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Viewing archives for Doctoral Student

Warda Arif is a doctoral student at the Department of Education. Her research aims to operationalise Critical Realist conceptions and methods to study Cultures of Higher Education in select Indian universities.

She completed her Master’s in Education and International Development from University College London’s – Institute of Education (UCL-IOE) as a Commonwealth Scholar and holds a B.Sc. in Biochemistry form Aligarh Muslim University (AMU).

Over her brief career, Warda has worked in the social development and impact sector in South Africa, India and Saudi Arabia, in teaching, research and advisory roles.

Supervisors

Dr Steven Puttick and Dr Aliya Khalid

Zak Devey is a passionate advocate for youth-led educational advocacy and equity – both within academia and in his work as co-founder of charitable trust Youth Arts New Zealand. In 2024, Zak continues to explore community conceptualisations of educational equity and their intersections with present and historic educational policy.

Zak also holds a deep care for youth-wellbeing, and its systemic determinants in the 21st century. His first publication, in the New Zealand Journal of Sociology, interrogates the ‘2021 World Happiness Report’ and that ways in which it constructs what it means to be happy.

Zak would be happy to hear from anyone looking to undertake a research journey in the Department, as well as scholars interested in educational equity, community-based participatory research, sociologies of well-being, and education in the political context of Aotearoa New Zealand.

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Pippa is a first-year DPhil student, whose research interests focus on vulnerable students’ outcomes and experiences of secondary school English education.

In 2023, Pippa completed an MSc in Learning and Teaching at the University of Oxford, researching pedagogical strategies for the teaching of emotionally challenging literature to students with experiences of trauma. Her DPhil research will build on this project, exploring looked after children’s engagement with English education, and their outcomes in the subject.

Alongside her research, Pippa continues to teach English in a secondary school; she is therefore passionate about collaborations between practice and research. Her project seeks to develop our understanding of looked after children’s experiences in English classrooms, in order to facilitate the development of strategies to support these vulnerable learners.

Supervisors

Nicole Dingwall and Julie Selwyn

Yunfei Ma is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of international higher education.

Following his B.A. (First Class) at the University of Durham, Yunfei was awarded with MSc (Distinction) from the Department of Education, University of Oxford prior to his DPhil studies. He has also worked as a research assistant on the project Transnational academic mobility to global south: an exploratory study of international faculty in China.

Yunfei’s DPhil research focuses on global academic publishing and its relationship with knowledge formation, codification and dissemination. His research interest primarily lies in the geo-politics of knowledge production, global epistemic governance, China’s Humanities and Social Sciences research, and the philosophy of power.

Supervisors

Ariel Lindorff and Xin Xu

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Penny is a DPhil student whose research interests centre on classroom talk and international collaborations between secondary English classrooms.

Penny completed Oxford’s MSc in Learning and Teaching with distinction in 2019, focusing on methods for mitigating the impact of mind-wandering and misunderstanding as a means of enhancing student engagement in small-group and whole-class debates of interpretations of literature.  She has since won SHINE research funding to explore the impact of her methodology on students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Her DPhil continues her interest in student discussions of literature, exploring the impact on identity of online discussions between English classrooms in different countries.

Penny began her career as a secondary English Language Arts and journalism teacher in the USA but has taught secondary English predominantly in the UK in a career spanning 25 years.  She has overseen development of the global dimension and international collaboration at her current school for 14 years.

Supervisors

Victoria Elliott and Steven Puttick

Warda Arif is a doctoral student at the Department of Education. Her research aims to operationalise Critical Realist conceptions and methods to study Cultures of Higher Education in select Indian universities.

She completed her Master’s in Education and International Development from University College London’s – Institute of Education (UCL-IOE) as a Commonwealth Scholar and holds a B.Sc. in Biochemistry form Aligarh Muslim University (AMU).

Over her brief career, Warda has worked in the social development and impact sector in South Africa, India and Saudi Arabia, in teaching, research and advisory roles.

Supervisors

Dr Steven Puttick and Dr Aliya Khalid

Zak Devey is a passionate advocate for youth-led educational advocacy and equity – both within academia and in his work as co-founder of charitable trust Youth Arts New Zealand. In 2024, Zak continues to explore community conceptualisations of educational equity and their intersections with present and historic educational policy.

Zak also holds a deep care for youth-wellbeing, and its systemic determinants in the 21st century. His first publication, in the New Zealand Journal of Sociology, interrogates the ‘2021 World Happiness Report’ and that ways in which it constructs what it means to be happy.

Zak would be happy to hear from anyone looking to undertake a research journey in the Department, as well as scholars interested in educational equity, community-based participatory research, sociologies of well-being, and education in the political context of Aotearoa New Zealand.

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Pippa is a first-year DPhil student, whose research interests focus on vulnerable students’ outcomes and experiences of secondary school English education.

In 2023, Pippa completed an MSc in Learning and Teaching at the University of Oxford, researching pedagogical strategies for the teaching of emotionally challenging literature to students with experiences of trauma. Her DPhil research will build on this project, exploring looked after children’s engagement with English education, and their outcomes in the subject.

Alongside her research, Pippa continues to teach English in a secondary school; she is therefore passionate about collaborations between practice and research. Her project seeks to develop our understanding of looked after children’s experiences in English classrooms, in order to facilitate the development of strategies to support these vulnerable learners.

Supervisors

Nicole Dingwall and Julie Selwyn

Yunfei Ma is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of international higher education.

Following his B.A. (First Class) at the University of Durham, Yunfei was awarded with MSc (Distinction) from the Department of Education, University of Oxford prior to his DPhil studies. He has also worked as a research assistant on the project Transnational academic mobility to global south: an exploratory study of international faculty in China.

Yunfei’s DPhil research focuses on global academic publishing and its relationship with knowledge formation, codification and dissemination. His research interest primarily lies in the geo-politics of knowledge production, global epistemic governance, China’s Humanities and Social Sciences research, and the philosophy of power.

Supervisors

Ariel Lindorff and Xin Xu

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Penny is a DPhil student whose research interests centre on classroom talk and international collaborations between secondary English classrooms.

Penny completed Oxford’s MSc in Learning and Teaching with distinction in 2019, focusing on methods for mitigating the impact of mind-wandering and misunderstanding as a means of enhancing student engagement in small-group and whole-class debates of interpretations of literature.  She has since won SHINE research funding to explore the impact of her methodology on students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Her DPhil continues her interest in student discussions of literature, exploring the impact on identity of online discussions between English classrooms in different countries.

Penny began her career as a secondary English Language Arts and journalism teacher in the USA but has taught secondary English predominantly in the UK in a career spanning 25 years.  She has overseen development of the global dimension and international collaboration at her current school for 14 years.

Supervisors

Victoria Elliott and Steven Puttick

Warda Arif is a doctoral student at the Department of Education. Her research aims to operationalise Critical Realist conceptions and methods to study Cultures of Higher Education in select Indian universities.

She completed her Master’s in Education and International Development from University College London’s – Institute of Education (UCL-IOE) as a Commonwealth Scholar and holds a B.Sc. in Biochemistry form Aligarh Muslim University (AMU).

Over her brief career, Warda has worked in the social development and impact sector in South Africa, India and Saudi Arabia, in teaching, research and advisory roles.

Supervisors

Dr Steven Puttick and Dr Aliya Khalid

Zak Devey is a passionate advocate for youth-led educational advocacy and equity – both within academia and in his work as co-founder of charitable trust Youth Arts New Zealand. In 2024, Zak continues to explore community conceptualisations of educational equity and their intersections with present and historic educational policy.

Zak also holds a deep care for youth-wellbeing, and its systemic determinants in the 21st century. His first publication, in the New Zealand Journal of Sociology, interrogates the ‘2021 World Happiness Report’ and that ways in which it constructs what it means to be happy.

Zak would be happy to hear from anyone looking to undertake a research journey in the Department, as well as scholars interested in educational equity, community-based participatory research, sociologies of well-being, and education in the political context of Aotearoa New Zealand.

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Pippa is a first-year DPhil student, whose research interests focus on vulnerable students’ outcomes and experiences of secondary school English education.

In 2023, Pippa completed an MSc in Learning and Teaching at the University of Oxford, researching pedagogical strategies for the teaching of emotionally challenging literature to students with experiences of trauma. Her DPhil research will build on this project, exploring looked after children’s engagement with English education, and their outcomes in the subject.

Alongside her research, Pippa continues to teach English in a secondary school; she is therefore passionate about collaborations between practice and research. Her project seeks to develop our understanding of looked after children’s experiences in English classrooms, in order to facilitate the development of strategies to support these vulnerable learners.

Supervisors

Nicole Dingwall and Julie Selwyn

Yunfei Ma is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of international higher education.

Following his B.A. (First Class) at the University of Durham, Yunfei was awarded with MSc (Distinction) from the Department of Education, University of Oxford prior to his DPhil studies. He has also worked as a research assistant on the project Transnational academic mobility to global south: an exploratory study of international faculty in China.

Yunfei’s DPhil research focuses on global academic publishing and its relationship with knowledge formation, codification and dissemination. His research interest primarily lies in the geo-politics of knowledge production, global epistemic governance, China’s Humanities and Social Sciences research, and the philosophy of power.

Supervisors

Ariel Lindorff and Xin Xu

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Penny is a DPhil student whose research interests centre on classroom talk and international collaborations between secondary English classrooms.

Penny completed Oxford’s MSc in Learning and Teaching with distinction in 2019, focusing on methods for mitigating the impact of mind-wandering and misunderstanding as a means of enhancing student engagement in small-group and whole-class debates of interpretations of literature.  She has since won SHINE research funding to explore the impact of her methodology on students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Her DPhil continues her interest in student discussions of literature, exploring the impact on identity of online discussions between English classrooms in different countries.

Penny began her career as a secondary English Language Arts and journalism teacher in the USA but has taught secondary English predominantly in the UK in a career spanning 25 years.  She has overseen development of the global dimension and international collaboration at her current school for 14 years.

Supervisors

Victoria Elliott and Steven Puttick

Warda Arif is a doctoral student at the Department of Education. Her research aims to operationalise Critical Realist conceptions and methods to study Cultures of Higher Education in select Indian universities.

She completed her Master’s in Education and International Development from University College London’s – Institute of Education (UCL-IOE) as a Commonwealth Scholar and holds a B.Sc. in Biochemistry form Aligarh Muslim University (AMU).

Over her brief career, Warda has worked in the social development and impact sector in South Africa, India and Saudi Arabia, in teaching, research and advisory roles.

Supervisors

Dr Steven Puttick and Dr Aliya Khalid

Zak Devey is a passionate advocate for youth-led educational advocacy and equity – both within academia and in his work as co-founder of charitable trust Youth Arts New Zealand. In 2024, Zak continues to explore community conceptualisations of educational equity and their intersections with present and historic educational policy.

Zak also holds a deep care for youth-wellbeing, and its systemic determinants in the 21st century. His first publication, in the New Zealand Journal of Sociology, interrogates the ‘2021 World Happiness Report’ and that ways in which it constructs what it means to be happy.

Zak would be happy to hear from anyone looking to undertake a research journey in the Department, as well as scholars interested in educational equity, community-based participatory research, sociologies of well-being, and education in the political context of Aotearoa New Zealand.

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Pippa is a first-year DPhil student, whose research interests focus on vulnerable students’ outcomes and experiences of secondary school English education.

In 2023, Pippa completed an MSc in Learning and Teaching at the University of Oxford, researching pedagogical strategies for the teaching of emotionally challenging literature to students with experiences of trauma. Her DPhil research will build on this project, exploring looked after children’s engagement with English education, and their outcomes in the subject.

Alongside her research, Pippa continues to teach English in a secondary school; she is therefore passionate about collaborations between practice and research. Her project seeks to develop our understanding of looked after children’s experiences in English classrooms, in order to facilitate the development of strategies to support these vulnerable learners.

Supervisors

Nicole Dingwall and Julie Selwyn

Yunfei Ma is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of international higher education.

Following his B.A. (First Class) at the University of Durham, Yunfei was awarded with MSc (Distinction) from the Department of Education, University of Oxford prior to his DPhil studies. He has also worked as a research assistant on the project Transnational academic mobility to global south: an exploratory study of international faculty in China.

Yunfei’s DPhil research focuses on global academic publishing and its relationship with knowledge formation, codification and dissemination. His research interest primarily lies in the geo-politics of knowledge production, global epistemic governance, China’s Humanities and Social Sciences research, and the philosophy of power.

Supervisors

Ariel Lindorff and Xin Xu

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Penny is a DPhil student whose research interests centre on classroom talk and international collaborations between secondary English classrooms.

Penny completed Oxford’s MSc in Learning and Teaching with distinction in 2019, focusing on methods for mitigating the impact of mind-wandering and misunderstanding as a means of enhancing student engagement in small-group and whole-class debates of interpretations of literature.  She has since won SHINE research funding to explore the impact of her methodology on students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Her DPhil continues her interest in student discussions of literature, exploring the impact on identity of online discussions between English classrooms in different countries.

Penny began her career as a secondary English Language Arts and journalism teacher in the USA but has taught secondary English predominantly in the UK in a career spanning 25 years.  She has overseen development of the global dimension and international collaboration at her current school for 14 years.

Supervisors

Victoria Elliott and Steven Puttick

Warda Arif is a doctoral student at the Department of Education. Her research aims to operationalise Critical Realist conceptions and methods to study Cultures of Higher Education in select Indian universities.

She completed her Master’s in Education and International Development from University College London’s – Institute of Education (UCL-IOE) as a Commonwealth Scholar and holds a B.Sc. in Biochemistry form Aligarh Muslim University (AMU).

Over her brief career, Warda has worked in the social development and impact sector in South Africa, India and Saudi Arabia, in teaching, research and advisory roles.

Supervisors

Dr Steven Puttick and Dr Aliya Khalid

Zak Devey is a passionate advocate for youth-led educational advocacy and equity – both within academia and in his work as co-founder of charitable trust Youth Arts New Zealand. In 2024, Zak continues to explore community conceptualisations of educational equity and their intersections with present and historic educational policy.

Zak also holds a deep care for youth-wellbeing, and its systemic determinants in the 21st century. His first publication, in the New Zealand Journal of Sociology, interrogates the ‘2021 World Happiness Report’ and that ways in which it constructs what it means to be happy.

Zak would be happy to hear from anyone looking to undertake a research journey in the Department, as well as scholars interested in educational equity, community-based participatory research, sociologies of well-being, and education in the political context of Aotearoa New Zealand.

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Pippa is a first-year DPhil student, whose research interests focus on vulnerable students’ outcomes and experiences of secondary school English education.

In 2023, Pippa completed an MSc in Learning and Teaching at the University of Oxford, researching pedagogical strategies for the teaching of emotionally challenging literature to students with experiences of trauma. Her DPhil research will build on this project, exploring looked after children’s engagement with English education, and their outcomes in the subject.

Alongside her research, Pippa continues to teach English in a secondary school; she is therefore passionate about collaborations between practice and research. Her project seeks to develop our understanding of looked after children’s experiences in English classrooms, in order to facilitate the development of strategies to support these vulnerable learners.

Supervisors

Nicole Dingwall and Julie Selwyn

Yunfei Ma is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of international higher education.

Following his B.A. (First Class) at the University of Durham, Yunfei was awarded with MSc (Distinction) from the Department of Education, University of Oxford prior to his DPhil studies. He has also worked as a research assistant on the project Transnational academic mobility to global south: an exploratory study of international faculty in China.

Yunfei’s DPhil research focuses on global academic publishing and its relationship with knowledge formation, codification and dissemination. His research interest primarily lies in the geo-politics of knowledge production, global epistemic governance, China’s Humanities and Social Sciences research, and the philosophy of power.

Supervisors

Ariel Lindorff and Xin Xu

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Penny is a DPhil student whose research interests centre on classroom talk and international collaborations between secondary English classrooms.

Penny completed Oxford’s MSc in Learning and Teaching with distinction in 2019, focusing on methods for mitigating the impact of mind-wandering and misunderstanding as a means of enhancing student engagement in small-group and whole-class debates of interpretations of literature.  She has since won SHINE research funding to explore the impact of her methodology on students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Her DPhil continues her interest in student discussions of literature, exploring the impact on identity of online discussions between English classrooms in different countries.

Penny began her career as a secondary English Language Arts and journalism teacher in the USA but has taught secondary English predominantly in the UK in a career spanning 25 years.  She has overseen development of the global dimension and international collaboration at her current school for 14 years.

Supervisors

Victoria Elliott and Steven Puttick

Warda Arif is a doctoral student at the Department of Education. Her research aims to operationalise Critical Realist conceptions and methods to study Cultures of Higher Education in select Indian universities.

She completed her Master’s in Education and International Development from University College London’s – Institute of Education (UCL-IOE) as a Commonwealth Scholar and holds a B.Sc. in Biochemistry form Aligarh Muslim University (AMU).

Over her brief career, Warda has worked in the social development and impact sector in South Africa, India and Saudi Arabia, in teaching, research and advisory roles.

Supervisors

Dr Steven Puttick and Dr Aliya Khalid

Zak Devey is a passionate advocate for youth-led educational advocacy and equity – both within academia and in his work as co-founder of charitable trust Youth Arts New Zealand. In 2024, Zak continues to explore community conceptualisations of educational equity and their intersections with present and historic educational policy.

Zak also holds a deep care for youth-wellbeing, and its systemic determinants in the 21st century. His first publication, in the New Zealand Journal of Sociology, interrogates the ‘2021 World Happiness Report’ and that ways in which it constructs what it means to be happy.

Zak would be happy to hear from anyone looking to undertake a research journey in the Department, as well as scholars interested in educational equity, community-based participatory research, sociologies of well-being, and education in the political context of Aotearoa New Zealand.

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Pippa is a first-year DPhil student, whose research interests focus on vulnerable students’ outcomes and experiences of secondary school English education.

In 2023, Pippa completed an MSc in Learning and Teaching at the University of Oxford, researching pedagogical strategies for the teaching of emotionally challenging literature to students with experiences of trauma. Her DPhil research will build on this project, exploring looked after children’s engagement with English education, and their outcomes in the subject.

Alongside her research, Pippa continues to teach English in a secondary school; she is therefore passionate about collaborations between practice and research. Her project seeks to develop our understanding of looked after children’s experiences in English classrooms, in order to facilitate the development of strategies to support these vulnerable learners.

Supervisors

Nicole Dingwall and Julie Selwyn

Yunfei Ma is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of international higher education.

Following his B.A. (First Class) at the University of Durham, Yunfei was awarded with MSc (Distinction) from the Department of Education, University of Oxford prior to his DPhil studies. He has also worked as a research assistant on the project Transnational academic mobility to global south: an exploratory study of international faculty in China.

Yunfei’s DPhil research focuses on global academic publishing and its relationship with knowledge formation, codification and dissemination. His research interest primarily lies in the geo-politics of knowledge production, global epistemic governance, China’s Humanities and Social Sciences research, and the philosophy of power.

Supervisors

Ariel Lindorff and Xin Xu

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Penny is a DPhil student whose research interests centre on classroom talk and international collaborations between secondary English classrooms.

Penny completed Oxford’s MSc in Learning and Teaching with distinction in 2019, focusing on methods for mitigating the impact of mind-wandering and misunderstanding as a means of enhancing student engagement in small-group and whole-class debates of interpretations of literature.  She has since won SHINE research funding to explore the impact of her methodology on students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Her DPhil continues her interest in student discussions of literature, exploring the impact on identity of online discussions between English classrooms in different countries.

Penny began her career as a secondary English Language Arts and journalism teacher in the USA but has taught secondary English predominantly in the UK in a career spanning 25 years.  She has overseen development of the global dimension and international collaboration at her current school for 14 years.

Supervisors

Victoria Elliott and Steven Puttick

Warda Arif is a doctoral student at the Department of Education. Her research aims to operationalise Critical Realist conceptions and methods to study Cultures of Higher Education in select Indian universities.

She completed her Master’s in Education and International Development from University College London’s – Institute of Education (UCL-IOE) as a Commonwealth Scholar and holds a B.Sc. in Biochemistry form Aligarh Muslim University (AMU).

Over her brief career, Warda has worked in the social development and impact sector in South Africa, India and Saudi Arabia, in teaching, research and advisory roles.

Supervisors

Dr Steven Puttick and Dr Aliya Khalid

Zak Devey is a passionate advocate for youth-led educational advocacy and equity – both within academia and in his work as co-founder of charitable trust Youth Arts New Zealand. In 2024, Zak continues to explore community conceptualisations of educational equity and their intersections with present and historic educational policy.

Zak also holds a deep care for youth-wellbeing, and its systemic determinants in the 21st century. His first publication, in the New Zealand Journal of Sociology, interrogates the ‘2021 World Happiness Report’ and that ways in which it constructs what it means to be happy.

Zak would be happy to hear from anyone looking to undertake a research journey in the Department, as well as scholars interested in educational equity, community-based participatory research, sociologies of well-being, and education in the political context of Aotearoa New Zealand.

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Pippa is a first-year DPhil student, whose research interests focus on vulnerable students’ outcomes and experiences of secondary school English education.

In 2023, Pippa completed an MSc in Learning and Teaching at the University of Oxford, researching pedagogical strategies for the teaching of emotionally challenging literature to students with experiences of trauma. Her DPhil research will build on this project, exploring looked after children’s engagement with English education, and their outcomes in the subject.

Alongside her research, Pippa continues to teach English in a secondary school; she is therefore passionate about collaborations between practice and research. Her project seeks to develop our understanding of looked after children’s experiences in English classrooms, in order to facilitate the development of strategies to support these vulnerable learners.

Supervisors

Nicole Dingwall and Julie Selwyn

Yunfei Ma is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of international higher education.

Following his B.A. (First Class) at the University of Durham, Yunfei was awarded with MSc (Distinction) from the Department of Education, University of Oxford prior to his DPhil studies. He has also worked as a research assistant on the project Transnational academic mobility to global south: an exploratory study of international faculty in China.

