particular, we will discuss how these families experience mobility and what motivates these relocations; how families create a sense of identity while ‘on the move’; what short-term and longer term aspirations the professionals, their partners and their children have; what education and extra-curricular choices are made; how different cultural contexts are negotiated etc.

Critically, we will discuss how these middle class families work to reproduce and extend their privilege, and so engage in ‘class-making’ practices.  Ultimately, this work offers a much-needed empirical basis to examine the theoretical proposition that there is now a ‘global’ middle class that is somehow different to nationally-located middle class groups.

The Department of Education and St Edmunds Hall are delighted to announce a new Public Seminar series which will take place online in Trinity Term on Wednesdays from 3pm-4pm (UK time) between 5th May and 28th July.

 

The Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education will address themes of major interest to academics, practitioners, and policy-makers working in the field of education globally. These seminars aim to illuminate the role of education in societal development, with a focus on understanding changes in education policy, discourse, and practice, and how these changes influence individual opportunities and shape the development of educational institutions around the world. Seminars will zoom into the local and zoom out into the national and supranational spaces, flows, and influences on education.

The series will be chaired by Maia Chankseliani, Associate Professor of Comparative and International Education, and will feature the following speakers:

Thabo Msibi, Dean and Head of School, School of Education, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

Miri Yemini, Senior Lecturer, Tel Aviv University, Israel

Miguel Antonio Lim, Senior Lecturer in Education, University of Manchester, United Kingdom

Oscar Valiente, Senior Lecturer University of Glasgow, United Kingdom

Moira Faul, Executive Director, NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva, Switzerland

Aliya Kuzhabekova, Associate Professor, Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan

 

To view the full programme of seminars, please click here.

Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education

Joint seminars organised by the Department of Education and St Edmund Hall, University of Oxford.

Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education address themes of major interest to academics, practitioners, and policy-makers working in the field of education globally. These seminars aim to illuminate the role of education in societal development, with a focus on understanding changes in education policy, discourse, and practice, and how these changes influence individual opportunities and shape the development of educational institutions around the world. Seminars will zoom into the local and zoom out into the national and supranational spaces, flows, and influences on education.

The series will be chaired by Maia Chankseliani, Associate Professor of Comparative and International Education.

 

The seminar programme:

*Please note that all seminars have a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

 

Wed 5 May at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Breaking gender, sex and sexuality borders: The case of comprehensive sexuality education in South Africa’

– Thabo Msibi, Dean and Head of School, School of Education, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

 

Wed 19 May at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Global Middle-Class families – comparative study of travel trajectories and imagined futures’

– Miri Yemini, Senior Lecturer, Tel Aviv University, Israel

 

Wed 2 June at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Equal’ Transnational Partnerships in Higher Education: Sino-Foreign Case Studies’

– Miguel Antonio Lim, Senior Lecturer in Education, University of Manchester, UK

 

Wed 16 June at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Why did policymakers in India and Mexico adopt the Germanic model of dual apprenticeships?’

– Oscar Valiente, Senior Lecturer University of Glasgow, UK

 

Wed 7th July at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Governing education by partnership: the GPE in the context of other sectors’ global financing partnerships.’

– Moira V. Faul, Executive Director, NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva

 

Wed 28th July at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

A comparison of the transition of returning scholars to domestic research environments in Kazakhstan, Malaysia and Cambodia.’

– Aliya Kuzhabekova, Associate Professor, Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Aliya Kuzhabekova is Associate Professor at Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan.

In this talk, Aliya Kuzhabekova will report on the results of a collaborative project exploring how individuals, who received Ph.D. degrees abroad transition to research environment in their home countries.

In particular, the aim of the comparative study was to develop a better understanding about how returnees, who obtained degrees in countries with high levels of research capacity re-integrated in the research environment of countries with lower levels of research capacities.

In addition, the project team tried to reveal the extent to which the returnees served as change agents transforming the research environment in their countries. The study allowed to obtain comparative insights about cross-country and program-related variations in the returnees’ adjustment experiences.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Moira V. Faul is Executive Director of NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva. 

The Global Partnership for Education (GPE) is one of a recent proliferation of pooled financing mechanisms in sustainable development. Despite a policy narrative of inclusive and egalitarian partnering, differences between public, private and voluntary sectors are assumed to affect relations between partners, and the effectiveness of partnerships.

We theorise global financing partnerships as a social ‘space between fields’ that is generated and structured by relationships between the actors mobilised into partnership boards from different fields. We move beyond the conventional focus on sectoral factions to investigate the potential of other aspects of diversity to affect partnership outcomes.

We empirically investigate the structuring of the space of global financing partnerships, comparing the GPE with climate change and health, by analysing a new dataset of 188 board members of ten global financing partnerships. First, network analyses reveal that donors (whether states, international organisations or private sector) are systematically privileged in this partnership space.

Secondly, faultline analytical tools reveal that despite a narrative of additional financing from the private sector, donors are significantly associated with the public sector. Furthermore, donors (public and private sector) are significantly associated with an economic logic of action and non-donors with an issue-specific framing.

Examining the multiple diversities that come into play in partnership board composition and structuring enables an improved theorisation of partnership effectiveness; it also holds important implications for board decisions and the sustainability and educational impacts that these partnerships are purported to deliver.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Oscar Valiente is Senior Lecturer in Educational Leadership & Policy at the University of Glasgow, Scotland. 

While most comparative education studies have focused on the historical processes that gave birth to the dual model in Germanic countries, our research aims to elucidate the drivers that explain why policymakers embrace the dual apprenticeship idea and how they re-contextualize it in their own educational context.

Drawing on a constructivist political economy framework, our study specifically investigates the reasons of policymakers in India and Mexico to adopt the dual model and how their different institutional conditions explain variations in the way the two countries have re-contextualized this global policy idea.

The selected cases are particularly interesting for the comparison because of the broad ambitions of their national reforms and the significant differences in the type of dual model of apprenticeships finally retained in the two countries.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Miguel Antonio Lim is Senior Lecturer in Education at the University of Manchester, UK, with special focus on Education and International Development at the University’s School of Environment, Education, and Development (SEED).

At this seminar, the evolving role of transnational higher education (TNHE) as part of wider national development policy will be discussed.

Using the case of Sino-foreign educational partnerships, Dr Lim will outline several features of the evolution of policies to govern and achieve more ‘equal’ partnerships.

In China, TNHE partnerships are seen as an important part of its drive to build ‘World Class Universities’. Its case shows an increasing orientation towards quality over quantity of partnerships and a growing role for urban and regional geopolitics in the choice of its HE partnerships.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Thabo Msibi is Associate Professor in Curriculum Studies in the School of Education at the University of KwaZulu-Natal, where he is also the Dean and Head of the School of Education.   

Professor Msibi’s scholarship is on the interface of gender and sexuality issues, particularly as they relate to education.  He also is interested in theory building as it relates to African sexualities.  He has published research in South African and international journals on these subjects, and has co-edited six journal special issues.

Thabo has also published numerous book chapters looking at the educational experiences of individuals who claim same-sex identities.  His recent monograph entitled Hidden Sexualities of South African Teachers: Black Male Educators and Same-sex Desire is published by Routledge.

This seminar reflects on the public uproar that has come with the expansion of the comprehensive sexuality education programme by the Department of Basic Education in South Africa.

Touted globally by the UNESCO and other international organisations as a critical vehicle for the promotion of positive sexual behaviour amongst young people, comprehensive sexuality education has recently received significant international fanfare.  This focus follows the release of the revised International technical guidance on sexuality education by UNESCO in 2018.  Some African countries, including South Africa, have used the revisions to update their curriculum offerings on sexuality education.

Section nine of the South African Constitution, known as the Equality Clause, explicitly provides protections against unfair discrimination on the basis of race, gender, sex, pregnancy, marital status, ethnic or social origin, colour, sexual orientation, age, disability, religion, conscience, belief, culture, language and birth.

It was through this constitutional guarantee that the country sought to revise its comprehensive curriculum offering, leading to significant backlash from the traditional, religious and conservative organisations. Front-page media articles screamed that the Minister of Education was trying to teach young children about how to have sex, and that she was effectively sexualising young children. The Ministry was also accused of imposing a Western ideals on African people.

The seminar will analyse the transnational and local reasons for the conservative backlash in South Africa. It will argue that the response largely follows a coordinated international movement that has sought to undermine sexuality education and reverse the gains already made by sexual rights organisations.  It will showcase how local sexual politics reflect a transnational mobility of ideas that are reconfigured at a local level in order to attain legitimacy.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Miri Yemini is a tenured Senior Lecturer in the School of Education at Tel Aviv University.

At Tel Aviv Dr. Yemini teaches graduate and undergraduate modules in education, including Internationalisation in Education, Education and Globalisation, Entrepreneurship in Education and Project Management in Schools.

Dr. Yemini serves as a co-Chair of UNESCO chair for Technology and Internationalisation in Education. Recently (April 2018) she was awarded (with Prof. Dr. Nina Kolleck) by the Max Plank Foundation the Award for Research Cooperation and High Excellence in Science (ARCHES), to develop research in the field of school-NGO interactions. This year (2021) Dr. Yemini secured funding from Israeli Science Foundation (150,000 Euro) for her project on education trajectories of Global Middle Class families.

Increasing numbers of highly educated and skilled professionals are internationally mobile for work. Some are transferred by employers; some proactively seek out new positions in different countries.

The currently estimated size of this group (known as globally mobile professionals, ‘global expatriates’ or members of a global middle class) is 66.2 million, which is predicted to rise to 87.5 million by 2022.

The increasing number, but also growing cultural diversity of this group (originating from all parts of the world), and the extent to which/frequency they relocate is an important articulation of newer forms of transnationalism that encompass the movement of people and ideas, and changing economic and social relations.

This seminar aims to map out and theorise the everyday practices of these globally middle professional families and to consider how their presence in key cities around the world might be re-shaping political, social, economic and education structures.

In particular, we will discuss how these families experience mobility and what motivates these relocations; how families create a sense of identity while ‘on the move’; what short-term and longer term aspirations the professionals, their partners and their children have; what education and extra-curricular choices are made; how different cultural contexts are negotiated etc.

Critically, we will discuss how these middle class families work to reproduce and extend their privilege, and so engage in ‘class-making’ practices.  Ultimately, this work offers a much-needed empirical basis to examine the theoretical proposition that there is now a ‘global’ middle class that is somehow different to nationally-located middle class groups.

The Department of Education and St Edmunds Hall are delighted to announce a new Public Seminar series which will take place online in Trinity Term on Wednesdays from 3pm-4pm (UK time) between 5th May and 28th July.

 

The Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education will address themes of major interest to academics, practitioners, and policy-makers working in the field of education globally. These seminars aim to illuminate the role of education in societal development, with a focus on understanding changes in education policy, discourse, and practice, and how these changes influence individual opportunities and shape the development of educational institutions around the world. Seminars will zoom into the local and zoom out into the national and supranational spaces, flows, and influences on education.

The series will be chaired by Maia Chankseliani, Associate Professor of Comparative and International Education, and will feature the following speakers:

Thabo Msibi, Dean and Head of School, School of Education, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

Miri Yemini, Senior Lecturer, Tel Aviv University, Israel

Miguel Antonio Lim, Senior Lecturer in Education, University of Manchester, United Kingdom

Oscar Valiente, Senior Lecturer University of Glasgow, United Kingdom

Moira Faul, Executive Director, NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva, Switzerland

Aliya Kuzhabekova, Associate Professor, Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan

 

To view the full programme of seminars, please click here.

Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education

Joint seminars organised by the Department of Education and St Edmund Hall, University of Oxford.

Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education address themes of major interest to academics, practitioners, and policy-makers working in the field of education globally. These seminars aim to illuminate the role of education in societal development, with a focus on understanding changes in education policy, discourse, and practice, and how these changes influence individual opportunities and shape the development of educational institutions around the world. Seminars will zoom into the local and zoom out into the national and supranational spaces, flows, and influences on education.

The series will be chaired by Maia Chankseliani, Associate Professor of Comparative and International Education.

 

The seminar programme:

*Please note that all seminars have a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

 

Wed 5 May at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Breaking gender, sex and sexuality borders: The case of comprehensive sexuality education in South Africa’

– Thabo Msibi, Dean and Head of School, School of Education, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

 

Wed 19 May at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Global Middle-Class families – comparative study of travel trajectories and imagined futures’

– Miri Yemini, Senior Lecturer, Tel Aviv University, Israel

 

Wed 2 June at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Equal’ Transnational Partnerships in Higher Education: Sino-Foreign Case Studies’

– Miguel Antonio Lim, Senior Lecturer in Education, University of Manchester, UK

 

Wed 16 June at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Why did policymakers in India and Mexico adopt the Germanic model of dual apprenticeships?’

– Oscar Valiente, Senior Lecturer University of Glasgow, UK

 

Wed 7th July at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Governing education by partnership: the GPE in the context of other sectors’ global financing partnerships.’

– Moira V. Faul, Executive Director, NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva

 

Wed 28th July at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

A comparison of the transition of returning scholars to domestic research environments in Kazakhstan, Malaysia and Cambodia.’

– Aliya Kuzhabekova, Associate Professor, Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Aliya Kuzhabekova is Associate Professor at Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan.

In this talk, Aliya Kuzhabekova will report on the results of a collaborative project exploring how individuals, who received Ph.D. degrees abroad transition to research environment in their home countries.

In particular, the aim of the comparative study was to develop a better understanding about how returnees, who obtained degrees in countries with high levels of research capacity re-integrated in the research environment of countries with lower levels of research capacities.

In addition, the project team tried to reveal the extent to which the returnees served as change agents transforming the research environment in their countries. The study allowed to obtain comparative insights about cross-country and program-related variations in the returnees’ adjustment experiences.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Moira V. Faul is Executive Director of NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva. 

The Global Partnership for Education (GPE) is one of a recent proliferation of pooled financing mechanisms in sustainable development. Despite a policy narrative of inclusive and egalitarian partnering, differences between public, private and voluntary sectors are assumed to affect relations between partners, and the effectiveness of partnerships.

We theorise global financing partnerships as a social ‘space between fields’ that is generated and structured by relationships between the actors mobilised into partnership boards from different fields. We move beyond the conventional focus on sectoral factions to investigate the potential of other aspects of diversity to affect partnership outcomes.

We empirically investigate the structuring of the space of global financing partnerships, comparing the GPE with climate change and health, by analysing a new dataset of 188 board members of ten global financing partnerships. First, network analyses reveal that donors (whether states, international organisations or private sector) are systematically privileged in this partnership space.

Secondly, faultline analytical tools reveal that despite a narrative of additional financing from the private sector, donors are significantly associated with the public sector. Furthermore, donors (public and private sector) are significantly associated with an economic logic of action and non-donors with an issue-specific framing.

Examining the multiple diversities that come into play in partnership board composition and structuring enables an improved theorisation of partnership effectiveness; it also holds important implications for board decisions and the sustainability and educational impacts that these partnerships are purported to deliver.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Oscar Valiente is Senior Lecturer in Educational Leadership & Policy at the University of Glasgow, Scotland. 

While most comparative education studies have focused on the historical processes that gave birth to the dual model in Germanic countries, our research aims to elucidate the drivers that explain why policymakers embrace the dual apprenticeship idea and how they re-contextualize it in their own educational context.

Drawing on a constructivist political economy framework, our study specifically investigates the reasons of policymakers in India and Mexico to adopt the dual model and how their different institutional conditions explain variations in the way the two countries have re-contextualized this global policy idea.

The selected cases are particularly interesting for the comparison because of the broad ambitions of their national reforms and the significant differences in the type of dual model of apprenticeships finally retained in the two countries.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Miguel Antonio Lim is Senior Lecturer in Education at the University of Manchester, UK, with special focus on Education and International Development at the University’s School of Environment, Education, and Development (SEED).

At this seminar, the evolving role of transnational higher education (TNHE) as part of wider national development policy will be discussed.

Using the case of Sino-foreign educational partnerships, Dr Lim will outline several features of the evolution of policies to govern and achieve more ‘equal’ partnerships.

In China, TNHE partnerships are seen as an important part of its drive to build ‘World Class Universities’. Its case shows an increasing orientation towards quality over quantity of partnerships and a growing role for urban and regional geopolitics in the choice of its HE partnerships.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Thabo Msibi is Associate Professor in Curriculum Studies in the School of Education at the University of KwaZulu-Natal, where he is also the Dean and Head of the School of Education.   

Professor Msibi’s scholarship is on the interface of gender and sexuality issues, particularly as they relate to education.  He also is interested in theory building as it relates to African sexualities.  He has published research in South African and international journals on these subjects, and has co-edited six journal special issues.

Thabo has also published numerous book chapters looking at the educational experiences of individuals who claim same-sex identities.  His recent monograph entitled Hidden Sexualities of South African Teachers: Black Male Educators and Same-sex Desire is published by Routledge.

This seminar reflects on the public uproar that has come with the expansion of the comprehensive sexuality education programme by the Department of Basic Education in South Africa.

Touted globally by the UNESCO and other international organisations as a critical vehicle for the promotion of positive sexual behaviour amongst young people, comprehensive sexuality education has recently received significant international fanfare.  This focus follows the release of the revised International technical guidance on sexuality education by UNESCO in 2018.  Some African countries, including South Africa, have used the revisions to update their curriculum offerings on sexuality education.

Section nine of the South African Constitution, known as the Equality Clause, explicitly provides protections against unfair discrimination on the basis of race, gender, sex, pregnancy, marital status, ethnic or social origin, colour, sexual orientation, age, disability, religion, conscience, belief, culture, language and birth.

It was through this constitutional guarantee that the country sought to revise its comprehensive curriculum offering, leading to significant backlash from the traditional, religious and conservative organisations. Front-page media articles screamed that the Minister of Education was trying to teach young children about how to have sex, and that she was effectively sexualising young children. The Ministry was also accused of imposing a Western ideals on African people.

The seminar will analyse the transnational and local reasons for the conservative backlash in South Africa. It will argue that the response largely follows a coordinated international movement that has sought to undermine sexuality education and reverse the gains already made by sexual rights organisations.  It will showcase how local sexual politics reflect a transnational mobility of ideas that are reconfigured at a local level in order to attain legitimacy.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Miri Yemini is a tenured Senior Lecturer in the School of Education at Tel Aviv University.

At Tel Aviv Dr. Yemini teaches graduate and undergraduate modules in education, including Internationalisation in Education, Education and Globalisation, Entrepreneurship in Education and Project Management in Schools.

Dr. Yemini serves as a co-Chair of UNESCO chair for Technology and Internationalisation in Education. Recently (April 2018) she was awarded (with Prof. Dr. Nina Kolleck) by the Max Plank Foundation the Award for Research Cooperation and High Excellence in Science (ARCHES), to develop research in the field of school-NGO interactions. This year (2021) Dr. Yemini secured funding from Israeli Science Foundation (150,000 Euro) for her project on education trajectories of Global Middle Class families.

Increasing numbers of highly educated and skilled professionals are internationally mobile for work. Some are transferred by employers; some proactively seek out new positions in different countries.

The currently estimated size of this group (known as globally mobile professionals, ‘global expatriates’ or members of a global middle class) is 66.2 million, which is predicted to rise to 87.5 million by 2022.

The increasing number, but also growing cultural diversity of this group (originating from all parts of the world), and the extent to which/frequency they relocate is an important articulation of newer forms of transnationalism that encompass the movement of people and ideas, and changing economic and social relations.

This seminar aims to map out and theorise the everyday practices of these globally middle professional families and to consider how their presence in key cities around the world might be re-shaping political, social, economic and education structures.

In particular, we will discuss how these families experience mobility and what motivates these relocations; how families create a sense of identity while ‘on the move’; what short-term and longer term aspirations the professionals, their partners and their children have; what education and extra-curricular choices are made; how different cultural contexts are negotiated etc.

Critically, we will discuss how these middle class families work to reproduce and extend their privilege, and so engage in ‘class-making’ practices.  Ultimately, this work offers a much-needed empirical basis to examine the theoretical proposition that there is now a ‘global’ middle class that is somehow different to nationally-located middle class groups.

The Department of Education and St Edmunds Hall are delighted to announce a new Public Seminar series which will take place online in Trinity Term on Wednesdays from 3pm-4pm (UK time) between 5th May and 28th July.

 

The Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education will address themes of major interest to academics, practitioners, and policy-makers working in the field of education globally. These seminars aim to illuminate the role of education in societal development, with a focus on understanding changes in education policy, discourse, and practice, and how these changes influence individual opportunities and shape the development of educational institutions around the world. Seminars will zoom into the local and zoom out into the national and supranational spaces, flows, and influences on education.

The series will be chaired by Maia Chankseliani, Associate Professor of Comparative and International Education, and will feature the following speakers:

Thabo Msibi, Dean and Head of School, School of Education, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

Miri Yemini, Senior Lecturer, Tel Aviv University, Israel

Miguel Antonio Lim, Senior Lecturer in Education, University of Manchester, United Kingdom

Oscar Valiente, Senior Lecturer University of Glasgow, United Kingdom

Moira Faul, Executive Director, NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva, Switzerland

Aliya Kuzhabekova, Associate Professor, Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan

 

To view the full programme of seminars, please click here.

Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education

Joint seminars organised by the Department of Education and St Edmund Hall, University of Oxford.

Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education address themes of major interest to academics, practitioners, and policy-makers working in the field of education globally. These seminars aim to illuminate the role of education in societal development, with a focus on understanding changes in education policy, discourse, and practice, and how these changes influence individual opportunities and shape the development of educational institutions around the world. Seminars will zoom into the local and zoom out into the national and supranational spaces, flows, and influences on education.

The series will be chaired by Maia Chankseliani, Associate Professor of Comparative and International Education.

 

The seminar programme:

*Please note that all seminars have a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

 

Wed 5 May at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Breaking gender, sex and sexuality borders: The case of comprehensive sexuality education in South Africa’

– Thabo Msibi, Dean and Head of School, School of Education, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

 

Wed 19 May at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Global Middle-Class families – comparative study of travel trajectories and imagined futures’

– Miri Yemini, Senior Lecturer, Tel Aviv University, Israel

 

Wed 2 June at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Equal’ Transnational Partnerships in Higher Education: Sino-Foreign Case Studies’

– Miguel Antonio Lim, Senior Lecturer in Education, University of Manchester, UK

 

Wed 16 June at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Why did policymakers in India and Mexico adopt the Germanic model of dual apprenticeships?’

– Oscar Valiente, Senior Lecturer University of Glasgow, UK

 

Wed 7th July at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Governing education by partnership: the GPE in the context of other sectors’ global financing partnerships.’

– Moira V. Faul, Executive Director, NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva

 

Wed 28th July at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

A comparison of the transition of returning scholars to domestic research environments in Kazakhstan, Malaysia and Cambodia.’

– Aliya Kuzhabekova, Associate Professor, Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Aliya Kuzhabekova is Associate Professor at Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan.

In this talk, Aliya Kuzhabekova will report on the results of a collaborative project exploring how individuals, who received Ph.D. degrees abroad transition to research environment in their home countries.

In particular, the aim of the comparative study was to develop a better understanding about how returnees, who obtained degrees in countries with high levels of research capacity re-integrated in the research environment of countries with lower levels of research capacities.

In addition, the project team tried to reveal the extent to which the returnees served as change agents transforming the research environment in their countries. The study allowed to obtain comparative insights about cross-country and program-related variations in the returnees’ adjustment experiences.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Moira V. Faul is Executive Director of NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva. 

The Global Partnership for Education (GPE) is one of a recent proliferation of pooled financing mechanisms in sustainable development. Despite a policy narrative of inclusive and egalitarian partnering, differences between public, private and voluntary sectors are assumed to affect relations between partners, and the effectiveness of partnerships.

We theorise global financing partnerships as a social ‘space between fields’ that is generated and structured by relationships between the actors mobilised into partnership boards from different fields. We move beyond the conventional focus on sectoral factions to investigate the potential of other aspects of diversity to affect partnership outcomes.

We empirically investigate the structuring of the space of global financing partnerships, comparing the GPE with climate change and health, by analysing a new dataset of 188 board members of ten global financing partnerships. First, network analyses reveal that donors (whether states, international organisations or private sector) are systematically privileged in this partnership space.

Secondly, faultline analytical tools reveal that despite a narrative of additional financing from the private sector, donors are significantly associated with the public sector. Furthermore, donors (public and private sector) are significantly associated with an economic logic of action and non-donors with an issue-specific framing.

Examining the multiple diversities that come into play in partnership board composition and structuring enables an improved theorisation of partnership effectiveness; it also holds important implications for board decisions and the sustainability and educational impacts that these partnerships are purported to deliver.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Oscar Valiente is Senior Lecturer in Educational Leadership & Policy at the University of Glasgow, Scotland. 

While most comparative education studies have focused on the historical processes that gave birth to the dual model in Germanic countries, our research aims to elucidate the drivers that explain why policymakers embrace the dual apprenticeship idea and how they re-contextualize it in their own educational context.

Drawing on a constructivist political economy framework, our study specifically investigates the reasons of policymakers in India and Mexico to adopt the dual model and how their different institutional conditions explain variations in the way the two countries have re-contextualized this global policy idea.

The selected cases are particularly interesting for the comparison because of the broad ambitions of their national reforms and the significant differences in the type of dual model of apprenticeships finally retained in the two countries.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Miguel Antonio Lim is Senior Lecturer in Education at the University of Manchester, UK, with special focus on Education and International Development at the University’s School of Environment, Education, and Development (SEED).

At this seminar, the evolving role of transnational higher education (TNHE) as part of wider national development policy will be discussed.

Using the case of Sino-foreign educational partnerships, Dr Lim will outline several features of the evolution of policies to govern and achieve more ‘equal’ partnerships.

In China, TNHE partnerships are seen as an important part of its drive to build ‘World Class Universities’. Its case shows an increasing orientation towards quality over quantity of partnerships and a growing role for urban and regional geopolitics in the choice of its HE partnerships.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Thabo Msibi is Associate Professor in Curriculum Studies in the School of Education at the University of KwaZulu-Natal, where he is also the Dean and Head of the School of Education.   

Professor Msibi’s scholarship is on the interface of gender and sexuality issues, particularly as they relate to education.  He also is interested in theory building as it relates to African sexualities.  He has published research in South African and international journals on these subjects, and has co-edited six journal special issues.

Thabo has also published numerous book chapters looking at the educational experiences of individuals who claim same-sex identities.  His recent monograph entitled Hidden Sexualities of South African Teachers: Black Male Educators and Same-sex Desire is published by Routledge.

This seminar reflects on the public uproar that has come with the expansion of the comprehensive sexuality education programme by the Department of Basic Education in South Africa.

Touted globally by the UNESCO and other international organisations as a critical vehicle for the promotion of positive sexual behaviour amongst young people, comprehensive sexuality education has recently received significant international fanfare.  This focus follows the release of the revised International technical guidance on sexuality education by UNESCO in 2018.  Some African countries, including South Africa, have used the revisions to update their curriculum offerings on sexuality education.

Section nine of the South African Constitution, known as the Equality Clause, explicitly provides protections against unfair discrimination on the basis of race, gender, sex, pregnancy, marital status, ethnic or social origin, colour, sexual orientation, age, disability, religion, conscience, belief, culture, language and birth.

It was through this constitutional guarantee that the country sought to revise its comprehensive curriculum offering, leading to significant backlash from the traditional, religious and conservative organisations. Front-page media articles screamed that the Minister of Education was trying to teach young children about how to have sex, and that she was effectively sexualising young children. The Ministry was also accused of imposing a Western ideals on African people.

The seminar will analyse the transnational and local reasons for the conservative backlash in South Africa. It will argue that the response largely follows a coordinated international movement that has sought to undermine sexuality education and reverse the gains already made by sexual rights organisations.  It will showcase how local sexual politics reflect a transnational mobility of ideas that are reconfigured at a local level in order to attain legitimacy.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Miri Yemini is a tenured Senior Lecturer in the School of Education at Tel Aviv University.

At Tel Aviv Dr. Yemini teaches graduate and undergraduate modules in education, including Internationalisation in Education, Education and Globalisation, Entrepreneurship in Education and Project Management in Schools.

Dr. Yemini serves as a co-Chair of UNESCO chair for Technology and Internationalisation in Education. Recently (April 2018) she was awarded (with Prof. Dr. Nina Kolleck) by the Max Plank Foundation the Award for Research Cooperation and High Excellence in Science (ARCHES), to develop research in the field of school-NGO interactions. This year (2021) Dr. Yemini secured funding from Israeli Science Foundation (150,000 Euro) for her project on education trajectories of Global Middle Class families.

Increasing numbers of highly educated and skilled professionals are internationally mobile for work. Some are transferred by employers; some proactively seek out new positions in different countries.

The currently estimated size of this group (known as globally mobile professionals, ‘global expatriates’ or members of a global middle class) is 66.2 million, which is predicted to rise to 87.5 million by 2022.

The increasing number, but also growing cultural diversity of this group (originating from all parts of the world), and the extent to which/frequency they relocate is an important articulation of newer forms of transnationalism that encompass the movement of people and ideas, and changing economic and social relations.

This seminar aims to map out and theorise the everyday practices of these globally middle professional families and to consider how their presence in key cities around the world might be re-shaping political, social, economic and education structures.

In particular, we will discuss how these families experience mobility and what motivates these relocations; how families create a sense of identity while ‘on the move’; what short-term and longer term aspirations the professionals, their partners and their children have; what education and extra-curricular choices are made; how different cultural contexts are negotiated etc.

Critically, we will discuss how these middle class families work to reproduce and extend their privilege, and so engage in ‘class-making’ practices.  Ultimately, this work offers a much-needed empirical basis to examine the theoretical proposition that there is now a ‘global’ middle class that is somehow different to nationally-located middle class groups.

The Department of Education and St Edmunds Hall are delighted to announce a new Public Seminar series which will take place online in Trinity Term on Wednesdays from 3pm-4pm (UK time) between 5th May and 28th July.

 

The Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education will address themes of major interest to academics, practitioners, and policy-makers working in the field of education globally. These seminars aim to illuminate the role of education in societal development, with a focus on understanding changes in education policy, discourse, and practice, and how these changes influence individual opportunities and shape the development of educational institutions around the world. Seminars will zoom into the local and zoom out into the national and supranational spaces, flows, and influences on education.

The series will be chaired by Maia Chankseliani, Associate Professor of Comparative and International Education, and will feature the following speakers:

Thabo Msibi, Dean and Head of School, School of Education, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

Miri Yemini, Senior Lecturer, Tel Aviv University, Israel

Miguel Antonio Lim, Senior Lecturer in Education, University of Manchester, United Kingdom

Oscar Valiente, Senior Lecturer University of Glasgow, United Kingdom

Moira Faul, Executive Director, NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva, Switzerland

Aliya Kuzhabekova, Associate Professor, Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan

 

To view the full programme of seminars, please click here.

Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education

Joint seminars organised by the Department of Education and St Edmund Hall, University of Oxford.

Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education address themes of major interest to academics, practitioners, and policy-makers working in the field of education globally. These seminars aim to illuminate the role of education in societal development, with a focus on understanding changes in education policy, discourse, and practice, and how these changes influence individual opportunities and shape the development of educational institutions around the world. Seminars will zoom into the local and zoom out into the national and supranational spaces, flows, and influences on education.

The series will be chaired by Maia Chankseliani, Associate Professor of Comparative and International Education.

 

The seminar programme:

*Please note that all seminars have a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

 

Wed 5 May at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Breaking gender, sex and sexuality borders: The case of comprehensive sexuality education in South Africa’

– Thabo Msibi, Dean and Head of School, School of Education, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

 

Wed 19 May at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Global Middle-Class families – comparative study of travel trajectories and imagined futures’

– Miri Yemini, Senior Lecturer, Tel Aviv University, Israel

 

Wed 2 June at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Equal’ Transnational Partnerships in Higher Education: Sino-Foreign Case Studies’

– Miguel Antonio Lim, Senior Lecturer in Education, University of Manchester, UK

 

Wed 16 June at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Why did policymakers in India and Mexico adopt the Germanic model of dual apprenticeships?’

– Oscar Valiente, Senior Lecturer University of Glasgow, UK

 

Wed 7th July at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Governing education by partnership: the GPE in the context of other sectors’ global financing partnerships.’

– Moira V. Faul, Executive Director, NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva

 

Wed 28th July at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

A comparison of the transition of returning scholars to domestic research environments in Kazakhstan, Malaysia and Cambodia.’

– Aliya Kuzhabekova, Associate Professor, Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Aliya Kuzhabekova is Associate Professor at Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan.

In this talk, Aliya Kuzhabekova will report on the results of a collaborative project exploring how individuals, who received Ph.D. degrees abroad transition to research environment in their home countries.

In particular, the aim of the comparative study was to develop a better understanding about how returnees, who obtained degrees in countries with high levels of research capacity re-integrated in the research environment of countries with lower levels of research capacities.

In addition, the project team tried to reveal the extent to which the returnees served as change agents transforming the research environment in their countries. The study allowed to obtain comparative insights about cross-country and program-related variations in the returnees’ adjustment experiences.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Moira V. Faul is Executive Director of NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva. 

The Global Partnership for Education (GPE) is one of a recent proliferation of pooled financing mechanisms in sustainable development. Despite a policy narrative of inclusive and egalitarian partnering, differences between public, private and voluntary sectors are assumed to affect relations between partners, and the effectiveness of partnerships.

We theorise global financing partnerships as a social ‘space between fields’ that is generated and structured by relationships between the actors mobilised into partnership boards from different fields. We move beyond the conventional focus on sectoral factions to investigate the potential of other aspects of diversity to affect partnership outcomes.

We empirically investigate the structuring of the space of global financing partnerships, comparing the GPE with climate change and health, by analysing a new dataset of 188 board members of ten global financing partnerships. First, network analyses reveal that donors (whether states, international organisations or private sector) are systematically privileged in this partnership space.

Secondly, faultline analytical tools reveal that despite a narrative of additional financing from the private sector, donors are significantly associated with the public sector. Furthermore, donors (public and private sector) are significantly associated with an economic logic of action and non-donors with an issue-specific framing.

Examining the multiple diversities that come into play in partnership board composition and structuring enables an improved theorisation of partnership effectiveness; it also holds important implications for board decisions and the sustainability and educational impacts that these partnerships are purported to deliver.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Oscar Valiente is Senior Lecturer in Educational Leadership & Policy at the University of Glasgow, Scotland. 

While most comparative education studies have focused on the historical processes that gave birth to the dual model in Germanic countries, our research aims to elucidate the drivers that explain why policymakers embrace the dual apprenticeship idea and how they re-contextualize it in their own educational context.

Drawing on a constructivist political economy framework, our study specifically investigates the reasons of policymakers in India and Mexico to adopt the dual model and how their different institutional conditions explain variations in the way the two countries have re-contextualized this global policy idea.

The selected cases are particularly interesting for the comparison because of the broad ambitions of their national reforms and the significant differences in the type of dual model of apprenticeships finally retained in the two countries.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Miguel Antonio Lim is Senior Lecturer in Education at the University of Manchester, UK, with special focus on Education and International Development at the University’s School of Environment, Education, and Development (SEED).

At this seminar, the evolving role of transnational higher education (TNHE) as part of wider national development policy will be discussed.

Using the case of Sino-foreign educational partnerships, Dr Lim will outline several features of the evolution of policies to govern and achieve more ‘equal’ partnerships.

In China, TNHE partnerships are seen as an important part of its drive to build ‘World Class Universities’. Its case shows an increasing orientation towards quality over quantity of partnerships and a growing role for urban and regional geopolitics in the choice of its HE partnerships.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Thabo Msibi is Associate Professor in Curriculum Studies in the School of Education at the University of KwaZulu-Natal, where he is also the Dean and Head of the School of Education.   

Professor Msibi’s scholarship is on the interface of gender and sexuality issues, particularly as they relate to education.  He also is interested in theory building as it relates to African sexualities.  He has published research in South African and international journals on these subjects, and has co-edited six journal special issues.

Thabo has also published numerous book chapters looking at the educational experiences of individuals who claim same-sex identities.  His recent monograph entitled Hidden Sexualities of South African Teachers: Black Male Educators and Same-sex Desire is published by Routledge.

This seminar reflects on the public uproar that has come with the expansion of the comprehensive sexuality education programme by the Department of Basic Education in South Africa.

Touted globally by the UNESCO and other international organisations as a critical vehicle for the promotion of positive sexual behaviour amongst young people, comprehensive sexuality education has recently received significant international fanfare.  This focus follows the release of the revised International technical guidance on sexuality education by UNESCO in 2018.  Some African countries, including South Africa, have used the revisions to update their curriculum offerings on sexuality education.

Section nine of the South African Constitution, known as the Equality Clause, explicitly provides protections against unfair discrimination on the basis of race, gender, sex, pregnancy, marital status, ethnic or social origin, colour, sexual orientation, age, disability, religion, conscience, belief, culture, language and birth.

It was through this constitutional guarantee that the country sought to revise its comprehensive curriculum offering, leading to significant backlash from the traditional, religious and conservative organisations. Front-page media articles screamed that the Minister of Education was trying to teach young children about how to have sex, and that she was effectively sexualising young children. The Ministry was also accused of imposing a Western ideals on African people.

The seminar will analyse the transnational and local reasons for the conservative backlash in South Africa. It will argue that the response largely follows a coordinated international movement that has sought to undermine sexuality education and reverse the gains already made by sexual rights organisations.  It will showcase how local sexual politics reflect a transnational mobility of ideas that are reconfigured at a local level in order to attain legitimacy.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Miri Yemini is a tenured Senior Lecturer in the School of Education at Tel Aviv University.

At Tel Aviv Dr. Yemini teaches graduate and undergraduate modules in education, including Internationalisation in Education, Education and Globalisation, Entrepreneurship in Education and Project Management in Schools.

Dr. Yemini serves as a co-Chair of UNESCO chair for Technology and Internationalisation in Education. Recently (April 2018) she was awarded (with Prof. Dr. Nina Kolleck) by the Max Plank Foundation the Award for Research Cooperation and High Excellence in Science (ARCHES), to develop research in the field of school-NGO interactions. This year (2021) Dr. Yemini secured funding from Israeli Science Foundation (150,000 Euro) for her project on education trajectories of Global Middle Class families.

Increasing numbers of highly educated and skilled professionals are internationally mobile for work. Some are transferred by employers; some proactively seek out new positions in different countries.

The currently estimated size of this group (known as globally mobile professionals, ‘global expatriates’ or members of a global middle class) is 66.2 million, which is predicted to rise to 87.5 million by 2022.

The increasing number, but also growing cultural diversity of this group (originating from all parts of the world), and the extent to which/frequency they relocate is an important articulation of newer forms of transnationalism that encompass the movement of people and ideas, and changing economic and social relations.

This seminar aims to map out and theorise the everyday practices of these globally middle professional families and to consider how their presence in key cities around the world might be re-shaping political, social, economic and education structures.

In particular, we will discuss how these families experience mobility and what motivates these relocations; how families create a sense of identity while ‘on the move’; what short-term and longer term aspirations the professionals, their partners and their children have; what education and extra-curricular choices are made; how different cultural contexts are negotiated etc.

Critically, we will discuss how these middle class families work to reproduce and extend their privilege, and so engage in ‘class-making’ practices.  Ultimately, this work offers a much-needed empirical basis to examine the theoretical proposition that there is now a ‘global’ middle class that is somehow different to nationally-located middle class groups.

The Department of Education and St Edmunds Hall are delighted to announce a new Public Seminar series which will take place online in Trinity Term on Wednesdays from 3pm-4pm (UK time) between 5th May and 28th July.

 

The Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education will address themes of major interest to academics, practitioners, and policy-makers working in the field of education globally. These seminars aim to illuminate the role of education in societal development, with a focus on understanding changes in education policy, discourse, and practice, and how these changes influence individual opportunities and shape the development of educational institutions around the world. Seminars will zoom into the local and zoom out into the national and supranational spaces, flows, and influences on education.