Yunfei’s DPhil research focuses on global academic publishing and its relationship with knowledge formation, codification and dissemination. His research interest primarily lies in the geo-politics of knowledge production, global epistemic governance, China’s Humanities and Social Sciences research, and the philosophy of power.

Supervisors

Ariel Lindorff and Xin Xu

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Penny is a DPhil student whose research interests centre on classroom talk and international collaborations between secondary English classrooms.

Penny completed Oxford’s MSc in Learning and Teaching with distinction in 2019, focusing on methods for mitigating the impact of mind-wandering and misunderstanding as a means of enhancing student engagement in small-group and whole-class debates of interpretations of literature.  She has since won SHINE research funding to explore the impact of her methodology on students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Her DPhil continues her interest in student discussions of literature, exploring the impact on identity of online discussions between English classrooms in different countries.

Penny began her career as a secondary English Language Arts and journalism teacher in the USA but has taught secondary English predominantly in the UK in a career spanning 25 years.  She has overseen development of the global dimension and international collaboration at her current school for 14 years.

Supervisors

Victoria Elliott and Steven Puttick

Warda Arif is a doctoral student at the Department of Education. Her research aims to operationalise Critical Realist conceptions and methods to study Cultures of Higher Education in select Indian universities.

She completed her Master’s in Education and International Development from University College London’s – Institute of Education (UCL-IOE) as a Commonwealth Scholar and holds a B.Sc. in Biochemistry form Aligarh Muslim University (AMU).

Over her brief career, Warda has worked in the social development and impact sector in South Africa, India and Saudi Arabia, in teaching, research and advisory roles.

Supervisors

Dr Steven Puttick and Dr Aliya Khalid

Zak Devey is a passionate advocate for youth-led educational advocacy and equity – both within academia and in his work as co-founder of charitable trust Youth Arts New Zealand. In 2024, Zak continues to explore community conceptualisations of educational equity and their intersections with present and historic educational policy.

Zak also holds a deep care for youth-wellbeing, and its systemic determinants in the 21st century. His first publication, in the New Zealand Journal of Sociology, interrogates the ‘2021 World Happiness Report’ and that ways in which it constructs what it means to be happy.

Zak would be happy to hear from anyone looking to undertake a research journey in the Department, as well as scholars interested in educational equity, community-based participatory research, sociologies of well-being, and education in the political context of Aotearoa New Zealand.

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Pippa is a first-year DPhil student, whose research interests focus on vulnerable students’ outcomes and experiences of secondary school English education.

In 2023, Pippa completed an MSc in Learning and Teaching at the University of Oxford, researching pedagogical strategies for the teaching of emotionally challenging literature to students with experiences of trauma. Her DPhil research will build on this project, exploring looked after children’s engagement with English education, and their outcomes in the subject.

Alongside her research, Pippa continues to teach English in a secondary school; she is therefore passionate about collaborations between practice and research. Her project seeks to develop our understanding of looked after children’s experiences in English classrooms, in order to facilitate the development of strategies to support these vulnerable learners.

Supervisors

Nicole Dingwall and Julie Selwyn

Yunfei Ma is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of international higher education.

Following his B.A. (First Class) at the University of Durham, Yunfei was awarded with MSc (Distinction) from the Department of Education, University of Oxford prior to his DPhil studies. He has also worked as a research assistant on the project Transnational academic mobility to global south: an exploratory study of international faculty in China.

Yunfei’s DPhil research focuses on global academic publishing and its relationship with knowledge formation, codification and dissemination. His research interest primarily lies in the geo-politics of knowledge production, global epistemic governance, China’s Humanities and Social Sciences research, and the philosophy of power.

Supervisors

Ariel Lindorff and Xin Xu

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Penny is a DPhil student whose research interests centre on classroom talk and international collaborations between secondary English classrooms.

Penny completed Oxford’s MSc in Learning and Teaching with distinction in 2019, focusing on methods for mitigating the impact of mind-wandering and misunderstanding as a means of enhancing student engagement in small-group and whole-class debates of interpretations of literature.  She has since won SHINE research funding to explore the impact of her methodology on students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Her DPhil continues her interest in student discussions of literature, exploring the impact on identity of online discussions between English classrooms in different countries.

Penny began her career as a secondary English Language Arts and journalism teacher in the USA but has taught secondary English predominantly in the UK in a career spanning 25 years.  She has overseen development of the global dimension and international collaboration at her current school for 14 years.

Supervisors

Victoria Elliott and Steven Puttick

Warda Arif is a doctoral student at the Department of Education. Her research aims to operationalise Critical Realist conceptions and methods to study Cultures of Higher Education in select Indian universities.

She completed her Master’s in Education and International Development from University College London’s – Institute of Education (UCL-IOE) as a Commonwealth Scholar and holds a B.Sc. in Biochemistry form Aligarh Muslim University (AMU).

Over her brief career, Warda has worked in the social development and impact sector in South Africa, India and Saudi Arabia, in teaching, research and advisory roles.

Supervisors

Dr Steven Puttick and Dr Aliya Khalid

Zak Devey is a passionate advocate for youth-led educational advocacy and equity – both within academia and in his work as co-founder of charitable trust Youth Arts New Zealand. In 2024, Zak continues to explore community conceptualisations of educational equity and their intersections with present and historic educational policy.

Zak also holds a deep care for youth-wellbeing, and its systemic determinants in the 21st century. His first publication, in the New Zealand Journal of Sociology, interrogates the ‘2021 World Happiness Report’ and that ways in which it constructs what it means to be happy.

Zak would be happy to hear from anyone looking to undertake a research journey in the Department, as well as scholars interested in educational equity, community-based participatory research, sociologies of well-being, and education in the political context of Aotearoa New Zealand.

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Pippa is a first-year DPhil student, whose research interests focus on vulnerable students’ outcomes and experiences of secondary school English education.

In 2023, Pippa completed an MSc in Learning and Teaching at the University of Oxford, researching pedagogical strategies for the teaching of emotionally challenging literature to students with experiences of trauma. Her DPhil research will build on this project, exploring looked after children’s engagement with English education, and their outcomes in the subject.

Alongside her research, Pippa continues to teach English in a secondary school; she is therefore passionate about collaborations between practice and research. Her project seeks to develop our understanding of looked after children’s experiences in English classrooms, in order to facilitate the development of strategies to support these vulnerable learners.

Supervisors

Nicole Dingwall and Julie Selwyn

Yunfei Ma is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of international higher education.

Following his B.A. (First Class) at the University of Durham, Yunfei was awarded with MSc (Distinction) from the Department of Education, University of Oxford prior to his DPhil studies. He has also worked as a research assistant on the project Transnational academic mobility to global south: an exploratory study of international faculty in China.

Yunfei’s DPhil research focuses on global academic publishing and its relationship with knowledge formation, codification and dissemination. His research interest primarily lies in the geo-politics of knowledge production, global epistemic governance, China’s Humanities and Social Sciences research, and the philosophy of power.

Supervisors

Ariel Lindorff and Xin Xu

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Penny is a DPhil student whose research interests centre on classroom talk and international collaborations between secondary English classrooms.

Penny completed Oxford’s MSc in Learning and Teaching with distinction in 2019, focusing on methods for mitigating the impact of mind-wandering and misunderstanding as a means of enhancing student engagement in small-group and whole-class debates of interpretations of literature.  She has since won SHINE research funding to explore the impact of her methodology on students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Her DPhil continues her interest in student discussions of literature, exploring the impact on identity of online discussions between English classrooms in different countries.

Penny began her career as a secondary English Language Arts and journalism teacher in the USA but has taught secondary English predominantly in the UK in a career spanning 25 years.  She has overseen development of the global dimension and international collaboration at her current school for 14 years.

Supervisors

Victoria Elliott and Steven Puttick

Warda Arif is a doctoral student at the Department of Education. Her research aims to operationalise Critical Realist conceptions and methods to study Cultures of Higher Education in select Indian universities.

She completed her Master’s in Education and International Development from University College London’s – Institute of Education (UCL-IOE) as a Commonwealth Scholar and holds a B.Sc. in Biochemistry form Aligarh Muslim University (AMU).

Over her brief career, Warda has worked in the social development and impact sector in South Africa, India and Saudi Arabia, in teaching, research and advisory roles.

Supervisors

Dr Steven Puttick and Dr Aliya Khalid

Zak Devey is a passionate advocate for youth-led educational advocacy and equity – both within academia and in his work as co-founder of charitable trust Youth Arts New Zealand. In 2024, Zak continues to explore community conceptualisations of educational equity and their intersections with present and historic educational policy.

Zak also holds a deep care for youth-wellbeing, and its systemic determinants in the 21st century. His first publication, in the New Zealand Journal of Sociology, interrogates the ‘2021 World Happiness Report’ and that ways in which it constructs what it means to be happy.

Zak would be happy to hear from anyone looking to undertake a research journey in the Department, as well as scholars interested in educational equity, community-based participatory research, sociologies of well-being, and education in the political context of Aotearoa New Zealand.

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Pippa is a first-year DPhil student, whose research interests focus on vulnerable students’ outcomes and experiences of secondary school English education.

In 2023, Pippa completed an MSc in Learning and Teaching at the University of Oxford, researching pedagogical strategies for the teaching of emotionally challenging literature to students with experiences of trauma. Her DPhil research will build on this project, exploring looked after children’s engagement with English education, and their outcomes in the subject.

Alongside her research, Pippa continues to teach English in a secondary school; she is therefore passionate about collaborations between practice and research. Her project seeks to develop our understanding of looked after children’s experiences in English classrooms, in order to facilitate the development of strategies to support these vulnerable learners.

Supervisors

Nicole Dingwall and Julie Selwyn

Yunfei Ma is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of international higher education.

Following his B.A. (First Class) at the University of Durham, Yunfei was awarded with MSc (Distinction) from the Department of Education, University of Oxford prior to his DPhil studies. He has also worked as a research assistant on the project Transnational academic mobility to global south: an exploratory study of international faculty in China.

Yunfei’s DPhil research focuses on global academic publishing and its relationship with knowledge formation, codification and dissemination. His research interest primarily lies in the geo-politics of knowledge production, global epistemic governance, China’s Humanities and Social Sciences research, and the philosophy of power.

Supervisors

Ariel Lindorff and Xin Xu

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Penny is a DPhil student whose research interests centre on classroom talk and international collaborations between secondary English classrooms.

Penny completed Oxford’s MSc in Learning and Teaching with distinction in 2019, focusing on methods for mitigating the impact of mind-wandering and misunderstanding as a means of enhancing student engagement in small-group and whole-class debates of interpretations of literature.  She has since won SHINE research funding to explore the impact of her methodology on students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Her DPhil continues her interest in student discussions of literature, exploring the impact on identity of online discussions between English classrooms in different countries.

Penny began her career as a secondary English Language Arts and journalism teacher in the USA but has taught secondary English predominantly in the UK in a career spanning 25 years.  She has overseen development of the global dimension and international collaboration at her current school for 14 years.

Supervisors

Victoria Elliott and Steven Puttick

Warda Arif is a doctoral student at the Department of Education. Her research aims to operationalise Critical Realist conceptions and methods to study Cultures of Higher Education in select Indian universities.

She completed her Master’s in Education and International Development from University College London’s – Institute of Education (UCL-IOE) as a Commonwealth Scholar and holds a B.Sc. in Biochemistry form Aligarh Muslim University (AMU).

Over her brief career, Warda has worked in the social development and impact sector in South Africa, India and Saudi Arabia, in teaching, research and advisory roles.

Supervisors

Dr Steven Puttick and Dr Aliya Khalid

Zak Devey is a passionate advocate for youth-led educational advocacy and equity – both within academia and in his work as co-founder of charitable trust Youth Arts New Zealand. In 2024, Zak continues to explore community conceptualisations of educational equity and their intersections with present and historic educational policy.

Zak also holds a deep care for youth-wellbeing, and its systemic determinants in the 21st century. His first publication, in the New Zealand Journal of Sociology, interrogates the ‘2021 World Happiness Report’ and that ways in which it constructs what it means to be happy.

Zak would be happy to hear from anyone looking to undertake a research journey in the Department, as well as scholars interested in educational equity, community-based participatory research, sociologies of well-being, and education in the political context of Aotearoa New Zealand.

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Pippa is a first-year DPhil student, whose research interests focus on vulnerable students’ outcomes and experiences of secondary school English education.

In 2023, Pippa completed an MSc in Learning and Teaching at the University of Oxford, researching pedagogical strategies for the teaching of emotionally challenging literature to students with experiences of trauma. Her DPhil research will build on this project, exploring looked after children’s engagement with English education, and their outcomes in the subject.

Alongside her research, Pippa continues to teach English in a secondary school; she is therefore passionate about collaborations between practice and research. Her project seeks to develop our understanding of looked after children’s experiences in English classrooms, in order to facilitate the development of strategies to support these vulnerable learners.

Supervisors

Nicole Dingwall and Julie Selwyn

Yunfei Ma is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of international higher education.

Following his B.A. (First Class) at the University of Durham, Yunfei was awarded with MSc (Distinction) from the Department of Education, University of Oxford prior to his DPhil studies. He has also worked as a research assistant on the project Transnational academic mobility to global south: an exploratory study of international faculty in China.

Yunfei’s DPhil research focuses on global academic publishing and its relationship with knowledge formation, codification and dissemination. His research interest primarily lies in the geo-politics of knowledge production, global epistemic governance, China’s Humanities and Social Sciences research, and the philosophy of power.

Supervisors

Ariel Lindorff and Xin Xu

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Penny is a DPhil student whose research interests centre on classroom talk and international collaborations between secondary English classrooms.

Penny completed Oxford’s MSc in Learning and Teaching with distinction in 2019, focusing on methods for mitigating the impact of mind-wandering and misunderstanding as a means of enhancing student engagement in small-group and whole-class debates of interpretations of literature.  She has since won SHINE research funding to explore the impact of her methodology on students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Her DPhil continues her interest in student discussions of literature, exploring the impact on identity of online discussions between English classrooms in different countries.

Penny began her career as a secondary English Language Arts and journalism teacher in the USA but has taught secondary English predominantly in the UK in a career spanning 25 years.  She has overseen development of the global dimension and international collaboration at her current school for 14 years.

Supervisors

Victoria Elliott and Steven Puttick

Warda Arif is a doctoral student at the Department of Education. Her research aims to operationalise Critical Realist conceptions and methods to study Cultures of Higher Education in select Indian universities.

She completed her Master’s in Education and International Development from University College London’s – Institute of Education (UCL-IOE) as a Commonwealth Scholar and holds a B.Sc. in Biochemistry form Aligarh Muslim University (AMU).

Over her brief career, Warda has worked in the social development and impact sector in South Africa, India and Saudi Arabia, in teaching, research and advisory roles.

Supervisors

Dr Steven Puttick and Dr Aliya Khalid

Zak Devey is a passionate advocate for youth-led educational advocacy and equity – both within academia and in his work as co-founder of charitable trust Youth Arts New Zealand. In 2024, Zak continues to explore community conceptualisations of educational equity and their intersections with present and historic educational policy.

Zak also holds a deep care for youth-wellbeing, and its systemic determinants in the 21st century. His first publication, in the New Zealand Journal of Sociology, interrogates the ‘2021 World Happiness Report’ and that ways in which it constructs what it means to be happy.

Zak would be happy to hear from anyone looking to undertake a research journey in the Department, as well as scholars interested in educational equity, community-based participatory research, sociologies of well-being, and education in the political context of Aotearoa New Zealand.

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Pippa is a first-year DPhil student, whose research interests focus on vulnerable students’ outcomes and experiences of secondary school English education.

In 2023, Pippa completed an MSc in Learning and Teaching at the University of Oxford, researching pedagogical strategies for the teaching of emotionally challenging literature to students with experiences of trauma. Her DPhil research will build on this project, exploring looked after children’s engagement with English education, and their outcomes in the subject.

Alongside her research, Pippa continues to teach English in a secondary school; she is therefore passionate about collaborations between practice and research. Her project seeks to develop our understanding of looked after children’s experiences in English classrooms, in order to facilitate the development of strategies to support these vulnerable learners.

Supervisors

Nicole Dingwall and Julie Selwyn

Yunfei Ma is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of international higher education.

Following his B.A. (First Class) at the University of Durham, Yunfei was awarded with MSc (Distinction) from the Department of Education, University of Oxford prior to his DPhil studies. He has also worked as a research assistant on the project Transnational academic mobility to global south: an exploratory study of international faculty in China.

Yunfei’s DPhil research focuses on global academic publishing and its relationship with knowledge formation, codification and dissemination. His research interest primarily lies in the geo-politics of knowledge production, global epistemic governance, China’s Humanities and Social Sciences research, and the philosophy of power.

Supervisors

Ariel Lindorff and Xin Xu

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Penny is a DPhil student whose research interests centre on classroom talk and international collaborations between secondary English classrooms.

Penny completed Oxford’s MSc in Learning and Teaching with distinction in 2019, focusing on methods for mitigating the impact of mind-wandering and misunderstanding as a means of enhancing student engagement in small-group and whole-class debates of interpretations of literature.  She has since won SHINE research funding to explore the impact of her methodology on students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Her DPhil continues her interest in student discussions of literature, exploring the impact on identity of online discussions between English classrooms in different countries.

Penny began her career as a secondary English Language Arts and journalism teacher in the USA but has taught secondary English predominantly in the UK in a career spanning 25 years.  She has overseen development of the global dimension and international collaboration at her current school for 14 years.

Supervisors

Victoria Elliott and Steven Puttick

Warda Arif is a doctoral student at the Department of Education. Her research aims to operationalise Critical Realist conceptions and methods to study Cultures of Higher Education in select Indian universities.

She completed her Master’s in Education and International Development from University College London’s – Institute of Education (UCL-IOE) as a Commonwealth Scholar and holds a B.Sc. in Biochemistry form Aligarh Muslim University (AMU).

Over her brief career, Warda has worked in the social development and impact sector in South Africa, India and Saudi Arabia, in teaching, research and advisory roles.

Supervisors

Dr Steven Puttick and Dr Aliya Khalid

Zak Devey is a passionate advocate for youth-led educational advocacy and equity – both within academia and in his work as co-founder of charitable trust Youth Arts New Zealand. In 2024, Zak continues to explore community conceptualisations of educational equity and their intersections with present and historic educational policy.

Zak also holds a deep care for youth-wellbeing, and its systemic determinants in the 21st century. His first publication, in the New Zealand Journal of Sociology, interrogates the ‘2021 World Happiness Report’ and that ways in which it constructs what it means to be happy.

Zak would be happy to hear from anyone looking to undertake a research journey in the Department, as well as scholars interested in educational equity, community-based participatory research, sociologies of well-being, and education in the political context of Aotearoa New Zealand.

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Pippa is a first-year DPhil student, whose research interests focus on vulnerable students’ outcomes and experiences of secondary school English education.

In 2023, Pippa completed an MSc in Learning and Teaching at the University of Oxford, researching pedagogical strategies for the teaching of emotionally challenging literature to students with experiences of trauma. Her DPhil research will build on this project, exploring looked after children’s engagement with English education, and their outcomes in the subject.

Alongside her research, Pippa continues to teach English in a secondary school; she is therefore passionate about collaborations between practice and research. Her project seeks to develop our understanding of looked after children’s experiences in English classrooms, in order to facilitate the development of strategies to support these vulnerable learners.

Supervisors

Nicole Dingwall and Julie Selwyn

Yunfei Ma is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of international higher education.

Following his B.A. (First Class) at the University of Durham, Yunfei was awarded with MSc (Distinction) from the Department of Education, University of Oxford prior to his DPhil studies. He has also worked as a research assistant on the project Transnational academic mobility to global south: an exploratory study of international faculty in China.

Yunfei’s DPhil research focuses on global academic publishing and its relationship with knowledge formation, codification and dissemination. His research interest primarily lies in the geo-politics of knowledge production, global epistemic governance, China’s Humanities and Social Sciences research, and the philosophy of power.

Supervisors

Ariel Lindorff and Xin Xu

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Penny is a DPhil student whose research interests centre on classroom talk and international collaborations between secondary English classrooms.

Penny completed Oxford’s MSc in Learning and Teaching with distinction in 2019, focusing on methods for mitigating the impact of mind-wandering and misunderstanding as a means of enhancing student engagement in small-group and whole-class debates of interpretations of literature.  She has since won SHINE research funding to explore the impact of her methodology on students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Her DPhil continues her interest in student discussions of literature, exploring the impact on identity of online discussions between English classrooms in different countries.

Penny began her career as a secondary English Language Arts and journalism teacher in the USA but has taught secondary English predominantly in the UK in a career spanning 25 years.  She has overseen development of the global dimension and international collaboration at her current school for 14 years.

Supervisors

Victoria Elliott and Steven Puttick

Warda Arif is a doctoral student at the Department of Education. Her research aims to operationalise Critical Realist conceptions and methods to study Cultures of Higher Education in select Indian universities.

She completed her Master’s in Education and International Development from University College London’s – Institute of Education (UCL-IOE) as a Commonwealth Scholar and holds a B.Sc. in Biochemistry form Aligarh Muslim University (AMU).

Over her brief career, Warda has worked in the social development and impact sector in South Africa, India and Saudi Arabia, in teaching, research and advisory roles.

Supervisors

Dr Steven Puttick and Dr Aliya Khalid

Zak Devey is a passionate advocate for youth-led educational advocacy and equity – both within academia and in his work as co-founder of charitable trust Youth Arts New Zealand. In 2024, Zak continues to explore community conceptualisations of educational equity and their intersections with present and historic educational policy.

Zak also holds a deep care for youth-wellbeing, and its systemic determinants in the 21st century. His first publication, in the New Zealand Journal of Sociology, interrogates the ‘2021 World Happiness Report’ and that ways in which it constructs what it means to be happy.

Zak would be happy to hear from anyone looking to undertake a research journey in the Department, as well as scholars interested in educational equity, community-based participatory research, sociologies of well-being, and education in the political context of Aotearoa New Zealand.

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Pippa is a first-year DPhil student, whose research interests focus on vulnerable students’ outcomes and experiences of secondary school English education.

In 2023, Pippa completed an MSc in Learning and Teaching at the University of Oxford, researching pedagogical strategies for the teaching of emotionally challenging literature to students with experiences of trauma. Her DPhil research will build on this project, exploring looked after children’s engagement with English education, and their outcomes in the subject.

Alongside her research, Pippa continues to teach English in a secondary school; she is therefore passionate about collaborations between practice and research. Her project seeks to develop our understanding of looked after children’s experiences in English classrooms, in order to facilitate the development of strategies to support these vulnerable learners.

Supervisors

Nicole Dingwall and Julie Selwyn

Yunfei Ma is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of international higher education.

Following his B.A. (First Class) at the University of Durham, Yunfei was awarded with MSc (Distinction) from the Department of Education, University of Oxford prior to his DPhil studies. He has also worked as a research assistant on the project Transnational academic mobility to global south: an exploratory study of international faculty in China.

Yunfei’s DPhil research focuses on global academic publishing and its relationship with knowledge formation, codification and dissemination. His research interest primarily lies in the geo-politics of knowledge production, global epistemic governance, China’s Humanities and Social Sciences research, and the philosophy of power.

Supervisors

Ariel Lindorff and Xin Xu

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Penny is a DPhil student whose research interests centre on classroom talk and international collaborations between secondary English classrooms.

Penny completed Oxford’s MSc in Learning and Teaching with distinction in 2019, focusing on methods for mitigating the impact of mind-wandering and misunderstanding as a means of enhancing student engagement in small-group and whole-class debates of interpretations of literature.  She has since won SHINE research funding to explore the impact of her methodology on students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Her DPhil continues her interest in student discussions of literature, exploring the impact on identity of online discussions between English classrooms in different countries.

Penny began her career as a secondary English Language Arts and journalism teacher in the USA but has taught secondary English predominantly in the UK in a career spanning 25 years.  She has overseen development of the global dimension and international collaboration at her current school for 14 years.

Supervisors

Victoria Elliott and Steven Puttick

Warda Arif is a doctoral student at the Department of Education. Her research aims to operationalise Critical Realist conceptions and methods to study Cultures of Higher Education in select Indian universities.

She completed her Master’s in Education and International Development from University College London’s – Institute of Education (UCL-IOE) as a Commonwealth Scholar and holds a B.Sc. in Biochemistry form Aligarh Muslim University (AMU).

Over her brief career, Warda has worked in the social development and impact sector in South Africa, India and Saudi Arabia, in teaching, research and advisory roles.

Supervisors

Dr Steven Puttick and Dr Aliya Khalid

Zak Devey is a passionate advocate for youth-led educational advocacy and equity – both within academia and in his work as co-founder of charitable trust Youth Arts New Zealand. In 2024, Zak continues to explore community conceptualisations of educational equity and their intersections with present and historic educational policy.

Zak also holds a deep care for youth-wellbeing, and its systemic determinants in the 21st century. His first publication, in the New Zealand Journal of Sociology, interrogates the ‘2021 World Happiness Report’ and that ways in which it constructs what it means to be happy.

Zak would be happy to hear from anyone looking to undertake a research journey in the Department, as well as scholars interested in educational equity, community-based participatory research, sociologies of well-being, and education in the political context of Aotearoa New Zealand.

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Pippa is a first-year DPhil student, whose research interests focus on vulnerable students’ outcomes and experiences of secondary school English education.

In 2023, Pippa completed an MSc in Learning and Teaching at the University of Oxford, researching pedagogical strategies for the teaching of emotionally challenging literature to students with experiences of trauma. Her DPhil research will build on this project, exploring looked after children’s engagement with English education, and their outcomes in the subject.

Alongside her research, Pippa continues to teach English in a secondary school; she is therefore passionate about collaborations between practice and research. Her project seeks to develop our understanding of looked after children’s experiences in English classrooms, in order to facilitate the development of strategies to support these vulnerable learners.

Supervisors

Nicole Dingwall and Julie Selwyn

Yunfei Ma is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of international higher education.

Following his B.A. (First Class) at the University of Durham, Yunfei was awarded with MSc (Distinction) from the Department of Education, University of Oxford prior to his DPhil studies. He has also worked as a research assistant on the project Transnational academic mobility to global south: an exploratory study of international faculty in China.

Yunfei’s DPhil research focuses on global academic publishing and its relationship with knowledge formation, codification and dissemination. His research interest primarily lies in the geo-politics of knowledge production, global epistemic governance, China’s Humanities and Social Sciences research, and the philosophy of power.

Supervisors

Ariel Lindorff and Xin Xu

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Penny is a DPhil student whose research interests centre on classroom talk and international collaborations between secondary English classrooms.

Penny completed Oxford’s MSc in Learning and Teaching with distinction in 2019, focusing on methods for mitigating the impact of mind-wandering and misunderstanding as a means of enhancing student engagement in small-group and whole-class debates of interpretations of literature.  She has since won SHINE research funding to explore the impact of her methodology on students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Her DPhil continues her interest in student discussions of literature, exploring the impact on identity of online discussions between English classrooms in different countries.

Penny began her career as a secondary English Language Arts and journalism teacher in the USA but has taught secondary English predominantly in the UK in a career spanning 25 years.  She has overseen development of the global dimension and international collaboration at her current school for 14 years.

Supervisors

Victoria Elliott and Steven Puttick

Warda Arif is a doctoral student at the Department of Education. Her research aims to operationalise Critical Realist conceptions and methods to study Cultures of Higher Education in select Indian universities.

She completed her Master’s in Education and International Development from University College London’s – Institute of Education (UCL-IOE) as a Commonwealth Scholar and holds a B.Sc. in Biochemistry form Aligarh Muslim University (AMU).

Over her brief career, Warda has worked in the social development and impact sector in South Africa, India and Saudi Arabia, in teaching, research and advisory roles.

Supervisors

Dr Steven Puttick and Dr Aliya Khalid

Zak Devey is a passionate advocate for youth-led educational advocacy and equity – both within academia and in his work as co-founder of charitable trust Youth Arts New Zealand. In 2024, Zak continues to explore community conceptualisations of educational equity and their intersections with present and historic educational policy.

Zak also holds a deep care for youth-wellbeing, and its systemic determinants in the 21st century. His first publication, in the New Zealand Journal of Sociology, interrogates the ‘2021 World Happiness Report’ and that ways in which it constructs what it means to be happy.

Zak would be happy to hear from anyone looking to undertake a research journey in the Department, as well as scholars interested in educational equity, community-based participatory research, sociologies of well-being, and education in the political context of Aotearoa New Zealand.

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Pippa is a first-year DPhil student, whose research interests focus on vulnerable students’ outcomes and experiences of secondary school English education.

In 2023, Pippa completed an MSc in Learning and Teaching at the University of Oxford, researching pedagogical strategies for the teaching of emotionally challenging literature to students with experiences of trauma. Her DPhil research will build on this project, exploring looked after children’s engagement with English education, and their outcomes in the subject.

Alongside her research, Pippa continues to teach English in a secondary school; she is therefore passionate about collaborations between practice and research. Her project seeks to develop our understanding of looked after children’s experiences in English classrooms, in order to facilitate the development of strategies to support these vulnerable learners.

Supervisors

Nicole Dingwall and Julie Selwyn

Yunfei Ma is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of international higher education.

Following his B.A. (First Class) at the University of Durham, Yunfei was awarded with MSc (Distinction) from the Department of Education, University of Oxford prior to his DPhil studies. He has also worked as a research assistant on the project Transnational academic mobility to global south: an exploratory study of international faculty in China.

Yunfei’s DPhil research focuses on global academic publishing and its relationship with knowledge formation, codification and dissemination. His research interest primarily lies in the geo-politics of knowledge production, global epistemic governance, China’s Humanities and Social Sciences research, and the philosophy of power.

Supervisors

Ariel Lindorff and Xin Xu

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Penny is a DPhil student whose research interests centre on classroom talk and international collaborations between secondary English classrooms.

Penny completed Oxford’s MSc in Learning and Teaching with distinction in 2019, focusing on methods for mitigating the impact of mind-wandering and misunderstanding as a means of enhancing student engagement in small-group and whole-class debates of interpretations of literature.  She has since won SHINE research funding to explore the impact of her methodology on students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Her DPhil continues her interest in student discussions of literature, exploring the impact on identity of online discussions between English classrooms in different countries.

Penny began her career as a secondary English Language Arts and journalism teacher in the USA but has taught secondary English predominantly in the UK in a career spanning 25 years.  She has overseen development of the global dimension and international collaboration at her current school for 14 years.

Supervisors

Victoria Elliott and Steven Puttick

Warda Arif is a doctoral student at the Department of Education. Her research aims to operationalise Critical Realist conceptions and methods to study Cultures of Higher Education in select Indian universities.

She completed her Master’s in Education and International Development from University College London’s – Institute of Education (UCL-IOE) as a Commonwealth Scholar and holds a B.Sc. in Biochemistry form Aligarh Muslim University (AMU).

Over her brief career, Warda has worked in the social development and impact sector in South Africa, India and Saudi Arabia, in teaching, research and advisory roles.

Supervisors

Dr Steven Puttick and Dr Aliya Khalid

Zak Devey is a passionate advocate for youth-led educational advocacy and equity – both within academia and in his work as co-founder of charitable trust Youth Arts New Zealand. In 2024, Zak continues to explore community conceptualisations of educational equity and their intersections with present and historic educational policy.

Zak also holds a deep care for youth-wellbeing, and its systemic determinants in the 21st century. His first publication, in the New Zealand Journal of Sociology, interrogates the ‘2021 World Happiness Report’ and that ways in which it constructs what it means to be happy.

Zak would be happy to hear from anyone looking to undertake a research journey in the Department, as well as scholars interested in educational equity, community-based participatory research, sociologies of well-being, and education in the political context of Aotearoa New Zealand.

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Pippa is a first-year DPhil student, whose research interests focus on vulnerable students’ outcomes and experiences of secondary school English education.

In 2023, Pippa completed an MSc in Learning and Teaching at the University of Oxford, researching pedagogical strategies for the teaching of emotionally challenging literature to students with experiences of trauma. Her DPhil research will build on this project, exploring looked after children’s engagement with English education, and their outcomes in the subject.

Alongside her research, Pippa continues to teach English in a secondary school; she is therefore passionate about collaborations between practice and research. Her project seeks to develop our understanding of looked after children’s experiences in English classrooms, in order to facilitate the development of strategies to support these vulnerable learners.

Supervisors

Nicole Dingwall and Julie Selwyn

Yunfei Ma is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of international higher education.

Following his B.A. (First Class) at the University of Durham, Yunfei was awarded with MSc (Distinction) from the Department of Education, University of Oxford prior to his DPhil studies. He has also worked as a research assistant on the project Transnational academic mobility to global south: an exploratory study of international faculty in China.

Yunfei’s DPhil research focuses on global academic publishing and its relationship with knowledge formation, codification and dissemination. His research interest primarily lies in the geo-politics of knowledge production, global epistemic governance, China’s Humanities and Social Sciences research, and the philosophy of power.

Supervisors

Ariel Lindorff and Xin Xu

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Penny is a DPhil student whose research interests centre on classroom talk and international collaborations between secondary English classrooms.

Penny completed Oxford’s MSc in Learning and Teaching with distinction in 2019, focusing on methods for mitigating the impact of mind-wandering and misunderstanding as a means of enhancing student engagement in small-group and whole-class debates of interpretations of literature.  She has since won SHINE research funding to explore the impact of her methodology on students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Her DPhil continues her interest in student discussions of literature, exploring the impact on identity of online discussions between English classrooms in different countries.

Penny began her career as a secondary English Language Arts and journalism teacher in the USA but has taught secondary English predominantly in the UK in a career spanning 25 years.  She has overseen development of the global dimension and international collaboration at her current school for 14 years.

Supervisors

Victoria Elliott and Steven Puttick

Warda Arif is a doctoral student at the Department of Education. Her research aims to operationalise Critical Realist conceptions and methods to study Cultures of Higher Education in select Indian universities.

She completed her Master’s in Education and International Development from University College London’s – Institute of Education (UCL-IOE) as a Commonwealth Scholar and holds a B.Sc. in Biochemistry form Aligarh Muslim University (AMU).

Over her brief career, Warda has worked in the social development and impact sector in South Africa, India and Saudi Arabia, in teaching, research and advisory roles.

Supervisors

Dr Steven Puttick and Dr Aliya Khalid

Zak Devey is a passionate advocate for youth-led educational advocacy and equity – both within academia and in his work as co-founder of charitable trust Youth Arts New Zealand. In 2024, Zak continues to explore community conceptualisations of educational equity and their intersections with present and historic educational policy.

Zak also holds a deep care for youth-wellbeing, and its systemic determinants in the 21st century. His first publication, in the New Zealand Journal of Sociology, interrogates the ‘2021 World Happiness Report’ and that ways in which it constructs what it means to be happy.

Zak would be happy to hear from anyone looking to undertake a research journey in the Department, as well as scholars interested in educational equity, community-based participatory research, sociologies of well-being, and education in the political context of Aotearoa New Zealand.

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Pippa is a first-year DPhil student, whose research interests focus on vulnerable students’ outcomes and experiences of secondary school English education.

In 2023, Pippa completed an MSc in Learning and Teaching at the University of Oxford, researching pedagogical strategies for the teaching of emotionally challenging literature to students with experiences of trauma. Her DPhil research will build on this project, exploring looked after children’s engagement with English education, and their outcomes in the subject.

Alongside her research, Pippa continues to teach English in a secondary school; she is therefore passionate about collaborations between practice and research. Her project seeks to develop our understanding of looked after children’s experiences in English classrooms, in order to facilitate the development of strategies to support these vulnerable learners.

Supervisors

Nicole Dingwall and Julie Selwyn

Yunfei Ma is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of international higher education.

Following his B.A. (First Class) at the University of Durham, Yunfei was awarded with MSc (Distinction) from the Department of Education, University of Oxford prior to his DPhil studies. He has also worked as a research assistant on the project Transnational academic mobility to global south: an exploratory study of international faculty in China.

Yunfei’s DPhil research focuses on global academic publishing and its relationship with knowledge formation, codification and dissemination. His research interest primarily lies in the geo-politics of knowledge production, global epistemic governance, China’s Humanities and Social Sciences research, and the philosophy of power.

Supervisors

Ariel Lindorff and Xin Xu

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Penny is a DPhil student whose research interests centre on classroom talk and international collaborations between secondary English classrooms.

Penny completed Oxford’s MSc in Learning and Teaching with distinction in 2019, focusing on methods for mitigating the impact of mind-wandering and misunderstanding as a means of enhancing student engagement in small-group and whole-class debates of interpretations of literature.  She has since won SHINE research funding to explore the impact of her methodology on students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Her DPhil continues her interest in student discussions of literature, exploring the impact on identity of online discussions between English classrooms in different countries.

Penny began her career as a secondary English Language Arts and journalism teacher in the USA but has taught secondary English predominantly in the UK in a career spanning 25 years.  She has overseen development of the global dimension and international collaboration at her current school for 14 years.

Supervisors

Victoria Elliott and Steven Puttick

Warda Arif is a doctoral student at the Department of Education. Her research aims to operationalise Critical Realist conceptions and methods to study Cultures of Higher Education in select Indian universities.

She completed her Master’s in Education and International Development from University College London’s – Institute of Education (UCL-IOE) as a Commonwealth Scholar and holds a B.Sc. in Biochemistry form Aligarh Muslim University (AMU).

Over her brief career, Warda has worked in the social development and impact sector in South Africa, India and Saudi Arabia, in teaching, research and advisory roles.

Supervisors

Dr Steven Puttick and Dr Aliya Khalid

Zak Devey is a passionate advocate for youth-led educational advocacy and equity – both within academia and in his work as co-founder of charitable trust Youth Arts New Zealand. In 2024, Zak continues to explore community conceptualisations of educational equity and their intersections with present and historic educational policy.

Zak also holds a deep care for youth-wellbeing, and its systemic determinants in the 21st century. His first publication, in the New Zealand Journal of Sociology, interrogates the ‘2021 World Happiness Report’ and that ways in which it constructs what it means to be happy.

Zak would be happy to hear from anyone looking to undertake a research journey in the Department, as well as scholars interested in educational equity, community-based participatory research, sociologies of well-being, and education in the political context of Aotearoa New Zealand.

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Pippa is a first-year DPhil student, whose research interests focus on vulnerable students’ outcomes and experiences of secondary school English education.

In 2023, Pippa completed an MSc in Learning and Teaching at the University of Oxford, researching pedagogical strategies for the teaching of emotionally challenging literature to students with experiences of trauma. Her DPhil research will build on this project, exploring looked after children’s engagement with English education, and their outcomes in the subject.

Alongside her research, Pippa continues to teach English in a secondary school; she is therefore passionate about collaborations between practice and research. Her project seeks to develop our understanding of looked after children’s experiences in English classrooms, in order to facilitate the development of strategies to support these vulnerable learners.

Supervisors

Nicole Dingwall and Julie Selwyn

Yunfei Ma is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of international higher education.

Following his B.A. (First Class) at the University of Durham, Yunfei was awarded with MSc (Distinction) from the Department of Education, University of Oxford prior to his DPhil studies. He has also worked as a research assistant on the project Transnational academic mobility to global south: an exploratory study of international faculty in China.

Yunfei’s DPhil research focuses on global academic publishing and its relationship with knowledge formation, codification and dissemination. His research interest primarily lies in the geo-politics of knowledge production, global epistemic governance, China’s Humanities and Social Sciences research, and the philosophy of power.

Supervisors

Ariel Lindorff and Xin Xu

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Penny is a DPhil student whose research interests centre on classroom talk and international collaborations between secondary English classrooms.

Penny completed Oxford’s MSc in Learning and Teaching with distinction in 2019, focusing on methods for mitigating the impact of mind-wandering and misunderstanding as a means of enhancing student engagement in small-group and whole-class debates of interpretations of literature.  She has since won SHINE research funding to explore the impact of her methodology on students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Her DPhil continues her interest in student discussions of literature, exploring the impact on identity of online discussions between English classrooms in different countries.

Penny began her career as a secondary English Language Arts and journalism teacher in the USA but has taught secondary English predominantly in the UK in a career spanning 25 years.  She has overseen development of the global dimension and international collaboration at her current school for 14 years.

Supervisors

Victoria Elliott and Steven Puttick

Warda Arif is a doctoral student at the Department of Education. Her research aims to operationalise Critical Realist conceptions and methods to study Cultures of Higher Education in select Indian universities.

She completed her Master’s in Education and International Development from University College London’s – Institute of Education (UCL-IOE) as a Commonwealth Scholar and holds a B.Sc. in Biochemistry form Aligarh Muslim University (AMU).

Over her brief career, Warda has worked in the social development and impact sector in South Africa, India and Saudi Arabia, in teaching, research and advisory roles.

Supervisors

Dr Steven Puttick and Dr Aliya Khalid

Zak Devey is a passionate advocate for youth-led educational advocacy and equity – both within academia and in his work as co-founder of charitable trust Youth Arts New Zealand. In 2024, Zak continues to explore community conceptualisations of educational equity and their intersections with present and historic educational policy.

Zak also holds a deep care for youth-wellbeing, and its systemic determinants in the 21st century. His first publication, in the New Zealand Journal of Sociology, interrogates the ‘2021 World Happiness Report’ and that ways in which it constructs what it means to be happy.

Zak would be happy to hear from anyone looking to undertake a research journey in the Department, as well as scholars interested in educational equity, community-based participatory research, sociologies of well-being, and education in the political context of Aotearoa New Zealand.

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Pippa is a first-year DPhil student, whose research interests focus on vulnerable students’ outcomes and experiences of secondary school English education.

In 2023, Pippa completed an MSc in Learning and Teaching at the University of Oxford, researching pedagogical strategies for the teaching of emotionally challenging literature to students with experiences of trauma. Her DPhil research will build on this project, exploring looked after children’s engagement with English education, and their outcomes in the subject.

Alongside her research, Pippa continues to teach English in a secondary school; she is therefore passionate about collaborations between practice and research. Her project seeks to develop our understanding of looked after children’s experiences in English classrooms, in order to facilitate the development of strategies to support these vulnerable learners.

Supervisors

Nicole Dingwall and Julie Selwyn

Yunfei Ma is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of international higher education.

Following his B.A. (First Class) at the University of Durham, Yunfei was awarded with MSc (Distinction) from the Department of Education, University of Oxford prior to his DPhil studies. He has also worked as a research assistant on the project Transnational academic mobility to global south: an exploratory study of international faculty in China.

Yunfei’s DPhil research focuses on global academic publishing and its relationship with knowledge formation, codification and dissemination. His research interest primarily lies in the geo-politics of knowledge production, global epistemic governance, China’s Humanities and Social Sciences research, and the philosophy of power.

Supervisors

Ariel Lindorff and Xin Xu

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Penny is a DPhil student whose research interests centre on classroom talk and international collaborations between secondary English classrooms.

Penny completed Oxford’s MSc in Learning and Teaching with distinction in 2019, focusing on methods for mitigating the impact of mind-wandering and misunderstanding as a means of enhancing student engagement in small-group and whole-class debates of interpretations of literature.  She has since won SHINE research funding to explore the impact of her methodology on students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Her DPhil continues her interest in student discussions of literature, exploring the impact on identity of online discussions between English classrooms in different countries.

Penny began her career as a secondary English Language Arts and journalism teacher in the USA but has taught secondary English predominantly in the UK in a career spanning 25 years.  She has overseen development of the global dimension and international collaboration at her current school for 14 years.

Supervisors

Victoria Elliott and Steven Puttick

Warda Arif is a doctoral student at the Department of Education. Her research aims to operationalise Critical Realist conceptions and methods to study Cultures of Higher Education in select Indian universities.