The series will be chaired by Maia Chankseliani, Associate Professor of Comparative and International Education, and will feature the following speakers:

Thabo Msibi, Dean and Head of School, School of Education, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

Miri Yemini, Senior Lecturer, Tel Aviv University, Israel

Miguel Antonio Lim, Senior Lecturer in Education, University of Manchester, United Kingdom

Oscar Valiente, Senior Lecturer University of Glasgow, United Kingdom

Moira Faul, Executive Director, NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva, Switzerland

Aliya Kuzhabekova, Associate Professor, Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan

 

To view the full programme of seminars, please click here.

Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education

Joint seminars organised by the Department of Education and St Edmund Hall, University of Oxford.

Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education address themes of major interest to academics, practitioners, and policy-makers working in the field of education globally. These seminars aim to illuminate the role of education in societal development, with a focus on understanding changes in education policy, discourse, and practice, and how these changes influence individual opportunities and shape the development of educational institutions around the world. Seminars will zoom into the local and zoom out into the national and supranational spaces, flows, and influences on education.

The series will be chaired by Maia Chankseliani, Associate Professor of Comparative and International Education.

 

The seminar programme:

*Please note that all seminars have a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

 

Wed 5 May at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Breaking gender, sex and sexuality borders: The case of comprehensive sexuality education in South Africa’

– Thabo Msibi, Dean and Head of School, School of Education, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

 

Wed 19 May at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Global Middle-Class families – comparative study of travel trajectories and imagined futures’

– Miri Yemini, Senior Lecturer, Tel Aviv University, Israel

 

Wed 2 June at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Equal’ Transnational Partnerships in Higher Education: Sino-Foreign Case Studies’

– Miguel Antonio Lim, Senior Lecturer in Education, University of Manchester, UK

 

Wed 16 June at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Why did policymakers in India and Mexico adopt the Germanic model of dual apprenticeships?’

– Oscar Valiente, Senior Lecturer University of Glasgow, UK

 

Wed 7th July at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Governing education by partnership: the GPE in the context of other sectors’ global financing partnerships.’

– Moira V. Faul, Executive Director, NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva

 

Wed 28th July at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

A comparison of the transition of returning scholars to domestic research environments in Kazakhstan, Malaysia and Cambodia.’

– Aliya Kuzhabekova, Associate Professor, Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Aliya Kuzhabekova is Associate Professor at Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan.

In this talk, Aliya Kuzhabekova will report on the results of a collaborative project exploring how individuals, who received Ph.D. degrees abroad transition to research environment in their home countries.

In particular, the aim of the comparative study was to develop a better understanding about how returnees, who obtained degrees in countries with high levels of research capacity re-integrated in the research environment of countries with lower levels of research capacities.

In addition, the project team tried to reveal the extent to which the returnees served as change agents transforming the research environment in their countries. The study allowed to obtain comparative insights about cross-country and program-related variations in the returnees’ adjustment experiences.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Moira V. Faul is Executive Director of NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva. 

The Global Partnership for Education (GPE) is one of a recent proliferation of pooled financing mechanisms in sustainable development. Despite a policy narrative of inclusive and egalitarian partnering, differences between public, private and voluntary sectors are assumed to affect relations between partners, and the effectiveness of partnerships.

We theorise global financing partnerships as a social ‘space between fields’ that is generated and structured by relationships between the actors mobilised into partnership boards from different fields. We move beyond the conventional focus on sectoral factions to investigate the potential of other aspects of diversity to affect partnership outcomes.

We empirically investigate the structuring of the space of global financing partnerships, comparing the GPE with climate change and health, by analysing a new dataset of 188 board members of ten global financing partnerships. First, network analyses reveal that donors (whether states, international organisations or private sector) are systematically privileged in this partnership space.

Secondly, faultline analytical tools reveal that despite a narrative of additional financing from the private sector, donors are significantly associated with the public sector. Furthermore, donors (public and private sector) are significantly associated with an economic logic of action and non-donors with an issue-specific framing.

Examining the multiple diversities that come into play in partnership board composition and structuring enables an improved theorisation of partnership effectiveness; it also holds important implications for board decisions and the sustainability and educational impacts that these partnerships are purported to deliver.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Oscar Valiente is Senior Lecturer in Educational Leadership & Policy at the University of Glasgow, Scotland. 

While most comparative education studies have focused on the historical processes that gave birth to the dual model in Germanic countries, our research aims to elucidate the drivers that explain why policymakers embrace the dual apprenticeship idea and how they re-contextualize it in their own educational context.

Drawing on a constructivist political economy framework, our study specifically investigates the reasons of policymakers in India and Mexico to adopt the dual model and how their different institutional conditions explain variations in the way the two countries have re-contextualized this global policy idea.

The selected cases are particularly interesting for the comparison because of the broad ambitions of their national reforms and the significant differences in the type of dual model of apprenticeships finally retained in the two countries.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Miguel Antonio Lim is Senior Lecturer in Education at the University of Manchester, UK, with special focus on Education and International Development at the University’s School of Environment, Education, and Development (SEED).

At this seminar, the evolving role of transnational higher education (TNHE) as part of wider national development policy will be discussed.

Using the case of Sino-foreign educational partnerships, Dr Lim will outline several features of the evolution of policies to govern and achieve more ‘equal’ partnerships.

In China, TNHE partnerships are seen as an important part of its drive to build ‘World Class Universities’. Its case shows an increasing orientation towards quality over quantity of partnerships and a growing role for urban and regional geopolitics in the choice of its HE partnerships.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Thabo Msibi is Associate Professor in Curriculum Studies in the School of Education at the University of KwaZulu-Natal, where he is also the Dean and Head of the School of Education.   

Professor Msibi’s scholarship is on the interface of gender and sexuality issues, particularly as they relate to education.  He also is interested in theory building as it relates to African sexualities.  He has published research in South African and international journals on these subjects, and has co-edited six journal special issues.

Thabo has also published numerous book chapters looking at the educational experiences of individuals who claim same-sex identities.  His recent monograph entitled Hidden Sexualities of South African Teachers: Black Male Educators and Same-sex Desire is published by Routledge.

This seminar reflects on the public uproar that has come with the expansion of the comprehensive sexuality education programme by the Department of Basic Education in South Africa.

Touted globally by the UNESCO and other international organisations as a critical vehicle for the promotion of positive sexual behaviour amongst young people, comprehensive sexuality education has recently received significant international fanfare.  This focus follows the release of the revised International technical guidance on sexuality education by UNESCO in 2018.  Some African countries, including South Africa, have used the revisions to update their curriculum offerings on sexuality education.

Section nine of the South African Constitution, known as the Equality Clause, explicitly provides protections against unfair discrimination on the basis of race, gender, sex, pregnancy, marital status, ethnic or social origin, colour, sexual orientation, age, disability, religion, conscience, belief, culture, language and birth.

It was through this constitutional guarantee that the country sought to revise its comprehensive curriculum offering, leading to significant backlash from the traditional, religious and conservative organisations. Front-page media articles screamed that the Minister of Education was trying to teach young children about how to have sex, and that she was effectively sexualising young children. The Ministry was also accused of imposing a Western ideals on African people.

The seminar will analyse the transnational and local reasons for the conservative backlash in South Africa. It will argue that the response largely follows a coordinated international movement that has sought to undermine sexuality education and reverse the gains already made by sexual rights organisations.  It will showcase how local sexual politics reflect a transnational mobility of ideas that are reconfigured at a local level in order to attain legitimacy.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Miri Yemini is a tenured Senior Lecturer in the School of Education at Tel Aviv University.

At Tel Aviv Dr. Yemini teaches graduate and undergraduate modules in education, including Internationalisation in Education, Education and Globalisation, Entrepreneurship in Education and Project Management in Schools.

Dr. Yemini serves as a co-Chair of UNESCO chair for Technology and Internationalisation in Education. Recently (April 2018) she was awarded (with Prof. Dr. Nina Kolleck) by the Max Plank Foundation the Award for Research Cooperation and High Excellence in Science (ARCHES), to develop research in the field of school-NGO interactions. This year (2021) Dr. Yemini secured funding from Israeli Science Foundation (150,000 Euro) for her project on education trajectories of Global Middle Class families.

Increasing numbers of highly educated and skilled professionals are internationally mobile for work. Some are transferred by employers; some proactively seek out new positions in different countries.

The currently estimated size of this group (known as globally mobile professionals, ‘global expatriates’ or members of a global middle class) is 66.2 million, which is predicted to rise to 87.5 million by 2022.

The increasing number, but also growing cultural diversity of this group (originating from all parts of the world), and the extent to which/frequency they relocate is an important articulation of newer forms of transnationalism that encompass the movement of people and ideas, and changing economic and social relations.

This seminar aims to map out and theorise the everyday practices of these globally middle professional families and to consider how their presence in key cities around the world might be re-shaping political, social, economic and education structures.

In particular, we will discuss how these families experience mobility and what motivates these relocations; how families create a sense of identity while ‘on the move’; what short-term and longer term aspirations the professionals, their partners and their children have; what education and extra-curricular choices are made; how different cultural contexts are negotiated etc.

Critically, we will discuss how these middle class families work to reproduce and extend their privilege, and so engage in ‘class-making’ practices.  Ultimately, this work offers a much-needed empirical basis to examine the theoretical proposition that there is now a ‘global’ middle class that is somehow different to nationally-located middle class groups.

The Department of Education and St Edmunds Hall are delighted to announce a new Public Seminar series which will take place online in Trinity Term on Wednesdays from 3pm-4pm (UK time) between 5th May and 28th July.

 

The Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education will address themes of major interest to academics, practitioners, and policy-makers working in the field of education globally. These seminars aim to illuminate the role of education in societal development, with a focus on understanding changes in education policy, discourse, and practice, and how these changes influence individual opportunities and shape the development of educational institutions around the world. Seminars will zoom into the local and zoom out into the national and supranational spaces, flows, and influences on education.

The series will be chaired by Maia Chankseliani, Associate Professor of Comparative and International Education, and will feature the following speakers:

Thabo Msibi, Dean and Head of School, School of Education, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

Miri Yemini, Senior Lecturer, Tel Aviv University, Israel

Miguel Antonio Lim, Senior Lecturer in Education, University of Manchester, United Kingdom

Oscar Valiente, Senior Lecturer University of Glasgow, United Kingdom

Moira Faul, Executive Director, NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva, Switzerland

Aliya Kuzhabekova, Associate Professor, Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan

 

To view the full programme of seminars, please click here.

Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education

Joint seminars organised by the Department of Education and St Edmund Hall, University of Oxford.

Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education address themes of major interest to academics, practitioners, and policy-makers working in the field of education globally. These seminars aim to illuminate the role of education in societal development, with a focus on understanding changes in education policy, discourse, and practice, and how these changes influence individual opportunities and shape the development of educational institutions around the world. Seminars will zoom into the local and zoom out into the national and supranational spaces, flows, and influences on education.

The series will be chaired by Maia Chankseliani, Associate Professor of Comparative and International Education.

 

The seminar programme:

*Please note that all seminars have a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

 

Wed 5 May at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Breaking gender, sex and sexuality borders: The case of comprehensive sexuality education in South Africa’

– Thabo Msibi, Dean and Head of School, School of Education, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

 

Wed 19 May at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Global Middle-Class families – comparative study of travel trajectories and imagined futures’

– Miri Yemini, Senior Lecturer, Tel Aviv University, Israel

 

Wed 2 June at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Equal’ Transnational Partnerships in Higher Education: Sino-Foreign Case Studies’

– Miguel Antonio Lim, Senior Lecturer in Education, University of Manchester, UK

 

Wed 16 June at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Why did policymakers in India and Mexico adopt the Germanic model of dual apprenticeships?’

– Oscar Valiente, Senior Lecturer University of Glasgow, UK

 

Wed 7th July at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Governing education by partnership: the GPE in the context of other sectors’ global financing partnerships.’

– Moira V. Faul, Executive Director, NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva

 

Wed 28th July at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

A comparison of the transition of returning scholars to domestic research environments in Kazakhstan, Malaysia and Cambodia.’

– Aliya Kuzhabekova, Associate Professor, Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Aliya Kuzhabekova is Associate Professor at Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan.

In this talk, Aliya Kuzhabekova will report on the results of a collaborative project exploring how individuals, who received Ph.D. degrees abroad transition to research environment in their home countries.

In particular, the aim of the comparative study was to develop a better understanding about how returnees, who obtained degrees in countries with high levels of research capacity re-integrated in the research environment of countries with lower levels of research capacities.

In addition, the project team tried to reveal the extent to which the returnees served as change agents transforming the research environment in their countries. The study allowed to obtain comparative insights about cross-country and program-related variations in the returnees’ adjustment experiences.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Moira V. Faul is Executive Director of NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva. 

The Global Partnership for Education (GPE) is one of a recent proliferation of pooled financing mechanisms in sustainable development. Despite a policy narrative of inclusive and egalitarian partnering, differences between public, private and voluntary sectors are assumed to affect relations between partners, and the effectiveness of partnerships.

We theorise global financing partnerships as a social ‘space between fields’ that is generated and structured by relationships between the actors mobilised into partnership boards from different fields. We move beyond the conventional focus on sectoral factions to investigate the potential of other aspects of diversity to affect partnership outcomes.

We empirically investigate the structuring of the space of global financing partnerships, comparing the GPE with climate change and health, by analysing a new dataset of 188 board members of ten global financing partnerships. First, network analyses reveal that donors (whether states, international organisations or private sector) are systematically privileged in this partnership space.

Secondly, faultline analytical tools reveal that despite a narrative of additional financing from the private sector, donors are significantly associated with the public sector. Furthermore, donors (public and private sector) are significantly associated with an economic logic of action and non-donors with an issue-specific framing.

Examining the multiple diversities that come into play in partnership board composition and structuring enables an improved theorisation of partnership effectiveness; it also holds important implications for board decisions and the sustainability and educational impacts that these partnerships are purported to deliver.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Oscar Valiente is Senior Lecturer in Educational Leadership & Policy at the University of Glasgow, Scotland. 

While most comparative education studies have focused on the historical processes that gave birth to the dual model in Germanic countries, our research aims to elucidate the drivers that explain why policymakers embrace the dual apprenticeship idea and how they re-contextualize it in their own educational context.

Drawing on a constructivist political economy framework, our study specifically investigates the reasons of policymakers in India and Mexico to adopt the dual model and how their different institutional conditions explain variations in the way the two countries have re-contextualized this global policy idea.

The selected cases are particularly interesting for the comparison because of the broad ambitions of their national reforms and the significant differences in the type of dual model of apprenticeships finally retained in the two countries.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Miguel Antonio Lim is Senior Lecturer in Education at the University of Manchester, UK, with special focus on Education and International Development at the University’s School of Environment, Education, and Development (SEED).

At this seminar, the evolving role of transnational higher education (TNHE) as part of wider national development policy will be discussed.

Using the case of Sino-foreign educational partnerships, Dr Lim will outline several features of the evolution of policies to govern and achieve more ‘equal’ partnerships.

In China, TNHE partnerships are seen as an important part of its drive to build ‘World Class Universities’. Its case shows an increasing orientation towards quality over quantity of partnerships and a growing role for urban and regional geopolitics in the choice of its HE partnerships.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Thabo Msibi is Associate Professor in Curriculum Studies in the School of Education at the University of KwaZulu-Natal, where he is also the Dean and Head of the School of Education.   

Professor Msibi’s scholarship is on the interface of gender and sexuality issues, particularly as they relate to education.  He also is interested in theory building as it relates to African sexualities.  He has published research in South African and international journals on these subjects, and has co-edited six journal special issues.

Thabo has also published numerous book chapters looking at the educational experiences of individuals who claim same-sex identities.  His recent monograph entitled Hidden Sexualities of South African Teachers: Black Male Educators and Same-sex Desire is published by Routledge.

This seminar reflects on the public uproar that has come with the expansion of the comprehensive sexuality education programme by the Department of Basic Education in South Africa.

Touted globally by the UNESCO and other international organisations as a critical vehicle for the promotion of positive sexual behaviour amongst young people, comprehensive sexuality education has recently received significant international fanfare.  This focus follows the release of the revised International technical guidance on sexuality education by UNESCO in 2018.  Some African countries, including South Africa, have used the revisions to update their curriculum offerings on sexuality education.

Section nine of the South African Constitution, known as the Equality Clause, explicitly provides protections against unfair discrimination on the basis of race, gender, sex, pregnancy, marital status, ethnic or social origin, colour, sexual orientation, age, disability, religion, conscience, belief, culture, language and birth.

It was through this constitutional guarantee that the country sought to revise its comprehensive curriculum offering, leading to significant backlash from the traditional, religious and conservative organisations. Front-page media articles screamed that the Minister of Education was trying to teach young children about how to have sex, and that she was effectively sexualising young children. The Ministry was also accused of imposing a Western ideals on African people.

The seminar will analyse the transnational and local reasons for the conservative backlash in South Africa. It will argue that the response largely follows a coordinated international movement that has sought to undermine sexuality education and reverse the gains already made by sexual rights organisations.  It will showcase how local sexual politics reflect a transnational mobility of ideas that are reconfigured at a local level in order to attain legitimacy.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Miri Yemini is a tenured Senior Lecturer in the School of Education at Tel Aviv University.

At Tel Aviv Dr. Yemini teaches graduate and undergraduate modules in education, including Internationalisation in Education, Education and Globalisation, Entrepreneurship in Education and Project Management in Schools.

Dr. Yemini serves as a co-Chair of UNESCO chair for Technology and Internationalisation in Education. Recently (April 2018) she was awarded (with Prof. Dr. Nina Kolleck) by the Max Plank Foundation the Award for Research Cooperation and High Excellence in Science (ARCHES), to develop research in the field of school-NGO interactions. This year (2021) Dr. Yemini secured funding from Israeli Science Foundation (150,000 Euro) for her project on education trajectories of Global Middle Class families.

Increasing numbers of highly educated and skilled professionals are internationally mobile for work. Some are transferred by employers; some proactively seek out new positions in different countries.

The currently estimated size of this group (known as globally mobile professionals, ‘global expatriates’ or members of a global middle class) is 66.2 million, which is predicted to rise to 87.5 million by 2022.

The increasing number, but also growing cultural diversity of this group (originating from all parts of the world), and the extent to which/frequency they relocate is an important articulation of newer forms of transnationalism that encompass the movement of people and ideas, and changing economic and social relations.

This seminar aims to map out and theorise the everyday practices of these globally middle professional families and to consider how their presence in key cities around the world might be re-shaping political, social, economic and education structures.

In particular, we will discuss how these families experience mobility and what motivates these relocations; how families create a sense of identity while ‘on the move’; what short-term and longer term aspirations the professionals, their partners and their children have; what education and extra-curricular choices are made; how different cultural contexts are negotiated etc.

Critically, we will discuss how these middle class families work to reproduce and extend their privilege, and so engage in ‘class-making’ practices.  Ultimately, this work offers a much-needed empirical basis to examine the theoretical proposition that there is now a ‘global’ middle class that is somehow different to nationally-located middle class groups.

The Department of Education and St Edmunds Hall are delighted to announce a new Public Seminar series which will take place online in Trinity Term on Wednesdays from 3pm-4pm (UK time) between 5th May and 28th July.

 

The Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education will address themes of major interest to academics, practitioners, and policy-makers working in the field of education globally. These seminars aim to illuminate the role of education in societal development, with a focus on understanding changes in education policy, discourse, and practice, and how these changes influence individual opportunities and shape the development of educational institutions around the world. Seminars will zoom into the local and zoom out into the national and supranational spaces, flows, and influences on education.

The series will be chaired by Maia Chankseliani, Associate Professor of Comparative and International Education, and will feature the following speakers:

Thabo Msibi, Dean and Head of School, School of Education, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

Miri Yemini, Senior Lecturer, Tel Aviv University, Israel

Miguel Antonio Lim, Senior Lecturer in Education, University of Manchester, United Kingdom

Oscar Valiente, Senior Lecturer University of Glasgow, United Kingdom

Moira Faul, Executive Director, NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva, Switzerland

Aliya Kuzhabekova, Associate Professor, Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan

 

To view the full programme of seminars, please click here.

Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education

Joint seminars organised by the Department of Education and St Edmund Hall, University of Oxford.

Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education address themes of major interest to academics, practitioners, and policy-makers working in the field of education globally. These seminars aim to illuminate the role of education in societal development, with a focus on understanding changes in education policy, discourse, and practice, and how these changes influence individual opportunities and shape the development of educational institutions around the world. Seminars will zoom into the local and zoom out into the national and supranational spaces, flows, and influences on education.

The series will be chaired by Maia Chankseliani, Associate Professor of Comparative and International Education.

 

The seminar programme:

*Please note that all seminars have a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

 

Wed 5 May at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Breaking gender, sex and sexuality borders: The case of comprehensive sexuality education in South Africa’

– Thabo Msibi, Dean and Head of School, School of Education, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

 

Wed 19 May at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Global Middle-Class families – comparative study of travel trajectories and imagined futures’

– Miri Yemini, Senior Lecturer, Tel Aviv University, Israel

 

Wed 2 June at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Equal’ Transnational Partnerships in Higher Education: Sino-Foreign Case Studies’

– Miguel Antonio Lim, Senior Lecturer in Education, University of Manchester, UK

 

Wed 16 June at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Why did policymakers in India and Mexico adopt the Germanic model of dual apprenticeships?’

– Oscar Valiente, Senior Lecturer University of Glasgow, UK

 

Wed 7th July at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Governing education by partnership: the GPE in the context of other sectors’ global financing partnerships.’

– Moira V. Faul, Executive Director, NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva

 

Wed 28th July at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

A comparison of the transition of returning scholars to domestic research environments in Kazakhstan, Malaysia and Cambodia.’

– Aliya Kuzhabekova, Associate Professor, Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Aliya Kuzhabekova is Associate Professor at Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan.

In this talk, Aliya Kuzhabekova will report on the results of a collaborative project exploring how individuals, who received Ph.D. degrees abroad transition to research environment in their home countries.

In particular, the aim of the comparative study was to develop a better understanding about how returnees, who obtained degrees in countries with high levels of research capacity re-integrated in the research environment of countries with lower levels of research capacities.

In addition, the project team tried to reveal the extent to which the returnees served as change agents transforming the research environment in their countries. The study allowed to obtain comparative insights about cross-country and program-related variations in the returnees’ adjustment experiences.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Moira V. Faul is Executive Director of NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva. 

The Global Partnership for Education (GPE) is one of a recent proliferation of pooled financing mechanisms in sustainable development. Despite a policy narrative of inclusive and egalitarian partnering, differences between public, private and voluntary sectors are assumed to affect relations between partners, and the effectiveness of partnerships.

We theorise global financing partnerships as a social ‘space between fields’ that is generated and structured by relationships between the actors mobilised into partnership boards from different fields. We move beyond the conventional focus on sectoral factions to investigate the potential of other aspects of diversity to affect partnership outcomes.

We empirically investigate the structuring of the space of global financing partnerships, comparing the GPE with climate change and health, by analysing a new dataset of 188 board members of ten global financing partnerships. First, network analyses reveal that donors (whether states, international organisations or private sector) are systematically privileged in this partnership space.

Secondly, faultline analytical tools reveal that despite a narrative of additional financing from the private sector, donors are significantly associated with the public sector. Furthermore, donors (public and private sector) are significantly associated with an economic logic of action and non-donors with an issue-specific framing.

Examining the multiple diversities that come into play in partnership board composition and structuring enables an improved theorisation of partnership effectiveness; it also holds important implications for board decisions and the sustainability and educational impacts that these partnerships are purported to deliver.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Oscar Valiente is Senior Lecturer in Educational Leadership & Policy at the University of Glasgow, Scotland. 

While most comparative education studies have focused on the historical processes that gave birth to the dual model in Germanic countries, our research aims to elucidate the drivers that explain why policymakers embrace the dual apprenticeship idea and how they re-contextualize it in their own educational context.

Drawing on a constructivist political economy framework, our study specifically investigates the reasons of policymakers in India and Mexico to adopt the dual model and how their different institutional conditions explain variations in the way the two countries have re-contextualized this global policy idea.

The selected cases are particularly interesting for the comparison because of the broad ambitions of their national reforms and the significant differences in the type of dual model of apprenticeships finally retained in the two countries.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Miguel Antonio Lim is Senior Lecturer in Education at the University of Manchester, UK, with special focus on Education and International Development at the University’s School of Environment, Education, and Development (SEED).

At this seminar, the evolving role of transnational higher education (TNHE) as part of wider national development policy will be discussed.

Using the case of Sino-foreign educational partnerships, Dr Lim will outline several features of the evolution of policies to govern and achieve more ‘equal’ partnerships.

In China, TNHE partnerships are seen as an important part of its drive to build ‘World Class Universities’. Its case shows an increasing orientation towards quality over quantity of partnerships and a growing role for urban and regional geopolitics in the choice of its HE partnerships.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Thabo Msibi is Associate Professor in Curriculum Studies in the School of Education at the University of KwaZulu-Natal, where he is also the Dean and Head of the School of Education.   

Professor Msibi’s scholarship is on the interface of gender and sexuality issues, particularly as they relate to education.  He also is interested in theory building as it relates to African sexualities.  He has published research in South African and international journals on these subjects, and has co-edited six journal special issues.

Thabo has also published numerous book chapters looking at the educational experiences of individuals who claim same-sex identities.  His recent monograph entitled Hidden Sexualities of South African Teachers: Black Male Educators and Same-sex Desire is published by Routledge.

This seminar reflects on the public uproar that has come with the expansion of the comprehensive sexuality education programme by the Department of Basic Education in South Africa.

Touted globally by the UNESCO and other international organisations as a critical vehicle for the promotion of positive sexual behaviour amongst young people, comprehensive sexuality education has recently received significant international fanfare.  This focus follows the release of the revised International technical guidance on sexuality education by UNESCO in 2018.  Some African countries, including South Africa, have used the revisions to update their curriculum offerings on sexuality education.

Section nine of the South African Constitution, known as the Equality Clause, explicitly provides protections against unfair discrimination on the basis of race, gender, sex, pregnancy, marital status, ethnic or social origin, colour, sexual orientation, age, disability, religion, conscience, belief, culture, language and birth.

It was through this constitutional guarantee that the country sought to revise its comprehensive curriculum offering, leading to significant backlash from the traditional, religious and conservative organisations. Front-page media articles screamed that the Minister of Education was trying to teach young children about how to have sex, and that she was effectively sexualising young children. The Ministry was also accused of imposing a Western ideals on African people.

The seminar will analyse the transnational and local reasons for the conservative backlash in South Africa. It will argue that the response largely follows a coordinated international movement that has sought to undermine sexuality education and reverse the gains already made by sexual rights organisations.  It will showcase how local sexual politics reflect a transnational mobility of ideas that are reconfigured at a local level in order to attain legitimacy.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Miri Yemini is a tenured Senior Lecturer in the School of Education at Tel Aviv University.

At Tel Aviv Dr. Yemini teaches graduate and undergraduate modules in education, including Internationalisation in Education, Education and Globalisation, Entrepreneurship in Education and Project Management in Schools.

Dr. Yemini serves as a co-Chair of UNESCO chair for Technology and Internationalisation in Education. Recently (April 2018) she was awarded (with Prof. Dr. Nina Kolleck) by the Max Plank Foundation the Award for Research Cooperation and High Excellence in Science (ARCHES), to develop research in the field of school-NGO interactions. This year (2021) Dr. Yemini secured funding from Israeli Science Foundation (150,000 Euro) for her project on education trajectories of Global Middle Class families.

Increasing numbers of highly educated and skilled professionals are internationally mobile for work. Some are transferred by employers; some proactively seek out new positions in different countries.

The currently estimated size of this group (known as globally mobile professionals, ‘global expatriates’ or members of a global middle class) is 66.2 million, which is predicted to rise to 87.5 million by 2022.

The increasing number, but also growing cultural diversity of this group (originating from all parts of the world), and the extent to which/frequency they relocate is an important articulation of newer forms of transnationalism that encompass the movement of people and ideas, and changing economic and social relations.

This seminar aims to map out and theorise the everyday practices of these globally middle professional families and to consider how their presence in key cities around the world might be re-shaping political, social, economic and education structures.

In particular, we will discuss how these families experience mobility and what motivates these relocations; how families create a sense of identity while ‘on the move’; what short-term and longer term aspirations the professionals, their partners and their children have; what education and extra-curricular choices are made; how different cultural contexts are negotiated etc.

Critically, we will discuss how these middle class families work to reproduce and extend their privilege, and so engage in ‘class-making’ practices.  Ultimately, this work offers a much-needed empirical basis to examine the theoretical proposition that there is now a ‘global’ middle class that is somehow different to nationally-located middle class groups.

The Department of Education and St Edmunds Hall are delighted to announce a new Public Seminar series which will take place online in Trinity Term on Wednesdays from 3pm-4pm (UK time) between 5th May and 28th July.

 

The Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education will address themes of major interest to academics, practitioners, and policy-makers working in the field of education globally. These seminars aim to illuminate the role of education in societal development, with a focus on understanding changes in education policy, discourse, and practice, and how these changes influence individual opportunities and shape the development of educational institutions around the world. Seminars will zoom into the local and zoom out into the national and supranational spaces, flows, and influences on education.

The series will be chaired by Maia Chankseliani, Associate Professor of Comparative and International Education, and will feature the following speakers:

Thabo Msibi, Dean and Head of School, School of Education, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

Miri Yemini, Senior Lecturer, Tel Aviv University, Israel

Miguel Antonio Lim, Senior Lecturer in Education, University of Manchester, United Kingdom

Oscar Valiente, Senior Lecturer University of Glasgow, United Kingdom

Moira Faul, Executive Director, NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva, Switzerland

Aliya Kuzhabekova, Associate Professor, Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan

 

To view the full programme of seminars, please click here.

Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education

Joint seminars organised by the Department of Education and St Edmund Hall, University of Oxford.

Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education address themes of major interest to academics, practitioners, and policy-makers working in the field of education globally. These seminars aim to illuminate the role of education in societal development, with a focus on understanding changes in education policy, discourse, and practice, and how these changes influence individual opportunities and shape the development of educational institutions around the world. Seminars will zoom into the local and zoom out into the national and supranational spaces, flows, and influences on education.

The series will be chaired by Maia Chankseliani, Associate Professor of Comparative and International Education.

 

The seminar programme:

*Please note that all seminars have a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

 

Wed 5 May at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Breaking gender, sex and sexuality borders: The case of comprehensive sexuality education in South Africa’

– Thabo Msibi, Dean and Head of School, School of Education, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

 

Wed 19 May at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Global Middle-Class families – comparative study of travel trajectories and imagined futures’

– Miri Yemini, Senior Lecturer, Tel Aviv University, Israel

 

Wed 2 June at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Equal’ Transnational Partnerships in Higher Education: Sino-Foreign Case Studies’

– Miguel Antonio Lim, Senior Lecturer in Education, University of Manchester, UK

 

Wed 16 June at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Why did policymakers in India and Mexico adopt the Germanic model of dual apprenticeships?’

– Oscar Valiente, Senior Lecturer University of Glasgow, UK

 

Wed 7th July at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Governing education by partnership: the GPE in the context of other sectors’ global financing partnerships.’

– Moira V. Faul, Executive Director, NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva

 

Wed 28th July at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

A comparison of the transition of returning scholars to domestic research environments in Kazakhstan, Malaysia and Cambodia.’

– Aliya Kuzhabekova, Associate Professor, Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Aliya Kuzhabekova is Associate Professor at Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan.

In this talk, Aliya Kuzhabekova will report on the results of a collaborative project exploring how individuals, who received Ph.D. degrees abroad transition to research environment in their home countries.

In particular, the aim of the comparative study was to develop a better understanding about how returnees, who obtained degrees in countries with high levels of research capacity re-integrated in the research environment of countries with lower levels of research capacities.

In addition, the project team tried to reveal the extent to which the returnees served as change agents transforming the research environment in their countries. The study allowed to obtain comparative insights about cross-country and program-related variations in the returnees’ adjustment experiences.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Moira V. Faul is Executive Director of NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva. 

The Global Partnership for Education (GPE) is one of a recent proliferation of pooled financing mechanisms in sustainable development. Despite a policy narrative of inclusive and egalitarian partnering, differences between public, private and voluntary sectors are assumed to affect relations between partners, and the effectiveness of partnerships.

We theorise global financing partnerships as a social ‘space between fields’ that is generated and structured by relationships between the actors mobilised into partnership boards from different fields. We move beyond the conventional focus on sectoral factions to investigate the potential of other aspects of diversity to affect partnership outcomes.

We empirically investigate the structuring of the space of global financing partnerships, comparing the GPE with climate change and health, by analysing a new dataset of 188 board members of ten global financing partnerships. First, network analyses reveal that donors (whether states, international organisations or private sector) are systematically privileged in this partnership space.

Secondly, faultline analytical tools reveal that despite a narrative of additional financing from the private sector, donors are significantly associated with the public sector. Furthermore, donors (public and private sector) are significantly associated with an economic logic of action and non-donors with an issue-specific framing.

Examining the multiple diversities that come into play in partnership board composition and structuring enables an improved theorisation of partnership effectiveness; it also holds important implications for board decisions and the sustainability and educational impacts that these partnerships are purported to deliver.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Oscar Valiente is Senior Lecturer in Educational Leadership & Policy at the University of Glasgow, Scotland. 

While most comparative education studies have focused on the historical processes that gave birth to the dual model in Germanic countries, our research aims to elucidate the drivers that explain why policymakers embrace the dual apprenticeship idea and how they re-contextualize it in their own educational context.

Drawing on a constructivist political economy framework, our study specifically investigates the reasons of policymakers in India and Mexico to adopt the dual model and how their different institutional conditions explain variations in the way the two countries have re-contextualized this global policy idea.

The selected cases are particularly interesting for the comparison because of the broad ambitions of their national reforms and the significant differences in the type of dual model of apprenticeships finally retained in the two countries.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Miguel Antonio Lim is Senior Lecturer in Education at the University of Manchester, UK, with special focus on Education and International Development at the University’s School of Environment, Education, and Development (SEED).

At this seminar, the evolving role of transnational higher education (TNHE) as part of wider national development policy will be discussed.

Using the case of Sino-foreign educational partnerships, Dr Lim will outline several features of the evolution of policies to govern and achieve more ‘equal’ partnerships.

In China, TNHE partnerships are seen as an important part of its drive to build ‘World Class Universities’. Its case shows an increasing orientation towards quality over quantity of partnerships and a growing role for urban and regional geopolitics in the choice of its HE partnerships.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Thabo Msibi is Associate Professor in Curriculum Studies in the School of Education at the University of KwaZulu-Natal, where he is also the Dean and Head of the School of Education.   

Professor Msibi’s scholarship is on the interface of gender and sexuality issues, particularly as they relate to education.  He also is interested in theory building as it relates to African sexualities.  He has published research in South African and international journals on these subjects, and has co-edited six journal special issues.

Thabo has also published numerous book chapters looking at the educational experiences of individuals who claim same-sex identities.  His recent monograph entitled Hidden Sexualities of South African Teachers: Black Male Educators and Same-sex Desire is published by Routledge.

This seminar reflects on the public uproar that has come with the expansion of the comprehensive sexuality education programme by the Department of Basic Education in South Africa.

Touted globally by the UNESCO and other international organisations as a critical vehicle for the promotion of positive sexual behaviour amongst young people, comprehensive sexuality education has recently received significant international fanfare.  This focus follows the release of the revised International technical guidance on sexuality education by UNESCO in 2018.  Some African countries, including South Africa, have used the revisions to update their curriculum offerings on sexuality education.

Section nine of the South African Constitution, known as the Equality Clause, explicitly provides protections against unfair discrimination on the basis of race, gender, sex, pregnancy, marital status, ethnic or social origin, colour, sexual orientation, age, disability, religion, conscience, belief, culture, language and birth.

It was through this constitutional guarantee that the country sought to revise its comprehensive curriculum offering, leading to significant backlash from the traditional, religious and conservative organisations. Front-page media articles screamed that the Minister of Education was trying to teach young children about how to have sex, and that she was effectively sexualising young children. The Ministry was also accused of imposing a Western ideals on African people.

The seminar will analyse the transnational and local reasons for the conservative backlash in South Africa. It will argue that the response largely follows a coordinated international movement that has sought to undermine sexuality education and reverse the gains already made by sexual rights organisations.  It will showcase how local sexual politics reflect a transnational mobility of ideas that are reconfigured at a local level in order to attain legitimacy.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Miri Yemini is a tenured Senior Lecturer in the School of Education at Tel Aviv University.

At Tel Aviv Dr. Yemini teaches graduate and undergraduate modules in education, including Internationalisation in Education, Education and Globalisation, Entrepreneurship in Education and Project Management in Schools.

Dr. Yemini serves as a co-Chair of UNESCO chair for Technology and Internationalisation in Education. Recently (April 2018) she was awarded (with Prof. Dr. Nina Kolleck) by the Max Plank Foundation the Award for Research Cooperation and High Excellence in Science (ARCHES), to develop research in the field of school-NGO interactions. This year (2021) Dr. Yemini secured funding from Israeli Science Foundation (150,000 Euro) for her project on education trajectories of Global Middle Class families.

Increasing numbers of highly educated and skilled professionals are internationally mobile for work. Some are transferred by employers; some proactively seek out new positions in different countries.

The currently estimated size of this group (known as globally mobile professionals, ‘global expatriates’ or members of a global middle class) is 66.2 million, which is predicted to rise to 87.5 million by 2022.

The increasing number, but also growing cultural diversity of this group (originating from all parts of the world), and the extent to which/frequency they relocate is an important articulation of newer forms of transnationalism that encompass the movement of people and ideas, and changing economic and social relations.

This seminar aims to map out and theorise the everyday practices of these globally middle professional families and to consider how their presence in key cities around the world might be re-shaping political, social, economic and education structures.

In particular, we will discuss how these families experience mobility and what motivates these relocations; how families create a sense of identity while ‘on the move’; what short-term and longer term aspirations the professionals, their partners and their children have; what education and extra-curricular choices are made; how different cultural contexts are negotiated etc.

Critically, we will discuss how these middle class families work to reproduce and extend their privilege, and so engage in ‘class-making’ practices.  Ultimately, this work offers a much-needed empirical basis to examine the theoretical proposition that there is now a ‘global’ middle class that is somehow different to nationally-located middle class groups.

The Department of Education and St Edmunds Hall are delighted to announce a new Public Seminar series which will take place online in Trinity Term on Wednesdays from 3pm-4pm (UK time) between 5th May and 28th July.

 

The Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education will address themes of major interest to academics, practitioners, and policy-makers working in the field of education globally. These seminars aim to illuminate the role of education in societal development, with a focus on understanding changes in education policy, discourse, and practice, and how these changes influence individual opportunities and shape the development of educational institutions around the world. Seminars will zoom into the local and zoom out into the national and supranational spaces, flows, and influences on education.

The series will be chaired by Maia Chankseliani, Associate Professor of Comparative and International Education, and will feature the following speakers:

Thabo Msibi, Dean and Head of School, School of Education, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

Miri Yemini, Senior Lecturer, Tel Aviv University, Israel

Miguel Antonio Lim, Senior Lecturer in Education, University of Manchester, United Kingdom

Oscar Valiente, Senior Lecturer University of Glasgow, United Kingdom

Moira Faul, Executive Director, NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva, Switzerland

Aliya Kuzhabekova, Associate Professor, Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan

 

To view the full programme of seminars, please click here.

Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education

Joint seminars organised by the Department of Education and St Edmund Hall, University of Oxford.

Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education address themes of major interest to academics, practitioners, and policy-makers working in the field of education globally. These seminars aim to illuminate the role of education in societal development, with a focus on understanding changes in education policy, discourse, and practice, and how these changes influence individual opportunities and shape the development of educational institutions around the world. Seminars will zoom into the local and zoom out into the national and supranational spaces, flows, and influences on education.

The series will be chaired by Maia Chankseliani, Associate Professor of Comparative and International Education.

 

The seminar programme:

*Please note that all seminars have a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

 

Wed 5 May at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Breaking gender, sex and sexuality borders: The case of comprehensive sexuality education in South Africa’

– Thabo Msibi, Dean and Head of School, School of Education, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

 

Wed 19 May at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Global Middle-Class families – comparative study of travel trajectories and imagined futures’

– Miri Yemini, Senior Lecturer, Tel Aviv University, Israel

 

Wed 2 June at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Equal’ Transnational Partnerships in Higher Education: Sino-Foreign Case Studies’

– Miguel Antonio Lim, Senior Lecturer in Education, University of Manchester, UK

 

Wed 16 June at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Why did policymakers in India and Mexico adopt the Germanic model of dual apprenticeships?’

– Oscar Valiente, Senior Lecturer University of Glasgow, UK

 

Wed 7th July at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Governing education by partnership: the GPE in the context of other sectors’ global financing partnerships.’

– Moira V. Faul, Executive Director, NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva

 

Wed 28th July at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

A comparison of the transition of returning scholars to domestic research environments in Kazakhstan, Malaysia and Cambodia.’

– Aliya Kuzhabekova, Associate Professor, Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Aliya Kuzhabekova is Associate Professor at Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan.

In this talk, Aliya Kuzhabekova will report on the results of a collaborative project exploring how individuals, who received Ph.D. degrees abroad transition to research environment in their home countries.

In particular, the aim of the comparative study was to develop a better understanding about how returnees, who obtained degrees in countries with high levels of research capacity re-integrated in the research environment of countries with lower levels of research capacities.

In addition, the project team tried to reveal the extent to which the returnees served as change agents transforming the research environment in their countries. The study allowed to obtain comparative insights about cross-country and program-related variations in the returnees’ adjustment experiences.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Moira V. Faul is Executive Director of NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva. 

The Global Partnership for Education (GPE) is one of a recent proliferation of pooled financing mechanisms in sustainable development. Despite a policy narrative of inclusive and egalitarian partnering, differences between public, private and voluntary sectors are assumed to affect relations between partners, and the effectiveness of partnerships.

We theorise global financing partnerships as a social ‘space between fields’ that is generated and structured by relationships between the actors mobilised into partnership boards from different fields. We move beyond the conventional focus on sectoral factions to investigate the potential of other aspects of diversity to affect partnership outcomes.

We empirically investigate the structuring of the space of global financing partnerships, comparing the GPE with climate change and health, by analysing a new dataset of 188 board members of ten global financing partnerships. First, network analyses reveal that donors (whether states, international organisations or private sector) are systematically privileged in this partnership space.

Secondly, faultline analytical tools reveal that despite a narrative of additional financing from the private sector, donors are significantly associated with the public sector. Furthermore, donors (public and private sector) are significantly associated with an economic logic of action and non-donors with an issue-specific framing.

Examining the multiple diversities that come into play in partnership board composition and structuring enables an improved theorisation of partnership effectiveness; it also holds important implications for board decisions and the sustainability and educational impacts that these partnerships are purported to deliver.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Oscar Valiente is Senior Lecturer in Educational Leadership & Policy at the University of Glasgow, Scotland. 

While most comparative education studies have focused on the historical processes that gave birth to the dual model in Germanic countries, our research aims to elucidate the drivers that explain why policymakers embrace the dual apprenticeship idea and how they re-contextualize it in their own educational context.

Drawing on a constructivist political economy framework, our study specifically investigates the reasons of policymakers in India and Mexico to adopt the dual model and how their different institutional conditions explain variations in the way the two countries have re-contextualized this global policy idea.

The selected cases are particularly interesting for the comparison because of the broad ambitions of their national reforms and the significant differences in the type of dual model of apprenticeships finally retained in the two countries.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Miguel Antonio Lim is Senior Lecturer in Education at the University of Manchester, UK, with special focus on Education and International Development at the University’s School of Environment, Education, and Development (SEED).

At this seminar, the evolving role of transnational higher education (TNHE) as part of wider national development policy will be discussed.

Using the case of Sino-foreign educational partnerships, Dr Lim will outline several features of the evolution of policies to govern and achieve more ‘equal’ partnerships.

In China, TNHE partnerships are seen as an important part of its drive to build ‘World Class Universities’. Its case shows an increasing orientation towards quality over quantity of partnerships and a growing role for urban and regional geopolitics in the choice of its HE partnerships.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Thabo Msibi is Associate Professor in Curriculum Studies in the School of Education at the University of KwaZulu-Natal, where he is also the Dean and Head of the School of Education.   

Professor Msibi’s scholarship is on the interface of gender and sexuality issues, particularly as they relate to education.  He also is interested in theory building as it relates to African sexualities.  He has published research in South African and international journals on these subjects, and has co-edited six journal special issues.

Thabo has also published numerous book chapters looking at the educational experiences of individuals who claim same-sex identities.  His recent monograph entitled Hidden Sexualities of South African Teachers: Black Male Educators and Same-sex Desire is published by Routledge.

This seminar reflects on the public uproar that has come with the expansion of the comprehensive sexuality education programme by the Department of Basic Education in South Africa.

Touted globally by the UNESCO and other international organisations as a critical vehicle for the promotion of positive sexual behaviour amongst young people, comprehensive sexuality education has recently received significant international fanfare.  This focus follows the release of the revised International technical guidance on sexuality education by UNESCO in 2018.  Some African countries, including South Africa, have used the revisions to update their curriculum offerings on sexuality education.

Section nine of the South African Constitution, known as the Equality Clause, explicitly provides protections against unfair discrimination on the basis of race, gender, sex, pregnancy, marital status, ethnic or social origin, colour, sexual orientation, age, disability, religion, conscience, belief, culture, language and birth.

It was through this constitutional guarantee that the country sought to revise its comprehensive curriculum offering, leading to significant backlash from the traditional, religious and conservative organisations. Front-page media articles screamed that the Minister of Education was trying to teach young children about how to have sex, and that she was effectively sexualising young children. The Ministry was also accused of imposing a Western ideals on African people.

The seminar will analyse the transnational and local reasons for the conservative backlash in South Africa. It will argue that the response largely follows a coordinated international movement that has sought to undermine sexuality education and reverse the gains already made by sexual rights organisations.  It will showcase how local sexual politics reflect a transnational mobility of ideas that are reconfigured at a local level in order to attain legitimacy.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Miri Yemini is a tenured Senior Lecturer in the School of Education at Tel Aviv University.

At Tel Aviv Dr. Yemini teaches graduate and undergraduate modules in education, including Internationalisation in Education, Education and Globalisation, Entrepreneurship in Education and Project Management in Schools.

Dr. Yemini serves as a co-Chair of UNESCO chair for Technology and Internationalisation in Education. Recently (April 2018) she was awarded (with Prof. Dr. Nina Kolleck) by the Max Plank Foundation the Award for Research Cooperation and High Excellence in Science (ARCHES), to develop research in the field of school-NGO interactions. This year (2021) Dr. Yemini secured funding from Israeli Science Foundation (150,000 Euro) for her project on education trajectories of Global Middle Class families.

Increasing numbers of highly educated and skilled professionals are internationally mobile for work. Some are transferred by employers; some proactively seek out new positions in different countries.

The currently estimated size of this group (known as globally mobile professionals, ‘global expatriates’ or members of a global middle class) is 66.2 million, which is predicted to rise to 87.5 million by 2022.

The increasing number, but also growing cultural diversity of this group (originating from all parts of the world), and the extent to which/frequency they relocate is an important articulation of newer forms of transnationalism that encompass the movement of people and ideas, and changing economic and social relations.

This seminar aims to map out and theorise the everyday practices of these globally middle professional families and to consider how their presence in key cities around the world might be re-shaping political, social, economic and education structures.

In particular, we will discuss how these families experience mobility and what motivates these relocations; how families create a sense of identity while ‘on the move’; what short-term and longer term aspirations the professionals, their partners and their children have; what education and extra-curricular choices are made; how different cultural contexts are negotiated etc.

Critically, we will discuss how these middle class families work to reproduce and extend their privilege, and so engage in ‘class-making’ practices.  Ultimately, this work offers a much-needed empirical basis to examine the theoretical proposition that there is now a ‘global’ middle class that is somehow different to nationally-located middle class groups.

The Department of Education and St Edmunds Hall are delighted to announce a new Public Seminar series which will take place online in Trinity Term on Wednesdays from 3pm-4pm (UK time) between 5th May and 28th July.

 

The Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education will address themes of major interest to academics, practitioners, and policy-makers working in the field of education globally. These seminars aim to illuminate the role of education in societal development, with a focus on understanding changes in education policy, discourse, and practice, and how these changes influence individual opportunities and shape the development of educational institutions around the world. Seminars will zoom into the local and zoom out into the national and supranational spaces, flows, and influences on education.

The series will be chaired by Maia Chankseliani, Associate Professor of Comparative and International Education, and will feature the following speakers:

Thabo Msibi, Dean and Head of School, School of Education, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

Miri Yemini, Senior Lecturer, Tel Aviv University, Israel

Miguel Antonio Lim, Senior Lecturer in Education, University of Manchester, United Kingdom

Oscar Valiente, Senior Lecturer University of Glasgow, United Kingdom

Moira Faul, Executive Director, NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva, Switzerland

Aliya Kuzhabekova, Associate Professor, Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan

 

To view the full programme of seminars, please click here.

Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education

Joint seminars organised by the Department of Education and St Edmund Hall, University of Oxford.

Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education address themes of major interest to academics, practitioners, and policy-makers working in the field of education globally. These seminars aim to illuminate the role of education in societal development, with a focus on understanding changes in education policy, discourse, and practice, and how these changes influence individual opportunities and shape the development of educational institutions around the world. Seminars will zoom into the local and zoom out into the national and supranational spaces, flows, and influences on education.

The series will be chaired by Maia Chankseliani, Associate Professor of Comparative and International Education.

 

The seminar programme:

*Please note that all seminars have a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

 

Wed 5 May at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Breaking gender, sex and sexuality borders: The case of comprehensive sexuality education in South Africa’

– Thabo Msibi, Dean and Head of School, School of Education, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

 

Wed 19 May at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Global Middle-Class families – comparative study of travel trajectories and imagined futures’

– Miri Yemini, Senior Lecturer, Tel Aviv University, Israel

 

Wed 2 June at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Equal’ Transnational Partnerships in Higher Education: Sino-Foreign Case Studies’

– Miguel Antonio Lim, Senior Lecturer in Education, University of Manchester, UK

 

Wed 16 June at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Why did policymakers in India and Mexico adopt the Germanic model of dual apprenticeships?’

– Oscar Valiente, Senior Lecturer University of Glasgow, UK

 

Wed 7th July at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Governing education by partnership: the GPE in the context of other sectors’ global financing partnerships.’

– Moira V. Faul, Executive Director, NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva

 

Wed 28th July at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

A comparison of the transition of returning scholars to domestic research environments in Kazakhstan, Malaysia and Cambodia.’

– Aliya Kuzhabekova, Associate Professor, Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Aliya Kuzhabekova is Associate Professor at Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan.

In this talk, Aliya Kuzhabekova will report on the results of a collaborative project exploring how individuals, who received Ph.D. degrees abroad transition to research environment in their home countries.

In particular, the aim of the comparative study was to develop a better understanding about how returnees, who obtained degrees in countries with high levels of research capacity re-integrated in the research environment of countries with lower levels of research capacities.

In addition, the project team tried to reveal the extent to which the returnees served as change agents transforming the research environment in their countries. The study allowed to obtain comparative insights about cross-country and program-related variations in the returnees’ adjustment experiences.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Moira V. Faul is Executive Director of NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva. 

The Global Partnership for Education (GPE) is one of a recent proliferation of pooled financing mechanisms in sustainable development. Despite a policy narrative of inclusive and egalitarian partnering, differences between public, private and voluntary sectors are assumed to affect relations between partners, and the effectiveness of partnerships.

We theorise global financing partnerships as a social ‘space between fields’ that is generated and structured by relationships between the actors mobilised into partnership boards from different fields. We move beyond the conventional focus on sectoral factions to investigate the potential of other aspects of diversity to affect partnership outcomes.

We empirically investigate the structuring of the space of global financing partnerships, comparing the GPE with climate change and health, by analysing a new dataset of 188 board members of ten global financing partnerships. First, network analyses reveal that donors (whether states, international organisations or private sector) are systematically privileged in this partnership space.

Secondly, faultline analytical tools reveal that despite a narrative of additional financing from the private sector, donors are significantly associated with the public sector. Furthermore, donors (public and private sector) are significantly associated with an economic logic of action and non-donors with an issue-specific framing.

Examining the multiple diversities that come into play in partnership board composition and structuring enables an improved theorisation of partnership effectiveness; it also holds important implications for board decisions and the sustainability and educational impacts that these partnerships are purported to deliver.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Oscar Valiente is Senior Lecturer in Educational Leadership & Policy at the University of Glasgow, Scotland. 

While most comparative education studies have focused on the historical processes that gave birth to the dual model in Germanic countries, our research aims to elucidate the drivers that explain why policymakers embrace the dual apprenticeship idea and how they re-contextualize it in their own educational context.

Drawing on a constructivist political economy framework, our study specifically investigates the reasons of policymakers in India and Mexico to adopt the dual model and how their different institutional conditions explain variations in the way the two countries have re-contextualized this global policy idea.

The selected cases are particularly interesting for the comparison because of the broad ambitions of their national reforms and the significant differences in the type of dual model of apprenticeships finally retained in the two countries.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Miguel Antonio Lim is Senior Lecturer in Education at the University of Manchester, UK, with special focus on Education and International Development at the University’s School of Environment, Education, and Development (SEED).

At this seminar, the evolving role of transnational higher education (TNHE) as part of wider national development policy will be discussed.

Using the case of Sino-foreign educational partnerships, Dr Lim will outline several features of the evolution of policies to govern and achieve more ‘equal’ partnerships.

In China, TNHE partnerships are seen as an important part of its drive to build ‘World Class Universities’. Its case shows an increasing orientation towards quality over quantity of partnerships and a growing role for urban and regional geopolitics in the choice of its HE partnerships.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Thabo Msibi is Associate Professor in Curriculum Studies in the School of Education at the University of KwaZulu-Natal, where he is also the Dean and Head of the School of Education.   

Professor Msibi’s scholarship is on the interface of gender and sexuality issues, particularly as they relate to education.  He also is interested in theory building as it relates to African sexualities.  He has published research in South African and international journals on these subjects, and has co-edited six journal special issues.

Thabo has also published numerous book chapters looking at the educational experiences of individuals who claim same-sex identities.  His recent monograph entitled Hidden Sexualities of South African Teachers: Black Male Educators and Same-sex Desire is published by Routledge.

This seminar reflects on the public uproar that has come with the expansion of the comprehensive sexuality education programme by the Department of Basic Education in South Africa.

Touted globally by the UNESCO and other international organisations as a critical vehicle for the promotion of positive sexual behaviour amongst young people, comprehensive sexuality education has recently received significant international fanfare.  This focus follows the release of the revised International technical guidance on sexuality education by UNESCO in 2018.  Some African countries, including South Africa, have used the revisions to update their curriculum offerings on sexuality education.

Section nine of the South African Constitution, known as the Equality Clause, explicitly provides protections against unfair discrimination on the basis of race, gender, sex, pregnancy, marital status, ethnic or social origin, colour, sexual orientation, age, disability, religion, conscience, belief, culture, language and birth.

It was through this constitutional guarantee that the country sought to revise its comprehensive curriculum offering, leading to significant backlash from the traditional, religious and conservative organisations. Front-page media articles screamed that the Minister of Education was trying to teach young children about how to have sex, and that she was effectively sexualising young children. The Ministry was also accused of imposing a Western ideals on African people.

The seminar will analyse the transnational and local reasons for the conservative backlash in South Africa. It will argue that the response largely follows a coordinated international movement that has sought to undermine sexuality education and reverse the gains already made by sexual rights organisations.  It will showcase how local sexual politics reflect a transnational mobility of ideas that are reconfigured at a local level in order to attain legitimacy.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Miri Yemini is a tenured Senior Lecturer in the School of Education at Tel Aviv University.

At Tel Aviv Dr. Yemini teaches graduate and undergraduate modules in education, including Internationalisation in Education, Education and Globalisation, Entrepreneurship in Education and Project Management in Schools.

Dr. Yemini serves as a co-Chair of UNESCO chair for Technology and Internationalisation in Education. Recently (April 2018) she was awarded (with Prof. Dr. Nina Kolleck) by the Max Plank Foundation the Award for Research Cooperation and High Excellence in Science (ARCHES), to develop research in the field of school-NGO interactions. This year (2021) Dr. Yemini secured funding from Israeli Science Foundation (150,000 Euro) for her project on education trajectories of Global Middle Class families.

Increasing numbers of highly educated and skilled professionals are internationally mobile for work. Some are transferred by employers; some proactively seek out new positions in different countries.

The currently estimated size of this group (known as globally mobile professionals, ‘global expatriates’ or members of a global middle class) is 66.2 million, which is predicted to rise to 87.5 million by 2022.

The increasing number, but also growing cultural diversity of this group (originating from all parts of the world), and the extent to which/frequency they relocate is an important articulation of newer forms of transnationalism that encompass the movement of people and ideas, and changing economic and social relations.

This seminar aims to map out and theorise the everyday practices of these globally middle professional families and to consider how their presence in key cities around the world might be re-shaping political, social, economic and education structures.

In particular, we will discuss how these families experience mobility and what motivates these relocations; how families create a sense of identity while ‘on the move’; what short-term and longer term aspirations the professionals, their partners and their children have; what education and extra-curricular choices are made; how different cultural contexts are negotiated etc.

Critically, we will discuss how these middle class families work to reproduce and extend their privilege, and so engage in ‘class-making’ practices.  Ultimately, this work offers a much-needed empirical basis to examine the theoretical proposition that there is now a ‘global’ middle class that is somehow different to nationally-located middle class groups.

The Department of Education and St Edmunds Hall are delighted to announce a new Public Seminar series which will take place online in Trinity Term on Wednesdays from 3pm-4pm (UK time) between 5th May and 28th July.

 

The Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education will address themes of major interest to academics, practitioners, and policy-makers working in the field of education globally. These seminars aim to illuminate the role of education in societal development, with a focus on understanding changes in education policy, discourse, and practice, and how these changes influence individual opportunities and shape the development of educational institutions around the world. Seminars will zoom into the local and zoom out into the national and supranational spaces, flows, and influences on education.

The series will be chaired by Maia Chankseliani, Associate Professor of Comparative and International Education, and will feature the following speakers:

Thabo Msibi, Dean and Head of School, School of Education, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

Miri Yemini, Senior Lecturer, Tel Aviv University, Israel

Miguel Antonio Lim, Senior Lecturer in Education, University of Manchester, United Kingdom

Oscar Valiente, Senior Lecturer University of Glasgow, United Kingdom

Moira Faul, Executive Director, NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva, Switzerland

Aliya Kuzhabekova, Associate Professor, Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan

 

To view the full programme of seminars, please click here.

Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education

Joint seminars organised by the Department of Education and St Edmund Hall, University of Oxford.

Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education address themes of major interest to academics, practitioners, and policy-makers working in the field of education globally. These seminars aim to illuminate the role of education in societal development, with a focus on understanding changes in education policy, discourse, and practice, and how these changes influence individual opportunities and shape the development of educational institutions around the world. Seminars will zoom into the local and zoom out into the national and supranational spaces, flows, and influences on education.

The series will be chaired by Maia Chankseliani, Associate Professor of Comparative and International Education.

 

The seminar programme:

*Please note that all seminars have a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

 

Wed 5 May at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Breaking gender, sex and sexuality borders: The case of comprehensive sexuality education in South Africa’

– Thabo Msibi, Dean and Head of School, School of Education, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

 

Wed 19 May at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Global Middle-Class families – comparative study of travel trajectories and imagined futures’

– Miri Yemini, Senior Lecturer, Tel Aviv University, Israel

 

Wed 2 June at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Equal’ Transnational Partnerships in Higher Education: Sino-Foreign Case Studies’

– Miguel Antonio Lim, Senior Lecturer in Education, University of Manchester, UK

 

Wed 16 June at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Why did policymakers in India and Mexico adopt the Germanic model of dual apprenticeships?’

– Oscar Valiente, Senior Lecturer University of Glasgow, UK

 

Wed 7th July at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Governing education by partnership: the GPE in the context of other sectors’ global financing partnerships.’

– Moira V. Faul, Executive Director, NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva

 

Wed 28th July at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

A comparison of the transition of returning scholars to domestic research environments in Kazakhstan, Malaysia and Cambodia.’

– Aliya Kuzhabekova, Associate Professor, Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Aliya Kuzhabekova is Associate Professor at Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan.

In this talk, Aliya Kuzhabekova will report on the results of a collaborative project exploring how individuals, who received Ph.D. degrees abroad transition to research environment in their home countries.

In particular, the aim of the comparative study was to develop a better understanding about how returnees, who obtained degrees in countries with high levels of research capacity re-integrated in the research environment of countries with lower levels of research capacities.

In addition, the project team tried to reveal the extent to which the returnees served as change agents transforming the research environment in their countries. The study allowed to obtain comparative insights about cross-country and program-related variations in the returnees’ adjustment experiences.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Moira V. Faul is Executive Director of NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva. 

The Global Partnership for Education (GPE) is one of a recent proliferation of pooled financing mechanisms in sustainable development. Despite a policy narrative of inclusive and egalitarian partnering, differences between public, private and voluntary sectors are assumed to affect relations between partners, and the effectiveness of partnerships.

We theorise global financing partnerships as a social ‘space between fields’ that is generated and structured by relationships between the actors mobilised into partnership boards from different fields. We move beyond the conventional focus on sectoral factions to investigate the potential of other aspects of diversity to affect partnership outcomes.

We empirically investigate the structuring of the space of global financing partnerships, comparing the GPE with climate change and health, by analysing a new dataset of 188 board members of ten global financing partnerships. First, network analyses reveal that donors (whether states, international organisations or private sector) are systematically privileged in this partnership space.

Secondly, faultline analytical tools reveal that despite a narrative of additional financing from the private sector, donors are significantly associated with the public sector. Furthermore, donors (public and private sector) are significantly associated with an economic logic of action and non-donors with an issue-specific framing.

Examining the multiple diversities that come into play in partnership board composition and structuring enables an improved theorisation of partnership effectiveness; it also holds important implications for board decisions and the sustainability and educational impacts that these partnerships are purported to deliver.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Oscar Valiente is Senior Lecturer in Educational Leadership & Policy at the University of Glasgow, Scotland. 

While most comparative education studies have focused on the historical processes that gave birth to the dual model in Germanic countries, our research aims to elucidate the drivers that explain why policymakers embrace the dual apprenticeship idea and how they re-contextualize it in their own educational context.

Drawing on a constructivist political economy framework, our study specifically investigates the reasons of policymakers in India and Mexico to adopt the dual model and how their different institutional conditions explain variations in the way the two countries have re-contextualized this global policy idea.

The selected cases are particularly interesting for the comparison because of the broad ambitions of their national reforms and the significant differences in the type of dual model of apprenticeships finally retained in the two countries.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Miguel Antonio Lim is Senior Lecturer in Education at the University of Manchester, UK, with special focus on Education and International Development at the University’s School of Environment, Education, and Development (SEED).

At this seminar, the evolving role of transnational higher education (TNHE) as part of wider national development policy will be discussed.

Using the case of Sino-foreign educational partnerships, Dr Lim will outline several features of the evolution of policies to govern and achieve more ‘equal’ partnerships.

In China, TNHE partnerships are seen as an important part of its drive to build ‘World Class Universities’. Its case shows an increasing orientation towards quality over quantity of partnerships and a growing role for urban and regional geopolitics in the choice of its HE partnerships.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Thabo Msibi is Associate Professor in Curriculum Studies in the School of Education at the University of KwaZulu-Natal, where he is also the Dean and Head of the School of Education.   

Professor Msibi’s scholarship is on the interface of gender and sexuality issues, particularly as they relate to education.  He also is interested in theory building as it relates to African sexualities.  He has published research in South African and international journals on these subjects, and has co-edited six journal special issues.

Thabo has also published numerous book chapters looking at the educational experiences of individuals who claim same-sex identities.  His recent monograph entitled Hidden Sexualities of South African Teachers: Black Male Educators and Same-sex Desire is published by Routledge.

This seminar reflects on the public uproar that has come with the expansion of the comprehensive sexuality education programme by the Department of Basic Education in South Africa.

Touted globally by the UNESCO and other international organisations as a critical vehicle for the promotion of positive sexual behaviour amongst young people, comprehensive sexuality education has recently received significant international fanfare.  This focus follows the release of the revised International technical guidance on sexuality education by UNESCO in 2018.  Some African countries, including South Africa, have used the revisions to update their curriculum offerings on sexuality education.

Section nine of the South African Constitution, known as the Equality Clause, explicitly provides protections against unfair discrimination on the basis of race, gender, sex, pregnancy, marital status, ethnic or social origin, colour, sexual orientation, age, disability, religion, conscience, belief, culture, language and birth.

It was through this constitutional guarantee that the country sought to revise its comprehensive curriculum offering, leading to significant backlash from the traditional, religious and conservative organisations. Front-page media articles screamed that the Minister of Education was trying to teach young children about how to have sex, and that she was effectively sexualising young children. The Ministry was also accused of imposing a Western ideals on African people.

The seminar will analyse the transnational and local reasons for the conservative backlash in South Africa. It will argue that the response largely follows a coordinated international movement that has sought to undermine sexuality education and reverse the gains already made by sexual rights organisations.  It will showcase how local sexual politics reflect a transnational mobility of ideas that are reconfigured at a local level in order to attain legitimacy.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Miri Yemini is a tenured Senior Lecturer in the School of Education at Tel Aviv University.

At Tel Aviv Dr. Yemini teaches graduate and undergraduate modules in education, including Internationalisation in Education, Education and Globalisation, Entrepreneurship in Education and Project Management in Schools.

Dr. Yemini serves as a co-Chair of UNESCO chair for Technology and Internationalisation in Education. Recently (April 2018) she was awarded (with Prof. Dr. Nina Kolleck) by the Max Plank Foundation the Award for Research Cooperation and High Excellence in Science (ARCHES), to develop research in the field of school-NGO interactions. This year (2021) Dr. Yemini secured funding from Israeli Science Foundation (150,000 Euro) for her project on education trajectories of Global Middle Class families.

Increasing numbers of highly educated and skilled professionals are internationally mobile for work. Some are transferred by employers; some proactively seek out new positions in different countries.

The currently estimated size of this group (known as globally mobile professionals, ‘global expatriates’ or members of a global middle class) is 66.2 million, which is predicted to rise to 87.5 million by 2022.

The increasing number, but also growing cultural diversity of this group (originating from all parts of the world), and the extent to which/frequency they relocate is an important articulation of newer forms of transnationalism that encompass the movement of people and ideas, and changing economic and social relations.

This seminar aims to map out and theorise the everyday practices of these globally middle professional families and to consider how their presence in key cities around the world might be re-shaping political, social, economic and education structures.

In particular, we will discuss how these families experience mobility and what motivates these relocations; how families create a sense of identity while ‘on the move’; what short-term and longer term aspirations the professionals, their partners and their children have; what education and extra-curricular choices are made; how different cultural contexts are negotiated etc.

Critically, we will discuss how these middle class families work to reproduce and extend their privilege, and so engage in ‘class-making’ practices.  Ultimately, this work offers a much-needed empirical basis to examine the theoretical proposition that there is now a ‘global’ middle class that is somehow different to nationally-located middle class groups.

The Department of Education and St Edmunds Hall are delighted to announce a new Public Seminar series which will take place online in Trinity Term on Wednesdays from 3pm-4pm (UK time) between 5th May and 28th July.

 

The Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education will address themes of major interest to academics, practitioners, and policy-makers working in the field of education globally. These seminars aim to illuminate the role of education in societal development, with a focus on understanding changes in education policy, discourse, and practice, and how these changes influence individual opportunities and shape the development of educational institutions around the world. Seminars will zoom into the local and zoom out into the national and supranational spaces, flows, and influences on education.

The series will be chaired by Maia Chankseliani, Associate Professor of Comparative and International Education, and will feature the following speakers:

Thabo Msibi, Dean and Head of School, School of Education, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

Miri Yemini, Senior Lecturer, Tel Aviv University, Israel

Miguel Antonio Lim, Senior Lecturer in Education, University of Manchester, United Kingdom

Oscar Valiente, Senior Lecturer University of Glasgow, United Kingdom

Moira Faul, Executive Director, NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva, Switzerland

Aliya Kuzhabekova, Associate Professor, Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan

 

To view the full programme of seminars, please click here.

Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education

Joint seminars organised by the Department of Education and St Edmund Hall, University of Oxford.

Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education address themes of major interest to academics, practitioners, and policy-makers working in the field of education globally. These seminars aim to illuminate the role of education in societal development, with a focus on understanding changes in education policy, discourse, and practice, and how these changes influence individual opportunities and shape the development of educational institutions around the world. Seminars will zoom into the local and zoom out into the national and supranational spaces, flows, and influences on education.

The series will be chaired by Maia Chankseliani, Associate Professor of Comparative and International Education.

 

The seminar programme:

*Please note that all seminars have a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

 

Wed 5 May at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Breaking gender, sex and sexuality borders: The case of comprehensive sexuality education in South Africa’

– Thabo Msibi, Dean and Head of School, School of Education, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

 

Wed 19 May at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Global Middle-Class families – comparative study of travel trajectories and imagined futures’

– Miri Yemini, Senior Lecturer, Tel Aviv University, Israel

 

Wed 2 June at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Equal’ Transnational Partnerships in Higher Education: Sino-Foreign Case Studies’

– Miguel Antonio Lim, Senior Lecturer in Education, University of Manchester, UK

 

Wed 16 June at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Why did policymakers in India and Mexico adopt the Germanic model of dual apprenticeships?’

– Oscar Valiente, Senior Lecturer University of Glasgow, UK

 

Wed 7th July at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Governing education by partnership: the GPE in the context of other sectors’ global financing partnerships.’

– Moira V. Faul, Executive Director, NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva

 

Wed 28th July at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

A comparison of the transition of returning scholars to domestic research environments in Kazakhstan, Malaysia and Cambodia.’

– Aliya Kuzhabekova, Associate Professor, Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Aliya Kuzhabekova is Associate Professor at Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan.

In this talk, Aliya Kuzhabekova will report on the results of a collaborative project exploring how individuals, who received Ph.D. degrees abroad transition to research environment in their home countries.

In particular, the aim of the comparative study was to develop a better understanding about how returnees, who obtained degrees in countries with high levels of research capacity re-integrated in the research environment of countries with lower levels of research capacities.

In addition, the project team tried to reveal the extent to which the returnees served as change agents transforming the research environment in their countries. The study allowed to obtain comparative insights about cross-country and program-related variations in the returnees’ adjustment experiences.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Moira V. Faul is Executive Director of NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva. 

The Global Partnership for Education (GPE) is one of a recent proliferation of pooled financing mechanisms in sustainable development. Despite a policy narrative of inclusive and egalitarian partnering, differences between public, private and voluntary sectors are assumed to affect relations between partners, and the effectiveness of partnerships.

We theorise global financing partnerships as a social ‘space between fields’ that is generated and structured by relationships between the actors mobilised into partnership boards from different fields. We move beyond the conventional focus on sectoral factions to investigate the potential of other aspects of diversity to affect partnership outcomes.

We empirically investigate the structuring of the space of global financing partnerships, comparing the GPE with climate change and health, by analysing a new dataset of 188 board members of ten global financing partnerships. First, network analyses reveal that donors (whether states, international organisations or private sector) are systematically privileged in this partnership space.

Secondly, faultline analytical tools reveal that despite a narrative of additional financing from the private sector, donors are significantly associated with the public sector. Furthermore, donors (public and private sector) are significantly associated with an economic logic of action and non-donors with an issue-specific framing.

Examining the multiple diversities that come into play in partnership board composition and structuring enables an improved theorisation of partnership effectiveness; it also holds important implications for board decisions and the sustainability and educational impacts that these partnerships are purported to deliver.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Oscar Valiente is Senior Lecturer in Educational Leadership & Policy at the University of Glasgow, Scotland. 

While most comparative education studies have focused on the historical processes that gave birth to the dual model in Germanic countries, our research aims to elucidate the drivers that explain why policymakers embrace the dual apprenticeship idea and how they re-contextualize it in their own educational context.

Drawing on a constructivist political economy framework, our study specifically investigates the reasons of policymakers in India and Mexico to adopt the dual model and how their different institutional conditions explain variations in the way the two countries have re-contextualized this global policy idea.

The selected cases are particularly interesting for the comparison because of the broad ambitions of their national reforms and the significant differences in the type of dual model of apprenticeships finally retained in the two countries.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Miguel Antonio Lim is Senior Lecturer in Education at the University of Manchester, UK, with special focus on Education and International Development at the University’s School of Environment, Education, and Development (SEED).

At this seminar, the evolving role of transnational higher education (TNHE) as part of wider national development policy will be discussed.

Using the case of Sino-foreign educational partnerships, Dr Lim will outline several features of the evolution of policies to govern and achieve more ‘equal’ partnerships.

In China, TNHE partnerships are seen as an important part of its drive to build ‘World Class Universities’. Its case shows an increasing orientation towards quality over quantity of partnerships and a growing role for urban and regional geopolitics in the choice of its HE partnerships.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Thabo Msibi is Associate Professor in Curriculum Studies in the School of Education at the University of KwaZulu-Natal, where he is also the Dean and Head of the School of Education.   

Professor Msibi’s scholarship is on the interface of gender and sexuality issues, particularly as they relate to education.  He also is interested in theory building as it relates to African sexualities.  He has published research in South African and international journals on these subjects, and has co-edited six journal special issues.

Thabo has also published numerous book chapters looking at the educational experiences of individuals who claim same-sex identities.  His recent monograph entitled Hidden Sexualities of South African Teachers: Black Male Educators and Same-sex Desire is published by Routledge.

This seminar reflects on the public uproar that has come with the expansion of the comprehensive sexuality education programme by the Department of Basic Education in South Africa.

Touted globally by the UNESCO and other international organisations as a critical vehicle for the promotion of positive sexual behaviour amongst young people, comprehensive sexuality education has recently received significant international fanfare.  This focus follows the release of the revised International technical guidance on sexuality education by UNESCO in 2018.  Some African countries, including South Africa, have used the revisions to update their curriculum offerings on sexuality education.

Section nine of the South African Constitution, known as the Equality Clause, explicitly provides protections against unfair discrimination on the basis of race, gender, sex, pregnancy, marital status, ethnic or social origin, colour, sexual orientation, age, disability, religion, conscience, belief, culture, language and birth.

It was through this constitutional guarantee that the country sought to revise its comprehensive curriculum offering, leading to significant backlash from the traditional, religious and conservative organisations. Front-page media articles screamed that the Minister of Education was trying to teach young children about how to have sex, and that she was effectively sexualising young children. The Ministry was also accused of imposing a Western ideals on African people.

The seminar will analyse the transnational and local reasons for the conservative backlash in South Africa. It will argue that the response largely follows a coordinated international movement that has sought to undermine sexuality education and reverse the gains already made by sexual rights organisations.  It will showcase how local sexual politics reflect a transnational mobility of ideas that are reconfigured at a local level in order to attain legitimacy.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Miri Yemini is a tenured Senior Lecturer in the School of Education at Tel Aviv University.

At Tel Aviv Dr. Yemini teaches graduate and undergraduate modules in education, including Internationalisation in Education, Education and Globalisation, Entrepreneurship in Education and Project Management in Schools.

Dr. Yemini serves as a co-Chair of UNESCO chair for Technology and Internationalisation in Education. Recently (April 2018) she was awarded (with Prof. Dr. Nina Kolleck) by the Max Plank Foundation the Award for Research Cooperation and High Excellence in Science (ARCHES), to develop research in the field of school-NGO interactions. This year (2021) Dr. Yemini secured funding from Israeli Science Foundation (150,000 Euro) for her project on education trajectories of Global Middle Class families.

Increasing numbers of highly educated and skilled professionals are internationally mobile for work. Some are transferred by employers; some proactively seek out new positions in different countries.

The currently estimated size of this group (known as globally mobile professionals, ‘global expatriates’ or members of a global middle class) is 66.2 million, which is predicted to rise to 87.5 million by 2022.

The increasing number, but also growing cultural diversity of this group (originating from all parts of the world), and the extent to which/frequency they relocate is an important articulation of newer forms of transnationalism that encompass the movement of people and ideas, and changing economic and social relations.

This seminar aims to map out and theorise the everyday practices of these globally middle professional families and to consider how their presence in key cities around the world might be re-shaping political, social, economic and education structures.

In particular, we will discuss how these families experience mobility and what motivates these relocations; how families create a sense of identity while ‘on the move’; what short-term and longer term aspirations the professionals, their partners and their children have; what education and extra-curricular choices are made; how different cultural contexts are negotiated etc.

Critically, we will discuss how these middle class families work to reproduce and extend their privilege, and so engage in ‘class-making’ practices.  Ultimately, this work offers a much-needed empirical basis to examine the theoretical proposition that there is now a ‘global’ middle class that is somehow different to nationally-located middle class groups.

The Department of Education and St Edmunds Hall are delighted to announce a new Public Seminar series which will take place online in Trinity Term on Wednesdays from 3pm-4pm (UK time) between 5th May and 28th July.

 

The Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education will address themes of major interest to academics, practitioners, and policy-makers working in the field of education globally. These seminars aim to illuminate the role of education in societal development, with a focus on understanding changes in education policy, discourse, and practice, and how these changes influence individual opportunities and shape the development of educational institutions around the world. Seminars will zoom into the local and zoom out into the national and supranational spaces, flows, and influences on education.

The series will be chaired by Maia Chankseliani, Associate Professor of Comparative and International Education, and will feature the following speakers:

Thabo Msibi, Dean and Head of School, School of Education, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

Miri Yemini, Senior Lecturer, Tel Aviv University, Israel

Miguel Antonio Lim, Senior Lecturer in Education, University of Manchester, United Kingdom

Oscar Valiente, Senior Lecturer University of Glasgow, United Kingdom

Moira Faul, Executive Director, NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva, Switzerland

Aliya Kuzhabekova, Associate Professor, Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan

 

To view the full programme of seminars, please click here.

Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education

Joint seminars organised by the Department of Education and St Edmund Hall, University of Oxford.

Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education address themes of major interest to academics, practitioners, and policy-makers working in the field of education globally. These seminars aim to illuminate the role of education in societal development, with a focus on understanding changes in education policy, discourse, and practice, and how these changes influence individual opportunities and shape the development of educational institutions around the world. Seminars will zoom into the local and zoom out into the national and supranational spaces, flows, and influences on education.

The series will be chaired by Maia Chankseliani, Associate Professor of Comparative and International Education.

 

The seminar programme:

*Please note that all seminars have a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

 

Wed 5 May at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Breaking gender, sex and sexuality borders: The case of comprehensive sexuality education in South Africa’

– Thabo Msibi, Dean and Head of School, School of Education, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

 

Wed 19 May at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Global Middle-Class families – comparative study of travel trajectories and imagined futures’

– Miri Yemini, Senior Lecturer, Tel Aviv University, Israel

 

Wed 2 June at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Equal’ Transnational Partnerships in Higher Education: Sino-Foreign Case Studies’

– Miguel Antonio Lim, Senior Lecturer in Education, University of Manchester, UK

 

Wed 16 June at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Why did policymakers in India and Mexico adopt the Germanic model of dual apprenticeships?’