She completed her Master’s in Education and International Development from University College London’s – Institute of Education (UCL-IOE) as a Commonwealth Scholar and holds a B.Sc. in Biochemistry form Aligarh Muslim University (AMU).

Over her brief career, Warda has worked in the social development and impact sector in South Africa, India and Saudi Arabia, in teaching, research and advisory roles.

Supervisors

Dr Steven Puttick and Dr Aliya Khalid

Zak Devey is a passionate advocate for youth-led educational advocacy and equity – both within academia and in his work as co-founder of charitable trust Youth Arts New Zealand. In 2024, Zak continues to explore community conceptualisations of educational equity and their intersections with present and historic educational policy.

Zak also holds a deep care for youth-wellbeing, and its systemic determinants in the 21st century. His first publication, in the New Zealand Journal of Sociology, interrogates the ‘2021 World Happiness Report’ and that ways in which it constructs what it means to be happy.

Zak would be happy to hear from anyone looking to undertake a research journey in the Department, as well as scholars interested in educational equity, community-based participatory research, sociologies of well-being, and education in the political context of Aotearoa New Zealand.

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Pippa is a first-year DPhil student, whose research interests focus on vulnerable students’ outcomes and experiences of secondary school English education.

In 2023, Pippa completed an MSc in Learning and Teaching at the University of Oxford, researching pedagogical strategies for the teaching of emotionally challenging literature to students with experiences of trauma. Her DPhil research will build on this project, exploring looked after children’s engagement with English education, and their outcomes in the subject.

Alongside her research, Pippa continues to teach English in a secondary school; she is therefore passionate about collaborations between practice and research. Her project seeks to develop our understanding of looked after children’s experiences in English classrooms, in order to facilitate the development of strategies to support these vulnerable learners.

Supervisors

Nicole Dingwall and Julie Selwyn

Yunfei Ma is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of international higher education.

Following his B.A. (First Class) at the University of Durham, Yunfei was awarded with MSc (Distinction) from the Department of Education, University of Oxford prior to his DPhil studies. He has also worked as a research assistant on the project Transnational academic mobility to global south: an exploratory study of international faculty in China.

Yunfei’s DPhil research focuses on global academic publishing and its relationship with knowledge formation, codification and dissemination. His research interest primarily lies in the geo-politics of knowledge production, global epistemic governance, China’s Humanities and Social Sciences research, and the philosophy of power.

Supervisors

Ariel Lindorff and Xin Xu

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Penny is a DPhil student whose research interests centre on classroom talk and international collaborations between secondary English classrooms.

Penny completed Oxford’s MSc in Learning and Teaching with distinction in 2019, focusing on methods for mitigating the impact of mind-wandering and misunderstanding as a means of enhancing student engagement in small-group and whole-class debates of interpretations of literature.  She has since won SHINE research funding to explore the impact of her methodology on students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Her DPhil continues her interest in student discussions of literature, exploring the impact on identity of online discussions between English classrooms in different countries.

Penny began her career as a secondary English Language Arts and journalism teacher in the USA but has taught secondary English predominantly in the UK in a career spanning 25 years.  She has overseen development of the global dimension and international collaboration at her current school for 14 years.

Supervisors

Victoria Elliott and Steven Puttick

Warda Arif is a doctoral student at the Department of Education. Her research aims to operationalise Critical Realist conceptions and methods to study Cultures of Higher Education in select Indian universities.

She completed her Master’s in Education and International Development from University College London’s – Institute of Education (UCL-IOE) as a Commonwealth Scholar and holds a B.Sc. in Biochemistry form Aligarh Muslim University (AMU).

Over her brief career, Warda has worked in the social development and impact sector in South Africa, India and Saudi Arabia, in teaching, research and advisory roles.

Supervisors

Dr Steven Puttick and Dr Aliya Khalid

Zak Devey is a passionate advocate for youth-led educational advocacy and equity – both within academia and in his work as co-founder of charitable trust Youth Arts New Zealand. In 2024, Zak continues to explore community conceptualisations of educational equity and their intersections with present and historic educational policy.

Zak also holds a deep care for youth-wellbeing, and its systemic determinants in the 21st century. His first publication, in the New Zealand Journal of Sociology, interrogates the ‘2021 World Happiness Report’ and that ways in which it constructs what it means to be happy.

Zak would be happy to hear from anyone looking to undertake a research journey in the Department, as well as scholars interested in educational equity, community-based participatory research, sociologies of well-being, and education in the political context of Aotearoa New Zealand.

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Pippa is a first-year DPhil student, whose research interests focus on vulnerable students’ outcomes and experiences of secondary school English education.

In 2023, Pippa completed an MSc in Learning and Teaching at the University of Oxford, researching pedagogical strategies for the teaching of emotionally challenging literature to students with experiences of trauma. Her DPhil research will build on this project, exploring looked after children’s engagement with English education, and their outcomes in the subject.

Alongside her research, Pippa continues to teach English in a secondary school; she is therefore passionate about collaborations between practice and research. Her project seeks to develop our understanding of looked after children’s experiences in English classrooms, in order to facilitate the development of strategies to support these vulnerable learners.

Supervisors

Nicole Dingwall and Julie Selwyn

Yunfei Ma is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of international higher education.

Following his B.A. (First Class) at the University of Durham, Yunfei was awarded with MSc (Distinction) from the Department of Education, University of Oxford prior to his DPhil studies. He has also worked as a research assistant on the project Transnational academic mobility to global south: an exploratory study of international faculty in China.

Yunfei’s DPhil research focuses on global academic publishing and its relationship with knowledge formation, codification and dissemination. His research interest primarily lies in the geo-politics of knowledge production, global epistemic governance, China’s Humanities and Social Sciences research, and the philosophy of power.

Supervisors

Ariel Lindorff and Xin Xu

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Penny is a DPhil student whose research interests centre on classroom talk and international collaborations between secondary English classrooms.

Penny completed Oxford’s MSc in Learning and Teaching with distinction in 2019, focusing on methods for mitigating the impact of mind-wandering and misunderstanding as a means of enhancing student engagement in small-group and whole-class debates of interpretations of literature.  She has since won SHINE research funding to explore the impact of her methodology on students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Her DPhil continues her interest in student discussions of literature, exploring the impact on identity of online discussions between English classrooms in different countries.

Penny began her career as a secondary English Language Arts and journalism teacher in the USA but has taught secondary English predominantly in the UK in a career spanning 25 years.  She has overseen development of the global dimension and international collaboration at her current school for 14 years.

Supervisors

Victoria Elliott and Steven Puttick

Warda Arif is a doctoral student at the Department of Education. Her research aims to operationalise Critical Realist conceptions and methods to study Cultures of Higher Education in select Indian universities.

She completed her Master’s in Education and International Development from University College London’s – Institute of Education (UCL-IOE) as a Commonwealth Scholar and holds a B.Sc. in Biochemistry form Aligarh Muslim University (AMU).

Over her brief career, Warda has worked in the social development and impact sector in South Africa, India and Saudi Arabia, in teaching, research and advisory roles.

Supervisors

Dr Steven Puttick and Dr Aliya Khalid

Zak Devey is a passionate advocate for youth-led educational advocacy and equity – both within academia and in his work as co-founder of charitable trust Youth Arts New Zealand. In 2024, Zak continues to explore community conceptualisations of educational equity and their intersections with present and historic educational policy.

Zak also holds a deep care for youth-wellbeing, and its systemic determinants in the 21st century. His first publication, in the New Zealand Journal of Sociology, interrogates the ‘2021 World Happiness Report’ and that ways in which it constructs what it means to be happy.

Zak would be happy to hear from anyone looking to undertake a research journey in the Department, as well as scholars interested in educational equity, community-based participatory research, sociologies of well-being, and education in the political context of Aotearoa New Zealand.

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Pippa is a first-year DPhil student, whose research interests focus on vulnerable students’ outcomes and experiences of secondary school English education.

In 2023, Pippa completed an MSc in Learning and Teaching at the University of Oxford, researching pedagogical strategies for the teaching of emotionally challenging literature to students with experiences of trauma. Her DPhil research will build on this project, exploring looked after children’s engagement with English education, and their outcomes in the subject.

Alongside her research, Pippa continues to teach English in a secondary school; she is therefore passionate about collaborations between practice and research. Her project seeks to develop our understanding of looked after children’s experiences in English classrooms, in order to facilitate the development of strategies to support these vulnerable learners.

Supervisors

Nicole Dingwall and Julie Selwyn

Yunfei Ma is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of international higher education.

Following his B.A. (First Class) at the University of Durham, Yunfei was awarded with MSc (Distinction) from the Department of Education, University of Oxford prior to his DPhil studies. He has also worked as a research assistant on the project Transnational academic mobility to global south: an exploratory study of international faculty in China.

Yunfei’s DPhil research focuses on global academic publishing and its relationship with knowledge formation, codification and dissemination. His research interest primarily lies in the geo-politics of knowledge production, global epistemic governance, China’s Humanities and Social Sciences research, and the philosophy of power.

Supervisors

Ariel Lindorff and Xin Xu

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Penny is a DPhil student whose research interests centre on classroom talk and international collaborations between secondary English classrooms.

Penny completed Oxford’s MSc in Learning and Teaching with distinction in 2019, focusing on methods for mitigating the impact of mind-wandering and misunderstanding as a means of enhancing student engagement in small-group and whole-class debates of interpretations of literature.  She has since won SHINE research funding to explore the impact of her methodology on students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Her DPhil continues her interest in student discussions of literature, exploring the impact on identity of online discussions between English classrooms in different countries.

Penny began her career as a secondary English Language Arts and journalism teacher in the USA but has taught secondary English predominantly in the UK in a career spanning 25 years.  She has overseen development of the global dimension and international collaboration at her current school for 14 years.

Supervisors

Victoria Elliott and Steven Puttick

Warda Arif is a doctoral student at the Department of Education. Her research aims to operationalise Critical Realist conceptions and methods to study Cultures of Higher Education in select Indian universities.

She completed her Master’s in Education and International Development from University College London’s – Institute of Education (UCL-IOE) as a Commonwealth Scholar and holds a B.Sc. in Biochemistry form Aligarh Muslim University (AMU).

Over her brief career, Warda has worked in the social development and impact sector in South Africa, India and Saudi Arabia, in teaching, research and advisory roles.

Supervisors

Dr Steven Puttick and Dr Aliya Khalid

Zak Devey is a passionate advocate for youth-led educational advocacy and equity – both within academia and in his work as co-founder of charitable trust Youth Arts New Zealand. In 2024, Zak continues to explore community conceptualisations of educational equity and their intersections with present and historic educational policy.

Zak also holds a deep care for youth-wellbeing, and its systemic determinants in the 21st century. His first publication, in the New Zealand Journal of Sociology, interrogates the ‘2021 World Happiness Report’ and that ways in which it constructs what it means to be happy.

Zak would be happy to hear from anyone looking to undertake a research journey in the Department, as well as scholars interested in educational equity, community-based participatory research, sociologies of well-being, and education in the political context of Aotearoa New Zealand.

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Pippa is a first-year DPhil student, whose research interests focus on vulnerable students’ outcomes and experiences of secondary school English education.

In 2023, Pippa completed an MSc in Learning and Teaching at the University of Oxford, researching pedagogical strategies for the teaching of emotionally challenging literature to students with experiences of trauma. Her DPhil research will build on this project, exploring looked after children’s engagement with English education, and their outcomes in the subject.

Alongside her research, Pippa continues to teach English in a secondary school; she is therefore passionate about collaborations between practice and research. Her project seeks to develop our understanding of looked after children’s experiences in English classrooms, in order to facilitate the development of strategies to support these vulnerable learners.

Supervisors

Nicole Dingwall and Julie Selwyn

Yunfei Ma is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of international higher education.

Following his B.A. (First Class) at the University of Durham, Yunfei was awarded with MSc (Distinction) from the Department of Education, University of Oxford prior to his DPhil studies. He has also worked as a research assistant on the project Transnational academic mobility to global south: an exploratory study of international faculty in China.

Yunfei’s DPhil research focuses on global academic publishing and its relationship with knowledge formation, codification and dissemination. His research interest primarily lies in the geo-politics of knowledge production, global epistemic governance, China’s Humanities and Social Sciences research, and the philosophy of power.

Supervisors

Ariel Lindorff and Xin Xu

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Penny is a DPhil student whose research interests centre on classroom talk and international collaborations between secondary English classrooms.

Penny completed Oxford’s MSc in Learning and Teaching with distinction in 2019, focusing on methods for mitigating the impact of mind-wandering and misunderstanding as a means of enhancing student engagement in small-group and whole-class debates of interpretations of literature.  She has since won SHINE research funding to explore the impact of her methodology on students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Her DPhil continues her interest in student discussions of literature, exploring the impact on identity of online discussions between English classrooms in different countries.

Penny began her career as a secondary English Language Arts and journalism teacher in the USA but has taught secondary English predominantly in the UK in a career spanning 25 years.  She has overseen development of the global dimension and international collaboration at her current school for 14 years.

Supervisors

Victoria Elliott and Steven Puttick

Warda Arif is a doctoral student at the Department of Education. Her research aims to operationalise Critical Realist conceptions and methods to study Cultures of Higher Education in select Indian universities.

She completed her Master’s in Education and International Development from University College London’s – Institute of Education (UCL-IOE) as a Commonwealth Scholar and holds a B.Sc. in Biochemistry form Aligarh Muslim University (AMU).

Over her brief career, Warda has worked in the social development and impact sector in South Africa, India and Saudi Arabia, in teaching, research and advisory roles.

Supervisors

Dr Steven Puttick and Dr Aliya Khalid

Zak Devey is a passionate advocate for youth-led educational advocacy and equity – both within academia and in his work as co-founder of charitable trust Youth Arts New Zealand. In 2024, Zak continues to explore community conceptualisations of educational equity and their intersections with present and historic educational policy.

Zak also holds a deep care for youth-wellbeing, and its systemic determinants in the 21st century. His first publication, in the New Zealand Journal of Sociology, interrogates the ‘2021 World Happiness Report’ and that ways in which it constructs what it means to be happy.

Zak would be happy to hear from anyone looking to undertake a research journey in the Department, as well as scholars interested in educational equity, community-based participatory research, sociologies of well-being, and education in the political context of Aotearoa New Zealand.

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Pippa is a first-year DPhil student, whose research interests focus on vulnerable students’ outcomes and experiences of secondary school English education.

In 2023, Pippa completed an MSc in Learning and Teaching at the University of Oxford, researching pedagogical strategies for the teaching of emotionally challenging literature to students with experiences of trauma. Her DPhil research will build on this project, exploring looked after children’s engagement with English education, and their outcomes in the subject.

Alongside her research, Pippa continues to teach English in a secondary school; she is therefore passionate about collaborations between practice and research. Her project seeks to develop our understanding of looked after children’s experiences in English classrooms, in order to facilitate the development of strategies to support these vulnerable learners.

Supervisors

Nicole Dingwall and Julie Selwyn

Yunfei Ma is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of international higher education.

Following his B.A. (First Class) at the University of Durham, Yunfei was awarded with MSc (Distinction) from the Department of Education, University of Oxford prior to his DPhil studies. He has also worked as a research assistant on the project Transnational academic mobility to global south: an exploratory study of international faculty in China.

Yunfei’s DPhil research focuses on global academic publishing and its relationship with knowledge formation, codification and dissemination. His research interest primarily lies in the geo-politics of knowledge production, global epistemic governance, China’s Humanities and Social Sciences research, and the philosophy of power.

Supervisors

Ariel Lindorff and Xin Xu

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Penny is a DPhil student whose research interests centre on classroom talk and international collaborations between secondary English classrooms.

Penny completed Oxford’s MSc in Learning and Teaching with distinction in 2019, focusing on methods for mitigating the impact of mind-wandering and misunderstanding as a means of enhancing student engagement in small-group and whole-class debates of interpretations of literature.  She has since won SHINE research funding to explore the impact of her methodology on students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Her DPhil continues her interest in student discussions of literature, exploring the impact on identity of online discussions between English classrooms in different countries.

Penny began her career as a secondary English Language Arts and journalism teacher in the USA but has taught secondary English predominantly in the UK in a career spanning 25 years.  She has overseen development of the global dimension and international collaboration at her current school for 14 years.

Supervisors

Victoria Elliott and Steven Puttick

Warda Arif is a doctoral student at the Department of Education. Her research aims to operationalise Critical Realist conceptions and methods to study Cultures of Higher Education in select Indian universities.

She completed her Master’s in Education and International Development from University College London’s – Institute of Education (UCL-IOE) as a Commonwealth Scholar and holds a B.Sc. in Biochemistry form Aligarh Muslim University (AMU).

Over her brief career, Warda has worked in the social development and impact sector in South Africa, India and Saudi Arabia, in teaching, research and advisory roles.

Supervisors

Dr Steven Puttick and Dr Aliya Khalid

Zak Devey is a passionate advocate for youth-led educational advocacy and equity – both within academia and in his work as co-founder of charitable trust Youth Arts New Zealand. In 2024, Zak continues to explore community conceptualisations of educational equity and their intersections with present and historic educational policy.

Zak also holds a deep care for youth-wellbeing, and its systemic determinants in the 21st century. His first publication, in the New Zealand Journal of Sociology, interrogates the ‘2021 World Happiness Report’ and that ways in which it constructs what it means to be happy.

Zak would be happy to hear from anyone looking to undertake a research journey in the Department, as well as scholars interested in educational equity, community-based participatory research, sociologies of well-being, and education in the political context of Aotearoa New Zealand.

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Pippa is a first-year DPhil student, whose research interests focus on vulnerable students’ outcomes and experiences of secondary school English education.

In 2023, Pippa completed an MSc in Learning and Teaching at the University of Oxford, researching pedagogical strategies for the teaching of emotionally challenging literature to students with experiences of trauma. Her DPhil research will build on this project, exploring looked after children’s engagement with English education, and their outcomes in the subject.

Alongside her research, Pippa continues to teach English in a secondary school; she is therefore passionate about collaborations between practice and research. Her project seeks to develop our understanding of looked after children’s experiences in English classrooms, in order to facilitate the development of strategies to support these vulnerable learners.

Supervisors

Nicole Dingwall and Julie Selwyn

Yunfei Ma is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of international higher education.

Following his B.A. (First Class) at the University of Durham, Yunfei was awarded with MSc (Distinction) from the Department of Education, University of Oxford prior to his DPhil studies. He has also worked as a research assistant on the project Transnational academic mobility to global south: an exploratory study of international faculty in China.

Yunfei’s DPhil research focuses on global academic publishing and its relationship with knowledge formation, codification and dissemination. His research interest primarily lies in the geo-politics of knowledge production, global epistemic governance, China’s Humanities and Social Sciences research, and the philosophy of power.

Supervisors

Ariel Lindorff and Xin Xu

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Penny is a DPhil student whose research interests centre on classroom talk and international collaborations between secondary English classrooms.

Penny completed Oxford’s MSc in Learning and Teaching with distinction in 2019, focusing on methods for mitigating the impact of mind-wandering and misunderstanding as a means of enhancing student engagement in small-group and whole-class debates of interpretations of literature.  She has since won SHINE research funding to explore the impact of her methodology on students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Her DPhil continues her interest in student discussions of literature, exploring the impact on identity of online discussions between English classrooms in different countries.

Penny began her career as a secondary English Language Arts and journalism teacher in the USA but has taught secondary English predominantly in the UK in a career spanning 25 years.  She has overseen development of the global dimension and international collaboration at her current school for 14 years.

Supervisors

Victoria Elliott and Steven Puttick

Warda Arif is a doctoral student at the Department of Education. Her research aims to operationalise Critical Realist conceptions and methods to study Cultures of Higher Education in select Indian universities.

She completed her Master’s in Education and International Development from University College London’s – Institute of Education (UCL-IOE) as a Commonwealth Scholar and holds a B.Sc. in Biochemistry form Aligarh Muslim University (AMU).

Over her brief career, Warda has worked in the social development and impact sector in South Africa, India and Saudi Arabia, in teaching, research and advisory roles.

Supervisors

Dr Steven Puttick and Dr Aliya Khalid

Zak Devey is a passionate advocate for youth-led educational advocacy and equity – both within academia and in his work as co-founder of charitable trust Youth Arts New Zealand. In 2024, Zak continues to explore community conceptualisations of educational equity and their intersections with present and historic educational policy.

Zak also holds a deep care for youth-wellbeing, and its systemic determinants in the 21st century. His first publication, in the New Zealand Journal of Sociology, interrogates the ‘2021 World Happiness Report’ and that ways in which it constructs what it means to be happy.

Zak would be happy to hear from anyone looking to undertake a research journey in the Department, as well as scholars interested in educational equity, community-based participatory research, sociologies of well-being, and education in the political context of Aotearoa New Zealand.

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Pippa is a first-year DPhil student, whose research interests focus on vulnerable students’ outcomes and experiences of secondary school English education.

In 2023, Pippa completed an MSc in Learning and Teaching at the University of Oxford, researching pedagogical strategies for the teaching of emotionally challenging literature to students with experiences of trauma. Her DPhil research will build on this project, exploring looked after children’s engagement with English education, and their outcomes in the subject.

Alongside her research, Pippa continues to teach English in a secondary school; she is therefore passionate about collaborations between practice and research. Her project seeks to develop our understanding of looked after children’s experiences in English classrooms, in order to facilitate the development of strategies to support these vulnerable learners.

Supervisors

Nicole Dingwall and Julie Selwyn

Yunfei Ma is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of international higher education.

Following his B.A. (First Class) at the University of Durham, Yunfei was awarded with MSc (Distinction) from the Department of Education, University of Oxford prior to his DPhil studies. He has also worked as a research assistant on the project Transnational academic mobility to global south: an exploratory study of international faculty in China.

Yunfei’s DPhil research focuses on global academic publishing and its relationship with knowledge formation, codification and dissemination. His research interest primarily lies in the geo-politics of knowledge production, global epistemic governance, China’s Humanities and Social Sciences research, and the philosophy of power.

Supervisors

Ariel Lindorff and Xin Xu

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Penny is a DPhil student whose research interests centre on classroom talk and international collaborations between secondary English classrooms.

Penny completed Oxford’s MSc in Learning and Teaching with distinction in 2019, focusing on methods for mitigating the impact of mind-wandering and misunderstanding as a means of enhancing student engagement in small-group and whole-class debates of interpretations of literature.  She has since won SHINE research funding to explore the impact of her methodology on students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Her DPhil continues her interest in student discussions of literature, exploring the impact on identity of online discussions between English classrooms in different countries.

Penny began her career as a secondary English Language Arts and journalism teacher in the USA but has taught secondary English predominantly in the UK in a career spanning 25 years.  She has overseen development of the global dimension and international collaboration at her current school for 14 years.

Supervisors

Victoria Elliott and Steven Puttick

Warda Arif is a doctoral student at the Department of Education. Her research aims to operationalise Critical Realist conceptions and methods to study Cultures of Higher Education in select Indian universities.

She completed her Master’s in Education and International Development from University College London’s – Institute of Education (UCL-IOE) as a Commonwealth Scholar and holds a B.Sc. in Biochemistry form Aligarh Muslim University (AMU).

Over her brief career, Warda has worked in the social development and impact sector in South Africa, India and Saudi Arabia, in teaching, research and advisory roles.

Supervisors

Dr Steven Puttick and Dr Aliya Khalid

Zak Devey is a passionate advocate for youth-led educational advocacy and equity – both within academia and in his work as co-founder of charitable trust Youth Arts New Zealand. In 2024, Zak continues to explore community conceptualisations of educational equity and their intersections with present and historic educational policy.

Zak also holds a deep care for youth-wellbeing, and its systemic determinants in the 21st century. His first publication, in the New Zealand Journal of Sociology, interrogates the ‘2021 World Happiness Report’ and that ways in which it constructs what it means to be happy.

Zak would be happy to hear from anyone looking to undertake a research journey in the Department, as well as scholars interested in educational equity, community-based participatory research, sociologies of well-being, and education in the political context of Aotearoa New Zealand.

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Pippa is a first-year DPhil student, whose research interests focus on vulnerable students’ outcomes and experiences of secondary school English education.

In 2023, Pippa completed an MSc in Learning and Teaching at the University of Oxford, researching pedagogical strategies for the teaching of emotionally challenging literature to students with experiences of trauma. Her DPhil research will build on this project, exploring looked after children’s engagement with English education, and their outcomes in the subject.

Alongside her research, Pippa continues to teach English in a secondary school; she is therefore passionate about collaborations between practice and research. Her project seeks to develop our understanding of looked after children’s experiences in English classrooms, in order to facilitate the development of strategies to support these vulnerable learners.

Supervisors

Nicole Dingwall and Julie Selwyn

Yunfei Ma is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of international higher education.

Following his B.A. (First Class) at the University of Durham, Yunfei was awarded with MSc (Distinction) from the Department of Education, University of Oxford prior to his DPhil studies. He has also worked as a research assistant on the project Transnational academic mobility to global south: an exploratory study of international faculty in China.

Yunfei’s DPhil research focuses on global academic publishing and its relationship with knowledge formation, codification and dissemination. His research interest primarily lies in the geo-politics of knowledge production, global epistemic governance, China’s Humanities and Social Sciences research, and the philosophy of power.

Supervisors

Ariel Lindorff and Xin Xu

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Penny is a DPhil student whose research interests centre on classroom talk and international collaborations between secondary English classrooms.

Penny completed Oxford’s MSc in Learning and Teaching with distinction in 2019, focusing on methods for mitigating the impact of mind-wandering and misunderstanding as a means of enhancing student engagement in small-group and whole-class debates of interpretations of literature.  She has since won SHINE research funding to explore the impact of her methodology on students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Her DPhil continues her interest in student discussions of literature, exploring the impact on identity of online discussions between English classrooms in different countries.

Penny began her career as a secondary English Language Arts and journalism teacher in the USA but has taught secondary English predominantly in the UK in a career spanning 25 years.  She has overseen development of the global dimension and international collaboration at her current school for 14 years.

Supervisors

Victoria Elliott and Steven Puttick

Warda Arif is a doctoral student at the Department of Education. Her research aims to operationalise Critical Realist conceptions and methods to study Cultures of Higher Education in select Indian universities.

She completed her Master’s in Education and International Development from University College London’s – Institute of Education (UCL-IOE) as a Commonwealth Scholar and holds a B.Sc. in Biochemistry form Aligarh Muslim University (AMU).

Over her brief career, Warda has worked in the social development and impact sector in South Africa, India and Saudi Arabia, in teaching, research and advisory roles.

Supervisors

Dr Steven Puttick and Dr Aliya Khalid

Zak Devey is a passionate advocate for youth-led educational advocacy and equity – both within academia and in his work as co-founder of charitable trust Youth Arts New Zealand. In 2024, Zak continues to explore community conceptualisations of educational equity and their intersections with present and historic educational policy.

Zak also holds a deep care for youth-wellbeing, and its systemic determinants in the 21st century. His first publication, in the New Zealand Journal of Sociology, interrogates the ‘2021 World Happiness Report’ and that ways in which it constructs what it means to be happy.

Zak would be happy to hear from anyone looking to undertake a research journey in the Department, as well as scholars interested in educational equity, community-based participatory research, sociologies of well-being, and education in the political context of Aotearoa New Zealand.

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Pippa is a first-year DPhil student, whose research interests focus on vulnerable students’ outcomes and experiences of secondary school English education.

In 2023, Pippa completed an MSc in Learning and Teaching at the University of Oxford, researching pedagogical strategies for the teaching of emotionally challenging literature to students with experiences of trauma. Her DPhil research will build on this project, exploring looked after children’s engagement with English education, and their outcomes in the subject.

Alongside her research, Pippa continues to teach English in a secondary school; she is therefore passionate about collaborations between practice and research. Her project seeks to develop our understanding of looked after children’s experiences in English classrooms, in order to facilitate the development of strategies to support these vulnerable learners.

Supervisors

Nicole Dingwall and Julie Selwyn

Yunfei Ma is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of international higher education.

Following his B.A. (First Class) at the University of Durham, Yunfei was awarded with MSc (Distinction) from the Department of Education, University of Oxford prior to his DPhil studies. He has also worked as a research assistant on the project Transnational academic mobility to global south: an exploratory study of international faculty in China.

Yunfei’s DPhil research focuses on global academic publishing and its relationship with knowledge formation, codification and dissemination. His research interest primarily lies in the geo-politics of knowledge production, global epistemic governance, China’s Humanities and Social Sciences research, and the philosophy of power.

Supervisors

Ariel Lindorff and Xin Xu

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Penny is a DPhil student whose research interests centre on classroom talk and international collaborations between secondary English classrooms.

Penny completed Oxford’s MSc in Learning and Teaching with distinction in 2019, focusing on methods for mitigating the impact of mind-wandering and misunderstanding as a means of enhancing student engagement in small-group and whole-class debates of interpretations of literature.  She has since won SHINE research funding to explore the impact of her methodology on students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Her DPhil continues her interest in student discussions of literature, exploring the impact on identity of online discussions between English classrooms in different countries.

Penny began her career as a secondary English Language Arts and journalism teacher in the USA but has taught secondary English predominantly in the UK in a career spanning 25 years.  She has overseen development of the global dimension and international collaboration at her current school for 14 years.

Supervisors

Victoria Elliott and Steven Puttick

Warda Arif is a doctoral student at the Department of Education. Her research aims to operationalise Critical Realist conceptions and methods to study Cultures of Higher Education in select Indian universities.

She completed her Master’s in Education and International Development from University College London’s – Institute of Education (UCL-IOE) as a Commonwealth Scholar and holds a B.Sc. in Biochemistry form Aligarh Muslim University (AMU).

Over her brief career, Warda has worked in the social development and impact sector in South Africa, India and Saudi Arabia, in teaching, research and advisory roles.

Supervisors

Dr Steven Puttick and Dr Aliya Khalid

Zak Devey is a passionate advocate for youth-led educational advocacy and equity – both within academia and in his work as co-founder of charitable trust Youth Arts New Zealand. In 2024, Zak continues to explore community conceptualisations of educational equity and their intersections with present and historic educational policy.

Zak also holds a deep care for youth-wellbeing, and its systemic determinants in the 21st century. His first publication, in the New Zealand Journal of Sociology, interrogates the ‘2021 World Happiness Report’ and that ways in which it constructs what it means to be happy.

Zak would be happy to hear from anyone looking to undertake a research journey in the Department, as well as scholars interested in educational equity, community-based participatory research, sociologies of well-being, and education in the political context of Aotearoa New Zealand.

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Pippa is a first-year DPhil student, whose research interests focus on vulnerable students’ outcomes and experiences of secondary school English education.

In 2023, Pippa completed an MSc in Learning and Teaching at the University of Oxford, researching pedagogical strategies for the teaching of emotionally challenging literature to students with experiences of trauma. Her DPhil research will build on this project, exploring looked after children’s engagement with English education, and their outcomes in the subject.

Alongside her research, Pippa continues to teach English in a secondary school; she is therefore passionate about collaborations between practice and research. Her project seeks to develop our understanding of looked after children’s experiences in English classrooms, in order to facilitate the development of strategies to support these vulnerable learners.

Supervisors

Nicole Dingwall and Julie Selwyn

Yunfei Ma is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of international higher education.

Following his B.A. (First Class) at the University of Durham, Yunfei was awarded with MSc (Distinction) from the Department of Education, University of Oxford prior to his DPhil studies. He has also worked as a research assistant on the project Transnational academic mobility to global south: an exploratory study of international faculty in China.

Yunfei’s DPhil research focuses on global academic publishing and its relationship with knowledge formation, codification and dissemination. His research interest primarily lies in the geo-politics of knowledge production, global epistemic governance, China’s Humanities and Social Sciences research, and the philosophy of power.

Supervisors

Ariel Lindorff and Xin Xu

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Penny is a DPhil student whose research interests centre on classroom talk and international collaborations between secondary English classrooms.

Penny completed Oxford’s MSc in Learning and Teaching with distinction in 2019, focusing on methods for mitigating the impact of mind-wandering and misunderstanding as a means of enhancing student engagement in small-group and whole-class debates of interpretations of literature.  She has since won SHINE research funding to explore the impact of her methodology on students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Her DPhil continues her interest in student discussions of literature, exploring the impact on identity of online discussions between English classrooms in different countries.

Penny began her career as a secondary English Language Arts and journalism teacher in the USA but has taught secondary English predominantly in the UK in a career spanning 25 years.  She has overseen development of the global dimension and international collaboration at her current school for 14 years.

Supervisors

Victoria Elliott and Steven Puttick

Warda Arif is a doctoral student at the Department of Education. Her research aims to operationalise Critical Realist conceptions and methods to study Cultures of Higher Education in select Indian universities.

She completed her Master’s in Education and International Development from University College London’s – Institute of Education (UCL-IOE) as a Commonwealth Scholar and holds a B.Sc. in Biochemistry form Aligarh Muslim University (AMU).

Over her brief career, Warda has worked in the social development and impact sector in South Africa, India and Saudi Arabia, in teaching, research and advisory roles.

Supervisors

Dr Steven Puttick and Dr Aliya Khalid

Zak Devey is a passionate advocate for youth-led educational advocacy and equity – both within academia and in his work as co-founder of charitable trust Youth Arts New Zealand. In 2024, Zak continues to explore community conceptualisations of educational equity and their intersections with present and historic educational policy.

Zak also holds a deep care for youth-wellbeing, and its systemic determinants in the 21st century. His first publication, in the New Zealand Journal of Sociology, interrogates the ‘2021 World Happiness Report’ and that ways in which it constructs what it means to be happy.

Zak would be happy to hear from anyone looking to undertake a research journey in the Department, as well as scholars interested in educational equity, community-based participatory research, sociologies of well-being, and education in the political context of Aotearoa New Zealand.

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Pippa is a first-year DPhil student, whose research interests focus on vulnerable students’ outcomes and experiences of secondary school English education.

In 2023, Pippa completed an MSc in Learning and Teaching at the University of Oxford, researching pedagogical strategies for the teaching of emotionally challenging literature to students with experiences of trauma. Her DPhil research will build on this project, exploring looked after children’s engagement with English education, and their outcomes in the subject.

Alongside her research, Pippa continues to teach English in a secondary school; she is therefore passionate about collaborations between practice and research. Her project seeks to develop our understanding of looked after children’s experiences in English classrooms, in order to facilitate the development of strategies to support these vulnerable learners.

Supervisors

Nicole Dingwall and Julie Selwyn

Yunfei Ma is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of international higher education.

Following his B.A. (First Class) at the University of Durham, Yunfei was awarded with MSc (Distinction) from the Department of Education, University of Oxford prior to his DPhil studies. He has also worked as a research assistant on the project Transnational academic mobility to global south: an exploratory study of international faculty in China.

Yunfei’s DPhil research focuses on global academic publishing and its relationship with knowledge formation, codification and dissemination. His research interest primarily lies in the geo-politics of knowledge production, global epistemic governance, China’s Humanities and Social Sciences research, and the philosophy of power.

Supervisors

Ariel Lindorff and Xin Xu

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Penny is a DPhil student whose research interests centre on classroom talk and international collaborations between secondary English classrooms.

Penny completed Oxford’s MSc in Learning and Teaching with distinction in 2019, focusing on methods for mitigating the impact of mind-wandering and misunderstanding as a means of enhancing student engagement in small-group and whole-class debates of interpretations of literature.  She has since won SHINE research funding to explore the impact of her methodology on students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Her DPhil continues her interest in student discussions of literature, exploring the impact on identity of online discussions between English classrooms in different countries.

Penny began her career as a secondary English Language Arts and journalism teacher in the USA but has taught secondary English predominantly in the UK in a career spanning 25 years.  She has overseen development of the global dimension and international collaboration at her current school for 14 years.

Supervisors

Victoria Elliott and Steven Puttick

Warda Arif is a doctoral student at the Department of Education. Her research aims to operationalise Critical Realist conceptions and methods to study Cultures of Higher Education in select Indian universities.

She completed her Master’s in Education and International Development from University College London’s – Institute of Education (UCL-IOE) as a Commonwealth Scholar and holds a B.Sc. in Biochemistry form Aligarh Muslim University (AMU).

Over her brief career, Warda has worked in the social development and impact sector in South Africa, India and Saudi Arabia, in teaching, research and advisory roles.

Supervisors

Dr Steven Puttick and Dr Aliya Khalid

Zak Devey is a passionate advocate for youth-led educational advocacy and equity – both within academia and in his work as co-founder of charitable trust Youth Arts New Zealand. In 2024, Zak continues to explore community conceptualisations of educational equity and their intersections with present and historic educational policy.

Zak also holds a deep care for youth-wellbeing, and its systemic determinants in the 21st century. His first publication, in the New Zealand Journal of Sociology, interrogates the ‘2021 World Happiness Report’ and that ways in which it constructs what it means to be happy.

Zak would be happy to hear from anyone looking to undertake a research journey in the Department, as well as scholars interested in educational equity, community-based participatory research, sociologies of well-being, and education in the political context of Aotearoa New Zealand.

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Pippa is a first-year DPhil student, whose research interests focus on vulnerable students’ outcomes and experiences of secondary school English education.

In 2023, Pippa completed an MSc in Learning and Teaching at the University of Oxford, researching pedagogical strategies for the teaching of emotionally challenging literature to students with experiences of trauma. Her DPhil research will build on this project, exploring looked after children’s engagement with English education, and their outcomes in the subject.

Alongside her research, Pippa continues to teach English in a secondary school; she is therefore passionate about collaborations between practice and research. Her project seeks to develop our understanding of looked after children’s experiences in English classrooms, in order to facilitate the development of strategies to support these vulnerable learners.

Supervisors

Nicole Dingwall and Julie Selwyn

Yunfei Ma is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of international higher education.

Following his B.A. (First Class) at the University of Durham, Yunfei was awarded with MSc (Distinction) from the Department of Education, University of Oxford prior to his DPhil studies. He has also worked as a research assistant on the project Transnational academic mobility to global south: an exploratory study of international faculty in China.

Yunfei’s DPhil research focuses on global academic publishing and its relationship with knowledge formation, codification and dissemination. His research interest primarily lies in the geo-politics of knowledge production, global epistemic governance, China’s Humanities and Social Sciences research, and the philosophy of power.

Supervisors

Ariel Lindorff and Xin Xu

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Penny is a DPhil student whose research interests centre on classroom talk and international collaborations between secondary English classrooms.

Penny completed Oxford’s MSc in Learning and Teaching with distinction in 2019, focusing on methods for mitigating the impact of mind-wandering and misunderstanding as a means of enhancing student engagement in small-group and whole-class debates of interpretations of literature.  She has since won SHINE research funding to explore the impact of her methodology on students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Her DPhil continues her interest in student discussions of literature, exploring the impact on identity of online discussions between English classrooms in different countries.

Penny began her career as a secondary English Language Arts and journalism teacher in the USA but has taught secondary English predominantly in the UK in a career spanning 25 years.  She has overseen development of the global dimension and international collaboration at her current school for 14 years.

Supervisors

Victoria Elliott and Steven Puttick

Warda Arif is a doctoral student at the Department of Education. Her research aims to operationalise Critical Realist conceptions and methods to study Cultures of Higher Education in select Indian universities.

She completed her Master’s in Education and International Development from University College London’s – Institute of Education (UCL-IOE) as a Commonwealth Scholar and holds a B.Sc. in Biochemistry form Aligarh Muslim University (AMU).

Over her brief career, Warda has worked in the social development and impact sector in South Africa, India and Saudi Arabia, in teaching, research and advisory roles.

Supervisors

Dr Steven Puttick and Dr Aliya Khalid

Zak Devey is a passionate advocate for youth-led educational advocacy and equity – both within academia and in his work as co-founder of charitable trust Youth Arts New Zealand. In 2024, Zak continues to explore community conceptualisations of educational equity and their intersections with present and historic educational policy.

Zak also holds a deep care for youth-wellbeing, and its systemic determinants in the 21st century. His first publication, in the New Zealand Journal of Sociology, interrogates the ‘2021 World Happiness Report’ and that ways in which it constructs what it means to be happy.

Zak would be happy to hear from anyone looking to undertake a research journey in the Department, as well as scholars interested in educational equity, community-based participatory research, sociologies of well-being, and education in the political context of Aotearoa New Zealand.

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Pippa is a first-year DPhil student, whose research interests focus on vulnerable students’ outcomes and experiences of secondary school English education.

In 2023, Pippa completed an MSc in Learning and Teaching at the University of Oxford, researching pedagogical strategies for the teaching of emotionally challenging literature to students with experiences of trauma. Her DPhil research will build on this project, exploring looked after children’s engagement with English education, and their outcomes in the subject.

Alongside her research, Pippa continues to teach English in a secondary school; she is therefore passionate about collaborations between practice and research. Her project seeks to develop our understanding of looked after children’s experiences in English classrooms, in order to facilitate the development of strategies to support these vulnerable learners.

Supervisors

Nicole Dingwall and Julie Selwyn

Yunfei Ma is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of international higher education.

Following his B.A. (First Class) at the University of Durham, Yunfei was awarded with MSc (Distinction) from the Department of Education, University of Oxford prior to his DPhil studies. He has also worked as a research assistant on the project Transnational academic mobility to global south: an exploratory study of international faculty in China.

Yunfei’s DPhil research focuses on global academic publishing and its relationship with knowledge formation, codification and dissemination. His research interest primarily lies in the geo-politics of knowledge production, global epistemic governance, China’s Humanities and Social Sciences research, and the philosophy of power.

Supervisors

Ariel Lindorff and Xin Xu

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Penny is a DPhil student whose research interests centre on classroom talk and international collaborations between secondary English classrooms.

Penny completed Oxford’s MSc in Learning and Teaching with distinction in 2019, focusing on methods for mitigating the impact of mind-wandering and misunderstanding as a means of enhancing student engagement in small-group and whole-class debates of interpretations of literature.  She has since won SHINE research funding to explore the impact of her methodology on students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Her DPhil continues her interest in student discussions of literature, exploring the impact on identity of online discussions between English classrooms in different countries.

Penny began her career as a secondary English Language Arts and journalism teacher in the USA but has taught secondary English predominantly in the UK in a career spanning 25 years.  She has overseen development of the global dimension and international collaboration at her current school for 14 years.

Supervisors

Victoria Elliott and Steven Puttick

Warda Arif is a doctoral student at the Department of Education. Her research aims to operationalise Critical Realist conceptions and methods to study Cultures of Higher Education in select Indian universities.

She completed her Master’s in Education and International Development from University College London’s – Institute of Education (UCL-IOE) as a Commonwealth Scholar and holds a B.Sc. in Biochemistry form Aligarh Muslim University (AMU).

Over her brief career, Warda has worked in the social development and impact sector in South Africa, India and Saudi Arabia, in teaching, research and advisory roles.

Supervisors

Dr Steven Puttick and Dr Aliya Khalid

Zak Devey is a passionate advocate for youth-led educational advocacy and equity – both within academia and in his work as co-founder of charitable trust Youth Arts New Zealand. In 2024, Zak continues to explore community conceptualisations of educational equity and their intersections with present and historic educational policy.

Zak also holds a deep care for youth-wellbeing, and its systemic determinants in the 21st century. His first publication, in the New Zealand Journal of Sociology, interrogates the ‘2021 World Happiness Report’ and that ways in which it constructs what it means to be happy.

Zak would be happy to hear from anyone looking to undertake a research journey in the Department, as well as scholars interested in educational equity, community-based participatory research, sociologies of well-being, and education in the political context of Aotearoa New Zealand.

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Pippa is a first-year DPhil student, whose research interests focus on vulnerable students’ outcomes and experiences of secondary school English education.