– Oscar Valiente, Senior Lecturer University of Glasgow, UK

 

Wed 7th July at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Governing education by partnership: the GPE in the context of other sectors’ global financing partnerships.’

– Moira V. Faul, Executive Director, NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva

 

Wed 28th July at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

A comparison of the transition of returning scholars to domestic research environments in Kazakhstan, Malaysia and Cambodia.’

– Aliya Kuzhabekova, Associate Professor, Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Aliya Kuzhabekova is Associate Professor at Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan.

In this talk, Aliya Kuzhabekova will report on the results of a collaborative project exploring how individuals, who received Ph.D. degrees abroad transition to research environment in their home countries.

In particular, the aim of the comparative study was to develop a better understanding about how returnees, who obtained degrees in countries with high levels of research capacity re-integrated in the research environment of countries with lower levels of research capacities.

In addition, the project team tried to reveal the extent to which the returnees served as change agents transforming the research environment in their countries. The study allowed to obtain comparative insights about cross-country and program-related variations in the returnees’ adjustment experiences.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Moira V. Faul is Executive Director of NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva. 

The Global Partnership for Education (GPE) is one of a recent proliferation of pooled financing mechanisms in sustainable development. Despite a policy narrative of inclusive and egalitarian partnering, differences between public, private and voluntary sectors are assumed to affect relations between partners, and the effectiveness of partnerships.

We theorise global financing partnerships as a social ‘space between fields’ that is generated and structured by relationships between the actors mobilised into partnership boards from different fields. We move beyond the conventional focus on sectoral factions to investigate the potential of other aspects of diversity to affect partnership outcomes.

We empirically investigate the structuring of the space of global financing partnerships, comparing the GPE with climate change and health, by analysing a new dataset of 188 board members of ten global financing partnerships. First, network analyses reveal that donors (whether states, international organisations or private sector) are systematically privileged in this partnership space.

Secondly, faultline analytical tools reveal that despite a narrative of additional financing from the private sector, donors are significantly associated with the public sector. Furthermore, donors (public and private sector) are significantly associated with an economic logic of action and non-donors with an issue-specific framing.

Examining the multiple diversities that come into play in partnership board composition and structuring enables an improved theorisation of partnership effectiveness; it also holds important implications for board decisions and the sustainability and educational impacts that these partnerships are purported to deliver.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Oscar Valiente is Senior Lecturer in Educational Leadership & Policy at the University of Glasgow, Scotland. 

While most comparative education studies have focused on the historical processes that gave birth to the dual model in Germanic countries, our research aims to elucidate the drivers that explain why policymakers embrace the dual apprenticeship idea and how they re-contextualize it in their own educational context.

Drawing on a constructivist political economy framework, our study specifically investigates the reasons of policymakers in India and Mexico to adopt the dual model and how their different institutional conditions explain variations in the way the two countries have re-contextualized this global policy idea.

The selected cases are particularly interesting for the comparison because of the broad ambitions of their national reforms and the significant differences in the type of dual model of apprenticeships finally retained in the two countries.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Miguel Antonio Lim is Senior Lecturer in Education at the University of Manchester, UK, with special focus on Education and International Development at the University’s School of Environment, Education, and Development (SEED).

At this seminar, the evolving role of transnational higher education (TNHE) as part of wider national development policy will be discussed.

Using the case of Sino-foreign educational partnerships, Dr Lim will outline several features of the evolution of policies to govern and achieve more ‘equal’ partnerships.

In China, TNHE partnerships are seen as an important part of its drive to build ‘World Class Universities’. Its case shows an increasing orientation towards quality over quantity of partnerships and a growing role for urban and regional geopolitics in the choice of its HE partnerships.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Thabo Msibi is Associate Professor in Curriculum Studies in the School of Education at the University of KwaZulu-Natal, where he is also the Dean and Head of the School of Education.   

Professor Msibi’s scholarship is on the interface of gender and sexuality issues, particularly as they relate to education.  He also is interested in theory building as it relates to African sexualities.  He has published research in South African and international journals on these subjects, and has co-edited six journal special issues.

Thabo has also published numerous book chapters looking at the educational experiences of individuals who claim same-sex identities.  His recent monograph entitled Hidden Sexualities of South African Teachers: Black Male Educators and Same-sex Desire is published by Routledge.

This seminar reflects on the public uproar that has come with the expansion of the comprehensive sexuality education programme by the Department of Basic Education in South Africa.

Touted globally by the UNESCO and other international organisations as a critical vehicle for the promotion of positive sexual behaviour amongst young people, comprehensive sexuality education has recently received significant international fanfare.  This focus follows the release of the revised International technical guidance on sexuality education by UNESCO in 2018.  Some African countries, including South Africa, have used the revisions to update their curriculum offerings on sexuality education.

Section nine of the South African Constitution, known as the Equality Clause, explicitly provides protections against unfair discrimination on the basis of race, gender, sex, pregnancy, marital status, ethnic or social origin, colour, sexual orientation, age, disability, religion, conscience, belief, culture, language and birth.

It was through this constitutional guarantee that the country sought to revise its comprehensive curriculum offering, leading to significant backlash from the traditional, religious and conservative organisations. Front-page media articles screamed that the Minister of Education was trying to teach young children about how to have sex, and that she was effectively sexualising young children. The Ministry was also accused of imposing a Western ideals on African people.

The seminar will analyse the transnational and local reasons for the conservative backlash in South Africa. It will argue that the response largely follows a coordinated international movement that has sought to undermine sexuality education and reverse the gains already made by sexual rights organisations.  It will showcase how local sexual politics reflect a transnational mobility of ideas that are reconfigured at a local level in order to attain legitimacy.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Miri Yemini is a tenured Senior Lecturer in the School of Education at Tel Aviv University.

At Tel Aviv Dr. Yemini teaches graduate and undergraduate modules in education, including Internationalisation in Education, Education and Globalisation, Entrepreneurship in Education and Project Management in Schools.

Dr. Yemini serves as a co-Chair of UNESCO chair for Technology and Internationalisation in Education. Recently (April 2018) she was awarded (with Prof. Dr. Nina Kolleck) by the Max Plank Foundation the Award for Research Cooperation and High Excellence in Science (ARCHES), to develop research in the field of school-NGO interactions. This year (2021) Dr. Yemini secured funding from Israeli Science Foundation (150,000 Euro) for her project on education trajectories of Global Middle Class families.

Increasing numbers of highly educated and skilled professionals are internationally mobile for work. Some are transferred by employers; some proactively seek out new positions in different countries.

The currently estimated size of this group (known as globally mobile professionals, ‘global expatriates’ or members of a global middle class) is 66.2 million, which is predicted to rise to 87.5 million by 2022.

The increasing number, but also growing cultural diversity of this group (originating from all parts of the world), and the extent to which/frequency they relocate is an important articulation of newer forms of transnationalism that encompass the movement of people and ideas, and changing economic and social relations.

This seminar aims to map out and theorise the everyday practices of these globally middle professional families and to consider how their presence in key cities around the world might be re-shaping political, social, economic and education structures.

In particular, we will discuss how these families experience mobility and what motivates these relocations; how families create a sense of identity while ‘on the move’; what short-term and longer term aspirations the professionals, their partners and their children have; what education and extra-curricular choices are made; how different cultural contexts are negotiated etc.

Critically, we will discuss how these middle class families work to reproduce and extend their privilege, and so engage in ‘class-making’ practices.  Ultimately, this work offers a much-needed empirical basis to examine the theoretical proposition that there is now a ‘global’ middle class that is somehow different to nationally-located middle class groups.

The Department of Education and St Edmunds Hall are delighted to announce a new Public Seminar series which will take place online in Trinity Term on Wednesdays from 3pm-4pm (UK time) between 5th May and 28th July.

 

The Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education will address themes of major interest to academics, practitioners, and policy-makers working in the field of education globally. These seminars aim to illuminate the role of education in societal development, with a focus on understanding changes in education policy, discourse, and practice, and how these changes influence individual opportunities and shape the development of educational institutions around the world. Seminars will zoom into the local and zoom out into the national and supranational spaces, flows, and influences on education.

The series will be chaired by Maia Chankseliani, Associate Professor of Comparative and International Education, and will feature the following speakers:

Thabo Msibi, Dean and Head of School, School of Education, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

Miri Yemini, Senior Lecturer, Tel Aviv University, Israel

Miguel Antonio Lim, Senior Lecturer in Education, University of Manchester, United Kingdom

Oscar Valiente, Senior Lecturer University of Glasgow, United Kingdom

Moira Faul, Executive Director, NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva, Switzerland

Aliya Kuzhabekova, Associate Professor, Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan

 

To view the full programme of seminars, please click here.

Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education

Joint seminars organised by the Department of Education and St Edmund Hall, University of Oxford.

Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education address themes of major interest to academics, practitioners, and policy-makers working in the field of education globally. These seminars aim to illuminate the role of education in societal development, with a focus on understanding changes in education policy, discourse, and practice, and how these changes influence individual opportunities and shape the development of educational institutions around the world. Seminars will zoom into the local and zoom out into the national and supranational spaces, flows, and influences on education.

The series will be chaired by Maia Chankseliani, Associate Professor of Comparative and International Education.

 

The seminar programme:

*Please note that all seminars have a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

 

Wed 5 May at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Breaking gender, sex and sexuality borders: The case of comprehensive sexuality education in South Africa’

– Thabo Msibi, Dean and Head of School, School of Education, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

 

Wed 19 May at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Global Middle-Class families – comparative study of travel trajectories and imagined futures’

– Miri Yemini, Senior Lecturer, Tel Aviv University, Israel

 

Wed 2 June at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Equal’ Transnational Partnerships in Higher Education: Sino-Foreign Case Studies’

– Miguel Antonio Lim, Senior Lecturer in Education, University of Manchester, UK

 

Wed 16 June at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Why did policymakers in India and Mexico adopt the Germanic model of dual apprenticeships?’

– Oscar Valiente, Senior Lecturer University of Glasgow, UK

 

Wed 7th July at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Governing education by partnership: the GPE in the context of other sectors’ global financing partnerships.’

– Moira V. Faul, Executive Director, NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva

 

Wed 28th July at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

A comparison of the transition of returning scholars to domestic research environments in Kazakhstan, Malaysia and Cambodia.’

– Aliya Kuzhabekova, Associate Professor, Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Aliya Kuzhabekova is Associate Professor at Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan.

In this talk, Aliya Kuzhabekova will report on the results of a collaborative project exploring how individuals, who received Ph.D. degrees abroad transition to research environment in their home countries.

In particular, the aim of the comparative study was to develop a better understanding about how returnees, who obtained degrees in countries with high levels of research capacity re-integrated in the research environment of countries with lower levels of research capacities.

In addition, the project team tried to reveal the extent to which the returnees served as change agents transforming the research environment in their countries. The study allowed to obtain comparative insights about cross-country and program-related variations in the returnees’ adjustment experiences.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Moira V. Faul is Executive Director of NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva. 

The Global Partnership for Education (GPE) is one of a recent proliferation of pooled financing mechanisms in sustainable development. Despite a policy narrative of inclusive and egalitarian partnering, differences between public, private and voluntary sectors are assumed to affect relations between partners, and the effectiveness of partnerships.

We theorise global financing partnerships as a social ‘space between fields’ that is generated and structured by relationships between the actors mobilised into partnership boards from different fields. We move beyond the conventional focus on sectoral factions to investigate the potential of other aspects of diversity to affect partnership outcomes.

We empirically investigate the structuring of the space of global financing partnerships, comparing the GPE with climate change and health, by analysing a new dataset of 188 board members of ten global financing partnerships. First, network analyses reveal that donors (whether states, international organisations or private sector) are systematically privileged in this partnership space.

Secondly, faultline analytical tools reveal that despite a narrative of additional financing from the private sector, donors are significantly associated with the public sector. Furthermore, donors (public and private sector) are significantly associated with an economic logic of action and non-donors with an issue-specific framing.

Examining the multiple diversities that come into play in partnership board composition and structuring enables an improved theorisation of partnership effectiveness; it also holds important implications for board decisions and the sustainability and educational impacts that these partnerships are purported to deliver.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Oscar Valiente is Senior Lecturer in Educational Leadership & Policy at the University of Glasgow, Scotland. 

While most comparative education studies have focused on the historical processes that gave birth to the dual model in Germanic countries, our research aims to elucidate the drivers that explain why policymakers embrace the dual apprenticeship idea and how they re-contextualize it in their own educational context.

Drawing on a constructivist political economy framework, our study specifically investigates the reasons of policymakers in India and Mexico to adopt the dual model and how their different institutional conditions explain variations in the way the two countries have re-contextualized this global policy idea.

The selected cases are particularly interesting for the comparison because of the broad ambitions of their national reforms and the significant differences in the type of dual model of apprenticeships finally retained in the two countries.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Miguel Antonio Lim is Senior Lecturer in Education at the University of Manchester, UK, with special focus on Education and International Development at the University’s School of Environment, Education, and Development (SEED).

At this seminar, the evolving role of transnational higher education (TNHE) as part of wider national development policy will be discussed.

Using the case of Sino-foreign educational partnerships, Dr Lim will outline several features of the evolution of policies to govern and achieve more ‘equal’ partnerships.

In China, TNHE partnerships are seen as an important part of its drive to build ‘World Class Universities’. Its case shows an increasing orientation towards quality over quantity of partnerships and a growing role for urban and regional geopolitics in the choice of its HE partnerships.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Thabo Msibi is Associate Professor in Curriculum Studies in the School of Education at the University of KwaZulu-Natal, where he is also the Dean and Head of the School of Education.   

Professor Msibi’s scholarship is on the interface of gender and sexuality issues, particularly as they relate to education.  He also is interested in theory building as it relates to African sexualities.  He has published research in South African and international journals on these subjects, and has co-edited six journal special issues.

Thabo has also published numerous book chapters looking at the educational experiences of individuals who claim same-sex identities.  His recent monograph entitled Hidden Sexualities of South African Teachers: Black Male Educators and Same-sex Desire is published by Routledge.

This seminar reflects on the public uproar that has come with the expansion of the comprehensive sexuality education programme by the Department of Basic Education in South Africa.

Touted globally by the UNESCO and other international organisations as a critical vehicle for the promotion of positive sexual behaviour amongst young people, comprehensive sexuality education has recently received significant international fanfare.  This focus follows the release of the revised International technical guidance on sexuality education by UNESCO in 2018.  Some African countries, including South Africa, have used the revisions to update their curriculum offerings on sexuality education.

Section nine of the South African Constitution, known as the Equality Clause, explicitly provides protections against unfair discrimination on the basis of race, gender, sex, pregnancy, marital status, ethnic or social origin, colour, sexual orientation, age, disability, religion, conscience, belief, culture, language and birth.

It was through this constitutional guarantee that the country sought to revise its comprehensive curriculum offering, leading to significant backlash from the traditional, religious and conservative organisations. Front-page media articles screamed that the Minister of Education was trying to teach young children about how to have sex, and that she was effectively sexualising young children. The Ministry was also accused of imposing a Western ideals on African people.

The seminar will analyse the transnational and local reasons for the conservative backlash in South Africa. It will argue that the response largely follows a coordinated international movement that has sought to undermine sexuality education and reverse the gains already made by sexual rights organisations.  It will showcase how local sexual politics reflect a transnational mobility of ideas that are reconfigured at a local level in order to attain legitimacy.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Miri Yemini is a tenured Senior Lecturer in the School of Education at Tel Aviv University.

At Tel Aviv Dr. Yemini teaches graduate and undergraduate modules in education, including Internationalisation in Education, Education and Globalisation, Entrepreneurship in Education and Project Management in Schools.

Dr. Yemini serves as a co-Chair of UNESCO chair for Technology and Internationalisation in Education. Recently (April 2018) she was awarded (with Prof. Dr. Nina Kolleck) by the Max Plank Foundation the Award for Research Cooperation and High Excellence in Science (ARCHES), to develop research in the field of school-NGO interactions. This year (2021) Dr. Yemini secured funding from Israeli Science Foundation (150,000 Euro) for her project on education trajectories of Global Middle Class families.

Increasing numbers of highly educated and skilled professionals are internationally mobile for work. Some are transferred by employers; some proactively seek out new positions in different countries.

The currently estimated size of this group (known as globally mobile professionals, ‘global expatriates’ or members of a global middle class) is 66.2 million, which is predicted to rise to 87.5 million by 2022.

The increasing number, but also growing cultural diversity of this group (originating from all parts of the world), and the extent to which/frequency they relocate is an important articulation of newer forms of transnationalism that encompass the movement of people and ideas, and changing economic and social relations.

This seminar aims to map out and theorise the everyday practices of these globally middle professional families and to consider how their presence in key cities around the world might be re-shaping political, social, economic and education structures.

In particular, we will discuss how these families experience mobility and what motivates these relocations; how families create a sense of identity while ‘on the move’; what short-term and longer term aspirations the professionals, their partners and their children have; what education and extra-curricular choices are made; how different cultural contexts are negotiated etc.

Critically, we will discuss how these middle class families work to reproduce and extend their privilege, and so engage in ‘class-making’ practices.  Ultimately, this work offers a much-needed empirical basis to examine the theoretical proposition that there is now a ‘global’ middle class that is somehow different to nationally-located middle class groups.

The Department of Education and St Edmunds Hall are delighted to announce a new Public Seminar series which will take place online in Trinity Term on Wednesdays from 3pm-4pm (UK time) between 5th May and 28th July.

 

The Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education will address themes of major interest to academics, practitioners, and policy-makers working in the field of education globally. These seminars aim to illuminate the role of education in societal development, with a focus on understanding changes in education policy, discourse, and practice, and how these changes influence individual opportunities and shape the development of educational institutions around the world. Seminars will zoom into the local and zoom out into the national and supranational spaces, flows, and influences on education.

The series will be chaired by Maia Chankseliani, Associate Professor of Comparative and International Education, and will feature the following speakers:

Thabo Msibi, Dean and Head of School, School of Education, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

Miri Yemini, Senior Lecturer, Tel Aviv University, Israel

Miguel Antonio Lim, Senior Lecturer in Education, University of Manchester, United Kingdom

Oscar Valiente, Senior Lecturer University of Glasgow, United Kingdom

Moira Faul, Executive Director, NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva, Switzerland

Aliya Kuzhabekova, Associate Professor, Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan

 

To view the full programme of seminars, please click here.

Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education

Joint seminars organised by the Department of Education and St Edmund Hall, University of Oxford.

Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education address themes of major interest to academics, practitioners, and policy-makers working in the field of education globally. These seminars aim to illuminate the role of education in societal development, with a focus on understanding changes in education policy, discourse, and practice, and how these changes influence individual opportunities and shape the development of educational institutions around the world. Seminars will zoom into the local and zoom out into the national and supranational spaces, flows, and influences on education.

The series will be chaired by Maia Chankseliani, Associate Professor of Comparative and International Education.

 

The seminar programme:

*Please note that all seminars have a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

 

Wed 5 May at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Breaking gender, sex and sexuality borders: The case of comprehensive sexuality education in South Africa’

– Thabo Msibi, Dean and Head of School, School of Education, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

 

Wed 19 May at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Global Middle-Class families – comparative study of travel trajectories and imagined futures’

– Miri Yemini, Senior Lecturer, Tel Aviv University, Israel

 

Wed 2 June at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Equal’ Transnational Partnerships in Higher Education: Sino-Foreign Case Studies’

– Miguel Antonio Lim, Senior Lecturer in Education, University of Manchester, UK

 

Wed 16 June at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Why did policymakers in India and Mexico adopt the Germanic model of dual apprenticeships?’

– Oscar Valiente, Senior Lecturer University of Glasgow, UK

 

Wed 7th July at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Governing education by partnership: the GPE in the context of other sectors’ global financing partnerships.’

– Moira V. Faul, Executive Director, NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva

 

Wed 28th July at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

A comparison of the transition of returning scholars to domestic research environments in Kazakhstan, Malaysia and Cambodia.’

– Aliya Kuzhabekova, Associate Professor, Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Aliya Kuzhabekova is Associate Professor at Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan.

In this talk, Aliya Kuzhabekova will report on the results of a collaborative project exploring how individuals, who received Ph.D. degrees abroad transition to research environment in their home countries.

In particular, the aim of the comparative study was to develop a better understanding about how returnees, who obtained degrees in countries with high levels of research capacity re-integrated in the research environment of countries with lower levels of research capacities.

In addition, the project team tried to reveal the extent to which the returnees served as change agents transforming the research environment in their countries. The study allowed to obtain comparative insights about cross-country and program-related variations in the returnees’ adjustment experiences.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Moira V. Faul is Executive Director of NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva. 

The Global Partnership for Education (GPE) is one of a recent proliferation of pooled financing mechanisms in sustainable development. Despite a policy narrative of inclusive and egalitarian partnering, differences between public, private and voluntary sectors are assumed to affect relations between partners, and the effectiveness of partnerships.

We theorise global financing partnerships as a social ‘space between fields’ that is generated and structured by relationships between the actors mobilised into partnership boards from different fields. We move beyond the conventional focus on sectoral factions to investigate the potential of other aspects of diversity to affect partnership outcomes.

We empirically investigate the structuring of the space of global financing partnerships, comparing the GPE with climate change and health, by analysing a new dataset of 188 board members of ten global financing partnerships. First, network analyses reveal that donors (whether states, international organisations or private sector) are systematically privileged in this partnership space.

Secondly, faultline analytical tools reveal that despite a narrative of additional financing from the private sector, donors are significantly associated with the public sector. Furthermore, donors (public and private sector) are significantly associated with an economic logic of action and non-donors with an issue-specific framing.

Examining the multiple diversities that come into play in partnership board composition and structuring enables an improved theorisation of partnership effectiveness; it also holds important implications for board decisions and the sustainability and educational impacts that these partnerships are purported to deliver.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Oscar Valiente is Senior Lecturer in Educational Leadership & Policy at the University of Glasgow, Scotland. 

While most comparative education studies have focused on the historical processes that gave birth to the dual model in Germanic countries, our research aims to elucidate the drivers that explain why policymakers embrace the dual apprenticeship idea and how they re-contextualize it in their own educational context.

Drawing on a constructivist political economy framework, our study specifically investigates the reasons of policymakers in India and Mexico to adopt the dual model and how their different institutional conditions explain variations in the way the two countries have re-contextualized this global policy idea.

The selected cases are particularly interesting for the comparison because of the broad ambitions of their national reforms and the significant differences in the type of dual model of apprenticeships finally retained in the two countries.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Miguel Antonio Lim is Senior Lecturer in Education at the University of Manchester, UK, with special focus on Education and International Development at the University’s School of Environment, Education, and Development (SEED).

At this seminar, the evolving role of transnational higher education (TNHE) as part of wider national development policy will be discussed.

Using the case of Sino-foreign educational partnerships, Dr Lim will outline several features of the evolution of policies to govern and achieve more ‘equal’ partnerships.

In China, TNHE partnerships are seen as an important part of its drive to build ‘World Class Universities’. Its case shows an increasing orientation towards quality over quantity of partnerships and a growing role for urban and regional geopolitics in the choice of its HE partnerships.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Thabo Msibi is Associate Professor in Curriculum Studies in the School of Education at the University of KwaZulu-Natal, where he is also the Dean and Head of the School of Education.   

Professor Msibi’s scholarship is on the interface of gender and sexuality issues, particularly as they relate to education.  He also is interested in theory building as it relates to African sexualities.  He has published research in South African and international journals on these subjects, and has co-edited six journal special issues.

Thabo has also published numerous book chapters looking at the educational experiences of individuals who claim same-sex identities.  His recent monograph entitled Hidden Sexualities of South African Teachers: Black Male Educators and Same-sex Desire is published by Routledge.

This seminar reflects on the public uproar that has come with the expansion of the comprehensive sexuality education programme by the Department of Basic Education in South Africa.

Touted globally by the UNESCO and other international organisations as a critical vehicle for the promotion of positive sexual behaviour amongst young people, comprehensive sexuality education has recently received significant international fanfare.  This focus follows the release of the revised International technical guidance on sexuality education by UNESCO in 2018.  Some African countries, including South Africa, have used the revisions to update their curriculum offerings on sexuality education.

Section nine of the South African Constitution, known as the Equality Clause, explicitly provides protections against unfair discrimination on the basis of race, gender, sex, pregnancy, marital status, ethnic or social origin, colour, sexual orientation, age, disability, religion, conscience, belief, culture, language and birth.

It was through this constitutional guarantee that the country sought to revise its comprehensive curriculum offering, leading to significant backlash from the traditional, religious and conservative organisations. Front-page media articles screamed that the Minister of Education was trying to teach young children about how to have sex, and that she was effectively sexualising young children. The Ministry was also accused of imposing a Western ideals on African people.

The seminar will analyse the transnational and local reasons for the conservative backlash in South Africa. It will argue that the response largely follows a coordinated international movement that has sought to undermine sexuality education and reverse the gains already made by sexual rights organisations.  It will showcase how local sexual politics reflect a transnational mobility of ideas that are reconfigured at a local level in order to attain legitimacy.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Miri Yemini is a tenured Senior Lecturer in the School of Education at Tel Aviv University.

At Tel Aviv Dr. Yemini teaches graduate and undergraduate modules in education, including Internationalisation in Education, Education and Globalisation, Entrepreneurship in Education and Project Management in Schools.

Dr. Yemini serves as a co-Chair of UNESCO chair for Technology and Internationalisation in Education. Recently (April 2018) she was awarded (with Prof. Dr. Nina Kolleck) by the Max Plank Foundation the Award for Research Cooperation and High Excellence in Science (ARCHES), to develop research in the field of school-NGO interactions. This year (2021) Dr. Yemini secured funding from Israeli Science Foundation (150,000 Euro) for her project on education trajectories of Global Middle Class families.

Increasing numbers of highly educated and skilled professionals are internationally mobile for work. Some are transferred by employers; some proactively seek out new positions in different countries.

The currently estimated size of this group (known as globally mobile professionals, ‘global expatriates’ or members of a global middle class) is 66.2 million, which is predicted to rise to 87.5 million by 2022.

The increasing number, but also growing cultural diversity of this group (originating from all parts of the world), and the extent to which/frequency they relocate is an important articulation of newer forms of transnationalism that encompass the movement of people and ideas, and changing economic and social relations.

This seminar aims to map out and theorise the everyday practices of these globally middle professional families and to consider how their presence in key cities around the world might be re-shaping political, social, economic and education structures.

In particular, we will discuss how these families experience mobility and what motivates these relocations; how families create a sense of identity while ‘on the move’; what short-term and longer term aspirations the professionals, their partners and their children have; what education and extra-curricular choices are made; how different cultural contexts are negotiated etc.

Critically, we will discuss how these middle class families work to reproduce and extend their privilege, and so engage in ‘class-making’ practices.  Ultimately, this work offers a much-needed empirical basis to examine the theoretical proposition that there is now a ‘global’ middle class that is somehow different to nationally-located middle class groups.

The Department of Education and St Edmunds Hall are delighted to announce a new Public Seminar series which will take place online in Trinity Term on Wednesdays from 3pm-4pm (UK time) between 5th May and 28th July.

 

The Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education will address themes of major interest to academics, practitioners, and policy-makers working in the field of education globally. These seminars aim to illuminate the role of education in societal development, with a focus on understanding changes in education policy, discourse, and practice, and how these changes influence individual opportunities and shape the development of educational institutions around the world. Seminars will zoom into the local and zoom out into the national and supranational spaces, flows, and influences on education.

The series will be chaired by Maia Chankseliani, Associate Professor of Comparative and International Education, and will feature the following speakers:

Thabo Msibi, Dean and Head of School, School of Education, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

Miri Yemini, Senior Lecturer, Tel Aviv University, Israel

Miguel Antonio Lim, Senior Lecturer in Education, University of Manchester, United Kingdom

Oscar Valiente, Senior Lecturer University of Glasgow, United Kingdom

Moira Faul, Executive Director, NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva, Switzerland

Aliya Kuzhabekova, Associate Professor, Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan

 

To view the full programme of seminars, please click here.

Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education

Joint seminars organised by the Department of Education and St Edmund Hall, University of Oxford.

Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education address themes of major interest to academics, practitioners, and policy-makers working in the field of education globally. These seminars aim to illuminate the role of education in societal development, with a focus on understanding changes in education policy, discourse, and practice, and how these changes influence individual opportunities and shape the development of educational institutions around the world. Seminars will zoom into the local and zoom out into the national and supranational spaces, flows, and influences on education.

The series will be chaired by Maia Chankseliani, Associate Professor of Comparative and International Education.

 

The seminar programme:

*Please note that all seminars have a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

 

Wed 5 May at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Breaking gender, sex and sexuality borders: The case of comprehensive sexuality education in South Africa’

– Thabo Msibi, Dean and Head of School, School of Education, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

 

Wed 19 May at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Global Middle-Class families – comparative study of travel trajectories and imagined futures’

– Miri Yemini, Senior Lecturer, Tel Aviv University, Israel

 

Wed 2 June at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Equal’ Transnational Partnerships in Higher Education: Sino-Foreign Case Studies’

– Miguel Antonio Lim, Senior Lecturer in Education, University of Manchester, UK

 

Wed 16 June at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Why did policymakers in India and Mexico adopt the Germanic model of dual apprenticeships?’

– Oscar Valiente, Senior Lecturer University of Glasgow, UK

 

Wed 7th July at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Governing education by partnership: the GPE in the context of other sectors’ global financing partnerships.’

– Moira V. Faul, Executive Director, NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva

 

Wed 28th July at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

A comparison of the transition of returning scholars to domestic research environments in Kazakhstan, Malaysia and Cambodia.’

– Aliya Kuzhabekova, Associate Professor, Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Aliya Kuzhabekova is Associate Professor at Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan.

In this talk, Aliya Kuzhabekova will report on the results of a collaborative project exploring how individuals, who received Ph.D. degrees abroad transition to research environment in their home countries.

In particular, the aim of the comparative study was to develop a better understanding about how returnees, who obtained degrees in countries with high levels of research capacity re-integrated in the research environment of countries with lower levels of research capacities.

In addition, the project team tried to reveal the extent to which the returnees served as change agents transforming the research environment in their countries. The study allowed to obtain comparative insights about cross-country and program-related variations in the returnees’ adjustment experiences.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Moira V. Faul is Executive Director of NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva. 

The Global Partnership for Education (GPE) is one of a recent proliferation of pooled financing mechanisms in sustainable development. Despite a policy narrative of inclusive and egalitarian partnering, differences between public, private and voluntary sectors are assumed to affect relations between partners, and the effectiveness of partnerships.

We theorise global financing partnerships as a social ‘space between fields’ that is generated and structured by relationships between the actors mobilised into partnership boards from different fields. We move beyond the conventional focus on sectoral factions to investigate the potential of other aspects of diversity to affect partnership outcomes.

We empirically investigate the structuring of the space of global financing partnerships, comparing the GPE with climate change and health, by analysing a new dataset of 188 board members of ten global financing partnerships. First, network analyses reveal that donors (whether states, international organisations or private sector) are systematically privileged in this partnership space.

Secondly, faultline analytical tools reveal that despite a narrative of additional financing from the private sector, donors are significantly associated with the public sector. Furthermore, donors (public and private sector) are significantly associated with an economic logic of action and non-donors with an issue-specific framing.

Examining the multiple diversities that come into play in partnership board composition and structuring enables an improved theorisation of partnership effectiveness; it also holds important implications for board decisions and the sustainability and educational impacts that these partnerships are purported to deliver.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Oscar Valiente is Senior Lecturer in Educational Leadership & Policy at the University of Glasgow, Scotland. 

While most comparative education studies have focused on the historical processes that gave birth to the dual model in Germanic countries, our research aims to elucidate the drivers that explain why policymakers embrace the dual apprenticeship idea and how they re-contextualize it in their own educational context.

Drawing on a constructivist political economy framework, our study specifically investigates the reasons of policymakers in India and Mexico to adopt the dual model and how their different institutional conditions explain variations in the way the two countries have re-contextualized this global policy idea.

The selected cases are particularly interesting for the comparison because of the broad ambitions of their national reforms and the significant differences in the type of dual model of apprenticeships finally retained in the two countries.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Miguel Antonio Lim is Senior Lecturer in Education at the University of Manchester, UK, with special focus on Education and International Development at the University’s School of Environment, Education, and Development (SEED).

At this seminar, the evolving role of transnational higher education (TNHE) as part of wider national development policy will be discussed.

Using the case of Sino-foreign educational partnerships, Dr Lim will outline several features of the evolution of policies to govern and achieve more ‘equal’ partnerships.

In China, TNHE partnerships are seen as an important part of its drive to build ‘World Class Universities’. Its case shows an increasing orientation towards quality over quantity of partnerships and a growing role for urban and regional geopolitics in the choice of its HE partnerships.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Thabo Msibi is Associate Professor in Curriculum Studies in the School of Education at the University of KwaZulu-Natal, where he is also the Dean and Head of the School of Education.   

Professor Msibi’s scholarship is on the interface of gender and sexuality issues, particularly as they relate to education.  He also is interested in theory building as it relates to African sexualities.  He has published research in South African and international journals on these subjects, and has co-edited six journal special issues.

Thabo has also published numerous book chapters looking at the educational experiences of individuals who claim same-sex identities.  His recent monograph entitled Hidden Sexualities of South African Teachers: Black Male Educators and Same-sex Desire is published by Routledge.

This seminar reflects on the public uproar that has come with the expansion of the comprehensive sexuality education programme by the Department of Basic Education in South Africa.

Touted globally by the UNESCO and other international organisations as a critical vehicle for the promotion of positive sexual behaviour amongst young people, comprehensive sexuality education has recently received significant international fanfare.  This focus follows the release of the revised International technical guidance on sexuality education by UNESCO in 2018.  Some African countries, including South Africa, have used the revisions to update their curriculum offerings on sexuality education.

Section nine of the South African Constitution, known as the Equality Clause, explicitly provides protections against unfair discrimination on the basis of race, gender, sex, pregnancy, marital status, ethnic or social origin, colour, sexual orientation, age, disability, religion, conscience, belief, culture, language and birth.

It was through this constitutional guarantee that the country sought to revise its comprehensive curriculum offering, leading to significant backlash from the traditional, religious and conservative organisations. Front-page media articles screamed that the Minister of Education was trying to teach young children about how to have sex, and that she was effectively sexualising young children. The Ministry was also accused of imposing a Western ideals on African people.

The seminar will analyse the transnational and local reasons for the conservative backlash in South Africa. It will argue that the response largely follows a coordinated international movement that has sought to undermine sexuality education and reverse the gains already made by sexual rights organisations.  It will showcase how local sexual politics reflect a transnational mobility of ideas that are reconfigured at a local level in order to attain legitimacy.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Miri Yemini is a tenured Senior Lecturer in the School of Education at Tel Aviv University.

At Tel Aviv Dr. Yemini teaches graduate and undergraduate modules in education, including Internationalisation in Education, Education and Globalisation, Entrepreneurship in Education and Project Management in Schools.

Dr. Yemini serves as a co-Chair of UNESCO chair for Technology and Internationalisation in Education. Recently (April 2018) she was awarded (with Prof. Dr. Nina Kolleck) by the Max Plank Foundation the Award for Research Cooperation and High Excellence in Science (ARCHES), to develop research in the field of school-NGO interactions. This year (2021) Dr. Yemini secured funding from Israeli Science Foundation (150,000 Euro) for her project on education trajectories of Global Middle Class families.

Increasing numbers of highly educated and skilled professionals are internationally mobile for work. Some are transferred by employers; some proactively seek out new positions in different countries.

The currently estimated size of this group (known as globally mobile professionals, ‘global expatriates’ or members of a global middle class) is 66.2 million, which is predicted to rise to 87.5 million by 2022.

The increasing number, but also growing cultural diversity of this group (originating from all parts of the world), and the extent to which/frequency they relocate is an important articulation of newer forms of transnationalism that encompass the movement of people and ideas, and changing economic and social relations.

This seminar aims to map out and theorise the everyday practices of these globally middle professional families and to consider how their presence in key cities around the world might be re-shaping political, social, economic and education structures.

In particular, we will discuss how these families experience mobility and what motivates these relocations; how families create a sense of identity while ‘on the move’; what short-term and longer term aspirations the professionals, their partners and their children have; what education and extra-curricular choices are made; how different cultural contexts are negotiated etc.

Critically, we will discuss how these middle class families work to reproduce and extend their privilege, and so engage in ‘class-making’ practices.  Ultimately, this work offers a much-needed empirical basis to examine the theoretical proposition that there is now a ‘global’ middle class that is somehow different to nationally-located middle class groups.

The Department of Education and St Edmunds Hall are delighted to announce a new Public Seminar series which will take place online in Trinity Term on Wednesdays from 3pm-4pm (UK time) between 5th May and 28th July.

 

The Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education will address themes of major interest to academics, practitioners, and policy-makers working in the field of education globally. These seminars aim to illuminate the role of education in societal development, with a focus on understanding changes in education policy, discourse, and practice, and how these changes influence individual opportunities and shape the development of educational institutions around the world. Seminars will zoom into the local and zoom out into the national and supranational spaces, flows, and influences on education.

The series will be chaired by Maia Chankseliani, Associate Professor of Comparative and International Education, and will feature the following speakers:

Thabo Msibi, Dean and Head of School, School of Education, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

Miri Yemini, Senior Lecturer, Tel Aviv University, Israel

Miguel Antonio Lim, Senior Lecturer in Education, University of Manchester, United Kingdom

Oscar Valiente, Senior Lecturer University of Glasgow, United Kingdom

Moira Faul, Executive Director, NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva, Switzerland

Aliya Kuzhabekova, Associate Professor, Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan

 

To view the full programme of seminars, please click here.

Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education

Joint seminars organised by the Department of Education and St Edmund Hall, University of Oxford.

Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education address themes of major interest to academics, practitioners, and policy-makers working in the field of education globally. These seminars aim to illuminate the role of education in societal development, with a focus on understanding changes in education policy, discourse, and practice, and how these changes influence individual opportunities and shape the development of educational institutions around the world. Seminars will zoom into the local and zoom out into the national and supranational spaces, flows, and influences on education.

The series will be chaired by Maia Chankseliani, Associate Professor of Comparative and International Education.

 

The seminar programme:

*Please note that all seminars have a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

 

Wed 5 May at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Breaking gender, sex and sexuality borders: The case of comprehensive sexuality education in South Africa’

– Thabo Msibi, Dean and Head of School, School of Education, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

 

Wed 19 May at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Global Middle-Class families – comparative study of travel trajectories and imagined futures’

– Miri Yemini, Senior Lecturer, Tel Aviv University, Israel

 

Wed 2 June at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Equal’ Transnational Partnerships in Higher Education: Sino-Foreign Case Studies’

– Miguel Antonio Lim, Senior Lecturer in Education, University of Manchester, UK

 

Wed 16 June at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Why did policymakers in India and Mexico adopt the Germanic model of dual apprenticeships?’

– Oscar Valiente, Senior Lecturer University of Glasgow, UK

 

Wed 7th July at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Governing education by partnership: the GPE in the context of other sectors’ global financing partnerships.’

– Moira V. Faul, Executive Director, NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva

 

Wed 28th July at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

A comparison of the transition of returning scholars to domestic research environments in Kazakhstan, Malaysia and Cambodia.’

– Aliya Kuzhabekova, Associate Professor, Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Aliya Kuzhabekova is Associate Professor at Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan.

In this talk, Aliya Kuzhabekova will report on the results of a collaborative project exploring how individuals, who received Ph.D. degrees abroad transition to research environment in their home countries.

In particular, the aim of the comparative study was to develop a better understanding about how returnees, who obtained degrees in countries with high levels of research capacity re-integrated in the research environment of countries with lower levels of research capacities.