In 2023, Pippa completed an MSc in Learning and Teaching at the University of Oxford, researching pedagogical strategies for the teaching of emotionally challenging literature to students with experiences of trauma. Her DPhil research will build on this project, exploring looked after children’s engagement with English education, and their outcomes in the subject.

Alongside her research, Pippa continues to teach English in a secondary school; she is therefore passionate about collaborations between practice and research. Her project seeks to develop our understanding of looked after children’s experiences in English classrooms, in order to facilitate the development of strategies to support these vulnerable learners.

Supervisors

Nicole Dingwall and Julie Selwyn

Yunfei Ma is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of international higher education.

Following his B.A. (First Class) at the University of Durham, Yunfei was awarded with MSc (Distinction) from the Department of Education, University of Oxford prior to his DPhil studies. He has also worked as a research assistant on the project Transnational academic mobility to global south: an exploratory study of international faculty in China.

Yunfei’s DPhil research focuses on global academic publishing and its relationship with knowledge formation, codification and dissemination. His research interest primarily lies in the geo-politics of knowledge production, global epistemic governance, China’s Humanities and Social Sciences research, and the philosophy of power.

Supervisors

Ariel Lindorff and Xin Xu

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Penny is a DPhil student whose research interests centre on classroom talk and international collaborations between secondary English classrooms.

Penny completed Oxford’s MSc in Learning and Teaching with distinction in 2019, focusing on methods for mitigating the impact of mind-wandering and misunderstanding as a means of enhancing student engagement in small-group and whole-class debates of interpretations of literature.  She has since won SHINE research funding to explore the impact of her methodology on students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Her DPhil continues her interest in student discussions of literature, exploring the impact on identity of online discussions between English classrooms in different countries.

Penny began her career as a secondary English Language Arts and journalism teacher in the USA but has taught secondary English predominantly in the UK in a career spanning 25 years.  She has overseen development of the global dimension and international collaboration at her current school for 14 years.

Supervisors

Victoria Elliott and Steven Puttick

Warda Arif is a doctoral student at the Department of Education. Her research aims to operationalise Critical Realist conceptions and methods to study Cultures of Higher Education in select Indian universities.

She completed her Master’s in Education and International Development from University College London’s – Institute of Education (UCL-IOE) as a Commonwealth Scholar and holds a B.Sc. in Biochemistry form Aligarh Muslim University (AMU).

Over her brief career, Warda has worked in the social development and impact sector in South Africa, India and Saudi Arabia, in teaching, research and advisory roles.

Supervisors

Dr Steven Puttick and Dr Aliya Khalid

Zak Devey is a passionate advocate for youth-led educational advocacy and equity – both within academia and in his work as co-founder of charitable trust Youth Arts New Zealand. In 2024, Zak continues to explore community conceptualisations of educational equity and their intersections with present and historic educational policy.

Zak also holds a deep care for youth-wellbeing, and its systemic determinants in the 21st century. His first publication, in the New Zealand Journal of Sociology, interrogates the ‘2021 World Happiness Report’ and that ways in which it constructs what it means to be happy.

Zak would be happy to hear from anyone looking to undertake a research journey in the Department, as well as scholars interested in educational equity, community-based participatory research, sociologies of well-being, and education in the political context of Aotearoa New Zealand.

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Pippa is a first-year DPhil student, whose research interests focus on vulnerable students’ outcomes and experiences of secondary school English education.

In 2023, Pippa completed an MSc in Learning and Teaching at the University of Oxford, researching pedagogical strategies for the teaching of emotionally challenging literature to students with experiences of trauma. Her DPhil research will build on this project, exploring looked after children’s engagement with English education, and their outcomes in the subject.

Alongside her research, Pippa continues to teach English in a secondary school; she is therefore passionate about collaborations between practice and research. Her project seeks to develop our understanding of looked after children’s experiences in English classrooms, in order to facilitate the development of strategies to support these vulnerable learners.

Supervisors

Nicole Dingwall and Julie Selwyn

Yunfei Ma is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of international higher education.

Following his B.A. (First Class) at the University of Durham, Yunfei was awarded with MSc (Distinction) from the Department of Education, University of Oxford prior to his DPhil studies. He has also worked as a research assistant on the project Transnational academic mobility to global south: an exploratory study of international faculty in China.

Yunfei’s DPhil research focuses on global academic publishing and its relationship with knowledge formation, codification and dissemination. His research interest primarily lies in the geo-politics of knowledge production, global epistemic governance, China’s Humanities and Social Sciences research, and the philosophy of power.

Supervisors

Ariel Lindorff and Xin Xu

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Penny is a DPhil student whose research interests centre on classroom talk and international collaborations between secondary English classrooms.

Penny completed Oxford’s MSc in Learning and Teaching with distinction in 2019, focusing on methods for mitigating the impact of mind-wandering and misunderstanding as a means of enhancing student engagement in small-group and whole-class debates of interpretations of literature.  She has since won SHINE research funding to explore the impact of her methodology on students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Her DPhil continues her interest in student discussions of literature, exploring the impact on identity of online discussions between English classrooms in different countries.

Penny began her career as a secondary English Language Arts and journalism teacher in the USA but has taught secondary English predominantly in the UK in a career spanning 25 years.  She has overseen development of the global dimension and international collaboration at her current school for 14 years.

Supervisors

Victoria Elliott and Steven Puttick

Warda Arif is a doctoral student at the Department of Education. Her research aims to operationalise Critical Realist conceptions and methods to study Cultures of Higher Education in select Indian universities.

She completed her Master’s in Education and International Development from University College London’s – Institute of Education (UCL-IOE) as a Commonwealth Scholar and holds a B.Sc. in Biochemistry form Aligarh Muslim University (AMU).

Over her brief career, Warda has worked in the social development and impact sector in South Africa, India and Saudi Arabia, in teaching, research and advisory roles.

Supervisors

Dr Steven Puttick and Dr Aliya Khalid

Zak Devey is a passionate advocate for youth-led educational advocacy and equity – both within academia and in his work as co-founder of charitable trust Youth Arts New Zealand. In 2024, Zak continues to explore community conceptualisations of educational equity and their intersections with present and historic educational policy.

Zak also holds a deep care for youth-wellbeing, and its systemic determinants in the 21st century. His first publication, in the New Zealand Journal of Sociology, interrogates the ‘2021 World Happiness Report’ and that ways in which it constructs what it means to be happy.

Zak would be happy to hear from anyone looking to undertake a research journey in the Department, as well as scholars interested in educational equity, community-based participatory research, sociologies of well-being, and education in the political context of Aotearoa New Zealand.

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Pippa is a first-year DPhil student, whose research interests focus on vulnerable students’ outcomes and experiences of secondary school English education.

In 2023, Pippa completed an MSc in Learning and Teaching at the University of Oxford, researching pedagogical strategies for the teaching of emotionally challenging literature to students with experiences of trauma. Her DPhil research will build on this project, exploring looked after children’s engagement with English education, and their outcomes in the subject.

Alongside her research, Pippa continues to teach English in a secondary school; she is therefore passionate about collaborations between practice and research. Her project seeks to develop our understanding of looked after children’s experiences in English classrooms, in order to facilitate the development of strategies to support these vulnerable learners.

Supervisors

Nicole Dingwall and Julie Selwyn

Yunfei Ma is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of international higher education.

Following his B.A. (First Class) at the University of Durham, Yunfei was awarded with MSc (Distinction) from the Department of Education, University of Oxford prior to his DPhil studies. He has also worked as a research assistant on the project Transnational academic mobility to global south: an exploratory study of international faculty in China.

Yunfei’s DPhil research focuses on global academic publishing and its relationship with knowledge formation, codification and dissemination. His research interest primarily lies in the geo-politics of knowledge production, global epistemic governance, China’s Humanities and Social Sciences research, and the philosophy of power.

Supervisors

Ariel Lindorff and Xin Xu

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Penny is a DPhil student whose research interests centre on classroom talk and international collaborations between secondary English classrooms.

Penny completed Oxford’s MSc in Learning and Teaching with distinction in 2019, focusing on methods for mitigating the impact of mind-wandering and misunderstanding as a means of enhancing student engagement in small-group and whole-class debates of interpretations of literature.  She has since won SHINE research funding to explore the impact of her methodology on students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Her DPhil continues her interest in student discussions of literature, exploring the impact on identity of online discussions between English classrooms in different countries.

Penny began her career as a secondary English Language Arts and journalism teacher in the USA but has taught secondary English predominantly in the UK in a career spanning 25 years.  She has overseen development of the global dimension and international collaboration at her current school for 14 years.

Supervisors

Victoria Elliott and Steven Puttick

Warda Arif is a doctoral student at the Department of Education. Her research aims to operationalise Critical Realist conceptions and methods to study Cultures of Higher Education in select Indian universities.

She completed her Master’s in Education and International Development from University College London’s – Institute of Education (UCL-IOE) as a Commonwealth Scholar and holds a B.Sc. in Biochemistry form Aligarh Muslim University (AMU).

Over her brief career, Warda has worked in the social development and impact sector in South Africa, India and Saudi Arabia, in teaching, research and advisory roles.

Supervisors

Dr Steven Puttick and Dr Aliya Khalid

Zak Devey is a passionate advocate for youth-led educational advocacy and equity – both within academia and in his work as co-founder of charitable trust Youth Arts New Zealand. In 2024, Zak continues to explore community conceptualisations of educational equity and their intersections with present and historic educational policy.

Zak also holds a deep care for youth-wellbeing, and its systemic determinants in the 21st century. His first publication, in the New Zealand Journal of Sociology, interrogates the ‘2021 World Happiness Report’ and that ways in which it constructs what it means to be happy.

Zak would be happy to hear from anyone looking to undertake a research journey in the Department, as well as scholars interested in educational equity, community-based participatory research, sociologies of well-being, and education in the political context of Aotearoa New Zealand.

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Pippa is a first-year DPhil student, whose research interests focus on vulnerable students’ outcomes and experiences of secondary school English education.

In 2023, Pippa completed an MSc in Learning and Teaching at the University of Oxford, researching pedagogical strategies for the teaching of emotionally challenging literature to students with experiences of trauma. Her DPhil research will build on this project, exploring looked after children’s engagement with English education, and their outcomes in the subject.

Alongside her research, Pippa continues to teach English in a secondary school; she is therefore passionate about collaborations between practice and research. Her project seeks to develop our understanding of looked after children’s experiences in English classrooms, in order to facilitate the development of strategies to support these vulnerable learners.

Supervisors

Nicole Dingwall and Julie Selwyn

Yunfei Ma is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of international higher education.

Following his B.A. (First Class) at the University of Durham, Yunfei was awarded with MSc (Distinction) from the Department of Education, University of Oxford prior to his DPhil studies. He has also worked as a research assistant on the project Transnational academic mobility to global south: an exploratory study of international faculty in China.

Yunfei’s DPhil research focuses on global academic publishing and its relationship with knowledge formation, codification and dissemination. His research interest primarily lies in the geo-politics of knowledge production, global epistemic governance, China’s Humanities and Social Sciences research, and the philosophy of power.

Supervisors

Ariel Lindorff and Xin Xu

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Penny is a DPhil student whose research interests centre on classroom talk and international collaborations between secondary English classrooms.

Penny completed Oxford’s MSc in Learning and Teaching with distinction in 2019, focusing on methods for mitigating the impact of mind-wandering and misunderstanding as a means of enhancing student engagement in small-group and whole-class debates of interpretations of literature.  She has since won SHINE research funding to explore the impact of her methodology on students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Her DPhil continues her interest in student discussions of literature, exploring the impact on identity of online discussions between English classrooms in different countries.

Penny began her career as a secondary English Language Arts and journalism teacher in the USA but has taught secondary English predominantly in the UK in a career spanning 25 years.  She has overseen development of the global dimension and international collaboration at her current school for 14 years.

Supervisors

Victoria Elliott and Steven Puttick

Warda Arif is a doctoral student at the Department of Education. Her research aims to operationalise Critical Realist conceptions and methods to study Cultures of Higher Education in select Indian universities.

She completed her Master’s in Education and International Development from University College London’s – Institute of Education (UCL-IOE) as a Commonwealth Scholar and holds a B.Sc. in Biochemistry form Aligarh Muslim University (AMU).

Over her brief career, Warda has worked in the social development and impact sector in South Africa, India and Saudi Arabia, in teaching, research and advisory roles.

Supervisors

Dr Steven Puttick and Dr Aliya Khalid

Zak Devey is a passionate advocate for youth-led educational advocacy and equity – both within academia and in his work as co-founder of charitable trust Youth Arts New Zealand. In 2024, Zak continues to explore community conceptualisations of educational equity and their intersections with present and historic educational policy.

Zak also holds a deep care for youth-wellbeing, and its systemic determinants in the 21st century. His first publication, in the New Zealand Journal of Sociology, interrogates the ‘2021 World Happiness Report’ and that ways in which it constructs what it means to be happy.

Zak would be happy to hear from anyone looking to undertake a research journey in the Department, as well as scholars interested in educational equity, community-based participatory research, sociologies of well-being, and education in the political context of Aotearoa New Zealand.

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Pippa is a first-year DPhil student, whose research interests focus on vulnerable students’ outcomes and experiences of secondary school English education.

In 2023, Pippa completed an MSc in Learning and Teaching at the University of Oxford, researching pedagogical strategies for the teaching of emotionally challenging literature to students with experiences of trauma. Her DPhil research will build on this project, exploring looked after children’s engagement with English education, and their outcomes in the subject.

Alongside her research, Pippa continues to teach English in a secondary school; she is therefore passionate about collaborations between practice and research. Her project seeks to develop our understanding of looked after children’s experiences in English classrooms, in order to facilitate the development of strategies to support these vulnerable learners.

Supervisors

Nicole Dingwall and Julie Selwyn

Yunfei Ma is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of international higher education.

Following his B.A. (First Class) at the University of Durham, Yunfei was awarded with MSc (Distinction) from the Department of Education, University of Oxford prior to his DPhil studies. He has also worked as a research assistant on the project Transnational academic mobility to global south: an exploratory study of international faculty in China.

Yunfei’s DPhil research focuses on global academic publishing and its relationship with knowledge formation, codification and dissemination. His research interest primarily lies in the geo-politics of knowledge production, global epistemic governance, China’s Humanities and Social Sciences research, and the philosophy of power.

Supervisors

Ariel Lindorff and Xin Xu

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Penny is a DPhil student whose research interests centre on classroom talk and international collaborations between secondary English classrooms.

Penny completed Oxford’s MSc in Learning and Teaching with distinction in 2019, focusing on methods for mitigating the impact of mind-wandering and misunderstanding as a means of enhancing student engagement in small-group and whole-class debates of interpretations of literature.  She has since won SHINE research funding to explore the impact of her methodology on students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Her DPhil continues her interest in student discussions of literature, exploring the impact on identity of online discussions between English classrooms in different countries.

Penny began her career as a secondary English Language Arts and journalism teacher in the USA but has taught secondary English predominantly in the UK in a career spanning 25 years.  She has overseen development of the global dimension and international collaboration at her current school for 14 years.

Supervisors

Victoria Elliott and Steven Puttick

Warda Arif is a doctoral student at the Department of Education. Her research aims to operationalise Critical Realist conceptions and methods to study Cultures of Higher Education in select Indian universities.

She completed her Master’s in Education and International Development from University College London’s – Institute of Education (UCL-IOE) as a Commonwealth Scholar and holds a B.Sc. in Biochemistry form Aligarh Muslim University (AMU).

Over her brief career, Warda has worked in the social development and impact sector in South Africa, India and Saudi Arabia, in teaching, research and advisory roles.

Supervisors

Dr Steven Puttick and Dr Aliya Khalid

Zak Devey is a passionate advocate for youth-led educational advocacy and equity – both within academia and in his work as co-founder of charitable trust Youth Arts New Zealand. In 2024, Zak continues to explore community conceptualisations of educational equity and their intersections with present and historic educational policy.

Zak also holds a deep care for youth-wellbeing, and its systemic determinants in the 21st century. His first publication, in the New Zealand Journal of Sociology, interrogates the ‘2021 World Happiness Report’ and that ways in which it constructs what it means to be happy.

Zak would be happy to hear from anyone looking to undertake a research journey in the Department, as well as scholars interested in educational equity, community-based participatory research, sociologies of well-being, and education in the political context of Aotearoa New Zealand.

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Pippa is a first-year DPhil student, whose research interests focus on vulnerable students’ outcomes and experiences of secondary school English education.

In 2023, Pippa completed an MSc in Learning and Teaching at the University of Oxford, researching pedagogical strategies for the teaching of emotionally challenging literature to students with experiences of trauma. Her DPhil research will build on this project, exploring looked after children’s engagement with English education, and their outcomes in the subject.

Alongside her research, Pippa continues to teach English in a secondary school; she is therefore passionate about collaborations between practice and research. Her project seeks to develop our understanding of looked after children’s experiences in English classrooms, in order to facilitate the development of strategies to support these vulnerable learners.

Supervisors

Nicole Dingwall and Julie Selwyn

Yunfei Ma is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of international higher education.

Following his B.A. (First Class) at the University of Durham, Yunfei was awarded with MSc (Distinction) from the Department of Education, University of Oxford prior to his DPhil studies. He has also worked as a research assistant on the project Transnational academic mobility to global south: an exploratory study of international faculty in China.

Yunfei’s DPhil research focuses on global academic publishing and its relationship with knowledge formation, codification and dissemination. His research interest primarily lies in the geo-politics of knowledge production, global epistemic governance, China’s Humanities and Social Sciences research, and the philosophy of power.

Supervisors

Ariel Lindorff and Xin Xu

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Penny is a DPhil student whose research interests centre on classroom talk and international collaborations between secondary English classrooms.

Penny completed Oxford’s MSc in Learning and Teaching with distinction in 2019, focusing on methods for mitigating the impact of mind-wandering and misunderstanding as a means of enhancing student engagement in small-group and whole-class debates of interpretations of literature.  She has since won SHINE research funding to explore the impact of her methodology on students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Her DPhil continues her interest in student discussions of literature, exploring the impact on identity of online discussions between English classrooms in different countries.

Penny began her career as a secondary English Language Arts and journalism teacher in the USA but has taught secondary English predominantly in the UK in a career spanning 25 years.  She has overseen development of the global dimension and international collaboration at her current school for 14 years.

Supervisors

Victoria Elliott and Steven Puttick

Warda Arif is a doctoral student at the Department of Education. Her research aims to operationalise Critical Realist conceptions and methods to study Cultures of Higher Education in select Indian universities.

She completed her Master’s in Education and International Development from University College London’s – Institute of Education (UCL-IOE) as a Commonwealth Scholar and holds a B.Sc. in Biochemistry form Aligarh Muslim University (AMU).

Over her brief career, Warda has worked in the social development and impact sector in South Africa, India and Saudi Arabia, in teaching, research and advisory roles.

Supervisors

Dr Steven Puttick and Dr Aliya Khalid

Zak Devey is a passionate advocate for youth-led educational advocacy and equity – both within academia and in his work as co-founder of charitable trust Youth Arts New Zealand. In 2024, Zak continues to explore community conceptualisations of educational equity and their intersections with present and historic educational policy.

Zak also holds a deep care for youth-wellbeing, and its systemic determinants in the 21st century. His first publication, in the New Zealand Journal of Sociology, interrogates the ‘2021 World Happiness Report’ and that ways in which it constructs what it means to be happy.

Zak would be happy to hear from anyone looking to undertake a research journey in the Department, as well as scholars interested in educational equity, community-based participatory research, sociologies of well-being, and education in the political context of Aotearoa New Zealand.

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Pippa is a first-year DPhil student, whose research interests focus on vulnerable students’ outcomes and experiences of secondary school English education.

In 2023, Pippa completed an MSc in Learning and Teaching at the University of Oxford, researching pedagogical strategies for the teaching of emotionally challenging literature to students with experiences of trauma. Her DPhil research will build on this project, exploring looked after children’s engagement with English education, and their outcomes in the subject.

Alongside her research, Pippa continues to teach English in a secondary school; she is therefore passionate about collaborations between practice and research. Her project seeks to develop our understanding of looked after children’s experiences in English classrooms, in order to facilitate the development of strategies to support these vulnerable learners.

Supervisors

Nicole Dingwall and Julie Selwyn

Yunfei Ma is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of international higher education.

Following his B.A. (First Class) at the University of Durham, Yunfei was awarded with MSc (Distinction) from the Department of Education, University of Oxford prior to his DPhil studies. He has also worked as a research assistant on the project Transnational academic mobility to global south: an exploratory study of international faculty in China.

Yunfei’s DPhil research focuses on global academic publishing and its relationship with knowledge formation, codification and dissemination. His research interest primarily lies in the geo-politics of knowledge production, global epistemic governance, China’s Humanities and Social Sciences research, and the philosophy of power.

Supervisors

Ariel Lindorff and Xin Xu

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Penny is a DPhil student whose research interests centre on classroom talk and international collaborations between secondary English classrooms.

Penny completed Oxford’s MSc in Learning and Teaching with distinction in 2019, focusing on methods for mitigating the impact of mind-wandering and misunderstanding as a means of enhancing student engagement in small-group and whole-class debates of interpretations of literature.  She has since won SHINE research funding to explore the impact of her methodology on students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Her DPhil continues her interest in student discussions of literature, exploring the impact on identity of online discussions between English classrooms in different countries.

Penny began her career as a secondary English Language Arts and journalism teacher in the USA but has taught secondary English predominantly in the UK in a career spanning 25 years.  She has overseen development of the global dimension and international collaboration at her current school for 14 years.

Supervisors

Victoria Elliott and Steven Puttick

Warda Arif is a doctoral student at the Department of Education. Her research aims to operationalise Critical Realist conceptions and methods to study Cultures of Higher Education in select Indian universities.

She completed her Master’s in Education and International Development from University College London’s – Institute of Education (UCL-IOE) as a Commonwealth Scholar and holds a B.Sc. in Biochemistry form Aligarh Muslim University (AMU).

Over her brief career, Warda has worked in the social development and impact sector in South Africa, India and Saudi Arabia, in teaching, research and advisory roles.

Supervisors

Dr Steven Puttick and Dr Aliya Khalid

Zak Devey is a passionate advocate for youth-led educational advocacy and equity – both within academia and in his work as co-founder of charitable trust Youth Arts New Zealand. In 2024, Zak continues to explore community conceptualisations of educational equity and their intersections with present and historic educational policy.

Zak also holds a deep care for youth-wellbeing, and its systemic determinants in the 21st century. His first publication, in the New Zealand Journal of Sociology, interrogates the ‘2021 World Happiness Report’ and that ways in which it constructs what it means to be happy.

Zak would be happy to hear from anyone looking to undertake a research journey in the Department, as well as scholars interested in educational equity, community-based participatory research, sociologies of well-being, and education in the political context of Aotearoa New Zealand.

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Pippa is a first-year DPhil student, whose research interests focus on vulnerable students’ outcomes and experiences of secondary school English education.

In 2023, Pippa completed an MSc in Learning and Teaching at the University of Oxford, researching pedagogical strategies for the teaching of emotionally challenging literature to students with experiences of trauma. Her DPhil research will build on this project, exploring looked after children’s engagement with English education, and their outcomes in the subject.

Alongside her research, Pippa continues to teach English in a secondary school; she is therefore passionate about collaborations between practice and research. Her project seeks to develop our understanding of looked after children’s experiences in English classrooms, in order to facilitate the development of strategies to support these vulnerable learners.

Supervisors

Nicole Dingwall and Julie Selwyn

Yunfei Ma is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of international higher education.

Following his B.A. (First Class) at the University of Durham, Yunfei was awarded with MSc (Distinction) from the Department of Education, University of Oxford prior to his DPhil studies. He has also worked as a research assistant on the project Transnational academic mobility to global south: an exploratory study of international faculty in China.

Yunfei’s DPhil research focuses on global academic publishing and its relationship with knowledge formation, codification and dissemination. His research interest primarily lies in the geo-politics of knowledge production, global epistemic governance, China’s Humanities and Social Sciences research, and the philosophy of power.

Supervisors

Ariel Lindorff and Xin Xu

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Penny is a DPhil student whose research interests centre on classroom talk and international collaborations between secondary English classrooms.

Penny completed Oxford’s MSc in Learning and Teaching with distinction in 2019, focusing on methods for mitigating the impact of mind-wandering and misunderstanding as a means of enhancing student engagement in small-group and whole-class debates of interpretations of literature.  She has since won SHINE research funding to explore the impact of her methodology on students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Her DPhil continues her interest in student discussions of literature, exploring the impact on identity of online discussions between English classrooms in different countries.

Penny began her career as a secondary English Language Arts and journalism teacher in the USA but has taught secondary English predominantly in the UK in a career spanning 25 years.  She has overseen development of the global dimension and international collaboration at her current school for 14 years.

Supervisors

Victoria Elliott and Steven Puttick

Warda Arif is a doctoral student at the Department of Education. Her research aims to operationalise Critical Realist conceptions and methods to study Cultures of Higher Education in select Indian universities.

She completed her Master’s in Education and International Development from University College London’s – Institute of Education (UCL-IOE) as a Commonwealth Scholar and holds a B.Sc. in Biochemistry form Aligarh Muslim University (AMU).

Over her brief career, Warda has worked in the social development and impact sector in South Africa, India and Saudi Arabia, in teaching, research and advisory roles.

Supervisors

Dr Steven Puttick and Dr Aliya Khalid

Zak Devey is a passionate advocate for youth-led educational advocacy and equity – both within academia and in his work as co-founder of charitable trust Youth Arts New Zealand. In 2024, Zak continues to explore community conceptualisations of educational equity and their intersections with present and historic educational policy.

Zak also holds a deep care for youth-wellbeing, and its systemic determinants in the 21st century. His first publication, in the New Zealand Journal of Sociology, interrogates the ‘2021 World Happiness Report’ and that ways in which it constructs what it means to be happy.

Zak would be happy to hear from anyone looking to undertake a research journey in the Department, as well as scholars interested in educational equity, community-based participatory research, sociologies of well-being, and education in the political context of Aotearoa New Zealand.

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Pippa is a first-year DPhil student, whose research interests focus on vulnerable students’ outcomes and experiences of secondary school English education.

In 2023, Pippa completed an MSc in Learning and Teaching at the University of Oxford, researching pedagogical strategies for the teaching of emotionally challenging literature to students with experiences of trauma. Her DPhil research will build on this project, exploring looked after children’s engagement with English education, and their outcomes in the subject.

Alongside her research, Pippa continues to teach English in a secondary school; she is therefore passionate about collaborations between practice and research. Her project seeks to develop our understanding of looked after children’s experiences in English classrooms, in order to facilitate the development of strategies to support these vulnerable learners.

Supervisors

Nicole Dingwall and Julie Selwyn

Yunfei Ma is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of international higher education.

Following his B.A. (First Class) at the University of Durham, Yunfei was awarded with MSc (Distinction) from the Department of Education, University of Oxford prior to his DPhil studies. He has also worked as a research assistant on the project Transnational academic mobility to global south: an exploratory study of international faculty in China.

Yunfei’s DPhil research focuses on global academic publishing and its relationship with knowledge formation, codification and dissemination. His research interest primarily lies in the geo-politics of knowledge production, global epistemic governance, China’s Humanities and Social Sciences research, and the philosophy of power.

Supervisors

Ariel Lindorff and Xin Xu

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Penny is a DPhil student whose research interests centre on classroom talk and international collaborations between secondary English classrooms.

Penny completed Oxford’s MSc in Learning and Teaching with distinction in 2019, focusing on methods for mitigating the impact of mind-wandering and misunderstanding as a means of enhancing student engagement in small-group and whole-class debates of interpretations of literature.  She has since won SHINE research funding to explore the impact of her methodology on students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Her DPhil continues her interest in student discussions of literature, exploring the impact on identity of online discussions between English classrooms in different countries.

Penny began her career as a secondary English Language Arts and journalism teacher in the USA but has taught secondary English predominantly in the UK in a career spanning 25 years.  She has overseen development of the global dimension and international collaboration at her current school for 14 years.

Supervisors

Victoria Elliott and Steven Puttick

Warda Arif is a doctoral student at the Department of Education. Her research aims to operationalise Critical Realist conceptions and methods to study Cultures of Higher Education in select Indian universities.

She completed her Master’s in Education and International Development from University College London’s – Institute of Education (UCL-IOE) as a Commonwealth Scholar and holds a B.Sc. in Biochemistry form Aligarh Muslim University (AMU).

Over her brief career, Warda has worked in the social development and impact sector in South Africa, India and Saudi Arabia, in teaching, research and advisory roles.

Supervisors

Dr Steven Puttick and Dr Aliya Khalid

Zak Devey is a passionate advocate for youth-led educational advocacy and equity – both within academia and in his work as co-founder of charitable trust Youth Arts New Zealand. In 2024, Zak continues to explore community conceptualisations of educational equity and their intersections with present and historic educational policy.

Zak also holds a deep care for youth-wellbeing, and its systemic determinants in the 21st century. His first publication, in the New Zealand Journal of Sociology, interrogates the ‘2021 World Happiness Report’ and that ways in which it constructs what it means to be happy.

Zak would be happy to hear from anyone looking to undertake a research journey in the Department, as well as scholars interested in educational equity, community-based participatory research, sociologies of well-being, and education in the political context of Aotearoa New Zealand.

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Pippa is a first-year DPhil student, whose research interests focus on vulnerable students’ outcomes and experiences of secondary school English education.

In 2023, Pippa completed an MSc in Learning and Teaching at the University of Oxford, researching pedagogical strategies for the teaching of emotionally challenging literature to students with experiences of trauma. Her DPhil research will build on this project, exploring looked after children’s engagement with English education, and their outcomes in the subject.

Alongside her research, Pippa continues to teach English in a secondary school; she is therefore passionate about collaborations between practice and research. Her project seeks to develop our understanding of looked after children’s experiences in English classrooms, in order to facilitate the development of strategies to support these vulnerable learners.

Supervisors

Nicole Dingwall and Julie Selwyn

Yunfei Ma is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of international higher education.

Following his B.A. (First Class) at the University of Durham, Yunfei was awarded with MSc (Distinction) from the Department of Education, University of Oxford prior to his DPhil studies. He has also worked as a research assistant on the project Transnational academic mobility to global south: an exploratory study of international faculty in China.

Yunfei’s DPhil research focuses on global academic publishing and its relationship with knowledge formation, codification and dissemination. His research interest primarily lies in the geo-politics of knowledge production, global epistemic governance, China’s Humanities and Social Sciences research, and the philosophy of power.

Supervisors

Ariel Lindorff and Xin Xu

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Penny is a DPhil student whose research interests centre on classroom talk and international collaborations between secondary English classrooms.

Penny completed Oxford’s MSc in Learning and Teaching with distinction in 2019, focusing on methods for mitigating the impact of mind-wandering and misunderstanding as a means of enhancing student engagement in small-group and whole-class debates of interpretations of literature.  She has since won SHINE research funding to explore the impact of her methodology on students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Her DPhil continues her interest in student discussions of literature, exploring the impact on identity of online discussions between English classrooms in different countries.

Penny began her career as a secondary English Language Arts and journalism teacher in the USA but has taught secondary English predominantly in the UK in a career spanning 25 years.  She has overseen development of the global dimension and international collaboration at her current school for 14 years.

Supervisors

Victoria Elliott and Steven Puttick

Warda Arif is a doctoral student at the Department of Education. Her research aims to operationalise Critical Realist conceptions and methods to study Cultures of Higher Education in select Indian universities.

She completed her Master’s in Education and International Development from University College London’s – Institute of Education (UCL-IOE) as a Commonwealth Scholar and holds a B.Sc. in Biochemistry form Aligarh Muslim University (AMU).

Over her brief career, Warda has worked in the social development and impact sector in South Africa, India and Saudi Arabia, in teaching, research and advisory roles.

Supervisors

Dr Steven Puttick and Dr Aliya Khalid

Zak Devey is a passionate advocate for youth-led educational advocacy and equity – both within academia and in his work as co-founder of charitable trust Youth Arts New Zealand. In 2024, Zak continues to explore community conceptualisations of educational equity and their intersections with present and historic educational policy.

Zak also holds a deep care for youth-wellbeing, and its systemic determinants in the 21st century. His first publication, in the New Zealand Journal of Sociology, interrogates the ‘2021 World Happiness Report’ and that ways in which it constructs what it means to be happy.

Zak would be happy to hear from anyone looking to undertake a research journey in the Department, as well as scholars interested in educational equity, community-based participatory research, sociologies of well-being, and education in the political context of Aotearoa New Zealand.

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Pippa is a first-year DPhil student, whose research interests focus on vulnerable students’ outcomes and experiences of secondary school English education.

In 2023, Pippa completed an MSc in Learning and Teaching at the University of Oxford, researching pedagogical strategies for the teaching of emotionally challenging literature to students with experiences of trauma. Her DPhil research will build on this project, exploring looked after children’s engagement with English education, and their outcomes in the subject.

Alongside her research, Pippa continues to teach English in a secondary school; she is therefore passionate about collaborations between practice and research. Her project seeks to develop our understanding of looked after children’s experiences in English classrooms, in order to facilitate the development of strategies to support these vulnerable learners.

Supervisors

Nicole Dingwall and Julie Selwyn

Yunfei Ma is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of international higher education.

Following his B.A. (First Class) at the University of Durham, Yunfei was awarded with MSc (Distinction) from the Department of Education, University of Oxford prior to his DPhil studies. He has also worked as a research assistant on the project Transnational academic mobility to global south: an exploratory study of international faculty in China.

Yunfei’s DPhil research focuses on global academic publishing and its relationship with knowledge formation, codification and dissemination. His research interest primarily lies in the geo-politics of knowledge production, global epistemic governance, China’s Humanities and Social Sciences research, and the philosophy of power.

Supervisors

Ariel Lindorff and Xin Xu

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Penny is a DPhil student whose research interests centre on classroom talk and international collaborations between secondary English classrooms.

Penny completed Oxford’s MSc in Learning and Teaching with distinction in 2019, focusing on methods for mitigating the impact of mind-wandering and misunderstanding as a means of enhancing student engagement in small-group and whole-class debates of interpretations of literature.  She has since won SHINE research funding to explore the impact of her methodology on students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Her DPhil continues her interest in student discussions of literature, exploring the impact on identity of online discussions between English classrooms in different countries.

Penny began her career as a secondary English Language Arts and journalism teacher in the USA but has taught secondary English predominantly in the UK in a career spanning 25 years.  She has overseen development of the global dimension and international collaboration at her current school for 14 years.

Supervisors

Victoria Elliott and Steven Puttick

Warda Arif is a doctoral student at the Department of Education. Her research aims to operationalise Critical Realist conceptions and methods to study Cultures of Higher Education in select Indian universities.

She completed her Master’s in Education and International Development from University College London’s – Institute of Education (UCL-IOE) as a Commonwealth Scholar and holds a B.Sc. in Biochemistry form Aligarh Muslim University (AMU).

Over her brief career, Warda has worked in the social development and impact sector in South Africa, India and Saudi Arabia, in teaching, research and advisory roles.

Supervisors

Dr Steven Puttick and Dr Aliya Khalid

Zak Devey is a passionate advocate for youth-led educational advocacy and equity – both within academia and in his work as co-founder of charitable trust Youth Arts New Zealand. In 2024, Zak continues to explore community conceptualisations of educational equity and their intersections with present and historic educational policy.

Zak also holds a deep care for youth-wellbeing, and its systemic determinants in the 21st century. His first publication, in the New Zealand Journal of Sociology, interrogates the ‘2021 World Happiness Report’ and that ways in which it constructs what it means to be happy.

Zak would be happy to hear from anyone looking to undertake a research journey in the Department, as well as scholars interested in educational equity, community-based participatory research, sociologies of well-being, and education in the political context of Aotearoa New Zealand.

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Pippa is a first-year DPhil student, whose research interests focus on vulnerable students’ outcomes and experiences of secondary school English education.

In 2023, Pippa completed an MSc in Learning and Teaching at the University of Oxford, researching pedagogical strategies for the teaching of emotionally challenging literature to students with experiences of trauma. Her DPhil research will build on this project, exploring looked after children’s engagement with English education, and their outcomes in the subject.

Alongside her research, Pippa continues to teach English in a secondary school; she is therefore passionate about collaborations between practice and research. Her project seeks to develop our understanding of looked after children’s experiences in English classrooms, in order to facilitate the development of strategies to support these vulnerable learners.

Supervisors

Nicole Dingwall and Julie Selwyn

Yunfei Ma is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of international higher education.

Following his B.A. (First Class) at the University of Durham, Yunfei was awarded with MSc (Distinction) from the Department of Education, University of Oxford prior to his DPhil studies. He has also worked as a research assistant on the project Transnational academic mobility to global south: an exploratory study of international faculty in China.

Yunfei’s DPhil research focuses on global academic publishing and its relationship with knowledge formation, codification and dissemination. His research interest primarily lies in the geo-politics of knowledge production, global epistemic governance, China’s Humanities and Social Sciences research, and the philosophy of power.

Supervisors

Ariel Lindorff and Xin Xu

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Penny is a DPhil student whose research interests centre on classroom talk and international collaborations between secondary English classrooms.

Penny completed Oxford’s MSc in Learning and Teaching with distinction in 2019, focusing on methods for mitigating the impact of mind-wandering and misunderstanding as a means of enhancing student engagement in small-group and whole-class debates of interpretations of literature.  She has since won SHINE research funding to explore the impact of her methodology on students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Her DPhil continues her interest in student discussions of literature, exploring the impact on identity of online discussions between English classrooms in different countries.

Penny began her career as a secondary English Language Arts and journalism teacher in the USA but has taught secondary English predominantly in the UK in a career spanning 25 years.  She has overseen development of the global dimension and international collaboration at her current school for 14 years.

Supervisors

Victoria Elliott and Steven Puttick

Warda Arif is a doctoral student at the Department of Education. Her research aims to operationalise Critical Realist conceptions and methods to study Cultures of Higher Education in select Indian universities.

She completed her Master’s in Education and International Development from University College London’s – Institute of Education (UCL-IOE) as a Commonwealth Scholar and holds a B.Sc. in Biochemistry form Aligarh Muslim University (AMU).

Over her brief career, Warda has worked in the social development and impact sector in South Africa, India and Saudi Arabia, in teaching, research and advisory roles.

Supervisors

Dr Steven Puttick and Dr Aliya Khalid

Zak Devey is a passionate advocate for youth-led educational advocacy and equity – both within academia and in his work as co-founder of charitable trust Youth Arts New Zealand. In 2024, Zak continues to explore community conceptualisations of educational equity and their intersections with present and historic educational policy.

Zak also holds a deep care for youth-wellbeing, and its systemic determinants in the 21st century. His first publication, in the New Zealand Journal of Sociology, interrogates the ‘2021 World Happiness Report’ and that ways in which it constructs what it means to be happy.

Zak would be happy to hear from anyone looking to undertake a research journey in the Department, as well as scholars interested in educational equity, community-based participatory research, sociologies of well-being, and education in the political context of Aotearoa New Zealand.

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Pippa is a first-year DPhil student, whose research interests focus on vulnerable students’ outcomes and experiences of secondary school English education.

In 2023, Pippa completed an MSc in Learning and Teaching at the University of Oxford, researching pedagogical strategies for the teaching of emotionally challenging literature to students with experiences of trauma. Her DPhil research will build on this project, exploring looked after children’s engagement with English education, and their outcomes in the subject.

Alongside her research, Pippa continues to teach English in a secondary school; she is therefore passionate about collaborations between practice and research. Her project seeks to develop our understanding of looked after children’s experiences in English classrooms, in order to facilitate the development of strategies to support these vulnerable learners.

Supervisors

Nicole Dingwall and Julie Selwyn

Yunfei Ma is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of international higher education.

Following his B.A. (First Class) at the University of Durham, Yunfei was awarded with MSc (Distinction) from the Department of Education, University of Oxford prior to his DPhil studies. He has also worked as a research assistant on the project Transnational academic mobility to global south: an exploratory study of international faculty in China.

Yunfei’s DPhil research focuses on global academic publishing and its relationship with knowledge formation, codification and dissemination. His research interest primarily lies in the geo-politics of knowledge production, global epistemic governance, China’s Humanities and Social Sciences research, and the philosophy of power.

Supervisors

Ariel Lindorff and Xin Xu

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Penny is a DPhil student whose research interests centre on classroom talk and international collaborations between secondary English classrooms.

Penny completed Oxford’s MSc in Learning and Teaching with distinction in 2019, focusing on methods for mitigating the impact of mind-wandering and misunderstanding as a means of enhancing student engagement in small-group and whole-class debates of interpretations of literature.  She has since won SHINE research funding to explore the impact of her methodology on students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Her DPhil continues her interest in student discussions of literature, exploring the impact on identity of online discussions between English classrooms in different countries.

Penny began her career as a secondary English Language Arts and journalism teacher in the USA but has taught secondary English predominantly in the UK in a career spanning 25 years.  She has overseen development of the global dimension and international collaboration at her current school for 14 years.

Supervisors

Victoria Elliott and Steven Puttick

Warda Arif is a doctoral student at the Department of Education. Her research aims to operationalise Critical Realist conceptions and methods to study Cultures of Higher Education in select Indian universities.

She completed her Master’s in Education and International Development from University College London’s – Institute of Education (UCL-IOE) as a Commonwealth Scholar and holds a B.Sc. in Biochemistry form Aligarh Muslim University (AMU).

Over her brief career, Warda has worked in the social development and impact sector in South Africa, India and Saudi Arabia, in teaching, research and advisory roles.

Supervisors

Dr Steven Puttick and Dr Aliya Khalid

Zak Devey is a passionate advocate for youth-led educational advocacy and equity – both within academia and in his work as co-founder of charitable trust Youth Arts New Zealand. In 2024, Zak continues to explore community conceptualisations of educational equity and their intersections with present and historic educational policy.

Zak also holds a deep care for youth-wellbeing, and its systemic determinants in the 21st century. His first publication, in the New Zealand Journal of Sociology, interrogates the ‘2021 World Happiness Report’ and that ways in which it constructs what it means to be happy.

Zak would be happy to hear from anyone looking to undertake a research journey in the Department, as well as scholars interested in educational equity, community-based participatory research, sociologies of well-being, and education in the political context of Aotearoa New Zealand.

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Pippa is a first-year DPhil student, whose research interests focus on vulnerable students’ outcomes and experiences of secondary school English education.

In 2023, Pippa completed an MSc in Learning and Teaching at the University of Oxford, researching pedagogical strategies for the teaching of emotionally challenging literature to students with experiences of trauma. Her DPhil research will build on this project, exploring looked after children’s engagement with English education, and their outcomes in the subject.

Alongside her research, Pippa continues to teach English in a secondary school; she is therefore passionate about collaborations between practice and research. Her project seeks to develop our understanding of looked after children’s experiences in English classrooms, in order to facilitate the development of strategies to support these vulnerable learners.

Supervisors

Nicole Dingwall and Julie Selwyn

Yunfei Ma is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of international higher education.

Following his B.A. (First Class) at the University of Durham, Yunfei was awarded with MSc (Distinction) from the Department of Education, University of Oxford prior to his DPhil studies. He has also worked as a research assistant on the project Transnational academic mobility to global south: an exploratory study of international faculty in China.

Yunfei’s DPhil research focuses on global academic publishing and its relationship with knowledge formation, codification and dissemination. His research interest primarily lies in the geo-politics of knowledge production, global epistemic governance, China’s Humanities and Social Sciences research, and the philosophy of power.