In addition, the project team tried to reveal the extent to which the returnees served as change agents transforming the research environment in their countries. The study allowed to obtain comparative insights about cross-country and program-related variations in the returnees’ adjustment experiences.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Moira V. Faul is Executive Director of NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva. 

The Global Partnership for Education (GPE) is one of a recent proliferation of pooled financing mechanisms in sustainable development. Despite a policy narrative of inclusive and egalitarian partnering, differences between public, private and voluntary sectors are assumed to affect relations between partners, and the effectiveness of partnerships.

We theorise global financing partnerships as a social ‘space between fields’ that is generated and structured by relationships between the actors mobilised into partnership boards from different fields. We move beyond the conventional focus on sectoral factions to investigate the potential of other aspects of diversity to affect partnership outcomes.

We empirically investigate the structuring of the space of global financing partnerships, comparing the GPE with climate change and health, by analysing a new dataset of 188 board members of ten global financing partnerships. First, network analyses reveal that donors (whether states, international organisations or private sector) are systematically privileged in this partnership space.

Secondly, faultline analytical tools reveal that despite a narrative of additional financing from the private sector, donors are significantly associated with the public sector. Furthermore, donors (public and private sector) are significantly associated with an economic logic of action and non-donors with an issue-specific framing.

Examining the multiple diversities that come into play in partnership board composition and structuring enables an improved theorisation of partnership effectiveness; it also holds important implications for board decisions and the sustainability and educational impacts that these partnerships are purported to deliver.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Oscar Valiente is Senior Lecturer in Educational Leadership & Policy at the University of Glasgow, Scotland. 

While most comparative education studies have focused on the historical processes that gave birth to the dual model in Germanic countries, our research aims to elucidate the drivers that explain why policymakers embrace the dual apprenticeship idea and how they re-contextualize it in their own educational context.

Drawing on a constructivist political economy framework, our study specifically investigates the reasons of policymakers in India and Mexico to adopt the dual model and how their different institutional conditions explain variations in the way the two countries have re-contextualized this global policy idea.

The selected cases are particularly interesting for the comparison because of the broad ambitions of their national reforms and the significant differences in the type of dual model of apprenticeships finally retained in the two countries.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Miguel Antonio Lim is Senior Lecturer in Education at the University of Manchester, UK, with special focus on Education and International Development at the University’s School of Environment, Education, and Development (SEED).

At this seminar, the evolving role of transnational higher education (TNHE) as part of wider national development policy will be discussed.

Using the case of Sino-foreign educational partnerships, Dr Lim will outline several features of the evolution of policies to govern and achieve more ‘equal’ partnerships.

In China, TNHE partnerships are seen as an important part of its drive to build ‘World Class Universities’. Its case shows an increasing orientation towards quality over quantity of partnerships and a growing role for urban and regional geopolitics in the choice of its HE partnerships.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Thabo Msibi is Associate Professor in Curriculum Studies in the School of Education at the University of KwaZulu-Natal, where he is also the Dean and Head of the School of Education.   

Professor Msibi’s scholarship is on the interface of gender and sexuality issues, particularly as they relate to education.  He also is interested in theory building as it relates to African sexualities.  He has published research in South African and international journals on these subjects, and has co-edited six journal special issues.

Thabo has also published numerous book chapters looking at the educational experiences of individuals who claim same-sex identities.  His recent monograph entitled Hidden Sexualities of South African Teachers: Black Male Educators and Same-sex Desire is published by Routledge.

This seminar reflects on the public uproar that has come with the expansion of the comprehensive sexuality education programme by the Department of Basic Education in South Africa.

Touted globally by the UNESCO and other international organisations as a critical vehicle for the promotion of positive sexual behaviour amongst young people, comprehensive sexuality education has recently received significant international fanfare.  This focus follows the release of the revised International technical guidance on sexuality education by UNESCO in 2018.  Some African countries, including South Africa, have used the revisions to update their curriculum offerings on sexuality education.

Section nine of the South African Constitution, known as the Equality Clause, explicitly provides protections against unfair discrimination on the basis of race, gender, sex, pregnancy, marital status, ethnic or social origin, colour, sexual orientation, age, disability, religion, conscience, belief, culture, language and birth.

It was through this constitutional guarantee that the country sought to revise its comprehensive curriculum offering, leading to significant backlash from the traditional, religious and conservative organisations. Front-page media articles screamed that the Minister of Education was trying to teach young children about how to have sex, and that she was effectively sexualising young children. The Ministry was also accused of imposing a Western ideals on African people.

The seminar will analyse the transnational and local reasons for the conservative backlash in South Africa. It will argue that the response largely follows a coordinated international movement that has sought to undermine sexuality education and reverse the gains already made by sexual rights organisations.  It will showcase how local sexual politics reflect a transnational mobility of ideas that are reconfigured at a local level in order to attain legitimacy.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Miri Yemini is a tenured Senior Lecturer in the School of Education at Tel Aviv University.

At Tel Aviv Dr. Yemini teaches graduate and undergraduate modules in education, including Internationalisation in Education, Education and Globalisation, Entrepreneurship in Education and Project Management in Schools.

Dr. Yemini serves as a co-Chair of UNESCO chair for Technology and Internationalisation in Education. Recently (April 2018) she was awarded (with Prof. Dr. Nina Kolleck) by the Max Plank Foundation the Award for Research Cooperation and High Excellence in Science (ARCHES), to develop research in the field of school-NGO interactions. This year (2021) Dr. Yemini secured funding from Israeli Science Foundation (150,000 Euro) for her project on education trajectories of Global Middle Class families.

Increasing numbers of highly educated and skilled professionals are internationally mobile for work. Some are transferred by employers; some proactively seek out new positions in different countries.

The currently estimated size of this group (known as globally mobile professionals, ‘global expatriates’ or members of a global middle class) is 66.2 million, which is predicted to rise to 87.5 million by 2022.

The increasing number, but also growing cultural diversity of this group (originating from all parts of the world), and the extent to which/frequency they relocate is an important articulation of newer forms of transnationalism that encompass the movement of people and ideas, and changing economic and social relations.

This seminar aims to map out and theorise the everyday practices of these globally middle professional families and to consider how their presence in key cities around the world might be re-shaping political, social, economic and education structures.

In particular, we will discuss how these families experience mobility and what motivates these relocations; how families create a sense of identity while ‘on the move’; what short-term and longer term aspirations the professionals, their partners and their children have; what education and extra-curricular choices are made; how different cultural contexts are negotiated etc.

Critically, we will discuss how these middle class families work to reproduce and extend their privilege, and so engage in ‘class-making’ practices.  Ultimately, this work offers a much-needed empirical basis to examine the theoretical proposition that there is now a ‘global’ middle class that is somehow different to nationally-located middle class groups.

The Department of Education and St Edmunds Hall are delighted to announce a new Public Seminar series which will take place online in Trinity Term on Wednesdays from 3pm-4pm (UK time) between 5th May and 28th July.

 

The Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education will address themes of major interest to academics, practitioners, and policy-makers working in the field of education globally. These seminars aim to illuminate the role of education in societal development, with a focus on understanding changes in education policy, discourse, and practice, and how these changes influence individual opportunities and shape the development of educational institutions around the world. Seminars will zoom into the local and zoom out into the national and supranational spaces, flows, and influences on education.

The series will be chaired by Maia Chankseliani, Associate Professor of Comparative and International Education, and will feature the following speakers:

Thabo Msibi, Dean and Head of School, School of Education, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

Miri Yemini, Senior Lecturer, Tel Aviv University, Israel

Miguel Antonio Lim, Senior Lecturer in Education, University of Manchester, United Kingdom

Oscar Valiente, Senior Lecturer University of Glasgow, United Kingdom

Moira Faul, Executive Director, NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva, Switzerland

Aliya Kuzhabekova, Associate Professor, Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan

 

To view the full programme of seminars, please click here.

Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education

Joint seminars organised by the Department of Education and St Edmund Hall, University of Oxford.

Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education address themes of major interest to academics, practitioners, and policy-makers working in the field of education globally. These seminars aim to illuminate the role of education in societal development, with a focus on understanding changes in education policy, discourse, and practice, and how these changes influence individual opportunities and shape the development of educational institutions around the world. Seminars will zoom into the local and zoom out into the national and supranational spaces, flows, and influences on education.

The series will be chaired by Maia Chankseliani, Associate Professor of Comparative and International Education.

 

The seminar programme:

*Please note that all seminars have a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

 

Wed 5 May at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Breaking gender, sex and sexuality borders: The case of comprehensive sexuality education in South Africa’

– Thabo Msibi, Dean and Head of School, School of Education, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

 

Wed 19 May at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Global Middle-Class families – comparative study of travel trajectories and imagined futures’

– Miri Yemini, Senior Lecturer, Tel Aviv University, Israel

 

Wed 2 June at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Equal’ Transnational Partnerships in Higher Education: Sino-Foreign Case Studies’

– Miguel Antonio Lim, Senior Lecturer in Education, University of Manchester, UK

 

Wed 16 June at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Why did policymakers in India and Mexico adopt the Germanic model of dual apprenticeships?’

– Oscar Valiente, Senior Lecturer University of Glasgow, UK

 

Wed 7th July at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Governing education by partnership: the GPE in the context of other sectors’ global financing partnerships.’

– Moira V. Faul, Executive Director, NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva

 

Wed 28th July at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

A comparison of the transition of returning scholars to domestic research environments in Kazakhstan, Malaysia and Cambodia.’

– Aliya Kuzhabekova, Associate Professor, Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Aliya Kuzhabekova is Associate Professor at Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan.

In this talk, Aliya Kuzhabekova will report on the results of a collaborative project exploring how individuals, who received Ph.D. degrees abroad transition to research environment in their home countries.

In particular, the aim of the comparative study was to develop a better understanding about how returnees, who obtained degrees in countries with high levels of research capacity re-integrated in the research environment of countries with lower levels of research capacities.

In addition, the project team tried to reveal the extent to which the returnees served as change agents transforming the research environment in their countries. The study allowed to obtain comparative insights about cross-country and program-related variations in the returnees’ adjustment experiences.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Moira V. Faul is Executive Director of NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva. 

The Global Partnership for Education (GPE) is one of a recent proliferation of pooled financing mechanisms in sustainable development. Despite a policy narrative of inclusive and egalitarian partnering, differences between public, private and voluntary sectors are assumed to affect relations between partners, and the effectiveness of partnerships.

We theorise global financing partnerships as a social ‘space between fields’ that is generated and structured by relationships between the actors mobilised into partnership boards from different fields. We move beyond the conventional focus on sectoral factions to investigate the potential of other aspects of diversity to affect partnership outcomes.

We empirically investigate the structuring of the space of global financing partnerships, comparing the GPE with climate change and health, by analysing a new dataset of 188 board members of ten global financing partnerships. First, network analyses reveal that donors (whether states, international organisations or private sector) are systematically privileged in this partnership space.

Secondly, faultline analytical tools reveal that despite a narrative of additional financing from the private sector, donors are significantly associated with the public sector. Furthermore, donors (public and private sector) are significantly associated with an economic logic of action and non-donors with an issue-specific framing.

Examining the multiple diversities that come into play in partnership board composition and structuring enables an improved theorisation of partnership effectiveness; it also holds important implications for board decisions and the sustainability and educational impacts that these partnerships are purported to deliver.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Oscar Valiente is Senior Lecturer in Educational Leadership & Policy at the University of Glasgow, Scotland. 

While most comparative education studies have focused on the historical processes that gave birth to the dual model in Germanic countries, our research aims to elucidate the drivers that explain why policymakers embrace the dual apprenticeship idea and how they re-contextualize it in their own educational context.

Drawing on a constructivist political economy framework, our study specifically investigates the reasons of policymakers in India and Mexico to adopt the dual model and how their different institutional conditions explain variations in the way the two countries have re-contextualized this global policy idea.

The selected cases are particularly interesting for the comparison because of the broad ambitions of their national reforms and the significant differences in the type of dual model of apprenticeships finally retained in the two countries.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Miguel Antonio Lim is Senior Lecturer in Education at the University of Manchester, UK, with special focus on Education and International Development at the University’s School of Environment, Education, and Development (SEED).

At this seminar, the evolving role of transnational higher education (TNHE) as part of wider national development policy will be discussed.

Using the case of Sino-foreign educational partnerships, Dr Lim will outline several features of the evolution of policies to govern and achieve more ‘equal’ partnerships.

In China, TNHE partnerships are seen as an important part of its drive to build ‘World Class Universities’. Its case shows an increasing orientation towards quality over quantity of partnerships and a growing role for urban and regional geopolitics in the choice of its HE partnerships.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Thabo Msibi is Associate Professor in Curriculum Studies in the School of Education at the University of KwaZulu-Natal, where he is also the Dean and Head of the School of Education.   

Professor Msibi’s scholarship is on the interface of gender and sexuality issues, particularly as they relate to education.  He also is interested in theory building as it relates to African sexualities.  He has published research in South African and international journals on these subjects, and has co-edited six journal special issues.

Thabo has also published numerous book chapters looking at the educational experiences of individuals who claim same-sex identities.  His recent monograph entitled Hidden Sexualities of South African Teachers: Black Male Educators and Same-sex Desire is published by Routledge.

This seminar reflects on the public uproar that has come with the expansion of the comprehensive sexuality education programme by the Department of Basic Education in South Africa.

Touted globally by the UNESCO and other international organisations as a critical vehicle for the promotion of positive sexual behaviour amongst young people, comprehensive sexuality education has recently received significant international fanfare.  This focus follows the release of the revised International technical guidance on sexuality education by UNESCO in 2018.  Some African countries, including South Africa, have used the revisions to update their curriculum offerings on sexuality education.

Section nine of the South African Constitution, known as the Equality Clause, explicitly provides protections against unfair discrimination on the basis of race, gender, sex, pregnancy, marital status, ethnic or social origin, colour, sexual orientation, age, disability, religion, conscience, belief, culture, language and birth.

It was through this constitutional guarantee that the country sought to revise its comprehensive curriculum offering, leading to significant backlash from the traditional, religious and conservative organisations. Front-page media articles screamed that the Minister of Education was trying to teach young children about how to have sex, and that she was effectively sexualising young children. The Ministry was also accused of imposing a Western ideals on African people.

The seminar will analyse the transnational and local reasons for the conservative backlash in South Africa. It will argue that the response largely follows a coordinated international movement that has sought to undermine sexuality education and reverse the gains already made by sexual rights organisations.  It will showcase how local sexual politics reflect a transnational mobility of ideas that are reconfigured at a local level in order to attain legitimacy.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Miri Yemini is a tenured Senior Lecturer in the School of Education at Tel Aviv University.

At Tel Aviv Dr. Yemini teaches graduate and undergraduate modules in education, including Internationalisation in Education, Education and Globalisation, Entrepreneurship in Education and Project Management in Schools.

Dr. Yemini serves as a co-Chair of UNESCO chair for Technology and Internationalisation in Education. Recently (April 2018) she was awarded (with Prof. Dr. Nina Kolleck) by the Max Plank Foundation the Award for Research Cooperation and High Excellence in Science (ARCHES), to develop research in the field of school-NGO interactions. This year (2021) Dr. Yemini secured funding from Israeli Science Foundation (150,000 Euro) for her project on education trajectories of Global Middle Class families.

Increasing numbers of highly educated and skilled professionals are internationally mobile for work. Some are transferred by employers; some proactively seek out new positions in different countries.

The currently estimated size of this group (known as globally mobile professionals, ‘global expatriates’ or members of a global middle class) is 66.2 million, which is predicted to rise to 87.5 million by 2022.

The increasing number, but also growing cultural diversity of this group (originating from all parts of the world), and the extent to which/frequency they relocate is an important articulation of newer forms of transnationalism that encompass the movement of people and ideas, and changing economic and social relations.

This seminar aims to map out and theorise the everyday practices of these globally middle professional families and to consider how their presence in key cities around the world might be re-shaping political, social, economic and education structures.

In particular, we will discuss how these families experience mobility and what motivates these relocations; how families create a sense of identity while ‘on the move’; what short-term and longer term aspirations the professionals, their partners and their children have; what education and extra-curricular choices are made; how different cultural contexts are negotiated etc.

Critically, we will discuss how these middle class families work to reproduce and extend their privilege, and so engage in ‘class-making’ practices.  Ultimately, this work offers a much-needed empirical basis to examine the theoretical proposition that there is now a ‘global’ middle class that is somehow different to nationally-located middle class groups.

The Department of Education and St Edmunds Hall are delighted to announce a new Public Seminar series which will take place online in Trinity Term on Wednesdays from 3pm-4pm (UK time) between 5th May and 28th July.

 

The Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education will address themes of major interest to academics, practitioners, and policy-makers working in the field of education globally. These seminars aim to illuminate the role of education in societal development, with a focus on understanding changes in education policy, discourse, and practice, and how these changes influence individual opportunities and shape the development of educational institutions around the world. Seminars will zoom into the local and zoom out into the national and supranational spaces, flows, and influences on education.

The series will be chaired by Maia Chankseliani, Associate Professor of Comparative and International Education, and will feature the following speakers:

Thabo Msibi, Dean and Head of School, School of Education, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

Miri Yemini, Senior Lecturer, Tel Aviv University, Israel

Miguel Antonio Lim, Senior Lecturer in Education, University of Manchester, United Kingdom

Oscar Valiente, Senior Lecturer University of Glasgow, United Kingdom

Moira Faul, Executive Director, NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva, Switzerland

Aliya Kuzhabekova, Associate Professor, Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan

 

To view the full programme of seminars, please click here.

Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education

Joint seminars organised by the Department of Education and St Edmund Hall, University of Oxford.

Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education address themes of major interest to academics, practitioners, and policy-makers working in the field of education globally. These seminars aim to illuminate the role of education in societal development, with a focus on understanding changes in education policy, discourse, and practice, and how these changes influence individual opportunities and shape the development of educational institutions around the world. Seminars will zoom into the local and zoom out into the national and supranational spaces, flows, and influences on education.

The series will be chaired by Maia Chankseliani, Associate Professor of Comparative and International Education.

 

The seminar programme:

*Please note that all seminars have a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

 

Wed 5 May at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Breaking gender, sex and sexuality borders: The case of comprehensive sexuality education in South Africa’

– Thabo Msibi, Dean and Head of School, School of Education, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

 

Wed 19 May at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Global Middle-Class families – comparative study of travel trajectories and imagined futures’

– Miri Yemini, Senior Lecturer, Tel Aviv University, Israel

 

Wed 2 June at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Equal’ Transnational Partnerships in Higher Education: Sino-Foreign Case Studies’

– Miguel Antonio Lim, Senior Lecturer in Education, University of Manchester, UK

 

Wed 16 June at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Why did policymakers in India and Mexico adopt the Germanic model of dual apprenticeships?’

– Oscar Valiente, Senior Lecturer University of Glasgow, UK

 

Wed 7th July at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Governing education by partnership: the GPE in the context of other sectors’ global financing partnerships.’

– Moira V. Faul, Executive Director, NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva

 

Wed 28th July at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

A comparison of the transition of returning scholars to domestic research environments in Kazakhstan, Malaysia and Cambodia.’

– Aliya Kuzhabekova, Associate Professor, Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Aliya Kuzhabekova is Associate Professor at Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan.

In this talk, Aliya Kuzhabekova will report on the results of a collaborative project exploring how individuals, who received Ph.D. degrees abroad transition to research environment in their home countries.

In particular, the aim of the comparative study was to develop a better understanding about how returnees, who obtained degrees in countries with high levels of research capacity re-integrated in the research environment of countries with lower levels of research capacities.

In addition, the project team tried to reveal the extent to which the returnees served as change agents transforming the research environment in their countries. The study allowed to obtain comparative insights about cross-country and program-related variations in the returnees’ adjustment experiences.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Moira V. Faul is Executive Director of NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva. 

The Global Partnership for Education (GPE) is one of a recent proliferation of pooled financing mechanisms in sustainable development. Despite a policy narrative of inclusive and egalitarian partnering, differences between public, private and voluntary sectors are assumed to affect relations between partners, and the effectiveness of partnerships.

We theorise global financing partnerships as a social ‘space between fields’ that is generated and structured by relationships between the actors mobilised into partnership boards from different fields. We move beyond the conventional focus on sectoral factions to investigate the potential of other aspects of diversity to affect partnership outcomes.

We empirically investigate the structuring of the space of global financing partnerships, comparing the GPE with climate change and health, by analysing a new dataset of 188 board members of ten global financing partnerships. First, network analyses reveal that donors (whether states, international organisations or private sector) are systematically privileged in this partnership space.

Secondly, faultline analytical tools reveal that despite a narrative of additional financing from the private sector, donors are significantly associated with the public sector. Furthermore, donors (public and private sector) are significantly associated with an economic logic of action and non-donors with an issue-specific framing.

Examining the multiple diversities that come into play in partnership board composition and structuring enables an improved theorisation of partnership effectiveness; it also holds important implications for board decisions and the sustainability and educational impacts that these partnerships are purported to deliver.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Oscar Valiente is Senior Lecturer in Educational Leadership & Policy at the University of Glasgow, Scotland. 

While most comparative education studies have focused on the historical processes that gave birth to the dual model in Germanic countries, our research aims to elucidate the drivers that explain why policymakers embrace the dual apprenticeship idea and how they re-contextualize it in their own educational context.

Drawing on a constructivist political economy framework, our study specifically investigates the reasons of policymakers in India and Mexico to adopt the dual model and how their different institutional conditions explain variations in the way the two countries have re-contextualized this global policy idea.

The selected cases are particularly interesting for the comparison because of the broad ambitions of their national reforms and the significant differences in the type of dual model of apprenticeships finally retained in the two countries.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Miguel Antonio Lim is Senior Lecturer in Education at the University of Manchester, UK, with special focus on Education and International Development at the University’s School of Environment, Education, and Development (SEED).

At this seminar, the evolving role of transnational higher education (TNHE) as part of wider national development policy will be discussed.

Using the case of Sino-foreign educational partnerships, Dr Lim will outline several features of the evolution of policies to govern and achieve more ‘equal’ partnerships.

In China, TNHE partnerships are seen as an important part of its drive to build ‘World Class Universities’. Its case shows an increasing orientation towards quality over quantity of partnerships and a growing role for urban and regional geopolitics in the choice of its HE partnerships.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Thabo Msibi is Associate Professor in Curriculum Studies in the School of Education at the University of KwaZulu-Natal, where he is also the Dean and Head of the School of Education.   

Professor Msibi’s scholarship is on the interface of gender and sexuality issues, particularly as they relate to education.  He also is interested in theory building as it relates to African sexualities.  He has published research in South African and international journals on these subjects, and has co-edited six journal special issues.

Thabo has also published numerous book chapters looking at the educational experiences of individuals who claim same-sex identities.  His recent monograph entitled Hidden Sexualities of South African Teachers: Black Male Educators and Same-sex Desire is published by Routledge.

This seminar reflects on the public uproar that has come with the expansion of the comprehensive sexuality education programme by the Department of Basic Education in South Africa.

Touted globally by the UNESCO and other international organisations as a critical vehicle for the promotion of positive sexual behaviour amongst young people, comprehensive sexuality education has recently received significant international fanfare.  This focus follows the release of the revised International technical guidance on sexuality education by UNESCO in 2018.  Some African countries, including South Africa, have used the revisions to update their curriculum offerings on sexuality education.

Section nine of the South African Constitution, known as the Equality Clause, explicitly provides protections against unfair discrimination on the basis of race, gender, sex, pregnancy, marital status, ethnic or social origin, colour, sexual orientation, age, disability, religion, conscience, belief, culture, language and birth.

It was through this constitutional guarantee that the country sought to revise its comprehensive curriculum offering, leading to significant backlash from the traditional, religious and conservative organisations. Front-page media articles screamed that the Minister of Education was trying to teach young children about how to have sex, and that she was effectively sexualising young children. The Ministry was also accused of imposing a Western ideals on African people.

The seminar will analyse the transnational and local reasons for the conservative backlash in South Africa. It will argue that the response largely follows a coordinated international movement that has sought to undermine sexuality education and reverse the gains already made by sexual rights organisations.  It will showcase how local sexual politics reflect a transnational mobility of ideas that are reconfigured at a local level in order to attain legitimacy.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Miri Yemini is a tenured Senior Lecturer in the School of Education at Tel Aviv University.

At Tel Aviv Dr. Yemini teaches graduate and undergraduate modules in education, including Internationalisation in Education, Education and Globalisation, Entrepreneurship in Education and Project Management in Schools.

Dr. Yemini serves as a co-Chair of UNESCO chair for Technology and Internationalisation in Education. Recently (April 2018) she was awarded (with Prof. Dr. Nina Kolleck) by the Max Plank Foundation the Award for Research Cooperation and High Excellence in Science (ARCHES), to develop research in the field of school-NGO interactions. This year (2021) Dr. Yemini secured funding from Israeli Science Foundation (150,000 Euro) for her project on education trajectories of Global Middle Class families.

Increasing numbers of highly educated and skilled professionals are internationally mobile for work. Some are transferred by employers; some proactively seek out new positions in different countries.

The currently estimated size of this group (known as globally mobile professionals, ‘global expatriates’ or members of a global middle class) is 66.2 million, which is predicted to rise to 87.5 million by 2022.

The increasing number, but also growing cultural diversity of this group (originating from all parts of the world), and the extent to which/frequency they relocate is an important articulation of newer forms of transnationalism that encompass the movement of people and ideas, and changing economic and social relations.

This seminar aims to map out and theorise the everyday practices of these globally middle professional families and to consider how their presence in key cities around the world might be re-shaping political, social, economic and education structures.

In particular, we will discuss how these families experience mobility and what motivates these relocations; how families create a sense of identity while ‘on the move’; what short-term and longer term aspirations the professionals, their partners and their children have; what education and extra-curricular choices are made; how different cultural contexts are negotiated etc.

Critically, we will discuss how these middle class families work to reproduce and extend their privilege, and so engage in ‘class-making’ practices.  Ultimately, this work offers a much-needed empirical basis to examine the theoretical proposition that there is now a ‘global’ middle class that is somehow different to nationally-located middle class groups.

The Department of Education and St Edmunds Hall are delighted to announce a new Public Seminar series which will take place online in Trinity Term on Wednesdays from 3pm-4pm (UK time) between 5th May and 28th July.

 

The Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education will address themes of major interest to academics, practitioners, and policy-makers working in the field of education globally. These seminars aim to illuminate the role of education in societal development, with a focus on understanding changes in education policy, discourse, and practice, and how these changes influence individual opportunities and shape the development of educational institutions around the world. Seminars will zoom into the local and zoom out into the national and supranational spaces, flows, and influences on education.

The series will be chaired by Maia Chankseliani, Associate Professor of Comparative and International Education, and will feature the following speakers:

Thabo Msibi, Dean and Head of School, School of Education, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

Miri Yemini, Senior Lecturer, Tel Aviv University, Israel

Miguel Antonio Lim, Senior Lecturer in Education, University of Manchester, United Kingdom

Oscar Valiente, Senior Lecturer University of Glasgow, United Kingdom

Moira Faul, Executive Director, NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva, Switzerland

Aliya Kuzhabekova, Associate Professor, Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan

 

To view the full programme of seminars, please click here.

Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education

Joint seminars organised by the Department of Education and St Edmund Hall, University of Oxford.

Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education address themes of major interest to academics, practitioners, and policy-makers working in the field of education globally. These seminars aim to illuminate the role of education in societal development, with a focus on understanding changes in education policy, discourse, and practice, and how these changes influence individual opportunities and shape the development of educational institutions around the world. Seminars will zoom into the local and zoom out into the national and supranational spaces, flows, and influences on education.

The series will be chaired by Maia Chankseliani, Associate Professor of Comparative and International Education.

 

The seminar programme:

*Please note that all seminars have a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

 

Wed 5 May at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Breaking gender, sex and sexuality borders: The case of comprehensive sexuality education in South Africa’

– Thabo Msibi, Dean and Head of School, School of Education, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

 

Wed 19 May at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Global Middle-Class families – comparative study of travel trajectories and imagined futures’

– Miri Yemini, Senior Lecturer, Tel Aviv University, Israel

 

Wed 2 June at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Equal’ Transnational Partnerships in Higher Education: Sino-Foreign Case Studies’

– Miguel Antonio Lim, Senior Lecturer in Education, University of Manchester, UK

 

Wed 16 June at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Why did policymakers in India and Mexico adopt the Germanic model of dual apprenticeships?’

– Oscar Valiente, Senior Lecturer University of Glasgow, UK

 

Wed 7th July at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Governing education by partnership: the GPE in the context of other sectors’ global financing partnerships.’

– Moira V. Faul, Executive Director, NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva

 

Wed 28th July at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

A comparison of the transition of returning scholars to domestic research environments in Kazakhstan, Malaysia and Cambodia.’

– Aliya Kuzhabekova, Associate Professor, Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Aliya Kuzhabekova is Associate Professor at Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan.

In this talk, Aliya Kuzhabekova will report on the results of a collaborative project exploring how individuals, who received Ph.D. degrees abroad transition to research environment in their home countries.

In particular, the aim of the comparative study was to develop a better understanding about how returnees, who obtained degrees in countries with high levels of research capacity re-integrated in the research environment of countries with lower levels of research capacities.

In addition, the project team tried to reveal the extent to which the returnees served as change agents transforming the research environment in their countries. The study allowed to obtain comparative insights about cross-country and program-related variations in the returnees’ adjustment experiences.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Moira V. Faul is Executive Director of NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva. 

The Global Partnership for Education (GPE) is one of a recent proliferation of pooled financing mechanisms in sustainable development. Despite a policy narrative of inclusive and egalitarian partnering, differences between public, private and voluntary sectors are assumed to affect relations between partners, and the effectiveness of partnerships.

We theorise global financing partnerships as a social ‘space between fields’ that is generated and structured by relationships between the actors mobilised into partnership boards from different fields. We move beyond the conventional focus on sectoral factions to investigate the potential of other aspects of diversity to affect partnership outcomes.

We empirically investigate the structuring of the space of global financing partnerships, comparing the GPE with climate change and health, by analysing a new dataset of 188 board members of ten global financing partnerships. First, network analyses reveal that donors (whether states, international organisations or private sector) are systematically privileged in this partnership space.

Secondly, faultline analytical tools reveal that despite a narrative of additional financing from the private sector, donors are significantly associated with the public sector. Furthermore, donors (public and private sector) are significantly associated with an economic logic of action and non-donors with an issue-specific framing.

Examining the multiple diversities that come into play in partnership board composition and structuring enables an improved theorisation of partnership effectiveness; it also holds important implications for board decisions and the sustainability and educational impacts that these partnerships are purported to deliver.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Oscar Valiente is Senior Lecturer in Educational Leadership & Policy at the University of Glasgow, Scotland. 

While most comparative education studies have focused on the historical processes that gave birth to the dual model in Germanic countries, our research aims to elucidate the drivers that explain why policymakers embrace the dual apprenticeship idea and how they re-contextualize it in their own educational context.

Drawing on a constructivist political economy framework, our study specifically investigates the reasons of policymakers in India and Mexico to adopt the dual model and how their different institutional conditions explain variations in the way the two countries have re-contextualized this global policy idea.

The selected cases are particularly interesting for the comparison because of the broad ambitions of their national reforms and the significant differences in the type of dual model of apprenticeships finally retained in the two countries.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Miguel Antonio Lim is Senior Lecturer in Education at the University of Manchester, UK, with special focus on Education and International Development at the University’s School of Environment, Education, and Development (SEED).

At this seminar, the evolving role of transnational higher education (TNHE) as part of wider national development policy will be discussed.

Using the case of Sino-foreign educational partnerships, Dr Lim will outline several features of the evolution of policies to govern and achieve more ‘equal’ partnerships.

In China, TNHE partnerships are seen as an important part of its drive to build ‘World Class Universities’. Its case shows an increasing orientation towards quality over quantity of partnerships and a growing role for urban and regional geopolitics in the choice of its HE partnerships.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Thabo Msibi is Associate Professor in Curriculum Studies in the School of Education at the University of KwaZulu-Natal, where he is also the Dean and Head of the School of Education.   

Professor Msibi’s scholarship is on the interface of gender and sexuality issues, particularly as they relate to education.  He also is interested in theory building as it relates to African sexualities.  He has published research in South African and international journals on these subjects, and has co-edited six journal special issues.

Thabo has also published numerous book chapters looking at the educational experiences of individuals who claim same-sex identities.  His recent monograph entitled Hidden Sexualities of South African Teachers: Black Male Educators and Same-sex Desire is published by Routledge.

This seminar reflects on the public uproar that has come with the expansion of the comprehensive sexuality education programme by the Department of Basic Education in South Africa.

Touted globally by the UNESCO and other international organisations as a critical vehicle for the promotion of positive sexual behaviour amongst young people, comprehensive sexuality education has recently received significant international fanfare.  This focus follows the release of the revised International technical guidance on sexuality education by UNESCO in 2018.  Some African countries, including South Africa, have used the revisions to update their curriculum offerings on sexuality education.

Section nine of the South African Constitution, known as the Equality Clause, explicitly provides protections against unfair discrimination on the basis of race, gender, sex, pregnancy, marital status, ethnic or social origin, colour, sexual orientation, age, disability, religion, conscience, belief, culture, language and birth.

It was through this constitutional guarantee that the country sought to revise its comprehensive curriculum offering, leading to significant backlash from the traditional, religious and conservative organisations. Front-page media articles screamed that the Minister of Education was trying to teach young children about how to have sex, and that she was effectively sexualising young children. The Ministry was also accused of imposing a Western ideals on African people.

The seminar will analyse the transnational and local reasons for the conservative backlash in South Africa. It will argue that the response largely follows a coordinated international movement that has sought to undermine sexuality education and reverse the gains already made by sexual rights organisations.  It will showcase how local sexual politics reflect a transnational mobility of ideas that are reconfigured at a local level in order to attain legitimacy.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Miri Yemini is a tenured Senior Lecturer in the School of Education at Tel Aviv University.

At Tel Aviv Dr. Yemini teaches graduate and undergraduate modules in education, including Internationalisation in Education, Education and Globalisation, Entrepreneurship in Education and Project Management in Schools.

Dr. Yemini serves as a co-Chair of UNESCO chair for Technology and Internationalisation in Education. Recently (April 2018) she was awarded (with Prof. Dr. Nina Kolleck) by the Max Plank Foundation the Award for Research Cooperation and High Excellence in Science (ARCHES), to develop research in the field of school-NGO interactions. This year (2021) Dr. Yemini secured funding from Israeli Science Foundation (150,000 Euro) for her project on education trajectories of Global Middle Class families.

Increasing numbers of highly educated and skilled professionals are internationally mobile for work. Some are transferred by employers; some proactively seek out new positions in different countries.

The currently estimated size of this group (known as globally mobile professionals, ‘global expatriates’ or members of a global middle class) is 66.2 million, which is predicted to rise to 87.5 million by 2022.

The increasing number, but also growing cultural diversity of this group (originating from all parts of the world), and the extent to which/frequency they relocate is an important articulation of newer forms of transnationalism that encompass the movement of people and ideas, and changing economic and social relations.

This seminar aims to map out and theorise the everyday practices of these globally middle professional families and to consider how their presence in key cities around the world might be re-shaping political, social, economic and education structures.

In particular, we will discuss how these families experience mobility and what motivates these relocations; how families create a sense of identity while ‘on the move’; what short-term and longer term aspirations the professionals, their partners and their children have; what education and extra-curricular choices are made; how different cultural contexts are negotiated etc.

Critically, we will discuss how these middle class families work to reproduce and extend their privilege, and so engage in ‘class-making’ practices.  Ultimately, this work offers a much-needed empirical basis to examine the theoretical proposition that there is now a ‘global’ middle class that is somehow different to nationally-located middle class groups.

The Department of Education and St Edmunds Hall are delighted to announce a new Public Seminar series which will take place online in Trinity Term on Wednesdays from 3pm-4pm (UK time) between 5th May and 28th July.

 

The Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education will address themes of major interest to academics, practitioners, and policy-makers working in the field of education globally. These seminars aim to illuminate the role of education in societal development, with a focus on understanding changes in education policy, discourse, and practice, and how these changes influence individual opportunities and shape the development of educational institutions around the world. Seminars will zoom into the local and zoom out into the national and supranational spaces, flows, and influences on education.

The series will be chaired by Maia Chankseliani, Associate Professor of Comparative and International Education, and will feature the following speakers:

Thabo Msibi, Dean and Head of School, School of Education, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

Miri Yemini, Senior Lecturer, Tel Aviv University, Israel

Miguel Antonio Lim, Senior Lecturer in Education, University of Manchester, United Kingdom

Oscar Valiente, Senior Lecturer University of Glasgow, United Kingdom

Moira Faul, Executive Director, NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva, Switzerland

Aliya Kuzhabekova, Associate Professor, Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan

 

To view the full programme of seminars, please click here.

Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education

Joint seminars organised by the Department of Education and St Edmund Hall, University of Oxford.

Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education address themes of major interest to academics, practitioners, and policy-makers working in the field of education globally. These seminars aim to illuminate the role of education in societal development, with a focus on understanding changes in education policy, discourse, and practice, and how these changes influence individual opportunities and shape the development of educational institutions around the world. Seminars will zoom into the local and zoom out into the national and supranational spaces, flows, and influences on education.

The series will be chaired by Maia Chankseliani, Associate Professor of Comparative and International Education.

 

The seminar programme:

*Please note that all seminars have a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

 

Wed 5 May at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Breaking gender, sex and sexuality borders: The case of comprehensive sexuality education in South Africa’

– Thabo Msibi, Dean and Head of School, School of Education, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

 

Wed 19 May at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Global Middle-Class families – comparative study of travel trajectories and imagined futures’

– Miri Yemini, Senior Lecturer, Tel Aviv University, Israel

 

Wed 2 June at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Equal’ Transnational Partnerships in Higher Education: Sino-Foreign Case Studies’

– Miguel Antonio Lim, Senior Lecturer in Education, University of Manchester, UK

 

Wed 16 June at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Why did policymakers in India and Mexico adopt the Germanic model of dual apprenticeships?’

– Oscar Valiente, Senior Lecturer University of Glasgow, UK

 

Wed 7th July at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Governing education by partnership: the GPE in the context of other sectors’ global financing partnerships.’

– Moira V. Faul, Executive Director, NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva

 

Wed 28th July at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

A comparison of the transition of returning scholars to domestic research environments in Kazakhstan, Malaysia and Cambodia.’

– Aliya Kuzhabekova, Associate Professor, Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Aliya Kuzhabekova is Associate Professor at Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan.

In this talk, Aliya Kuzhabekova will report on the results of a collaborative project exploring how individuals, who received Ph.D. degrees abroad transition to research environment in their home countries.

In particular, the aim of the comparative study was to develop a better understanding about how returnees, who obtained degrees in countries with high levels of research capacity re-integrated in the research environment of countries with lower levels of research capacities.

In addition, the project team tried to reveal the extent to which the returnees served as change agents transforming the research environment in their countries. The study allowed to obtain comparative insights about cross-country and program-related variations in the returnees’ adjustment experiences.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Moira V. Faul is Executive Director of NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva. 

The Global Partnership for Education (GPE) is one of a recent proliferation of pooled financing mechanisms in sustainable development. Despite a policy narrative of inclusive and egalitarian partnering, differences between public, private and voluntary sectors are assumed to affect relations between partners, and the effectiveness of partnerships.

We theorise global financing partnerships as a social ‘space between fields’ that is generated and structured by relationships between the actors mobilised into partnership boards from different fields. We move beyond the conventional focus on sectoral factions to investigate the potential of other aspects of diversity to affect partnership outcomes.

We empirically investigate the structuring of the space of global financing partnerships, comparing the GPE with climate change and health, by analysing a new dataset of 188 board members of ten global financing partnerships. First, network analyses reveal that donors (whether states, international organisations or private sector) are systematically privileged in this partnership space.

Secondly, faultline analytical tools reveal that despite a narrative of additional financing from the private sector, donors are significantly associated with the public sector. Furthermore, donors (public and private sector) are significantly associated with an economic logic of action and non-donors with an issue-specific framing.

Examining the multiple diversities that come into play in partnership board composition and structuring enables an improved theorisation of partnership effectiveness; it also holds important implications for board decisions and the sustainability and educational impacts that these partnerships are purported to deliver.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Oscar Valiente is Senior Lecturer in Educational Leadership & Policy at the University of Glasgow, Scotland. 

While most comparative education studies have focused on the historical processes that gave birth to the dual model in Germanic countries, our research aims to elucidate the drivers that explain why policymakers embrace the dual apprenticeship idea and how they re-contextualize it in their own educational context.

Drawing on a constructivist political economy framework, our study specifically investigates the reasons of policymakers in India and Mexico to adopt the dual model and how their different institutional conditions explain variations in the way the two countries have re-contextualized this global policy idea.

The selected cases are particularly interesting for the comparison because of the broad ambitions of their national reforms and the significant differences in the type of dual model of apprenticeships finally retained in the two countries.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Miguel Antonio Lim is Senior Lecturer in Education at the University of Manchester, UK, with special focus on Education and International Development at the University’s School of Environment, Education, and Development (SEED).

At this seminar, the evolving role of transnational higher education (TNHE) as part of wider national development policy will be discussed.

Using the case of Sino-foreign educational partnerships, Dr Lim will outline several features of the evolution of policies to govern and achieve more ‘equal’ partnerships.

In China, TNHE partnerships are seen as an important part of its drive to build ‘World Class Universities’. Its case shows an increasing orientation towards quality over quantity of partnerships and a growing role for urban and regional geopolitics in the choice of its HE partnerships.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Thabo Msibi is Associate Professor in Curriculum Studies in the School of Education at the University of KwaZulu-Natal, where he is also the Dean and Head of the School of Education.   

Professor Msibi’s scholarship is on the interface of gender and sexuality issues, particularly as they relate to education.  He also is interested in theory building as it relates to African sexualities.  He has published research in South African and international journals on these subjects, and has co-edited six journal special issues.

Thabo has also published numerous book chapters looking at the educational experiences of individuals who claim same-sex identities.  His recent monograph entitled Hidden Sexualities of South African Teachers: Black Male Educators and Same-sex Desire is published by Routledge.

This seminar reflects on the public uproar that has come with the expansion of the comprehensive sexuality education programme by the Department of Basic Education in South Africa.

Touted globally by the UNESCO and other international organisations as a critical vehicle for the promotion of positive sexual behaviour amongst young people, comprehensive sexuality education has recently received significant international fanfare.  This focus follows the release of the revised International technical guidance on sexuality education by UNESCO in 2018.  Some African countries, including South Africa, have used the revisions to update their curriculum offerings on sexuality education.

Section nine of the South African Constitution, known as the Equality Clause, explicitly provides protections against unfair discrimination on the basis of race, gender, sex, pregnancy, marital status, ethnic or social origin, colour, sexual orientation, age, disability, religion, conscience, belief, culture, language and birth.

It was through this constitutional guarantee that the country sought to revise its comprehensive curriculum offering, leading to significant backlash from the traditional, religious and conservative organisations. Front-page media articles screamed that the Minister of Education was trying to teach young children about how to have sex, and that she was effectively sexualising young children. The Ministry was also accused of imposing a Western ideals on African people.

The seminar will analyse the transnational and local reasons for the conservative backlash in South Africa. It will argue that the response largely follows a coordinated international movement that has sought to undermine sexuality education and reverse the gains already made by sexual rights organisations.  It will showcase how local sexual politics reflect a transnational mobility of ideas that are reconfigured at a local level in order to attain legitimacy.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Miri Yemini is a tenured Senior Lecturer in the School of Education at Tel Aviv University.

At Tel Aviv Dr. Yemini teaches graduate and undergraduate modules in education, including Internationalisation in Education, Education and Globalisation, Entrepreneurship in Education and Project Management in Schools.

Dr. Yemini serves as a co-Chair of UNESCO chair for Technology and Internationalisation in Education. Recently (April 2018) she was awarded (with Prof. Dr. Nina Kolleck) by the Max Plank Foundation the Award for Research Cooperation and High Excellence in Science (ARCHES), to develop research in the field of school-NGO interactions. This year (2021) Dr. Yemini secured funding from Israeli Science Foundation (150,000 Euro) for her project on education trajectories of Global Middle Class families.

Increasing numbers of highly educated and skilled professionals are internationally mobile for work. Some are transferred by employers; some proactively seek out new positions in different countries.

The currently estimated size of this group (known as globally mobile professionals, ‘global expatriates’ or members of a global middle class) is 66.2 million, which is predicted to rise to 87.5 million by 2022.

The increasing number, but also growing cultural diversity of this group (originating from all parts of the world), and the extent to which/frequency they relocate is an important articulation of newer forms of transnationalism that encompass the movement of people and ideas, and changing economic and social relations.

This seminar aims to map out and theorise the everyday practices of these globally middle professional families and to consider how their presence in key cities around the world might be re-shaping political, social, economic and education structures.

In particular, we will discuss how these families experience mobility and what motivates these relocations; how families create a sense of identity while ‘on the move’; what short-term and longer term aspirations the professionals, their partners and their children have; what education and extra-curricular choices are made; how different cultural contexts are negotiated etc.

Critically, we will discuss how these middle class families work to reproduce and extend their privilege, and so engage in ‘class-making’ practices.  Ultimately, this work offers a much-needed empirical basis to examine the theoretical proposition that there is now a ‘global’ middle class that is somehow different to nationally-located middle class groups.

The Department of Education and St Edmunds Hall are delighted to announce a new Public Seminar series which will take place online in Trinity Term on Wednesdays from 3pm-4pm (UK time) between 5th May and 28th July.

 

The Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education will address themes of major interest to academics, practitioners, and policy-makers working in the field of education globally. These seminars aim to illuminate the role of education in societal development, with a focus on understanding changes in education policy, discourse, and practice, and how these changes influence individual opportunities and shape the development of educational institutions around the world. Seminars will zoom into the local and zoom out into the national and supranational spaces, flows, and influences on education.

The series will be chaired by Maia Chankseliani, Associate Professor of Comparative and International Education, and will feature the following speakers:

Thabo Msibi, Dean and Head of School, School of Education, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

Miri Yemini, Senior Lecturer, Tel Aviv University, Israel

Miguel Antonio Lim, Senior Lecturer in Education, University of Manchester, United Kingdom

Oscar Valiente, Senior Lecturer University of Glasgow, United Kingdom

Moira Faul, Executive Director, NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva, Switzerland

Aliya Kuzhabekova, Associate Professor, Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan

 

To view the full programme of seminars, please click here.

Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education

Joint seminars organised by the Department of Education and St Edmund Hall, University of Oxford.

Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education address themes of major interest to academics, practitioners, and policy-makers working in the field of education globally. These seminars aim to illuminate the role of education in societal development, with a focus on understanding changes in education policy, discourse, and practice, and how these changes influence individual opportunities and shape the development of educational institutions around the world. Seminars will zoom into the local and zoom out into the national and supranational spaces, flows, and influences on education.

The series will be chaired by Maia Chankseliani, Associate Professor of Comparative and International Education.

 

The seminar programme:

*Please note that all seminars have a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

 

Wed 5 May at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Breaking gender, sex and sexuality borders: The case of comprehensive sexuality education in South Africa’

– Thabo Msibi, Dean and Head of School, School of Education, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

 

Wed 19 May at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Global Middle-Class families – comparative study of travel trajectories and imagined futures’

– Miri Yemini, Senior Lecturer, Tel Aviv University, Israel

 

Wed 2 June at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Equal’ Transnational Partnerships in Higher Education: Sino-Foreign Case Studies’

– Miguel Antonio Lim, Senior Lecturer in Education, University of Manchester, UK

 

Wed 16 June at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Why did policymakers in India and Mexico adopt the Germanic model of dual apprenticeships?’

– Oscar Valiente, Senior Lecturer University of Glasgow, UK

 

Wed 7th July at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Governing education by partnership: the GPE in the context of other sectors’ global financing partnerships.’

– Moira V. Faul, Executive Director, NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva

 

Wed 28th July at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

A comparison of the transition of returning scholars to domestic research environments in Kazakhstan, Malaysia and Cambodia.’

– Aliya Kuzhabekova, Associate Professor, Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Aliya Kuzhabekova is Associate Professor at Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan.

In this talk, Aliya Kuzhabekova will report on the results of a collaborative project exploring how individuals, who received Ph.D. degrees abroad transition to research environment in their home countries.

In particular, the aim of the comparative study was to develop a better understanding about how returnees, who obtained degrees in countries with high levels of research capacity re-integrated in the research environment of countries with lower levels of research capacities.

In addition, the project team tried to reveal the extent to which the returnees served as change agents transforming the research environment in their countries. The study allowed to obtain comparative insights about cross-country and program-related variations in the returnees’ adjustment experiences.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Moira V. Faul is Executive Director of NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva. 

The Global Partnership for Education (GPE) is one of a recent proliferation of pooled financing mechanisms in sustainable development. Despite a policy narrative of inclusive and egalitarian partnering, differences between public, private and voluntary sectors are assumed to affect relations between partners, and the effectiveness of partnerships.

We theorise global financing partnerships as a social ‘space between fields’ that is generated and structured by relationships between the actors mobilised into partnership boards from different fields. We move beyond the conventional focus on sectoral factions to investigate the potential of other aspects of diversity to affect partnership outcomes.

We empirically investigate the structuring of the space of global financing partnerships, comparing the GPE with climate change and health, by analysing a new dataset of 188 board members of ten global financing partnerships. First, network analyses reveal that donors (whether states, international organisations or private sector) are systematically privileged in this partnership space.

Secondly, faultline analytical tools reveal that despite a narrative of additional financing from the private sector, donors are significantly associated with the public sector. Furthermore, donors (public and private sector) are significantly associated with an economic logic of action and non-donors with an issue-specific framing.

Examining the multiple diversities that come into play in partnership board composition and structuring enables an improved theorisation of partnership effectiveness; it also holds important implications for board decisions and the sustainability and educational impacts that these partnerships are purported to deliver.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Oscar Valiente is Senior Lecturer in Educational Leadership & Policy at the University of Glasgow, Scotland. 

While most comparative education studies have focused on the historical processes that gave birth to the dual model in Germanic countries, our research aims to elucidate the drivers that explain why policymakers embrace the dual apprenticeship idea and how they re-contextualize it in their own educational context.

Drawing on a constructivist political economy framework, our study specifically investigates the reasons of policymakers in India and Mexico to adopt the dual model and how their different institutional conditions explain variations in the way the two countries have re-contextualized this global policy idea.

The selected cases are particularly interesting for the comparison because of the broad ambitions of their national reforms and the significant differences in the type of dual model of apprenticeships finally retained in the two countries.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Miguel Antonio Lim is Senior Lecturer in Education at the University of Manchester, UK, with special focus on Education and International Development at the University’s School of Environment, Education, and Development (SEED).

At this seminar, the evolving role of transnational higher education (TNHE) as part of wider national development policy will be discussed.

Using the case of Sino-foreign educational partnerships, Dr Lim will outline several features of the evolution of policies to govern and achieve more ‘equal’ partnerships.

In China, TNHE partnerships are seen as an important part of its drive to build ‘World Class Universities’. Its case shows an increasing orientation towards quality over quantity of partnerships and a growing role for urban and regional geopolitics in the choice of its HE partnerships.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Thabo Msibi is Associate Professor in Curriculum Studies in the School of Education at the University of KwaZulu-Natal, where he is also the Dean and Head of the School of Education.   

Professor Msibi’s scholarship is on the interface of gender and sexuality issues, particularly as they relate to education.  He also is interested in theory building as it relates to African sexualities.  He has published research in South African and international journals on these subjects, and has co-edited six journal special issues.

Thabo has also published numerous book chapters looking at the educational experiences of individuals who claim same-sex identities.  His recent monograph entitled Hidden Sexualities of South African Teachers: Black Male Educators and Same-sex Desire is published by Routledge.

This seminar reflects on the public uproar that has come with the expansion of the comprehensive sexuality education programme by the Department of Basic Education in South Africa.

Touted globally by the UNESCO and other international organisations as a critical vehicle for the promotion of positive sexual behaviour amongst young people, comprehensive sexuality education has recently received significant international fanfare.  This focus follows the release of the revised International technical guidance on sexuality education by UNESCO in 2018.  Some African countries, including South Africa, have used the revisions to update their curriculum offerings on sexuality education.

Section nine of the South African Constitution, known as the Equality Clause, explicitly provides protections against unfair discrimination on the basis of race, gender, sex, pregnancy, marital status, ethnic or social origin, colour, sexual orientation, age, disability, religion, conscience, belief, culture, language and birth.

It was through this constitutional guarantee that the country sought to revise its comprehensive curriculum offering, leading to significant backlash from the traditional, religious and conservative organisations. Front-page media articles screamed that the Minister of Education was trying to teach young children about how to have sex, and that she was effectively sexualising young children. The Ministry was also accused of imposing a Western ideals on African people.

The seminar will analyse the transnational and local reasons for the conservative backlash in South Africa. It will argue that the response largely follows a coordinated international movement that has sought to undermine sexuality education and reverse the gains already made by sexual rights organisations.  It will showcase how local sexual politics reflect a transnational mobility of ideas that are reconfigured at a local level in order to attain legitimacy.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Miri Yemini is a tenured Senior Lecturer in the School of Education at Tel Aviv University.

At Tel Aviv Dr. Yemini teaches graduate and undergraduate modules in education, including Internationalisation in Education, Education and Globalisation, Entrepreneurship in Education and Project Management in Schools.

Dr. Yemini serves as a co-Chair of UNESCO chair for Technology and Internationalisation in Education. Recently (April 2018) she was awarded (with Prof. Dr. Nina Kolleck) by the Max Plank Foundation the Award for Research Cooperation and High Excellence in Science (ARCHES), to develop research in the field of school-NGO interactions. This year (2021) Dr. Yemini secured funding from Israeli Science Foundation (150,000 Euro) for her project on education trajectories of Global Middle Class families.

Increasing numbers of highly educated and skilled professionals are internationally mobile for work. Some are transferred by employers; some proactively seek out new positions in different countries.

The currently estimated size of this group (known as globally mobile professionals, ‘global expatriates’ or members of a global middle class) is 66.2 million, which is predicted to rise to 87.5 million by 2022.

The increasing number, but also growing cultural diversity of this group (originating from all parts of the world), and the extent to which/frequency they relocate is an important articulation of newer forms of transnationalism that encompass the movement of people and ideas, and changing economic and social relations.

This seminar aims to map out and theorise the everyday practices of these globally middle professional families and to consider how their presence in key cities around the world might be re-shaping political, social, economic and education structures.

In particular, we will discuss how these families experience mobility and what motivates these relocations; how families create a sense of identity while ‘on the move’; what short-term and longer term aspirations the professionals, their partners and their children have; what education and extra-curricular choices are made; how different cultural contexts are negotiated etc.

Critically, we will discuss how these middle class families work to reproduce and extend their privilege, and so engage in ‘class-making’ practices.  Ultimately, this work offers a much-needed empirical basis to examine the theoretical proposition that there is now a ‘global’ middle class that is somehow different to nationally-located middle class groups.

The Department of Education and St Edmunds Hall are delighted to announce a new Public Seminar series which will take place online in Trinity Term on Wednesdays from 3pm-4pm (UK time) between 5th May and 28th July.

 

The Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education will address themes of major interest to academics, practitioners, and policy-makers working in the field of education globally. These seminars aim to illuminate the role of education in societal development, with a focus on understanding changes in education policy, discourse, and practice, and how these changes influence individual opportunities and shape the development of educational institutions around the world. Seminars will zoom into the local and zoom out into the national and supranational spaces, flows, and influences on education.

The series will be chaired by Maia Chankseliani, Associate Professor of Comparative and International Education, and will feature the following speakers:

Thabo Msibi, Dean and Head of School, School of Education, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

Miri Yemini, Senior Lecturer, Tel Aviv University, Israel

Miguel Antonio Lim, Senior Lecturer in Education, University of Manchester, United Kingdom

Oscar Valiente, Senior Lecturer University of Glasgow, United Kingdom

Moira Faul, Executive Director, NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva, Switzerland

Aliya Kuzhabekova, Associate Professor, Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan

 

To view the full programme of seminars, please click here.

Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education

Joint seminars organised by the Department of Education and St Edmund Hall, University of Oxford.

Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education address themes of major interest to academics, practitioners, and policy-makers working in the field of education globally. These seminars aim to illuminate the role of education in societal development, with a focus on understanding changes in education policy, discourse, and practice, and how these changes influence individual opportunities and shape the development of educational institutions around the world. Seminars will zoom into the local and zoom out into the national and supranational spaces, flows, and influences on education.

The series will be chaired by Maia Chankseliani, Associate Professor of Comparative and International Education.

 

The seminar programme:

*Please note that all seminars have a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

 

Wed 5 May at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Breaking gender, sex and sexuality borders: The case of comprehensive sexuality education in South Africa’

– Thabo Msibi, Dean and Head of School, School of Education, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

 

Wed 19 May at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Global Middle-Class families – comparative study of travel trajectories and imagined futures’

– Miri Yemini, Senior Lecturer, Tel Aviv University, Israel

 

Wed 2 June at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Equal’ Transnational Partnerships in Higher Education: Sino-Foreign Case Studies’

– Miguel Antonio Lim, Senior Lecturer in Education, University of Manchester, UK

 

Wed 16 June at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Why did policymakers in India and Mexico adopt the Germanic model of dual apprenticeships?’

– Oscar Valiente, Senior Lecturer University of Glasgow, UK

 

Wed 7th July at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Governing education by partnership: the GPE in the context of other sectors’ global financing partnerships.’

– Moira V. Faul, Executive Director, NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva

 

Wed 28th July at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

A comparison of the transition of returning scholars to domestic research environments in Kazakhstan, Malaysia and Cambodia.’

– Aliya Kuzhabekova, Associate Professor, Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Aliya Kuzhabekova is Associate Professor at Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan.

In this talk, Aliya Kuzhabekova will report on the results of a collaborative project exploring how individuals, who received Ph.D. degrees abroad transition to research environment in their home countries.

In particular, the aim of the comparative study was to develop a better understanding about how returnees, who obtained degrees in countries with high levels of research capacity re-integrated in the research environment of countries with lower levels of research capacities.

In addition, the project team tried to reveal the extent to which the returnees served as change agents transforming the research environment in their countries. The study allowed to obtain comparative insights about cross-country and program-related variations in the returnees’ adjustment experiences.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Moira V. Faul is Executive Director of NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva. 

The Global Partnership for Education (GPE) is one of a recent proliferation of pooled financing mechanisms in sustainable development. Despite a policy narrative of inclusive and egalitarian partnering, differences between public, private and voluntary sectors are assumed to affect relations between partners, and the effectiveness of partnerships.

We theorise global financing partnerships as a social ‘space between fields’ that is generated and structured by relationships between the actors mobilised into partnership boards from different fields. We move beyond the conventional focus on sectoral factions to investigate the potential of other aspects of diversity to affect partnership outcomes.

We empirically investigate the structuring of the space of global financing partnerships, comparing the GPE with climate change and health, by analysing a new dataset of 188 board members of ten global financing partnerships. First, network analyses reveal that donors (whether states, international organisations or private sector) are systematically privileged in this partnership space.

Secondly, faultline analytical tools reveal that despite a narrative of additional financing from the private sector, donors are significantly associated with the public sector. Furthermore, donors (public and private sector) are significantly associated with an economic logic of action and non-donors with an issue-specific framing.

Examining the multiple diversities that come into play in partnership board composition and structuring enables an improved theorisation of partnership effectiveness; it also holds important implications for board decisions and the sustainability and educational impacts that these partnerships are purported to deliver.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Oscar Valiente is Senior Lecturer in Educational Leadership & Policy at the University of Glasgow, Scotland. 

While most comparative education studies have focused on the historical processes that gave birth to the dual model in Germanic countries, our research aims to elucidate the drivers that explain why policymakers embrace the dual apprenticeship idea and how they re-contextualize it in their own educational context.

Drawing on a constructivist political economy framework, our study specifically investigates the reasons of policymakers in India and Mexico to adopt the dual model and how their different institutional conditions explain variations in the way the two countries have re-contextualized this global policy idea.

The selected cases are particularly interesting for the comparison because of the broad ambitions of their national reforms and the significant differences in the type of dual model of apprenticeships finally retained in the two countries.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Miguel Antonio Lim is Senior Lecturer in Education at the University of Manchester, UK, with special focus on Education and International Development at the University’s School of Environment, Education, and Development (SEED).

At this seminar, the evolving role of transnational higher education (TNHE) as part of wider national development policy will be discussed.

Using the case of Sino-foreign educational partnerships, Dr Lim will outline several features of the evolution of policies to govern and achieve more ‘equal’ partnerships.

In China, TNHE partnerships are seen as an important part of its drive to build ‘World Class Universities’. Its case shows an increasing orientation towards quality over quantity of partnerships and a growing role for urban and regional geopolitics in the choice of its HE partnerships.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Thabo Msibi is Associate Professor in Curriculum Studies in the School of Education at the University of KwaZulu-Natal, where he is also the Dean and Head of the School of Education.   

Professor Msibi’s scholarship is on the interface of gender and sexuality issues, particularly as they relate to education.  He also is interested in theory building as it relates to African sexualities.  He has published research in South African and international journals on these subjects, and has co-edited six journal special issues.

Thabo has also published numerous book chapters looking at the educational experiences of individuals who claim same-sex identities.  His recent monograph entitled Hidden Sexualities of South African Teachers: Black Male Educators and Same-sex Desire is published by Routledge.

This seminar reflects on the public uproar that has come with the expansion of the comprehensive sexuality education programme by the Department of Basic Education in South Africa.

Touted globally by the UNESCO and other international organisations as a critical vehicle for the promotion of positive sexual behaviour amongst young people, comprehensive sexuality education has recently received significant international fanfare.  This focus follows the release of the revised International technical guidance on sexuality education by UNESCO in 2018.  Some African countries, including South Africa, have used the revisions to update their curriculum offerings on sexuality education.

Section nine of the South African Constitution, known as the Equality Clause, explicitly provides protections against unfair discrimination on the basis of race, gender, sex, pregnancy, marital status, ethnic or social origin, colour, sexual orientation, age, disability, religion, conscience, belief, culture, language and birth.

It was through this constitutional guarantee that the country sought to revise its comprehensive curriculum offering, leading to significant backlash from the traditional, religious and conservative organisations. Front-page media articles screamed that the Minister of Education was trying to teach young children about how to have sex, and that she was effectively sexualising young children. The Ministry was also accused of imposing a Western ideals on African people.

The seminar will analyse the transnational and local reasons for the conservative backlash in South Africa. It will argue that the response largely follows a coordinated international movement that has sought to undermine sexuality education and reverse the gains already made by sexual rights organisations.  It will showcase how local sexual politics reflect a transnational mobility of ideas that are reconfigured at a local level in order to attain legitimacy.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Miri Yemini is a tenured Senior Lecturer in the School of Education at Tel Aviv University.

At Tel Aviv Dr. Yemini teaches graduate and undergraduate modules in education, including Internationalisation in Education, Education and Globalisation, Entrepreneurship in Education and Project Management in Schools.

Dr. Yemini serves as a co-Chair of UNESCO chair for Technology and Internationalisation in Education. Recently (April 2018) she was awarded (with Prof. Dr. Nina Kolleck) by the Max Plank Foundation the Award for Research Cooperation and High Excellence in Science (ARCHES), to develop research in the field of school-NGO interactions. This year (2021) Dr. Yemini secured funding from Israeli Science Foundation (150,000 Euro) for her project on education trajectories of Global Middle Class families.

Increasing numbers of highly educated and skilled professionals are internationally mobile for work. Some are transferred by employers; some proactively seek out new positions in different countries.

The currently estimated size of this group (known as globally mobile professionals, ‘global expatriates’ or members of a global middle class) is 66.2 million, which is predicted to rise to 87.5 million by 2022.

The increasing number, but also growing cultural diversity of this group (originating from all parts of the world), and the extent to which/frequency they relocate is an important articulation of newer forms of transnationalism that encompass the movement of people and ideas, and changing economic and social relations.

This seminar aims to map out and theorise the everyday practices of these globally middle professional families and to consider how their presence in key cities around the world might be re-shaping political, social, economic and education structures.

In particular, we will discuss how these families experience mobility and what motivates these relocations; how families create a sense of identity while ‘on the move’; what short-term and longer term aspirations the professionals, their partners and their children have; what education and extra-curricular choices are made; how different cultural contexts are negotiated etc.

Critically, we will discuss how these middle class families work to reproduce and extend their privilege, and so engage in ‘class-making’ practices.  Ultimately, this work offers a much-needed empirical basis to examine the theoretical proposition that there is now a ‘global’ middle class that is somehow different to nationally-located middle class groups.

The Department of Education and St Edmunds Hall are delighted to announce a new Public Seminar series which will take place online in Trinity Term on Wednesdays from 3pm-4pm (UK time) between 5th May and 28th July.

 

The Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education will address themes of major interest to academics, practitioners, and policy-makers working in the field of education globally. These seminars aim to illuminate the role of education in societal development, with a focus on understanding changes in education policy, discourse, and practice, and how these changes influence individual opportunities and shape the development of educational institutions around the world. Seminars will zoom into the local and zoom out into the national and supranational spaces, flows, and influences on education.

The series will be chaired by Maia Chankseliani, Associate Professor of Comparative and International Education, and will feature the following speakers:

Thabo Msibi, Dean and Head of School, School of Education, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

Miri Yemini, Senior Lecturer, Tel Aviv University, Israel

Miguel Antonio Lim, Senior Lecturer in Education, University of Manchester, United Kingdom

Oscar Valiente, Senior Lecturer University of Glasgow, United Kingdom

Moira Faul, Executive Director, NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva, Switzerland

Aliya Kuzhabekova, Associate Professor, Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan

 

To view the full programme of seminars, please click here.

Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education

Joint seminars organised by the Department of Education and St Edmund Hall, University of Oxford.

Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education address themes of major interest to academics, practitioners, and policy-makers working in the field of education globally. These seminars aim to illuminate the role of education in societal development, with a focus on understanding changes in education policy, discourse, and practice, and how these changes influence individual opportunities and shape the development of educational institutions around the world. Seminars will zoom into the local and zoom out into the national and supranational spaces, flows, and influences on education.

The series will be chaired by Maia Chankseliani, Associate Professor of Comparative and International Education.

 

The seminar programme:

*Please note that all seminars have a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

 

Wed 5 May at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Breaking gender, sex and sexuality borders: The case of comprehensive sexuality education in South Africa’

– Thabo Msibi, Dean and Head of School, School of Education, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

 

Wed 19 May at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Global Middle-Class families – comparative study of travel trajectories and imagined futures’

– Miri Yemini, Senior Lecturer, Tel Aviv University, Israel

 

Wed 2 June at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Equal’ Transnational Partnerships in Higher Education: Sino-Foreign Case Studies’

– Miguel Antonio Lim, Senior Lecturer in Education, University of Manchester, UK

 

Wed 16 June at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Why did policymakers in India and Mexico adopt the Germanic model of dual apprenticeships?’

– Oscar Valiente, Senior Lecturer University of Glasgow, UK

 

Wed 7th July at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Governing education by partnership: the GPE in the context of other sectors’ global financing partnerships.’

– Moira V. Faul, Executive Director, NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva

 

Wed 28th July at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

A comparison of the transition of returning scholars to domestic research environments in Kazakhstan, Malaysia and Cambodia.’

– Aliya Kuzhabekova, Associate Professor, Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Aliya Kuzhabekova is Associate Professor at Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan.

In this talk, Aliya Kuzhabekova will report on the results of a collaborative project exploring how individuals, who received Ph.D. degrees abroad transition to research environment in their home countries.

In particular, the aim of the comparative study was to develop a better understanding about how returnees, who obtained degrees in countries with high levels of research capacity re-integrated in the research environment of countries with lower levels of research capacities.

In addition, the project team tried to reveal the extent to which the returnees served as change agents transforming the research environment in their countries. The study allowed to obtain comparative insights about cross-country and program-related variations in the returnees’ adjustment experiences.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Moira V. Faul is Executive Director of NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva. 

The Global Partnership for Education (GPE) is one of a recent proliferation of pooled financing mechanisms in sustainable development. Despite a policy narrative of inclusive and egalitarian partnering, differences between public, private and voluntary sectors are assumed to affect relations between partners, and the effectiveness of partnerships.

We theorise global financing partnerships as a social ‘space between fields’ that is generated and structured by relationships between the actors mobilised into partnership boards from different fields. We move beyond the conventional focus on sectoral factions to investigate the potential of other aspects of diversity to affect partnership outcomes.

We empirically investigate the structuring of the space of global financing partnerships, comparing the GPE with climate change and health, by analysing a new dataset of 188 board members of ten global financing partnerships. First, network analyses reveal that donors (whether states, international organisations or private sector) are systematically privileged in this partnership space.

Secondly, faultline analytical tools reveal that despite a narrative of additional financing from the private sector, donors are significantly associated with the public sector. Furthermore, donors (public and private sector) are significantly associated with an economic logic of action and non-donors with an issue-specific framing.

Examining the multiple diversities that come into play in partnership board composition and structuring enables an improved theorisation of partnership effectiveness; it also holds important implications for board decisions and the sustainability and educational impacts that these partnerships are purported to deliver.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Oscar Valiente is Senior Lecturer in Educational Leadership & Policy at the University of Glasgow, Scotland. 

While most comparative education studies have focused on the historical processes that gave birth to the dual model in Germanic countries, our research aims to elucidate the drivers that explain why policymakers embrace the dual apprenticeship idea and how they re-contextualize it in their own educational context.

Drawing on a constructivist political economy framework, our study specifically investigates the reasons of policymakers in India and Mexico to adopt the dual model and how their different institutional conditions explain variations in the way the two countries have re-contextualized this global policy idea.

The selected cases are particularly interesting for the comparison because of the broad ambitions of their national reforms and the significant differences in the type of dual model of apprenticeships finally retained in the two countries.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Miguel Antonio Lim is Senior Lecturer in Education at the University of Manchester, UK, with special focus on Education and International Development at the University’s School of Environment, Education, and Development (SEED).

At this seminar, the evolving role of transnational higher education (TNHE) as part of wider national development policy will be discussed.

Using the case of Sino-foreign educational partnerships, Dr Lim will outline several features of the evolution of policies to govern and achieve more ‘equal’ partnerships.

In China, TNHE partnerships are seen as an important part of its drive to build ‘World Class Universities’. Its case shows an increasing orientation towards quality over quantity of partnerships and a growing role for urban and regional geopolitics in the choice of its HE partnerships.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Thabo Msibi is Associate Professor in Curriculum Studies in the School of Education at the University of KwaZulu-Natal, where he is also the Dean and Head of the School of Education.   

Professor Msibi’s scholarship is on the interface of gender and sexuality issues, particularly as they relate to education.  He also is interested in theory building as it relates to African sexualities.  He has published research in South African and international journals on these subjects, and has co-edited six journal special issues.

Thabo has also published numerous book chapters looking at the educational experiences of individuals who claim same-sex identities.  His recent monograph entitled Hidden Sexualities of South African Teachers: Black Male Educators and Same-sex Desire is published by Routledge.

This seminar reflects on the public uproar that has come with the expansion of the comprehensive sexuality education programme by the Department of Basic Education in South Africa.

Touted globally by the UNESCO and other international organisations as a critical vehicle for the promotion of positive sexual behaviour amongst young people, comprehensive sexuality education has recently received significant international fanfare.  This focus follows the release of the revised International technical guidance on sexuality education by UNESCO in 2018.  Some African countries, including South Africa, have used the revisions to update their curriculum offerings on sexuality education.

Section nine of the South African Constitution, known as the Equality Clause, explicitly provides protections against unfair discrimination on the basis of race, gender, sex, pregnancy, marital status, ethnic or social origin, colour, sexual orientation, age, disability, religion, conscience, belief, culture, language and birth.

It was through this constitutional guarantee that the country sought to revise its comprehensive curriculum offering, leading to significant backlash from the traditional, religious and conservative organisations. Front-page media articles screamed that the Minister of Education was trying to teach young children about how to have sex, and that she was effectively sexualising young children. The Ministry was also accused of imposing a Western ideals on African people.

The seminar will analyse the transnational and local reasons for the conservative backlash in South Africa. It will argue that the response largely follows a coordinated international movement that has sought to undermine sexuality education and reverse the gains already made by sexual rights organisations.  It will showcase how local sexual politics reflect a transnational mobility of ideas that are reconfigured at a local level in order to attain legitimacy.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Miri Yemini is a tenured Senior Lecturer in the School of Education at Tel Aviv University.

At Tel Aviv Dr. Yemini teaches graduate and undergraduate modules in education, including Internationalisation in Education, Education and Globalisation, Entrepreneurship in Education and Project Management in Schools.

Dr. Yemini serves as a co-Chair of UNESCO chair for Technology and Internationalisation in Education. Recently (April 2018) she was awarded (with Prof. Dr. Nina Kolleck) by the Max Plank Foundation the Award for Research Cooperation and High Excellence in Science (ARCHES), to develop research in the field of school-NGO interactions. This year (2021) Dr. Yemini secured funding from Israeli Science Foundation (150,000 Euro) for her project on education trajectories of Global Middle Class families.

Increasing numbers of highly educated and skilled professionals are internationally mobile for work. Some are transferred by employers; some proactively seek out new positions in different countries.

The currently estimated size of this group (known as globally mobile professionals, ‘global expatriates’ or members of a global middle class) is 66.2 million, which is predicted to rise to 87.5 million by 2022.

The increasing number, but also growing cultural diversity of this group (originating from all parts of the world), and the extent to which/frequency they relocate is an important articulation of newer forms of transnationalism that encompass the movement of people and ideas, and changing economic and social relations.

This seminar aims to map out and theorise the everyday practices of these globally middle professional families and to consider how their presence in key cities around the world might be re-shaping political, social, economic and education structures.

In particular, we will discuss how these families experience mobility and what motivates these relocations; how families create a sense of identity while ‘on the move’; what short-term and longer term aspirations the professionals, their partners and their children have; what education and extra-curricular choices are made; how different cultural contexts are negotiated etc.

Critically, we will discuss how these middle class families work to reproduce and extend their privilege, and so engage in ‘class-making’ practices.  Ultimately, this work offers a much-needed empirical basis to examine the theoretical proposition that there is now a ‘global’ middle class that is somehow different to nationally-located middle class groups.

The Department of Education and St Edmunds Hall are delighted to announce a new Public Seminar series which will take place online in Trinity Term on Wednesdays from 3pm-4pm (UK time) between 5th May and 28th July.

 

The Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education will address themes of major interest to academics, practitioners, and policy-makers working in the field of education globally. These seminars aim to illuminate the role of education in societal development, with a focus on understanding changes in education policy, discourse, and practice, and how these changes influence individual opportunities and shape the development of educational institutions around the world. Seminars will zoom into the local and zoom out into the national and supranational spaces, flows, and influences on education.

The series will be chaired by Maia Chankseliani, Associate Professor of Comparative and International Education, and will feature the following speakers:

Thabo Msibi, Dean and Head of School, School of Education, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

Miri Yemini, Senior Lecturer, Tel Aviv University, Israel

Miguel Antonio Lim, Senior Lecturer in Education, University of Manchester, United Kingdom

Oscar Valiente, Senior Lecturer University of Glasgow, United Kingdom

Moira Faul, Executive Director, NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva, Switzerland

Aliya Kuzhabekova, Associate Professor, Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan

 

To view the full programme of seminars, please click here.

Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education

Joint seminars organised by the Department of Education and St Edmund Hall, University of Oxford.

Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education address themes of major interest to academics, practitioners, and policy-makers working in the field of education globally. These seminars aim to illuminate the role of education in societal development, with a focus on understanding changes in education policy, discourse, and practice, and how these changes influence individual opportunities and shape the development of educational institutions around the world. Seminars will zoom into the local and zoom out into the national and supranational spaces, flows, and influences on education.

The series will be chaired by Maia Chankseliani, Associate Professor of Comparative and International Education.

 

The seminar programme:

*Please note that all seminars have a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

 

Wed 5 May at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Breaking gender, sex and sexuality borders: The case of comprehensive sexuality education in South Africa’

– Thabo Msibi, Dean and Head of School, School of Education, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

 

Wed 19 May at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Global Middle-Class families – comparative study of travel trajectories and imagined futures’

– Miri Yemini, Senior Lecturer, Tel Aviv University, Israel

 

Wed 2 June at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Equal’ Transnational Partnerships in Higher Education: Sino-Foreign Case Studies’

– Miguel Antonio Lim, Senior Lecturer in Education, University of Manchester, UK

 

Wed 16 June at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Why did policymakers in India and Mexico adopt the Germanic model of dual apprenticeships?’

– Oscar Valiente, Senior Lecturer University of Glasgow, UK

 

Wed 7th July at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Governing education by partnership: the GPE in the context of other sectors’ global financing partnerships.’

– Moira V. Faul, Executive Director, NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva

 

Wed 28th July at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

A comparison of the transition of returning scholars to domestic research environments in Kazakhstan, Malaysia and Cambodia.’

– Aliya Kuzhabekova, Associate Professor, Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Aliya Kuzhabekova is Associate Professor at Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan.

In this talk, Aliya Kuzhabekova will report on the results of a collaborative project exploring how individuals, who received Ph.D. degrees abroad transition to research environment in their home countries.

In particular, the aim of the comparative study was to develop a better understanding about how returnees, who obtained degrees in countries with high levels of research capacity re-integrated in the research environment of countries with lower levels of research capacities.

In addition, the project team tried to reveal the extent to which the returnees served as change agents transforming the research environment in their countries. The study allowed to obtain comparative insights about cross-country and program-related variations in the returnees’ adjustment experiences.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Moira V. Faul is Executive Director of NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva. 

The Global Partnership for Education (GPE) is one of a recent proliferation of pooled financing mechanisms in sustainable development. Despite a policy narrative of inclusive and egalitarian partnering, differences between public, private and voluntary sectors are assumed to affect relations between partners, and the effectiveness of partnerships.

We theorise global financing partnerships as a social ‘space between fields’ that is generated and structured by relationships between the actors mobilised into partnership boards from different fields. We move beyond the conventional focus on sectoral factions to investigate the potential of other aspects of diversity to affect partnership outcomes.

We empirically investigate the structuring of the space of global financing partnerships, comparing the GPE with climate change and health, by analysing a new dataset of 188 board members of ten global financing partnerships. First, network analyses reveal that donors (whether states, international organisations or private sector) are systematically privileged in this partnership space.

Secondly, faultline analytical tools reveal that despite a narrative of additional financing from the private sector, donors are significantly associated with the public sector. Furthermore, donors (public and private sector) are significantly associated with an economic logic of action and non-donors with an issue-specific framing.

Examining the multiple diversities that come into play in partnership board composition and structuring enables an improved theorisation of partnership effectiveness; it also holds important implications for board decisions and the sustainability and educational impacts that these partnerships are purported to deliver.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Oscar Valiente is Senior Lecturer in Educational Leadership & Policy at the University of Glasgow, Scotland. 

While most comparative education studies have focused on the historical processes that gave birth to the dual model in Germanic countries, our research aims to elucidate the drivers that explain why policymakers embrace the dual apprenticeship idea and how they re-contextualize it in their own educational context.

Drawing on a constructivist political economy framework, our study specifically investigates the reasons of policymakers in India and Mexico to adopt the dual model and how their different institutional conditions explain variations in the way the two countries have re-contextualized this global policy idea.

The selected cases are particularly interesting for the comparison because of the broad ambitions of their national reforms and the significant differences in the type of dual model of apprenticeships finally retained in the two countries.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Miguel Antonio Lim is Senior Lecturer in Education at the University of Manchester, UK, with special focus on Education and International Development at the University’s School of Environment, Education, and Development (SEED).

At this seminar, the evolving role of transnational higher education (TNHE) as part of wider national development policy will be discussed.

Using the case of Sino-foreign educational partnerships, Dr Lim will outline several features of the evolution of policies to govern and achieve more ‘equal’ partnerships.

In China, TNHE partnerships are seen as an important part of its drive to build ‘World Class Universities’. Its case shows an increasing orientation towards quality over quantity of partnerships and a growing role for urban and regional geopolitics in the choice of its HE partnerships.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Thabo Msibi is Associate Professor in Curriculum Studies in the School of Education at the University of KwaZulu-Natal, where he is also the Dean and Head of the School of Education.   

Professor Msibi’s scholarship is on the interface of gender and sexuality issues, particularly as they relate to education.  He also is interested in theory building as it relates to African sexualities.  He has published research in South African and international journals on these subjects, and has co-edited six journal special issues.

Thabo has also published numerous book chapters looking at the educational experiences of individuals who claim same-sex identities.  His recent monograph entitled Hidden Sexualities of South African Teachers: Black Male Educators and Same-sex Desire is published by Routledge.

This seminar reflects on the public uproar that has come with the expansion of the comprehensive sexuality education programme by the Department of Basic Education in South Africa.

Touted globally by the UNESCO and other international organisations as a critical vehicle for the promotion of positive sexual behaviour amongst young people, comprehensive sexuality education has recently received significant international fanfare.  This focus follows the release of the revised International technical guidance on sexuality education by UNESCO in 2018.  Some African countries, including South Africa, have used the revisions to update their curriculum offerings on sexuality education.

Section nine of the South African Constitution, known as the Equality Clause, explicitly provides protections against unfair discrimination on the basis of race, gender, sex, pregnancy, marital status, ethnic or social origin, colour, sexual orientation, age, disability, religion, conscience, belief, culture, language and birth.

It was through this constitutional guarantee that the country sought to revise its comprehensive curriculum offering, leading to significant backlash from the traditional, religious and conservative organisations. Front-page media articles screamed that the Minister of Education was trying to teach young children about how to have sex, and that she was effectively sexualising young children. The Ministry was also accused of imposing a Western ideals on African people.

The seminar will analyse the transnational and local reasons for the conservative backlash in South Africa. It will argue that the response largely follows a coordinated international movement that has sought to undermine sexuality education and reverse the gains already made by sexual rights organisations.  It will showcase how local sexual politics reflect a transnational mobility of ideas that are reconfigured at a local level in order to attain legitimacy.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Miri Yemini is a tenured Senior Lecturer in the School of Education at Tel Aviv University.

At Tel Aviv Dr. Yemini teaches graduate and undergraduate modules in education, including Internationalisation in Education, Education and Globalisation, Entrepreneurship in Education and Project Management in Schools.

Dr. Yemini serves as a co-Chair of UNESCO chair for Technology and Internationalisation in Education. Recently (April 2018) she was awarded (with Prof. Dr. Nina Kolleck) by the Max Plank Foundation the Award for Research Cooperation and High Excellence in Science (ARCHES), to develop research in the field of school-NGO interactions. This year (2021) Dr. Yemini secured funding from Israeli Science Foundation (150,000 Euro) for her project on education trajectories of Global Middle Class families.

Increasing numbers of highly educated and skilled professionals are internationally mobile for work. Some are transferred by employers; some proactively seek out new positions in different countries.

The currently estimated size of this group (known as globally mobile professionals, ‘global expatriates’ or members of a global middle class) is 66.2 million, which is predicted to rise to 87.5 million by 2022.

The increasing number, but also growing cultural diversity of this group (originating from all parts of the world), and the extent to which/frequency they relocate is an important articulation of newer forms of transnationalism that encompass the movement of people and ideas, and changing economic and social relations.

This seminar aims to map out and theorise the everyday practices of these globally middle professional families and to consider how their presence in key cities around the world might be re-shaping political, social, economic and education structures.

In particular, we will discuss how these families experience mobility and what motivates these relocations; how families create a sense of identity while ‘on the move’; what short-term and longer term aspirations the professionals, their partners and their children have; what education and extra-curricular choices are made; how different cultural contexts are negotiated etc.

Critically, we will discuss how these middle class families work to reproduce and extend their privilege, and so engage in ‘class-making’ practices.  Ultimately, this work offers a much-needed empirical basis to examine the theoretical proposition that there is now a ‘global’ middle class that is somehow different to nationally-located middle class groups.

The Department of Education and St Edmunds Hall are delighted to announce a new Public Seminar series which will take place online in Trinity Term on Wednesdays from 3pm-4pm (UK time) between 5th May and 28th July.

 

The Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education will address themes of major interest to academics, practitioners, and policy-makers working in the field of education globally. These seminars aim to illuminate the role of education in societal development, with a focus on understanding changes in education policy, discourse, and practice, and how these changes influence individual opportunities and shape the development of educational institutions around the world. Seminars will zoom into the local and zoom out into the national and supranational spaces, flows, and influences on education.

The series will be chaired by Maia Chankseliani, Associate Professor of Comparative and International Education, and will feature the following speakers:

Thabo Msibi, Dean and Head of School, School of Education, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

Miri Yemini, Senior Lecturer, Tel Aviv University, Israel

Miguel Antonio Lim, Senior Lecturer in Education, University of Manchester, United Kingdom

Oscar Valiente, Senior Lecturer University of Glasgow, United Kingdom

Moira Faul, Executive Director, NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva, Switzerland

Aliya Kuzhabekova, Associate Professor, Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan

 

To view the full programme of seminars, please click here.

Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education

Joint seminars organised by the Department of Education and St Edmund Hall, University of Oxford.

Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education address themes of major interest to academics, practitioners, and policy-makers working in the field of education globally. These seminars aim to illuminate the role of education in societal development, with a focus on understanding changes in education policy, discourse, and practice, and how these changes influence individual opportunities and shape the development of educational institutions around the world. Seminars will zoom into the local and zoom out into the national and supranational spaces, flows, and influences on education.

The series will be chaired by Maia Chankseliani, Associate Professor of Comparative and International Education.

 

The seminar programme:

*Please note that all seminars have a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

 

Wed 5 May at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Breaking gender, sex and sexuality borders: The case of comprehensive sexuality education in South Africa’

– Thabo Msibi, Dean and Head of School, School of Education, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

 

Wed 19 May at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Global Middle-Class families – comparative study of travel trajectories and imagined futures’

– Miri Yemini, Senior Lecturer, Tel Aviv University, Israel

 

Wed 2 June at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Equal’ Transnational Partnerships in Higher Education: Sino-Foreign Case Studies’

– Miguel Antonio Lim, Senior Lecturer in Education, University of Manchester, UK

 

Wed 16 June at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Why did policymakers in India and Mexico adopt the Germanic model of dual apprenticeships?’

– Oscar Valiente, Senior Lecturer University of Glasgow, UK

 

Wed 7th July at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Governing education by partnership: the GPE in the context of other sectors’ global financing partnerships.’

– Moira V. Faul, Executive Director, NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva

 

Wed 28th July at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

A comparison of the transition of returning scholars to domestic research environments in Kazakhstan, Malaysia and Cambodia.’

– Aliya Kuzhabekova, Associate Professor, Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Aliya Kuzhabekova is Associate Professor at Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan.

In this talk, Aliya Kuzhabekova will report on the results of a collaborative project exploring how individuals, who received Ph.D. degrees abroad transition to research environment in their home countries.

In particular, the aim of the comparative study was to develop a better understanding about how returnees, who obtained degrees in countries with high levels of research capacity re-integrated in the research environment of countries with lower levels of research capacities.

In addition, the project team tried to reveal the extent to which the returnees served as change agents transforming the research environment in their countries. The study allowed to obtain comparative insights about cross-country and program-related variations in the returnees’ adjustment experiences.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Moira V. Faul is Executive Director of NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva. 

The Global Partnership for Education (GPE) is one of a recent proliferation of pooled financing mechanisms in sustainable development. Despite a policy narrative of inclusive and egalitarian partnering, differences between public, private and voluntary sectors are assumed to affect relations between partners, and the effectiveness of partnerships.

We theorise global financing partnerships as a social ‘space between fields’ that is generated and structured by relationships between the actors mobilised into partnership boards from different fields. We move beyond the conventional focus on sectoral factions to investigate the potential of other aspects of diversity to affect partnership outcomes.

We empirically investigate the structuring of the space of global financing partnerships, comparing the GPE with climate change and health, by analysing a new dataset of 188 board members of ten global financing partnerships. First, network analyses reveal that donors (whether states, international organisations or private sector) are systematically privileged in this partnership space.

Secondly, faultline analytical tools reveal that despite a narrative of additional financing from the private sector, donors are significantly associated with the public sector. Furthermore, donors (public and private sector) are significantly associated with an economic logic of action and non-donors with an issue-specific framing.

Examining the multiple diversities that come into play in partnership board composition and structuring enables an improved theorisation of partnership effectiveness; it also holds important implications for board decisions and the sustainability and educational impacts that these partnerships are purported to deliver.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Oscar Valiente is Senior Lecturer in Educational Leadership & Policy at the University of Glasgow, Scotland. 

While most comparative education studies have focused on the historical processes that gave birth to the dual model in Germanic countries, our research aims to elucidate the drivers that explain why policymakers embrace the dual apprenticeship idea and how they re-contextualize it in their own educational context.

Drawing on a constructivist political economy framework, our study specifically investigates the reasons of policymakers in India and Mexico to adopt the dual model and how their different institutional conditions explain variations in the way the two countries have re-contextualized this global policy idea.

The selected cases are particularly interesting for the comparison because of the broad ambitions of their national reforms and the significant differences in the type of dual model of apprenticeships finally retained in the two countries.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Miguel Antonio Lim is Senior Lecturer in Education at the University of Manchester, UK, with special focus on Education and International Development at the University’s School of Environment, Education, and Development (SEED).

At this seminar, the evolving role of transnational higher education (TNHE) as part of wider national development policy will be discussed.

Using the case of Sino-foreign educational partnerships, Dr Lim will outline several features of the evolution of policies to govern and achieve more ‘equal’ partnerships.

In China, TNHE partnerships are seen as an important part of its drive to build ‘World Class Universities’. Its case shows an increasing orientation towards quality over quantity of partnerships and a growing role for urban and regional geopolitics in the choice of its HE partnerships.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Thabo Msibi is Associate Professor in Curriculum Studies in the School of Education at the University of KwaZulu-Natal, where he is also the Dean and Head of the School of Education.   

Professor Msibi’s scholarship is on the interface of gender and sexuality issues, particularly as they relate to education.  He also is interested in theory building as it relates to African sexualities.  He has published research in South African and international journals on these subjects, and has co-edited six journal special issues.

Thabo has also published numerous book chapters looking at the educational experiences of individuals who claim same-sex identities.  His recent monograph entitled Hidden Sexualities of South African Teachers: Black Male Educators and Same-sex Desire is published by Routledge.

This seminar reflects on the public uproar that has come with the expansion of the comprehensive sexuality education programme by the Department of Basic Education in South Africa.

Touted globally by the UNESCO and other international organisations as a critical vehicle for the promotion of positive sexual behaviour amongst young people, comprehensive sexuality education has recently received significant international fanfare.  This focus follows the release of the revised International technical guidance on sexuality education by UNESCO in 2018.  Some African countries, including South Africa, have used the revisions to update their curriculum offerings on sexuality education.

Section nine of the South African Constitution, known as the Equality Clause, explicitly provides protections against unfair discrimination on the basis of race, gender, sex, pregnancy, marital status, ethnic or social origin, colour, sexual orientation, age, disability, religion, conscience, belief, culture, language and birth.

It was through this constitutional guarantee that the country sought to revise its comprehensive curriculum offering, leading to significant backlash from the traditional, religious and conservative organisations. Front-page media articles screamed that the Minister of Education was trying to teach young children about how to have sex, and that she was effectively sexualising young children. The Ministry was also accused of imposing a Western ideals on African people.

The seminar will analyse the transnational and local reasons for the conservative backlash in South Africa. It will argue that the response largely follows a coordinated international movement that has sought to undermine sexuality education and reverse the gains already made by sexual rights organisations.  It will showcase how local sexual politics reflect a transnational mobility of ideas that are reconfigured at a local level in order to attain legitimacy.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Miri Yemini is a tenured Senior Lecturer in the School of Education at Tel Aviv University.

At Tel Aviv Dr. Yemini teaches graduate and undergraduate modules in education, including Internationalisation in Education, Education and Globalisation, Entrepreneurship in Education and Project Management in Schools.

Dr. Yemini serves as a co-Chair of UNESCO chair for Technology and Internationalisation in Education. Recently (April 2018) she was awarded (with Prof. Dr. Nina Kolleck) by the Max Plank Foundation the Award for Research Cooperation and High Excellence in Science (ARCHES), to develop research in the field of school-NGO interactions. This year (2021) Dr. Yemini secured funding from Israeli Science Foundation (150,000 Euro) for her project on education trajectories of Global Middle Class families.

Increasing numbers of highly educated and skilled professionals are internationally mobile for work. Some are transferred by employers; some proactively seek out new positions in different countries.

The currently estimated size of this group (known as globally mobile professionals, ‘global expatriates’ or members of a global middle class) is 66.2 million, which is predicted to rise to 87.5 million by 2022.

The increasing number, but also growing cultural diversity of this group (originating from all parts of the world), and the extent to which/frequency they relocate is an important articulation of newer forms of transnationalism that encompass the movement of people and ideas, and changing economic and social relations.

This seminar aims to map out and theorise the everyday practices of these globally middle professional families and to consider how their presence in key cities around the world might be re-shaping political, social, economic and education structures.

In particular, we will discuss how these families experience mobility and what motivates these relocations; how families create a sense of identity while ‘on the move’; what short-term and longer term aspirations the professionals, their partners and their children have; what education and extra-curricular choices are made; how different cultural contexts are negotiated etc.

Critically, we will discuss how these middle class families work to reproduce and extend their privilege, and so engage in ‘class-making’ practices.  Ultimately, this work offers a much-needed empirical basis to examine the theoretical proposition that there is now a ‘global’ middle class that is somehow different to nationally-located middle class groups.

The Department of Education and St Edmunds Hall are delighted to announce a new Public Seminar series which will take place online in Trinity Term on Wednesdays from 3pm-4pm (UK time) between 5th May and 28th July.

 

The Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education will address themes of major interest to academics, practitioners, and policy-makers working in the field of education globally. These seminars aim to illuminate the role of education in societal development, with a focus on understanding changes in education policy, discourse, and practice, and how these changes influence individual opportunities and shape the development of educational institutions around the world. Seminars will zoom into the local and zoom out into the national and supranational spaces, flows, and influences on education.

The series will be chaired by Maia Chankseliani, Associate Professor of Comparative and International Education, and will feature the following speakers:

Thabo Msibi, Dean and Head of School, School of Education, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

Miri Yemini, Senior Lecturer, Tel Aviv University, Israel

Miguel Antonio Lim, Senior Lecturer in Education, University of Manchester, United Kingdom

Oscar Valiente, Senior Lecturer University of Glasgow, United Kingdom

Moira Faul, Executive Director, NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva, Switzerland

Aliya Kuzhabekova, Associate Professor, Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan

 

To view the full programme of seminars, please click here.

Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education

Joint seminars organised by the Department of Education and St Edmund Hall, University of Oxford.

Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education address themes of major interest to academics, practitioners, and policy-makers working in the field of education globally. These seminars aim to illuminate the role of education in societal development, with a focus on understanding changes in education policy, discourse, and practice, and how these changes influence individual opportunities and shape the development of educational institutions around the world. Seminars will zoom into the local and zoom out into the national and supranational spaces, flows, and influences on education.

The series will be chaired by Maia Chankseliani, Associate Professor of Comparative and International Education.

 

The seminar programme:

*Please note that all seminars have a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

 

Wed 5 May at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Breaking gender, sex and sexuality borders: The case of comprehensive sexuality education in South Africa’

– Thabo Msibi, Dean and Head of School, School of Education, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

 

Wed 19 May at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Global Middle-Class families – comparative study of travel trajectories and imagined futures’

– Miri Yemini, Senior Lecturer, Tel Aviv University, Israel

 

Wed 2 June at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Equal’ Transnational Partnerships in Higher Education: Sino-Foreign Case Studies’

– Miguel Antonio Lim, Senior Lecturer in Education, University of Manchester, UK

 

Wed 16 June at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Why did policymakers in India and Mexico adopt the Germanic model of dual apprenticeships?’

– Oscar Valiente, Senior Lecturer University of Glasgow, UK

 

Wed 7th July at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Governing education by partnership: the GPE in the context of other sectors’ global financing partnerships.’

– Moira V. Faul, Executive Director, NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva

 

Wed 28th July at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

A comparison of the transition of returning scholars to domestic research environments in Kazakhstan, Malaysia and Cambodia.’

– Aliya Kuzhabekova, Associate Professor, Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Aliya Kuzhabekova is Associate Professor at Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan.

In this talk, Aliya Kuzhabekova will report on the results of a collaborative project exploring how individuals, who received Ph.D. degrees abroad transition to research environment in their home countries.

In particular, the aim of the comparative study was to develop a better understanding about how returnees, who obtained degrees in countries with high levels of research capacity re-integrated in the research environment of countries with lower levels of research capacities.

In addition, the project team tried to reveal the extent to which the returnees served as change agents transforming the research environment in their countries. The study allowed to obtain comparative insights about cross-country and program-related variations in the returnees’ adjustment experiences.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Moira V. Faul is Executive Director of NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva. 

The Global Partnership for Education (GPE) is one of a recent proliferation of pooled financing mechanisms in sustainable development. Despite a policy narrative of inclusive and egalitarian partnering, differences between public, private and voluntary sectors are assumed to affect relations between partners, and the effectiveness of partnerships.

We theorise global financing partnerships as a social ‘space between fields’ that is generated and structured by relationships between the actors mobilised into partnership boards from different fields. We move beyond the conventional focus on sectoral factions to investigate the potential of other aspects of diversity to affect partnership outcomes.

We empirically investigate the structuring of the space of global financing partnerships, comparing the GPE with climate change and health, by analysing a new dataset of 188 board members of ten global financing partnerships. First, network analyses reveal that donors (whether states, international organisations or private sector) are systematically privileged in this partnership space.

Secondly, faultline analytical tools reveal that despite a narrative of additional financing from the private sector, donors are significantly associated with the public sector. Furthermore, donors (public and private sector) are significantly associated with an economic logic of action and non-donors with an issue-specific framing.

Examining the multiple diversities that come into play in partnership board composition and structuring enables an improved theorisation of partnership effectiveness; it also holds important implications for board decisions and the sustainability and educational impacts that these partnerships are purported to deliver.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Oscar Valiente is Senior Lecturer in Educational Leadership & Policy at the University of Glasgow, Scotland. 

While most comparative education studies have focused on the historical processes that gave birth to the dual model in Germanic countries, our research aims to elucidate the drivers that explain why policymakers embrace the dual apprenticeship idea and how they re-contextualize it in their own educational context.

Drawing on a constructivist political economy framework, our study specifically investigates the reasons of policymakers in India and Mexico to adopt the dual model and how their different institutional conditions explain variations in the way the two countries have re-contextualized this global policy idea.

The selected cases are particularly interesting for the comparison because of the broad ambitions of their national reforms and the significant differences in the type of dual model of apprenticeships finally retained in the two countries.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Miguel Antonio Lim is Senior Lecturer in Education at the University of Manchester, UK, with special focus on Education and International Development at the University’s School of Environment, Education, and Development (SEED).

At this seminar, the evolving role of transnational higher education (TNHE) as part of wider national development policy will be discussed.

Using the case of Sino-foreign educational partnerships, Dr Lim will outline several features of the evolution of policies to govern and achieve more ‘equal’ partnerships.

In China, TNHE partnerships are seen as an important part of its drive to build ‘World Class Universities’. Its case shows an increasing orientation towards quality over quantity of partnerships and a growing role for urban and regional geopolitics in the choice of its HE partnerships.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Thabo Msibi is Associate Professor in Curriculum Studies in the School of Education at the University of KwaZulu-Natal, where he is also the Dean and Head of the School of Education.   

Professor Msibi’s scholarship is on the interface of gender and sexuality issues, particularly as they relate to education.  He also is interested in theory building as it relates to African sexualities.  He has published research in South African and international journals on these subjects, and has co-edited six journal special issues.

Thabo has also published numerous book chapters looking at the educational experiences of individuals who claim same-sex identities.  His recent monograph entitled Hidden Sexualities of South African Teachers: Black Male Educators and Same-sex Desire is published by Routledge.

This seminar reflects on the public uproar that has come with the expansion of the comprehensive sexuality education programme by the Department of Basic Education in South Africa.

Touted globally by the UNESCO and other international organisations as a critical vehicle for the promotion of positive sexual behaviour amongst young people, comprehensive sexuality education has recently received significant international fanfare.  This focus follows the release of the revised International technical guidance on sexuality education by UNESCO in 2018.  Some African countries, including South Africa, have used the revisions to update their curriculum offerings on sexuality education.

Section nine of the South African Constitution, known as the Equality Clause, explicitly provides protections against unfair discrimination on the basis of race, gender, sex, pregnancy, marital status, ethnic or social origin, colour, sexual orientation, age, disability, religion, conscience, belief, culture, language and birth.

It was through this constitutional guarantee that the country sought to revise its comprehensive curriculum offering, leading to significant backlash from the traditional, religious and conservative organisations. Front-page media articles screamed that the Minister of Education was trying to teach young children about how to have sex, and that she was effectively sexualising young children. The Ministry was also accused of imposing a Western ideals on African people.

The seminar will analyse the transnational and local reasons for the conservative backlash in South Africa. It will argue that the response largely follows a coordinated international movement that has sought to undermine sexuality education and reverse the gains already made by sexual rights organisations.  It will showcase how local sexual politics reflect a transnational mobility of ideas that are reconfigured at a local level in order to attain legitimacy.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Miri Yemini is a tenured Senior Lecturer in the School of Education at Tel Aviv University.

At Tel Aviv Dr. Yemini teaches graduate and undergraduate modules in education, including Internationalisation in Education, Education and Globalisation, Entrepreneurship in Education and Project Management in Schools.

Dr. Yemini serves as a co-Chair of UNESCO chair for Technology and Internationalisation in Education. Recently (April 2018) she was awarded (with Prof. Dr. Nina Kolleck) by the Max Plank Foundation the Award for Research Cooperation and High Excellence in Science (ARCHES), to develop research in the field of school-NGO interactions. This year (2021) Dr. Yemini secured funding from Israeli Science Foundation (150,000 Euro) for her project on education trajectories of Global Middle Class families.

Increasing numbers of highly educated and skilled professionals are internationally mobile for work. Some are transferred by employers; some proactively seek out new positions in different countries.

The currently estimated size of this group (known as globally mobile professionals, ‘global expatriates’ or members of a global middle class) is 66.2 million, which is predicted to rise to 87.5 million by 2022.

The increasing number, but also growing cultural diversity of this group (originating from all parts of the world), and the extent to which/frequency they relocate is an important articulation of newer forms of transnationalism that encompass the movement of people and ideas, and changing economic and social relations.

This seminar aims to map out and theorise the everyday practices of these globally middle professional families and to consider how their presence in key cities around the world might be re-shaping political, social, economic and education structures.

In particular, we will discuss how these families experience mobility and what motivates these relocations; how families create a sense of identity while ‘on the move’; what short-term and longer term aspirations the professionals, their partners and their children have; what education and extra-curricular choices are made; how different cultural contexts are negotiated etc.

Critically, we will discuss how these middle class families work to reproduce and extend their privilege, and so engage in ‘class-making’ practices.  Ultimately, this work offers a much-needed empirical basis to examine the theoretical proposition that there is now a ‘global’ middle class that is somehow different to nationally-located middle class groups.

The Department of Education and St Edmunds Hall are delighted to announce a new Public Seminar series which will take place online in Trinity Term on Wednesdays from 3pm-4pm (UK time) between 5th May and 28th July.

 

The Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education will address themes of major interest to academics, practitioners, and policy-makers working in the field of education globally. These seminars aim to illuminate the role of education in societal development, with a focus on understanding changes in education policy, discourse, and practice, and how these changes influence individual opportunities and shape the development of educational institutions around the world. Seminars will zoom into the local and zoom out into the national and supranational spaces, flows, and influences on education.

The series will be chaired by Maia Chankseliani, Associate Professor of Comparative and International Education, and will feature the following speakers:

Thabo Msibi, Dean and Head of School, School of Education, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

Miri Yemini, Senior Lecturer, Tel Aviv University, Israel

Miguel Antonio Lim, Senior Lecturer in Education, University of Manchester, United Kingdom

Oscar Valiente, Senior Lecturer University of Glasgow, United Kingdom

Moira Faul, Executive Director, NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva, Switzerland

Aliya Kuzhabekova, Associate Professor, Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan

 

To view the full programme of seminars, please click here.

Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education

Joint seminars organised by the Department of Education and St Edmund Hall, University of Oxford.

Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education address themes of major interest to academics, practitioners, and policy-makers working in the field of education globally. These seminars aim to illuminate the role of education in societal development, with a focus on understanding changes in education policy, discourse, and practice, and how these changes influence individual opportunities and shape the development of educational institutions around the world. Seminars will zoom into the local and zoom out into the national and supranational spaces, flows, and influences on education.

The series will be chaired by Maia Chankseliani, Associate Professor of Comparative and International Education.

 

The seminar programme:

*Please note that all seminars have a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

 

Wed 5 May at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Breaking gender, sex and sexuality borders: The case of comprehensive sexuality education in South Africa’

– Thabo Msibi, Dean and Head of School, School of Education, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

 

Wed 19 May at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Global Middle-Class families – comparative study of travel trajectories and imagined futures’

– Miri Yemini, Senior Lecturer, Tel Aviv University, Israel

 

Wed 2 June at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Equal’ Transnational Partnerships in Higher Education: Sino-Foreign Case Studies’

– Miguel Antonio Lim, Senior Lecturer in Education, University of Manchester, UK

 

Wed 16 June at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Why did policymakers in India and Mexico adopt the Germanic model of dual apprenticeships?’

– Oscar Valiente, Senior Lecturer University of Glasgow, UK

 

Wed 7th July at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Governing education by partnership: the GPE in the context of other sectors’ global financing partnerships.’

– Moira V. Faul, Executive Director, NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva

 

Wed 28th July at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

A comparison of the transition of returning scholars to domestic research environments in Kazakhstan, Malaysia and Cambodia.’

– Aliya Kuzhabekova, Associate Professor, Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Aliya Kuzhabekova is Associate Professor at Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan.

In this talk, Aliya Kuzhabekova will report on the results of a collaborative project exploring how individuals, who received Ph.D. degrees abroad transition to research environment in their home countries.

In particular, the aim of the comparative study was to develop a better understanding about how returnees, who obtained degrees in countries with high levels of research capacity re-integrated in the research environment of countries with lower levels of research capacities.

In addition, the project team tried to reveal the extent to which the returnees served as change agents transforming the research environment in their countries. The study allowed to obtain comparative insights about cross-country and program-related variations in the returnees’ adjustment experiences.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Moira V. Faul is Executive Director of NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva. 

The Global Partnership for Education (GPE) is one of a recent proliferation of pooled financing mechanisms in sustainable development. Despite a policy narrative of inclusive and egalitarian partnering, differences between public, private and voluntary sectors are assumed to affect relations between partners, and the effectiveness of partnerships.

We theorise global financing partnerships as a social ‘space between fields’ that is generated and structured by relationships between the actors mobilised into partnership boards from different fields. We move beyond the conventional focus on sectoral factions to investigate the potential of other aspects of diversity to affect partnership outcomes.

We empirically investigate the structuring of the space of global financing partnerships, comparing the GPE with climate change and health, by analysing a new dataset of 188 board members of ten global financing partnerships. First, network analyses reveal that donors (whether states, international organisations or private sector) are systematically privileged in this partnership space.

Secondly, faultline analytical tools reveal that despite a narrative of additional financing from the private sector, donors are significantly associated with the public sector. Furthermore, donors (public and private sector) are significantly associated with an economic logic of action and non-donors with an issue-specific framing.

Examining the multiple diversities that come into play in partnership board composition and structuring enables an improved theorisation of partnership effectiveness; it also holds important implications for board decisions and the sustainability and educational impacts that these partnerships are purported to deliver.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Oscar Valiente is Senior Lecturer in Educational Leadership & Policy at the University of Glasgow, Scotland. 

While most comparative education studies have focused on the historical processes that gave birth to the dual model in Germanic countries, our research aims to elucidate the drivers that explain why policymakers embrace the dual apprenticeship idea and how they re-contextualize it in their own educational context.

Drawing on a constructivist political economy framework, our study specifically investigates the reasons of policymakers in India and Mexico to adopt the dual model and how their different institutional conditions explain variations in the way the two countries have re-contextualized this global policy idea.

The selected cases are particularly interesting for the comparison because of the broad ambitions of their national reforms and the significant differences in the type of dual model of apprenticeships finally retained in the two countries.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Miguel Antonio Lim is Senior Lecturer in Education at the University of Manchester, UK, with special focus on Education and International Development at the University’s School of Environment, Education, and Development (SEED).

At this seminar, the evolving role of transnational higher education (TNHE) as part of wider national development policy will be discussed.

Using the case of Sino-foreign educational partnerships, Dr Lim will outline several features of the evolution of policies to govern and achieve more ‘equal’ partnerships.

In China, TNHE partnerships are seen as an important part of its drive to build ‘World Class Universities’. Its case shows an increasing orientation towards quality over quantity of partnerships and a growing role for urban and regional geopolitics in the choice of its HE partnerships.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Thabo Msibi is Associate Professor in Curriculum Studies in the School of Education at the University of KwaZulu-Natal, where he is also the Dean and Head of the School of Education.   

Professor Msibi’s scholarship is on the interface of gender and sexuality issues, particularly as they relate to education.  He also is interested in theory building as it relates to African sexualities.  He has published research in South African and international journals on these subjects, and has co-edited six journal special issues.

Thabo has also published numerous book chapters looking at the educational experiences of individuals who claim same-sex identities.  His recent monograph entitled Hidden Sexualities of South African Teachers: Black Male Educators and Same-sex Desire is published by Routledge.

This seminar reflects on the public uproar that has come with the expansion of the comprehensive sexuality education programme by the Department of Basic Education in South Africa.

Touted globally by the UNESCO and other international organisations as a critical vehicle for the promotion of positive sexual behaviour amongst young people, comprehensive sexuality education has recently received significant international fanfare.  This focus follows the release of the revised International technical guidance on sexuality education by UNESCO in 2018.  Some African countries, including South Africa, have used the revisions to update their curriculum offerings on sexuality education.

Section nine of the South African Constitution, known as the Equality Clause, explicitly provides protections against unfair discrimination on the basis of race, gender, sex, pregnancy, marital status, ethnic or social origin, colour, sexual orientation, age, disability, religion, conscience, belief, culture, language and birth.

It was through this constitutional guarantee that the country sought to revise its comprehensive curriculum offering, leading to significant backlash from the traditional, religious and conservative organisations. Front-page media articles screamed that the Minister of Education was trying to teach young children about how to have sex, and that she was effectively sexualising young children. The Ministry was also accused of imposing a Western ideals on African people.

The seminar will analyse the transnational and local reasons for the conservative backlash in South Africa. It will argue that the response largely follows a coordinated international movement that has sought to undermine sexuality education and reverse the gains already made by sexual rights organisations.  It will showcase how local sexual politics reflect a transnational mobility of ideas that are reconfigured at a local level in order to attain legitimacy.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Miri Yemini is a tenured Senior Lecturer in the School of Education at Tel Aviv University.

At Tel Aviv Dr. Yemini teaches graduate and undergraduate modules in education, including Internationalisation in Education, Education and Globalisation, Entrepreneurship in Education and Project Management in Schools.

Dr. Yemini serves as a co-Chair of UNESCO chair for Technology and Internationalisation in Education. Recently (April 2018) she was awarded (with Prof. Dr. Nina Kolleck) by the Max Plank Foundation the Award for Research Cooperation and High Excellence in Science (ARCHES), to develop research in the field of school-NGO interactions. This year (2021) Dr. Yemini secured funding from Israeli Science Foundation (150,000 Euro) for her project on education trajectories of Global Middle Class families.

Increasing numbers of highly educated and skilled professionals are internationally mobile for work. Some are transferred by employers; some proactively seek out new positions in different countries.

The currently estimated size of this group (known as globally mobile professionals, ‘global expatriates’ or members of a global middle class) is 66.2 million, which is predicted to rise to 87.5 million by 2022.

The increasing number, but also growing cultural diversity of this group (originating from all parts of the world), and the extent to which/frequency they relocate is an important articulation of newer forms of transnationalism that encompass the movement of people and ideas, and changing economic and social relations.

This seminar aims to map out and theorise the everyday practices of these globally middle professional families and to consider how their presence in key cities around the world might be re-shaping political, social, economic and education structures.

In particular, we will discuss how these families experience mobility and what motivates these relocations; how families create a sense of identity while ‘on the move’; what short-term and longer term aspirations the professionals, their partners and their children have; what education and extra-curricular choices are made; how different cultural contexts are negotiated etc.

Critically, we will discuss how these middle class families work to reproduce and extend their privilege, and so engage in ‘class-making’ practices.  Ultimately, this work offers a much-needed empirical basis to examine the theoretical proposition that there is now a ‘global’ middle class that is somehow different to nationally-located middle class groups.

The Department of Education and St Edmunds Hall are delighted to announce a new Public Seminar series which will take place online in Trinity Term on Wednesdays from 3pm-4pm (UK time) between 5th May and 28th July.

 

The Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education will address themes of major interest to academics, practitioners, and policy-makers working in the field of education globally. These seminars aim to illuminate the role of education in societal development, with a focus on understanding changes in education policy, discourse, and practice, and how these changes influence individual opportunities and shape the development of educational institutions around the world. Seminars will zoom into the local and zoom out into the national and supranational spaces, flows, and influences on education.

The series will be chaired by Maia Chankseliani, Associate Professor of Comparative and International Education, and will feature the following speakers:

Thabo Msibi, Dean and Head of School, School of Education, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

Miri Yemini, Senior Lecturer, Tel Aviv University, Israel

Miguel Antonio Lim, Senior Lecturer in Education, University of Manchester, United Kingdom

Oscar Valiente, Senior Lecturer University of Glasgow, United Kingdom

Moira Faul, Executive Director, NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva, Switzerland

Aliya Kuzhabekova, Associate Professor, Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan

 

To view the full programme of seminars, please click here.

Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education

Joint seminars organised by the Department of Education and St Edmund Hall, University of Oxford.

Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education address themes of major interest to academics, practitioners, and policy-makers working in the field of education globally. These seminars aim to illuminate the role of education in societal development, with a focus on understanding changes in education policy, discourse, and practice, and how these changes influence individual opportunities and shape the development of educational institutions around the world. Seminars will zoom into the local and zoom out into the national and supranational spaces, flows, and influences on education.

The series will be chaired by Maia Chankseliani, Associate Professor of Comparative and International Education.

 

The seminar programme:

*Please note that all seminars have a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

 

Wed 5 May at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Breaking gender, sex and sexuality borders: The case of comprehensive sexuality education in South Africa’

– Thabo Msibi, Dean and Head of School, School of Education, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

 

Wed 19 May at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Global Middle-Class families – comparative study of travel trajectories and imagined futures’

– Miri Yemini, Senior Lecturer, Tel Aviv University, Israel

 

Wed 2 June at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Equal’ Transnational Partnerships in Higher Education: Sino-Foreign Case Studies’

– Miguel Antonio Lim, Senior Lecturer in Education, University of Manchester, UK

 

Wed 16 June at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Why did policymakers in India and Mexico adopt the Germanic model of dual apprenticeships?’

– Oscar Valiente, Senior Lecturer University of Glasgow, UK

 

Wed 7th July at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Governing education by partnership: the GPE in the context of other sectors’ global financing partnerships.’

– Moira V. Faul, Executive Director, NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva

 

Wed 28th July at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

A comparison of the transition of returning scholars to domestic research environments in Kazakhstan, Malaysia and Cambodia.’

– Aliya Kuzhabekova, Associate Professor, Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Aliya Kuzhabekova is Associate Professor at Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan.

In this talk, Aliya Kuzhabekova will report on the results of a collaborative project exploring how individuals, who received Ph.D. degrees abroad transition to research environment in their home countries.

In particular, the aim of the comparative study was to develop a better understanding about how returnees, who obtained degrees in countries with high levels of research capacity re-integrated in the research environment of countries with lower levels of research capacities.

In addition, the project team tried to reveal the extent to which the returnees served as change agents transforming the research environment in their countries. The study allowed to obtain comparative insights about cross-country and program-related variations in the returnees’ adjustment experiences.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Moira V. Faul is Executive Director of NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva. 

The Global Partnership for Education (GPE) is one of a recent proliferation of pooled financing mechanisms in sustainable development. Despite a policy narrative of inclusive and egalitarian partnering, differences between public, private and voluntary sectors are assumed to affect relations between partners, and the effectiveness of partnerships.

We theorise global financing partnerships as a social ‘space between fields’ that is generated and structured by relationships between the actors mobilised into partnership boards from different fields. We move beyond the conventional focus on sectoral factions to investigate the potential of other aspects of diversity to affect partnership outcomes.

We empirically investigate the structuring of the space of global financing partnerships, comparing the GPE with climate change and health, by analysing a new dataset of 188 board members of ten global financing partnerships. First, network analyses reveal that donors (whether states, international organisations or private sector) are systematically privileged in this partnership space.

Secondly, faultline analytical tools reveal that despite a narrative of additional financing from the private sector, donors are significantly associated with the public sector. Furthermore, donors (public and private sector) are significantly associated with an economic logic of action and non-donors with an issue-specific framing.

Examining the multiple diversities that come into play in partnership board composition and structuring enables an improved theorisation of partnership effectiveness; it also holds important implications for board decisions and the sustainability and educational impacts that these partnerships are purported to deliver.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Oscar Valiente is Senior Lecturer in Educational Leadership & Policy at the University of Glasgow, Scotland. 

While most comparative education studies have focused on the historical processes that gave birth to the dual model in Germanic countries, our research aims to elucidate the drivers that explain why policymakers embrace the dual apprenticeship idea and how they re-contextualize it in their own educational context.

Drawing on a constructivist political economy framework, our study specifically investigates the reasons of policymakers in India and Mexico to adopt the dual model and how their different institutional conditions explain variations in the way the two countries have re-contextualized this global policy idea.

The selected cases are particularly interesting for the comparison because of the broad ambitions of their national reforms and the significant differences in the type of dual model of apprenticeships finally retained in the two countries.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Miguel Antonio Lim is Senior Lecturer in Education at the University of Manchester, UK, with special focus on Education and International Development at the University’s School of Environment, Education, and Development (SEED).

At this seminar, the evolving role of transnational higher education (TNHE) as part of wider national development policy will be discussed.

Using the case of Sino-foreign educational partnerships, Dr Lim will outline several features of the evolution of policies to govern and achieve more ‘equal’ partnerships.

In China, TNHE partnerships are seen as an important part of its drive to build ‘World Class Universities’. Its case shows an increasing orientation towards quality over quantity of partnerships and a growing role for urban and regional geopolitics in the choice of its HE partnerships.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Thabo Msibi is Associate Professor in Curriculum Studies in the School of Education at the University of KwaZulu-Natal, where he is also the Dean and Head of the School of Education.   

Professor Msibi’s scholarship is on the interface of gender and sexuality issues, particularly as they relate to education.  He also is interested in theory building as it relates to African sexualities.  He has published research in South African and international journals on these subjects, and has co-edited six journal special issues.

Thabo has also published numerous book chapters looking at the educational experiences of individuals who claim same-sex identities.  His recent monograph entitled Hidden Sexualities of South African Teachers: Black Male Educators and Same-sex Desire is published by Routledge.

This seminar reflects on the public uproar that has come with the expansion of the comprehensive sexuality education programme by the Department of Basic Education in South Africa.

Touted globally by the UNESCO and other international organisations as a critical vehicle for the promotion of positive sexual behaviour amongst young people, comprehensive sexuality education has recently received significant international fanfare.  This focus follows the release of the revised International technical guidance on sexuality education by UNESCO in 2018.  Some African countries, including South Africa, have used the revisions to update their curriculum offerings on sexuality education.

Section nine of the South African Constitution, known as the Equality Clause, explicitly provides protections against unfair discrimination on the basis of race, gender, sex, pregnancy, marital status, ethnic or social origin, colour, sexual orientation, age, disability, religion, conscience, belief, culture, language and birth.

It was through this constitutional guarantee that the country sought to revise its comprehensive curriculum offering, leading to significant backlash from the traditional, religious and conservative organisations. Front-page media articles screamed that the Minister of Education was trying to teach young children about how to have sex, and that she was effectively sexualising young children. The Ministry was also accused of imposing a Western ideals on African people.

The seminar will analyse the transnational and local reasons for the conservative backlash in South Africa. It will argue that the response largely follows a coordinated international movement that has sought to undermine sexuality education and reverse the gains already made by sexual rights organisations.  It will showcase how local sexual politics reflect a transnational mobility of ideas that are reconfigured at a local level in order to attain legitimacy.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Miri Yemini is a tenured Senior Lecturer in the School of Education at Tel Aviv University.

At Tel Aviv Dr. Yemini teaches graduate and undergraduate modules in education, including Internationalisation in Education, Education and Globalisation, Entrepreneurship in Education and Project Management in Schools.

Dr. Yemini serves as a co-Chair of UNESCO chair for Technology and Internationalisation in Education. Recently (April 2018) she was awarded (with Prof. Dr. Nina Kolleck) by the Max Plank Foundation the Award for Research Cooperation and High Excellence in Science (ARCHES), to develop research in the field of school-NGO interactions. This year (2021) Dr. Yemini secured funding from Israeli Science Foundation (150,000 Euro) for her project on education trajectories of Global Middle Class families.

Increasing numbers of highly educated and skilled professionals are internationally mobile for work. Some are transferred by employers; some proactively seek out new positions in different countries.

The currently estimated size of this group (known as globally mobile professionals, ‘global expatriates’ or members of a global middle class) is 66.2 million, which is predicted to rise to 87.5 million by 2022.

The increasing number, but also growing cultural diversity of this group (originating from all parts of the world), and the extent to which/frequency they relocate is an important articulation of newer forms of transnationalism that encompass the movement of people and ideas, and changing economic and social relations.

This seminar aims to map out and theorise the everyday practices of these globally middle professional families and to consider how their presence in key cities around the world might be re-shaping political, social, economic and education structures.

In particular, we will discuss how these families experience mobility and what motivates these relocations; how families create a sense of identity while ‘on the move’; what short-term and longer term aspirations the professionals, their partners and their children have; what education and extra-curricular choices are made; how different cultural contexts are negotiated etc.

Critically, we will discuss how these middle class families work to reproduce and extend their privilege, and so engage in ‘class-making’ practices.  Ultimately, this work offers a much-needed empirical basis to examine the theoretical proposition that there is now a ‘global’ middle class that is somehow different to nationally-located middle class groups.

The Department of Education and St Edmunds Hall are delighted to announce a new Public Seminar series which will take place online in Trinity Term on Wednesdays from 3pm-4pm (UK time) between 5th May and 28th July.

 

The Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education will address themes of major interest to academics, practitioners, and policy-makers working in the field of education globally. These seminars aim to illuminate the role of education in societal development, with a focus on understanding changes in education policy, discourse, and practice, and how these changes influence individual opportunities and shape the development of educational institutions around the world. Seminars will zoom into the local and zoom out into the national and supranational spaces, flows, and influences on education.

The series will be chaired by Maia Chankseliani, Associate Professor of Comparative and International Education, and will feature the following speakers:

Thabo Msibi, Dean and Head of School, School of Education, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

Miri Yemini, Senior Lecturer, Tel Aviv University, Israel

Miguel Antonio Lim, Senior Lecturer in Education, University of Manchester, United Kingdom

Oscar Valiente, Senior Lecturer University of Glasgow, United Kingdom

Moira Faul, Executive Director, NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva, Switzerland

Aliya Kuzhabekova, Associate Professor, Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan

 

To view the full programme of seminars, please click here.

Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education

Joint seminars organised by the Department of Education and St Edmund Hall, University of Oxford.

Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education address themes of major interest to academics, practitioners, and policy-makers working in the field of education globally. These seminars aim to illuminate the role of education in societal development, with a focus on understanding changes in education policy, discourse, and practice, and how these changes influence individual opportunities and shape the development of educational institutions around the world. Seminars will zoom into the local and zoom out into the national and supranational spaces, flows, and influences on education.

The series will be chaired by Maia Chankseliani, Associate Professor of Comparative and International Education.

 

The seminar programme:

*Please note that all seminars have a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

 

Wed 5 May at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Breaking gender, sex and sexuality borders: The case of comprehensive sexuality education in South Africa’

– Thabo Msibi, Dean and Head of School, School of Education, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

 

Wed 19 May at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Global Middle-Class families – comparative study of travel trajectories and imagined futures’

– Miri Yemini, Senior Lecturer, Tel Aviv University, Israel

 

Wed 2 June at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Equal’ Transnational Partnerships in Higher Education: Sino-Foreign Case Studies’

– Miguel Antonio Lim, Senior Lecturer in Education, University of Manchester, UK

 

Wed 16 June at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Why did policymakers in India and Mexico adopt the Germanic model of dual apprenticeships?’

– Oscar Valiente, Senior Lecturer University of Glasgow, UK

 

Wed 7th July at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Governing education by partnership: the GPE in the context of other sectors’ global financing partnerships.’

– Moira V. Faul, Executive Director, NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva

 

Wed 28th July at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

A comparison of the transition of returning scholars to domestic research environments in Kazakhstan, Malaysia and Cambodia.’

– Aliya Kuzhabekova, Associate Professor, Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Aliya Kuzhabekova is Associate Professor at Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan.

In this talk, Aliya Kuzhabekova will report on the results of a collaborative project exploring how individuals, who received Ph.D. degrees abroad transition to research environment in their home countries.

In particular, the aim of the comparative study was to develop a better understanding about how returnees, who obtained degrees in countries with high levels of research capacity re-integrated in the research environment of countries with lower levels of research capacities.

In addition, the project team tried to reveal the extent to which the returnees served as change agents transforming the research environment in their countries. The study allowed to obtain comparative insights about cross-country and program-related variations in the returnees’ adjustment experiences.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Moira V. Faul is Executive Director of NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva. 

The Global Partnership for Education (GPE) is one of a recent proliferation of pooled financing mechanisms in sustainable development. Despite a policy narrative of inclusive and egalitarian partnering, differences between public, private and voluntary sectors are assumed to affect relations between partners, and the effectiveness of partnerships.

We theorise global financing partnerships as a social ‘space between fields’ that is generated and structured by relationships between the actors mobilised into partnership boards from different fields. We move beyond the conventional focus on sectoral factions to investigate the potential of other aspects of diversity to affect partnership outcomes.

We empirically investigate the structuring of the space of global financing partnerships, comparing the GPE with climate change and health, by analysing a new dataset of 188 board members of ten global financing partnerships. First, network analyses reveal that donors (whether states, international organisations or private sector) are systematically privileged in this partnership space.

Secondly, faultline analytical tools reveal that despite a narrative of additional financing from the private sector, donors are significantly associated with the public sector. Furthermore, donors (public and private sector) are significantly associated with an economic logic of action and non-donors with an issue-specific framing.

Examining the multiple diversities that come into play in partnership board composition and structuring enables an improved theorisation of partnership effectiveness; it also holds important implications for board decisions and the sustainability and educational impacts that these partnerships are purported to deliver.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Oscar Valiente is Senior Lecturer in Educational Leadership & Policy at the University of Glasgow, Scotland. 

While most comparative education studies have focused on the historical processes that gave birth to the dual model in Germanic countries, our research aims to elucidate the drivers that explain why policymakers embrace the dual apprenticeship idea and how they re-contextualize it in their own educational context.

Drawing on a constructivist political economy framework, our study specifically investigates the reasons of policymakers in India and Mexico to adopt the dual model and how their different institutional conditions explain variations in the way the two countries have re-contextualized this global policy idea.

The selected cases are particularly interesting for the comparison because of the broad ambitions of their national reforms and the significant differences in the type of dual model of apprenticeships finally retained in the two countries.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Miguel Antonio Lim is Senior Lecturer in Education at the University of Manchester, UK, with special focus on Education and International Development at the University’s School of Environment, Education, and Development (SEED).

At this seminar, the evolving role of transnational higher education (TNHE) as part of wider national development policy will be discussed.

Using the case of Sino-foreign educational partnerships, Dr Lim will outline several features of the evolution of policies to govern and achieve more ‘equal’ partnerships.

In China, TNHE partnerships are seen as an important part of its drive to build ‘World Class Universities’. Its case shows an increasing orientation towards quality over quantity of partnerships and a growing role for urban and regional geopolitics in the choice of its HE partnerships.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Thabo Msibi is Associate Professor in Curriculum Studies in the School of Education at the University of KwaZulu-Natal, where he is also the Dean and Head of the School of Education.   

Professor Msibi’s scholarship is on the interface of gender and sexuality issues, particularly as they relate to education.  He also is interested in theory building as it relates to African sexualities.  He has published research in South African and international journals on these subjects, and has co-edited six journal special issues.

Thabo has also published numerous book chapters looking at the educational experiences of individuals who claim same-sex identities.  His recent monograph entitled Hidden Sexualities of South African Teachers: Black Male Educators and Same-sex Desire is published by Routledge.

This seminar reflects on the public uproar that has come with the expansion of the comprehensive sexuality education programme by the Department of Basic Education in South Africa.

Touted globally by the UNESCO and other international organisations as a critical vehicle for the promotion of positive sexual behaviour amongst young people, comprehensive sexuality education has recently received significant international fanfare.  This focus follows the release of the revised International technical guidance on sexuality education by UNESCO in 2018.  Some African countries, including South Africa, have used the revisions to update their curriculum offerings on sexuality education.

Section nine of the South African Constitution, known as the Equality Clause, explicitly provides protections against unfair discrimination on the basis of race, gender, sex, pregnancy, marital status, ethnic or social origin, colour, sexual orientation, age, disability, religion, conscience, belief, culture, language and birth.

It was through this constitutional guarantee that the country sought to revise its comprehensive curriculum offering, leading to significant backlash from the traditional, religious and conservative organisations. Front-page media articles screamed that the Minister of Education was trying to teach young children about how to have sex, and that she was effectively sexualising young children. The Ministry was also accused of imposing a Western ideals on African people.

The seminar will analyse the transnational and local reasons for the conservative backlash in South Africa. It will argue that the response largely follows a coordinated international movement that has sought to undermine sexuality education and reverse the gains already made by sexual rights organisations.  It will showcase how local sexual politics reflect a transnational mobility of ideas that are reconfigured at a local level in order to attain legitimacy.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Miri Yemini is a tenured Senior Lecturer in the School of Education at Tel Aviv University.

At Tel Aviv Dr. Yemini teaches graduate and undergraduate modules in education, including Internationalisation in Education, Education and Globalisation, Entrepreneurship in Education and Project Management in Schools.

Dr. Yemini serves as a co-Chair of UNESCO chair for Technology and Internationalisation in Education. Recently (April 2018) she was awarded (with Prof. Dr. Nina Kolleck) by the Max Plank Foundation the Award for Research Cooperation and High Excellence in Science (ARCHES), to develop research in the field of school-NGO interactions. This year (2021) Dr. Yemini secured funding from Israeli Science Foundation (150,000 Euro) for her project on education trajectories of Global Middle Class families.

Increasing numbers of highly educated and skilled professionals are internationally mobile for work. Some are transferred by employers; some proactively seek out new positions in different countries.

The currently estimated size of this group (known as globally mobile professionals, ‘global expatriates’ or members of a global middle class) is 66.2 million, which is predicted to rise to 87.5 million by 2022.

The increasing number, but also growing cultural diversity of this group (originating from all parts of the world), and the extent to which/frequency they relocate is an important articulation of newer forms of transnationalism that encompass the movement of people and ideas, and changing economic and social relations.

This seminar aims to map out and theorise the everyday practices of these globally middle professional families and to consider how their presence in key cities around the world might be re-shaping political, social, economic and education structures.

In particular, we will discuss how these families experience mobility and what motivates these relocations; how families create a sense of identity while ‘on the move’; what short-term and longer term aspirations the professionals, their partners and their children have; what education and extra-curricular choices are made; how different cultural contexts are negotiated etc.

Critically, we will discuss how these middle class families work to reproduce and extend their privilege, and so engage in ‘class-making’ practices.  Ultimately, this work offers a much-needed empirical basis to examine the theoretical proposition that there is now a ‘global’ middle class that is somehow different to nationally-located middle class groups.

The Department of Education and St Edmunds Hall are delighted to announce a new Public Seminar series which will take place online in Trinity Term on Wednesdays from 3pm-4pm (UK time) between 5th May and 28th July.

 

The Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education will address themes of major interest to academics, practitioners, and policy-makers working in the field of education globally. These seminars aim to illuminate the role of education in societal development, with a focus on understanding changes in education policy, discourse, and practice, and how these changes influence individual opportunities and shape the development of educational institutions around the world. Seminars will zoom into the local and zoom out into the national and supranational spaces, flows, and influences on education.

The series will be chaired by Maia Chankseliani, Associate Professor of Comparative and International Education, and will feature the following speakers:

Thabo Msibi, Dean and Head of School, School of Education, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

Miri Yemini, Senior Lecturer, Tel Aviv University, Israel

Miguel Antonio Lim, Senior Lecturer in Education, University of Manchester, United Kingdom

Oscar Valiente, Senior Lecturer University of Glasgow, United Kingdom

Moira Faul, Executive Director, NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva, Switzerland

Aliya Kuzhabekova, Associate Professor, Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan

 

To view the full programme of seminars, please click here.

Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education

Joint seminars organised by the Department of Education and St Edmund Hall, University of Oxford.

Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education address themes of major interest to academics, practitioners, and policy-makers working in the field of education globally. These seminars aim to illuminate the role of education in societal development, with a focus on understanding changes in education policy, discourse, and practice, and how these changes influence individual opportunities and shape the development of educational institutions around the world. Seminars will zoom into the local and zoom out into the national and supranational spaces, flows, and influences on education.

The series will be chaired by Maia Chankseliani, Associate Professor of Comparative and International Education.

 

The seminar programme:

*Please note that all seminars have a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

 

Wed 5 May at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Breaking gender, sex and sexuality borders: The case of comprehensive sexuality education in South Africa’

– Thabo Msibi, Dean and Head of School, School of Education, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

 

Wed 19 May at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Global Middle-Class families – comparative study of travel trajectories and imagined futures’

– Miri Yemini, Senior Lecturer, Tel Aviv University, Israel

 

Wed 2 June at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Equal’ Transnational Partnerships in Higher Education: Sino-Foreign Case Studies’

– Miguel Antonio Lim, Senior Lecturer in Education, University of Manchester, UK

 

Wed 16 June at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Why did policymakers in India and Mexico adopt the Germanic model of dual apprenticeships?’

– Oscar Valiente, Senior Lecturer University of Glasgow, UK

 

Wed 7th July at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Governing education by partnership: the GPE in the context of other sectors’ global financing partnerships.’

– Moira V. Faul, Executive Director, NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva

 

Wed 28th July at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

A comparison of the transition of returning scholars to domestic research environments in Kazakhstan, Malaysia and Cambodia.’

– Aliya Kuzhabekova, Associate Professor, Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Aliya Kuzhabekova is Associate Professor at Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan.

In this talk, Aliya Kuzhabekova will report on the results of a collaborative project exploring how individuals, who received Ph.D. degrees abroad transition to research environment in their home countries.

In particular, the aim of the comparative study was to develop a better understanding about how returnees, who obtained degrees in countries with high levels of research capacity re-integrated in the research environment of countries with lower levels of research capacities.

In addition, the project team tried to reveal the extent to which the returnees served as change agents transforming the research environment in their countries. The study allowed to obtain comparative insights about cross-country and program-related variations in the returnees’ adjustment experiences.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Moira V. Faul is Executive Director of NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva. 

The Global Partnership for Education (GPE) is one of a recent proliferation of pooled financing mechanisms in sustainable development. Despite a policy narrative of inclusive and egalitarian partnering, differences between public, private and voluntary sectors are assumed to affect relations between partners, and the effectiveness of partnerships.

We theorise global financing partnerships as a social ‘space between fields’ that is generated and structured by relationships between the actors mobilised into partnership boards from different fields. We move beyond the conventional focus on sectoral factions to investigate the potential of other aspects of diversity to affect partnership outcomes.

We empirically investigate the structuring of the space of global financing partnerships, comparing the GPE with climate change and health, by analysing a new dataset of 188 board members of ten global financing partnerships. First, network analyses reveal that donors (whether states, international organisations or private sector) are systematically privileged in this partnership space.

Secondly, faultline analytical tools reveal that despite a narrative of additional financing from the private sector, donors are significantly associated with the public sector. Furthermore, donors (public and private sector) are significantly associated with an economic logic of action and non-donors with an issue-specific framing.

Examining the multiple diversities that come into play in partnership board composition and structuring enables an improved theorisation of partnership effectiveness; it also holds important implications for board decisions and the sustainability and educational impacts that these partnerships are purported to deliver.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Oscar Valiente is Senior Lecturer in Educational Leadership & Policy at the University of Glasgow, Scotland. 

While most comparative education studies have focused on the historical processes that gave birth to the dual model in Germanic countries, our research aims to elucidate the drivers that explain why policymakers embrace the dual apprenticeship idea and how they re-contextualize it in their own educational context.

Drawing on a constructivist political economy framework, our study specifically investigates the reasons of policymakers in India and Mexico to adopt the dual model and how their different institutional conditions explain variations in the way the two countries have re-contextualized this global policy idea.

The selected cases are particularly interesting for the comparison because of the broad ambitions of their national reforms and the significant differences in the type of dual model of apprenticeships finally retained in the two countries.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Miguel Antonio Lim is Senior Lecturer in Education at the University of Manchester, UK, with special focus on Education and International Development at the University’s School of Environment, Education, and Development (SEED).

At this seminar, the evolving role of transnational higher education (TNHE) as part of wider national development policy will be discussed.

Using the case of Sino-foreign educational partnerships, Dr Lim will outline several features of the evolution of policies to govern and achieve more ‘equal’ partnerships.

In China, TNHE partnerships are seen as an important part of its drive to build ‘World Class Universities’. Its case shows an increasing orientation towards quality over quantity of partnerships and a growing role for urban and regional geopolitics in the choice of its HE partnerships.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Thabo Msibi is Associate Professor in Curriculum Studies in the School of Education at the University of KwaZulu-Natal, where he is also the Dean and Head of the School of Education.   

Professor Msibi’s scholarship is on the interface of gender and sexuality issues, particularly as they relate to education.  He also is interested in theory building as it relates to African sexualities.  He has published research in South African and international journals on these subjects, and has co-edited six journal special issues.

Thabo has also published numerous book chapters looking at the educational experiences of individuals who claim same-sex identities.  His recent monograph entitled Hidden Sexualities of South African Teachers: Black Male Educators and Same-sex Desire is published by Routledge.

This seminar reflects on the public uproar that has come with the expansion of the comprehensive sexuality education programme by the Department of Basic Education in South Africa.

Touted globally by the UNESCO and other international organisations as a critical vehicle for the promotion of positive sexual behaviour amongst young people, comprehensive sexuality education has recently received significant international fanfare.  This focus follows the release of the revised International technical guidance on sexuality education by UNESCO in 2018.  Some African countries, including South Africa, have used the revisions to update their curriculum offerings on sexuality education.

Section nine of the South African Constitution, known as the Equality Clause, explicitly provides protections against unfair discrimination on the basis of race, gender, sex, pregnancy, marital status, ethnic or social origin, colour, sexual orientation, age, disability, religion, conscience, belief, culture, language and birth.

It was through this constitutional guarantee that the country sought to revise its comprehensive curriculum offering, leading to significant backlash from the traditional, religious and conservative organisations. Front-page media articles screamed that the Minister of Education was trying to teach young children about how to have sex, and that she was effectively sexualising young children. The Ministry was also accused of imposing a Western ideals on African people.

The seminar will analyse the transnational and local reasons for the conservative backlash in South Africa. It will argue that the response largely follows a coordinated international movement that has sought to undermine sexuality education and reverse the gains already made by sexual rights organisations.  It will showcase how local sexual politics reflect a transnational mobility of ideas that are reconfigured at a local level in order to attain legitimacy.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Miri Yemini is a tenured Senior Lecturer in the School of Education at Tel Aviv University.

At Tel Aviv Dr. Yemini teaches graduate and undergraduate modules in education, including Internationalisation in Education, Education and Globalisation, Entrepreneurship in Education and Project Management in Schools.

Dr. Yemini serves as a co-Chair of UNESCO chair for Technology and Internationalisation in Education. Recently (April 2018) she was awarded (with Prof. Dr. Nina Kolleck) by the Max Plank Foundation the Award for Research Cooperation and High Excellence in Science (ARCHES), to develop research in the field of school-NGO interactions. This year (2021) Dr. Yemini secured funding from Israeli Science Foundation (150,000 Euro) for her project on education trajectories of Global Middle Class families.

Increasing numbers of highly educated and skilled professionals are internationally mobile for work. Some are transferred by employers; some proactively seek out new positions in different countries.

The currently estimated size of this group (known as globally mobile professionals, ‘global expatriates’ or members of a global middle class) is 66.2 million, which is predicted to rise to 87.5 million by 2022.

The increasing number, but also growing cultural diversity of this group (originating from all parts of the world), and the extent to which/frequency they relocate is an important articulation of newer forms of transnationalism that encompass the movement of people and ideas, and changing economic and social relations.

This seminar aims to map out and theorise the everyday practices of these globally middle professional families and to consider how their presence in key cities around the world might be re-shaping political, social, economic and education structures.

In particular, we will discuss how these families experience mobility and what motivates these relocations; how families create a sense of identity while ‘on the move’; what short-term and longer term aspirations the professionals, their partners and their children have; what education and extra-curricular choices are made; how different cultural contexts are negotiated etc.

Critically, we will discuss how these middle class families work to reproduce and extend their privilege, and so engage in ‘class-making’ practices.  Ultimately, this work offers a much-needed empirical basis to examine the theoretical proposition that there is now a ‘global’ middle class that is somehow different to nationally-located middle class groups.

The Department of Education and St Edmunds Hall are delighted to announce a new Public Seminar series which will take place online in Trinity Term on Wednesdays from 3pm-4pm (UK time) between 5th May and 28th July.

 

The Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education will address themes of major interest to academics, practitioners, and policy-makers working in the field of education globally. These seminars aim to illuminate the role of education in societal development, with a focus on understanding changes in education policy, discourse, and practice, and how these changes influence individual opportunities and shape the development of educational institutions around the world. Seminars will zoom into the local and zoom out into the national and supranational spaces, flows, and influences on education.

The series will be chaired by Maia Chankseliani, Associate Professor of Comparative and International Education, and will feature the following speakers:

Thabo Msibi, Dean and Head of School, School of Education, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

Miri Yemini, Senior Lecturer, Tel Aviv University, Israel

Miguel Antonio Lim, Senior Lecturer in Education, University of Manchester, United Kingdom

Oscar Valiente, Senior Lecturer University of Glasgow, United Kingdom

Moira Faul, Executive Director, NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva, Switzerland

Aliya Kuzhabekova, Associate Professor, Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan

 

To view the full programme of seminars, please click here.

Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education

Joint seminars organised by the Department of Education and St Edmund Hall, University of Oxford.

Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education address themes of major interest to academics, practitioners, and policy-makers working in the field of education globally. These seminars aim to illuminate the role of education in societal development, with a focus on understanding changes in education policy, discourse, and practice, and how these changes influence individual opportunities and shape the development of educational institutions around the world. Seminars will zoom into the local and zoom out into the national and supranational spaces, flows, and influences on education.

The series will be chaired by Maia Chankseliani, Associate Professor of Comparative and International Education.

 

The seminar programme:

*Please note that all seminars have a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

 

Wed 5 May at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Breaking gender, sex and sexuality borders: The case of comprehensive sexuality education in South Africa’

– Thabo Msibi, Dean and Head of School, School of Education, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

 

Wed 19 May at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Global Middle-Class families – comparative study of travel trajectories and imagined futures’

– Miri Yemini, Senior Lecturer, Tel Aviv University, Israel

 

Wed 2 June at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Equal’ Transnational Partnerships in Higher Education: Sino-Foreign Case Studies’

– Miguel Antonio Lim, Senior Lecturer in Education, University of Manchester, UK

 

Wed 16 June at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Why did policymakers in India and Mexico adopt the Germanic model of dual apprenticeships?’

– Oscar Valiente, Senior Lecturer University of Glasgow, UK

 

Wed 7th July at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Governing education by partnership: the GPE in the context of other sectors’ global financing partnerships.’

– Moira V. Faul, Executive Director, NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva

 

Wed 28th July at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

A comparison of the transition of returning scholars to domestic research environments in Kazakhstan, Malaysia and Cambodia.’

– Aliya Kuzhabekova, Associate Professor, Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Aliya Kuzhabekova is Associate Professor at Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan.

In this talk, Aliya Kuzhabekova will report on the results of a collaborative project exploring how individuals, who received Ph.D. degrees abroad transition to research environment in their home countries.

In particular, the aim of the comparative study was to develop a better understanding about how returnees, who obtained degrees in countries with high levels of research capacity re-integrated in the research environment of countries with lower levels of research capacities.

In addition, the project team tried to reveal the extent to which the returnees served as change agents transforming the research environment in their countries. The study allowed to obtain comparative insights about cross-country and program-related variations in the returnees’ adjustment experiences.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Moira V. Faul is Executive Director of NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva. 

The Global Partnership for Education (GPE) is one of a recent proliferation of pooled financing mechanisms in sustainable development. Despite a policy narrative of inclusive and egalitarian partnering, differences between public, private and voluntary sectors are assumed to affect relations between partners, and the effectiveness of partnerships.

We theorise global financing partnerships as a social ‘space between fields’ that is generated and structured by relationships between the actors mobilised into partnership boards from different fields. We move beyond the conventional focus on sectoral factions to investigate the potential of other aspects of diversity to affect partnership outcomes.

We empirically investigate the structuring of the space of global financing partnerships, comparing the GPE with climate change and health, by analysing a new dataset of 188 board members of ten global financing partnerships. First, network analyses reveal that donors (whether states, international organisations or private sector) are systematically privileged in this partnership space.

Secondly, faultline analytical tools reveal that despite a narrative of additional financing from the private sector, donors are significantly associated with the public sector. Furthermore, donors (public and private sector) are significantly associated with an economic logic of action and non-donors with an issue-specific framing.

Examining the multiple diversities that come into play in partnership board composition and structuring enables an improved theorisation of partnership effectiveness; it also holds important implications for board decisions and the sustainability and educational impacts that these partnerships are purported to deliver.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Oscar Valiente is Senior Lecturer in Educational Leadership & Policy at the University of Glasgow, Scotland. 

While most comparative education studies have focused on the historical processes that gave birth to the dual model in Germanic countries, our research aims to elucidate the drivers that explain why policymakers embrace the dual apprenticeship idea and how they re-contextualize it in their own educational context.

Drawing on a constructivist political economy framework, our study specifically investigates the reasons of policymakers in India and Mexico to adopt the dual model and how their different institutional conditions explain variations in the way the two countries have re-contextualized this global policy idea.

The selected cases are particularly interesting for the comparison because of the broad ambitions of their national reforms and the significant differences in the type of dual model of apprenticeships finally retained in the two countries.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Miguel Antonio Lim is Senior Lecturer in Education at the University of Manchester, UK, with special focus on Education and International Development at the University’s School of Environment, Education, and Development (SEED).

At this seminar, the evolving role of transnational higher education (TNHE) as part of wider national development policy will be discussed.

Using the case of Sino-foreign educational partnerships, Dr Lim will outline several features of the evolution of policies to govern and achieve more ‘equal’ partnerships.

In China, TNHE partnerships are seen as an important part of its drive to build ‘World Class Universities’. Its case shows an increasing orientation towards quality over quantity of partnerships and a growing role for urban and regional geopolitics in the choice of its HE partnerships.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Thabo Msibi is Associate Professor in Curriculum Studies in the School of Education at the University of KwaZulu-Natal, where he is also the Dean and Head of the School of Education.   

Professor Msibi’s scholarship is on the interface of gender and sexuality issues, particularly as they relate to education.  He also is interested in theory building as it relates to African sexualities.  He has published research in South African and international journals on these subjects, and has co-edited six journal special issues.

Thabo has also published numerous book chapters looking at the educational experiences of individuals who claim same-sex identities.  His recent monograph entitled Hidden Sexualities of South African Teachers: Black Male Educators and Same-sex Desire is published by Routledge.

This seminar reflects on the public uproar that has come with the expansion of the comprehensive sexuality education programme by the Department of Basic Education in South Africa.

Touted globally by the UNESCO and other international organisations as a critical vehicle for the promotion of positive sexual behaviour amongst young people, comprehensive sexuality education has recently received significant international fanfare.  This focus follows the release of the revised International technical guidance on sexuality education by UNESCO in 2018.  Some African countries, including South Africa, have used the revisions to update their curriculum offerings on sexuality education.

Section nine of the South African Constitution, known as the Equality Clause, explicitly provides protections against unfair discrimination on the basis of race, gender, sex, pregnancy, marital status, ethnic or social origin, colour, sexual orientation, age, disability, religion, conscience, belief, culture, language and birth.

It was through this constitutional guarantee that the country sought to revise its comprehensive curriculum offering, leading to significant backlash from the traditional, religious and conservative organisations. Front-page media articles screamed that the Minister of Education was trying to teach young children about how to have sex, and that she was effectively sexualising young children. The Ministry was also accused of imposing a Western ideals on African people.

The seminar will analyse the transnational and local reasons for the conservative backlash in South Africa. It will argue that the response largely follows a coordinated international movement that has sought to undermine sexuality education and reverse the gains already made by sexual rights organisations.  It will showcase how local sexual politics reflect a transnational mobility of ideas that are reconfigured at a local level in order to attain legitimacy.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Miri Yemini is a tenured Senior Lecturer in the School of Education at Tel Aviv University.

At Tel Aviv Dr. Yemini teaches graduate and undergraduate modules in education, including Internationalisation in Education, Education and Globalisation, Entrepreneurship in Education and Project Management in Schools.

Dr. Yemini serves as a co-Chair of UNESCO chair for Technology and Internationalisation in Education. Recently (April 2018) she was awarded (with Prof. Dr. Nina Kolleck) by the Max Plank Foundation the Award for Research Cooperation and High Excellence in Science (ARCHES), to develop research in the field of school-NGO interactions. This year (2021) Dr. Yemini secured funding from Israeli Science Foundation (150,000 Euro) for her project on education trajectories of Global Middle Class families.

Increasing numbers of highly educated and skilled professionals are internationally mobile for work. Some are transferred by employers; some proactively seek out new positions in different countries.

The currently estimated size of this group (known as globally mobile professionals, ‘global expatriates’ or members of a global middle class) is 66.2 million, which is predicted to rise to 87.5 million by 2022.

The increasing number, but also growing cultural diversity of this group (originating from all parts of the world), and the extent to which/frequency they relocate is an important articulation of newer forms of transnationalism that encompass the movement of people and ideas, and changing economic and social relations.

This seminar aims to map out and theorise the everyday practices of these globally middle professional families and to consider how their presence in key cities around the world might be re-shaping political, social, economic and education structures.

In particular, we will discuss how these families experience mobility and what motivates these relocations; how families create a sense of identity while ‘on the move’; what short-term and longer term aspirations the professionals, their partners and their children have; what education and extra-curricular choices are made; how different cultural contexts are negotiated etc.

Critically, we will discuss how these middle class families work to reproduce and extend their privilege, and so engage in ‘class-making’ practices.  Ultimately, this work offers a much-needed empirical basis to examine the theoretical proposition that there is now a ‘global’ middle class that is somehow different to nationally-located middle class groups.

The Department of Education and St Edmunds Hall are delighted to announce a new Public Seminar series which will take place online in Trinity Term on Wednesdays from 3pm-4pm (UK time) between 5th May and 28th July.

 

The Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education will address themes of major interest to academics, practitioners, and policy-makers working in the field of education globally. These seminars aim to illuminate the role of education in societal development, with a focus on understanding changes in education policy, discourse, and practice, and how these changes influence individual opportunities and shape the development of educational institutions around the world. Seminars will zoom into the local and zoom out into the national and supranational spaces, flows, and influences on education.

The series will be chaired by Maia Chankseliani, Associate Professor of Comparative and International Education, and will feature the following speakers:

Thabo Msibi, Dean and Head of School, School of Education, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

Miri Yemini, Senior Lecturer, Tel Aviv University, Israel

Miguel Antonio Lim, Senior Lecturer in Education, University of Manchester, United Kingdom

Oscar Valiente, Senior Lecturer University of Glasgow, United Kingdom

Moira Faul, Executive Director, NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva, Switzerland

Aliya Kuzhabekova, Associate Professor, Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan

 

To view the full programme of seminars, please click here.

Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education

Joint seminars organised by the Department of Education and St Edmund Hall, University of Oxford.

Global Public Seminars in Comparative and International Education address themes of major interest to academics, practitioners, and policy-makers working in the field of education globally. These seminars aim to illuminate the role of education in societal development, with a focus on understanding changes in education policy, discourse, and practice, and how these changes influence individual opportunities and shape the development of educational institutions around the world. Seminars will zoom into the local and zoom out into the national and supranational spaces, flows, and influences on education.

The series will be chaired by Maia Chankseliani, Associate Professor of Comparative and International Education.

 

The seminar programme:

*Please note that all seminars have a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

 

Wed 5 May at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Breaking gender, sex and sexuality borders: The case of comprehensive sexuality education in South Africa’

– Thabo Msibi, Dean and Head of School, School of Education, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

 

Wed 19 May at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Global Middle-Class families – comparative study of travel trajectories and imagined futures’

– Miri Yemini, Senior Lecturer, Tel Aviv University, Israel

 

Wed 2 June at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Equal’ Transnational Partnerships in Higher Education: Sino-Foreign Case Studies’

– Miguel Antonio Lim, Senior Lecturer in Education, University of Manchester, UK

 

Wed 16 June at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Why did policymakers in India and Mexico adopt the Germanic model of dual apprenticeships?’

– Oscar Valiente, Senior Lecturer University of Glasgow, UK

 

Wed 7th July at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

‘Governing education by partnership: the GPE in the context of other sectors’ global financing partnerships.’

– Moira V. Faul, Executive Director, NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva

 

Wed 28th July at 3pm – 4pm (UK time)

A comparison of the transition of returning scholars to domestic research environments in Kazakhstan, Malaysia and Cambodia.’

– Aliya Kuzhabekova, Associate Professor, Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Aliya Kuzhabekova is Associate Professor at Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan.

In this talk, Aliya Kuzhabekova will report on the results of a collaborative project exploring how individuals, who received Ph.D. degrees abroad transition to research environment in their home countries.

In particular, the aim of the comparative study was to develop a better understanding about how returnees, who obtained degrees in countries with high levels of research capacity re-integrated in the research environment of countries with lower levels of research capacities.

In addition, the project team tried to reveal the extent to which the returnees served as change agents transforming the research environment in their countries. The study allowed to obtain comparative insights about cross-country and program-related variations in the returnees’ adjustment experiences.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Moira V. Faul is Executive Director of NORRAG, Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva. 

The Global Partnership for Education (GPE) is one of a recent proliferation of pooled financing mechanisms in sustainable development. Despite a policy narrative of inclusive and egalitarian partnering, differences between public, private and voluntary sectors are assumed to affect relations between partners, and the effectiveness of partnerships.

We theorise global financing partnerships as a social ‘space between fields’ that is generated and structured by relationships between the actors mobilised into partnership boards from different fields. We move beyond the conventional focus on sectoral factions to investigate the potential of other aspects of diversity to affect partnership outcomes.

We empirically investigate the structuring of the space of global financing partnerships, comparing the GPE with climate change and health, by analysing a new dataset of 188 board members of ten global financing partnerships. First, network analyses reveal that donors (whether states, international organisations or private sector) are systematically privileged in this partnership space.

Secondly, faultline analytical tools reveal that despite a narrative of additional financing from the private sector, donors are significantly associated with the public sector. Furthermore, donors (public and private sector) are significantly associated with an economic logic of action and non-donors with an issue-specific framing.

Examining the multiple diversities that come into play in partnership board composition and structuring enables an improved theorisation of partnership effectiveness; it also holds important implications for board decisions and the sustainability and educational impacts that these partnerships are purported to deliver.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Oscar Valiente is Senior Lecturer in Educational Leadership & Policy at the University of Glasgow, Scotland. 

While most comparative education studies have focused on the historical processes that gave birth to the dual model in Germanic countries, our research aims to elucidate the drivers that explain why policymakers embrace the dual apprenticeship idea and how they re-contextualize it in their own educational context.

Drawing on a constructivist political economy framework, our study specifically investigates the reasons of policymakers in India and Mexico to adopt the dual model and how their different institutional conditions explain variations in the way the two countries have re-contextualized this global policy idea.

The selected cases are particularly interesting for the comparison because of the broad ambitions of their national reforms and the significant differences in the type of dual model of apprenticeships finally retained in the two countries.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Miguel Antonio Lim is Senior Lecturer in Education at the University of Manchester, UK, with special focus on Education and International Development at the University’s School of Environment, Education, and Development (SEED).

At this seminar, the evolving role of transnational higher education (TNHE) as part of wider national development policy will be discussed.

Using the case of Sino-foreign educational partnerships, Dr Lim will outline several features of the evolution of policies to govern and achieve more ‘equal’ partnerships.

In China, TNHE partnerships are seen as an important part of its drive to build ‘World Class Universities’. Its case shows an increasing orientation towards quality over quantity of partnerships and a growing role for urban and regional geopolitics in the choice of its HE partnerships.

REGISTER NOW

*Please note this seminar has a maximum capacity of 100 participants*

Thabo Msibi is Associate Professor in Curriculum Studies in the School of Education at the University of KwaZulu-Natal, where he is also the Dean and Head of the School of Education.   

Professor Msibi’s scholarship is on the interface of gender and sexuality issues, particularly as they relate to education.  He also is interested in theory building as it relates to African sexualities.  He has published research in South African and international journals on these subjects, and has co-edited six journal special issues.

Thabo has also published numerous book chapters looking at the educational experiences of individuals who claim same-sex identities.  His recent monograph entitled Hidden Sexualities of South African Teachers: Black Male Educators and Same-sex Desire is published by R