Supervisors

Ariel Lindorff and Xin Xu

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Penny is a DPhil student whose research interests centre on classroom talk and international collaborations between secondary English classrooms.

Penny completed Oxford’s MSc in Learning and Teaching with distinction in 2019, focusing on methods for mitigating the impact of mind-wandering and misunderstanding as a means of enhancing student engagement in small-group and whole-class debates of interpretations of literature.  She has since won SHINE research funding to explore the impact of her methodology on students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Her DPhil continues her interest in student discussions of literature, exploring the impact on identity of online discussions between English classrooms in different countries.

Penny began her career as a secondary English Language Arts and journalism teacher in the USA but has taught secondary English predominantly in the UK in a career spanning 25 years.  She has overseen development of the global dimension and international collaboration at her current school for 14 years.

Supervisors

Victoria Elliott and Steven Puttick

Warda Arif is a doctoral student at the Department of Education. Her research aims to operationalise Critical Realist conceptions and methods to study Cultures of Higher Education in select Indian universities.

She completed her Master’s in Education and International Development from University College London’s – Institute of Education (UCL-IOE) as a Commonwealth Scholar and holds a B.Sc. in Biochemistry form Aligarh Muslim University (AMU).

Over her brief career, Warda has worked in the social development and impact sector in South Africa, India and Saudi Arabia, in teaching, research and advisory roles.

Supervisors

Dr Steven Puttick and Dr Aliya Khalid

Zak Devey is a passionate advocate for youth-led educational advocacy and equity – both within academia and in his work as co-founder of charitable trust Youth Arts New Zealand. In 2024, Zak continues to explore community conceptualisations of educational equity and their intersections with present and historic educational policy.

Zak also holds a deep care for youth-wellbeing, and its systemic determinants in the 21st century. His first publication, in the New Zealand Journal of Sociology, interrogates the ‘2021 World Happiness Report’ and that ways in which it constructs what it means to be happy.

Zak would be happy to hear from anyone looking to undertake a research journey in the Department, as well as scholars interested in educational equity, community-based participatory research, sociologies of well-being, and education in the political context of Aotearoa New Zealand.

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Pippa is a first-year DPhil student, whose research interests focus on vulnerable students’ outcomes and experiences of secondary school English education.

In 2023, Pippa completed an MSc in Learning and Teaching at the University of Oxford, researching pedagogical strategies for the teaching of emotionally challenging literature to students with experiences of trauma. Her DPhil research will build on this project, exploring looked after children’s engagement with English education, and their outcomes in the subject.

Alongside her research, Pippa continues to teach English in a secondary school; she is therefore passionate about collaborations between practice and research. Her project seeks to develop our understanding of looked after children’s experiences in English classrooms, in order to facilitate the development of strategies to support these vulnerable learners.

Supervisors

Nicole Dingwall and Julie Selwyn

Yunfei Ma is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of international higher education.

Following his B.A. (First Class) at the University of Durham, Yunfei was awarded with MSc (Distinction) from the Department of Education, University of Oxford prior to his DPhil studies. He has also worked as a research assistant on the project Transnational academic mobility to global south: an exploratory study of international faculty in China.

Yunfei’s DPhil research focuses on global academic publishing and its relationship with knowledge formation, codification and dissemination. His research interest primarily lies in the geo-politics of knowledge production, global epistemic governance, China’s Humanities and Social Sciences research, and the philosophy of power.

Supervisors

Ariel Lindorff and Xin Xu

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Penny is a DPhil student whose research interests centre on classroom talk and international collaborations between secondary English classrooms.

Penny completed Oxford’s MSc in Learning and Teaching with distinction in 2019, focusing on methods for mitigating the impact of mind-wandering and misunderstanding as a means of enhancing student engagement in small-group and whole-class debates of interpretations of literature.  She has since won SHINE research funding to explore the impact of her methodology on students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Her DPhil continues her interest in student discussions of literature, exploring the impact on identity of online discussions between English classrooms in different countries.

Penny began her career as a secondary English Language Arts and journalism teacher in the USA but has taught secondary English predominantly in the UK in a career spanning 25 years.  She has overseen development of the global dimension and international collaboration at her current school for 14 years.

Supervisors

Victoria Elliott and Steven Puttick

Warda Arif is a doctoral student at the Department of Education. Her research aims to operationalise Critical Realist conceptions and methods to study Cultures of Higher Education in select Indian universities.

She completed her Master’s in Education and International Development from University College London’s – Institute of Education (UCL-IOE) as a Commonwealth Scholar and holds a B.Sc. in Biochemistry form Aligarh Muslim University (AMU).

Over her brief career, Warda has worked in the social development and impact sector in South Africa, India and Saudi Arabia, in teaching, research and advisory roles.

Supervisors

Dr Steven Puttick and Dr Aliya Khalid

Zak Devey is a passionate advocate for youth-led educational advocacy and equity – both within academia and in his work as co-founder of charitable trust Youth Arts New Zealand. In 2024, Zak continues to explore community conceptualisations of educational equity and their intersections with present and historic educational policy.

Zak also holds a deep care for youth-wellbeing, and its systemic determinants in the 21st century. His first publication, in the New Zealand Journal of Sociology, interrogates the ‘2021 World Happiness Report’ and that ways in which it constructs what it means to be happy.

Zak would be happy to hear from anyone looking to undertake a research journey in the Department, as well as scholars interested in educational equity, community-based participatory research, sociologies of well-being, and education in the political context of Aotearoa New Zealand.

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Pippa is a first-year DPhil student, whose research interests focus on vulnerable students’ outcomes and experiences of secondary school English education.

In 2023, Pippa completed an MSc in Learning and Teaching at the University of Oxford, researching pedagogical strategies for the teaching of emotionally challenging literature to students with experiences of trauma. Her DPhil research will build on this project, exploring looked after children’s engagement with English education, and their outcomes in the subject.

Alongside her research, Pippa continues to teach English in a secondary school; she is therefore passionate about collaborations between practice and research. Her project seeks to develop our understanding of looked after children’s experiences in English classrooms, in order to facilitate the development of strategies to support these vulnerable learners.

Supervisors

Nicole Dingwall and Julie Selwyn

Yunfei Ma is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of international higher education.

Following his B.A. (First Class) at the University of Durham, Yunfei was awarded with MSc (Distinction) from the Department of Education, University of Oxford prior to his DPhil studies. He has also worked as a research assistant on the project Transnational academic mobility to global south: an exploratory study of international faculty in China.

Yunfei’s DPhil research focuses on global academic publishing and its relationship with knowledge formation, codification and dissemination. His research interest primarily lies in the geo-politics of knowledge production, global epistemic governance, China’s Humanities and Social Sciences research, and the philosophy of power.

Supervisors

Ariel Lindorff and Xin Xu

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Penny is a DPhil student whose research interests centre on classroom talk and international collaborations between secondary English classrooms.

Penny completed Oxford’s MSc in Learning and Teaching with distinction in 2019, focusing on methods for mitigating the impact of mind-wandering and misunderstanding as a means of enhancing student engagement in small-group and whole-class debates of interpretations of literature.  She has since won SHINE research funding to explore the impact of her methodology on students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Her DPhil continues her interest in student discussions of literature, exploring the impact on identity of online discussions between English classrooms in different countries.

Penny began her career as a secondary English Language Arts and journalism teacher in the USA but has taught secondary English predominantly in the UK in a career spanning 25 years.  She has overseen development of the global dimension and international collaboration at her current school for 14 years.

Supervisors

Victoria Elliott and Steven Puttick

Warda Arif is a doctoral student at the Department of Education. Her research aims to operationalise Critical Realist conceptions and methods to study Cultures of Higher Education in select Indian universities.

She completed her Master’s in Education and International Development from University College London’s – Institute of Education (UCL-IOE) as a Commonwealth Scholar and holds a B.Sc. in Biochemistry form Aligarh Muslim University (AMU).

Over her brief career, Warda has worked in the social development and impact sector in South Africa, India and Saudi Arabia, in teaching, research and advisory roles.

Supervisors

Dr Steven Puttick and Dr Aliya Khalid

Zak Devey is a passionate advocate for youth-led educational advocacy and equity – both within academia and in his work as co-founder of charitable trust Youth Arts New Zealand. In 2024, Zak continues to explore community conceptualisations of educational equity and their intersections with present and historic educational policy.

Zak also holds a deep care for youth-wellbeing, and its systemic determinants in the 21st century. His first publication, in the New Zealand Journal of Sociology, interrogates the ‘2021 World Happiness Report’ and that ways in which it constructs what it means to be happy.

Zak would be happy to hear from anyone looking to undertake a research journey in the Department, as well as scholars interested in educational equity, community-based participatory research, sociologies of well-being, and education in the political context of Aotearoa New Zealand.

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Pippa is a first-year DPhil student, whose research interests focus on vulnerable students’ outcomes and experiences of secondary school English education.

In 2023, Pippa completed an MSc in Learning and Teaching at the University of Oxford, researching pedagogical strategies for the teaching of emotionally challenging literature to students with experiences of trauma. Her DPhil research will build on this project, exploring looked after children’s engagement with English education, and their outcomes in the subject.

Alongside her research, Pippa continues to teach English in a secondary school; she is therefore passionate about collaborations between practice and research. Her project seeks to develop our understanding of looked after children’s experiences in English classrooms, in order to facilitate the development of strategies to support these vulnerable learners.

Supervisors

Nicole Dingwall and Julie Selwyn

Yunfei Ma is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of international higher education.

Following his B.A. (First Class) at the University of Durham, Yunfei was awarded with MSc (Distinction) from the Department of Education, University of Oxford prior to his DPhil studies. He has also worked as a research assistant on the project Transnational academic mobility to global south: an exploratory study of international faculty in China.

Yunfei’s DPhil research focuses on global academic publishing and its relationship with knowledge formation, codification and dissemination. His research interest primarily lies in the geo-politics of knowledge production, global epistemic governance, China’s Humanities and Social Sciences research, and the philosophy of power.

Supervisors

Ariel Lindorff and Xin Xu

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Penny is a DPhil student whose research interests centre on classroom talk and international collaborations between secondary English classrooms.

Penny completed Oxford’s MSc in Learning and Teaching with distinction in 2019, focusing on methods for mitigating the impact of mind-wandering and misunderstanding as a means of enhancing student engagement in small-group and whole-class debates of interpretations of literature.  She has since won SHINE research funding to explore the impact of her methodology on students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Her DPhil continues her interest in student discussions of literature, exploring the impact on identity of online discussions between English classrooms in different countries.

Penny began her career as a secondary English Language Arts and journalism teacher in the USA but has taught secondary English predominantly in the UK in a career spanning 25 years.  She has overseen development of the global dimension and international collaboration at her current school for 14 years.

Supervisors

Victoria Elliott and Steven Puttick

Warda Arif is a doctoral student at the Department of Education. Her research aims to operationalise Critical Realist conceptions and methods to study Cultures of Higher Education in select Indian universities.

She completed her Master’s in Education and International Development from University College London’s – Institute of Education (UCL-IOE) as a Commonwealth Scholar and holds a B.Sc. in Biochemistry form Aligarh Muslim University (AMU).

Over her brief career, Warda has worked in the social development and impact sector in South Africa, India and Saudi Arabia, in teaching, research and advisory roles.

Supervisors

Dr Steven Puttick and Dr Aliya Khalid

Zak Devey is a passionate advocate for youth-led educational advocacy and equity – both within academia and in his work as co-founder of charitable trust Youth Arts New Zealand. In 2024, Zak continues to explore community conceptualisations of educational equity and their intersections with present and historic educational policy.

Zak also holds a deep care for youth-wellbeing, and its systemic determinants in the 21st century. His first publication, in the New Zealand Journal of Sociology, interrogates the ‘2021 World Happiness Report’ and that ways in which it constructs what it means to be happy.

Zak would be happy to hear from anyone looking to undertake a research journey in the Department, as well as scholars interested in educational equity, community-based participatory research, sociologies of well-being, and education in the political context of Aotearoa New Zealand.

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Pippa is a first-year DPhil student, whose research interests focus on vulnerable students’ outcomes and experiences of secondary school English education.

In 2023, Pippa completed an MSc in Learning and Teaching at the University of Oxford, researching pedagogical strategies for the teaching of emotionally challenging literature to students with experiences of trauma. Her DPhil research will build on this project, exploring looked after children’s engagement with English education, and their outcomes in the subject.

Alongside her research, Pippa continues to teach English in a secondary school; she is therefore passionate about collaborations between practice and research. Her project seeks to develop our understanding of looked after children’s experiences in English classrooms, in order to facilitate the development of strategies to support these vulnerable learners.

Supervisors

Nicole Dingwall and Julie Selwyn

Yunfei Ma is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of international higher education.

Following his B.A. (First Class) at the University of Durham, Yunfei was awarded with MSc (Distinction) from the Department of Education, University of Oxford prior to his DPhil studies. He has also worked as a research assistant on the project Transnational academic mobility to global south: an exploratory study of international faculty in China.

Yunfei’s DPhil research focuses on global academic publishing and its relationship with knowledge formation, codification and dissemination. His research interest primarily lies in the geo-politics of knowledge production, global epistemic governance, China’s Humanities and Social Sciences research, and the philosophy of power.

Supervisors

Ariel Lindorff and Xin Xu

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Penny is a DPhil student whose research interests centre on classroom talk and international collaborations between secondary English classrooms.

Penny completed Oxford’s MSc in Learning and Teaching with distinction in 2019, focusing on methods for mitigating the impact of mind-wandering and misunderstanding as a means of enhancing student engagement in small-group and whole-class debates of interpretations of literature.  She has since won SHINE research funding to explore the impact of her methodology on students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Her DPhil continues her interest in student discussions of literature, exploring the impact on identity of online discussions between English classrooms in different countries.

Penny began her career as a secondary English Language Arts and journalism teacher in the USA but has taught secondary English predominantly in the UK in a career spanning 25 years.  She has overseen development of the global dimension and international collaboration at her current school for 14 years.

Supervisors

Victoria Elliott and Steven Puttick

Warda Arif is a doctoral student at the Department of Education. Her research aims to operationalise Critical Realist conceptions and methods to study Cultures of Higher Education in select Indian universities.

She completed her Master’s in Education and International Development from University College London’s – Institute of Education (UCL-IOE) as a Commonwealth Scholar and holds a B.Sc. in Biochemistry form Aligarh Muslim University (AMU).

Over her brief career, Warda has worked in the social development and impact sector in South Africa, India and Saudi Arabia, in teaching, research and advisory roles.

Supervisors

Dr Steven Puttick and Dr Aliya Khalid

Zak Devey is a passionate advocate for youth-led educational advocacy and equity – both within academia and in his work as co-founder of charitable trust Youth Arts New Zealand. In 2024, Zak continues to explore community conceptualisations of educational equity and their intersections with present and historic educational policy.

Zak also holds a deep care for youth-wellbeing, and its systemic determinants in the 21st century. His first publication, in the New Zealand Journal of Sociology, interrogates the ‘2021 World Happiness Report’ and that ways in which it constructs what it means to be happy.

Zak would be happy to hear from anyone looking to undertake a research journey in the Department, as well as scholars interested in educational equity, community-based participatory research, sociologies of well-being, and education in the political context of Aotearoa New Zealand.

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Pippa is a first-year DPhil student, whose research interests focus on vulnerable students’ outcomes and experiences of secondary school English education.

In 2023, Pippa completed an MSc in Learning and Teaching at the University of Oxford, researching pedagogical strategies for the teaching of emotionally challenging literature to students with experiences of trauma. Her DPhil research will build on this project, exploring looked after children’s engagement with English education, and their outcomes in the subject.

Alongside her research, Pippa continues to teach English in a secondary school; she is therefore passionate about collaborations between practice and research. Her project seeks to develop our understanding of looked after children’s experiences in English classrooms, in order to facilitate the development of strategies to support these vulnerable learners.

Supervisors

Nicole Dingwall and Julie Selwyn

Yunfei Ma is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of international higher education.

Following his B.A. (First Class) at the University of Durham, Yunfei was awarded with MSc (Distinction) from the Department of Education, University of Oxford prior to his DPhil studies. He has also worked as a research assistant on the project Transnational academic mobility to global south: an exploratory study of international faculty in China.

Yunfei’s DPhil research focuses on global academic publishing and its relationship with knowledge formation, codification and dissemination. His research interest primarily lies in the geo-politics of knowledge production, global epistemic governance, China’s Humanities and Social Sciences research, and the philosophy of power.

Supervisors

Ariel Lindorff and Xin Xu

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Penny is a DPhil student whose research interests centre on classroom talk and international collaborations between secondary English classrooms.

Penny completed Oxford’s MSc in Learning and Teaching with distinction in 2019, focusing on methods for mitigating the impact of mind-wandering and misunderstanding as a means of enhancing student engagement in small-group and whole-class debates of interpretations of literature.  She has since won SHINE research funding to explore the impact of her methodology on students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Her DPhil continues her interest in student discussions of literature, exploring the impact on identity of online discussions between English classrooms in different countries.

Penny began her career as a secondary English Language Arts and journalism teacher in the USA but has taught secondary English predominantly in the UK in a career spanning 25 years.  She has overseen development of the global dimension and international collaboration at her current school for 14 years.

Supervisors

Victoria Elliott and Steven Puttick

Warda Arif is a doctoral student at the Department of Education. Her research aims to operationalise Critical Realist conceptions and methods to study Cultures of Higher Education in select Indian universities.

She completed her Master’s in Education and International Development from University College London’s – Institute of Education (UCL-IOE) as a Commonwealth Scholar and holds a B.Sc. in Biochemistry form Aligarh Muslim University (AMU).

Over her brief career, Warda has worked in the social development and impact sector in South Africa, India and Saudi Arabia, in teaching, research and advisory roles.

Supervisors

Dr Steven Puttick and Dr Aliya Khalid

Zak Devey is a passionate advocate for youth-led educational advocacy and equity – both within academia and in his work as co-founder of charitable trust Youth Arts New Zealand. In 2024, Zak continues to explore community conceptualisations of educational equity and their intersections with present and historic educational policy.

Zak also holds a deep care for youth-wellbeing, and its systemic determinants in the 21st century. His first publication, in the New Zealand Journal of Sociology, interrogates the ‘2021 World Happiness Report’ and that ways in which it constructs what it means to be happy.

Zak would be happy to hear from anyone looking to undertake a research journey in the Department, as well as scholars interested in educational equity, community-based participatory research, sociologies of well-being, and education in the political context of Aotearoa New Zealand.

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Pippa is a first-year DPhil student, whose research interests focus on vulnerable students’ outcomes and experiences of secondary school English education.

In 2023, Pippa completed an MSc in Learning and Teaching at the University of Oxford, researching pedagogical strategies for the teaching of emotionally challenging literature to students with experiences of trauma. Her DPhil research will build on this project, exploring looked after children’s engagement with English education, and their outcomes in the subject.

Alongside her research, Pippa continues to teach English in a secondary school; she is therefore passionate about collaborations between practice and research. Her project seeks to develop our understanding of looked after children’s experiences in English classrooms, in order to facilitate the development of strategies to support these vulnerable learners.

Supervisors

Nicole Dingwall and Julie Selwyn

Yunfei Ma is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of international higher education.

Following his B.A. (First Class) at the University of Durham, Yunfei was awarded with MSc (Distinction) from the Department of Education, University of Oxford prior to his DPhil studies. He has also worked as a research assistant on the project Transnational academic mobility to global south: an exploratory study of international faculty in China.

Yunfei’s DPhil research focuses on global academic publishing and its relationship with knowledge formation, codification and dissemination. His research interest primarily lies in the geo-politics of knowledge production, global epistemic governance, China’s Humanities and Social Sciences research, and the philosophy of power.

Supervisors

Ariel Lindorff and Xin Xu

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Penny is a DPhil student whose research interests centre on classroom talk and international collaborations between secondary English classrooms.

Penny completed Oxford’s MSc in Learning and Teaching with distinction in 2019, focusing on methods for mitigating the impact of mind-wandering and misunderstanding as a means of enhancing student engagement in small-group and whole-class debates of interpretations of literature.  She has since won SHINE research funding to explore the impact of her methodology on students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Her DPhil continues her interest in student discussions of literature, exploring the impact on identity of online discussions between English classrooms in different countries.

Penny began her career as a secondary English Language Arts and journalism teacher in the USA but has taught secondary English predominantly in the UK in a career spanning 25 years.  She has overseen development of the global dimension and international collaboration at her current school for 14 years.

Supervisors

Victoria Elliott and Steven Puttick

Warda Arif is a doctoral student at the Department of Education. Her research aims to operationalise Critical Realist conceptions and methods to study Cultures of Higher Education in select Indian universities.

She completed her Master’s in Education and International Development from University College London’s – Institute of Education (UCL-IOE) as a Commonwealth Scholar and holds a B.Sc. in Biochemistry form Aligarh Muslim University (AMU).

Over her brief career, Warda has worked in the social development and impact sector in South Africa, India and Saudi Arabia, in teaching, research and advisory roles.

Supervisors

Dr Steven Puttick and Dr Aliya Khalid

Zak Devey is a passionate advocate for youth-led educational advocacy and equity – both within academia and in his work as co-founder of charitable trust Youth Arts New Zealand. In 2024, Zak continues to explore community conceptualisations of educational equity and their intersections with present and historic educational policy.

Zak also holds a deep care for youth-wellbeing, and its systemic determinants in the 21st century. His first publication, in the New Zealand Journal of Sociology, interrogates the ‘2021 World Happiness Report’ and that ways in which it constructs what it means to be happy.

Zak would be happy to hear from anyone looking to undertake a research journey in the Department, as well as scholars interested in educational equity, community-based participatory research, sociologies of well-being, and education in the political context of Aotearoa New Zealand.

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Pippa is a first-year DPhil student, whose research interests focus on vulnerable students’ outcomes and experiences of secondary school English education.

In 2023, Pippa completed an MSc in Learning and Teaching at the University of Oxford, researching pedagogical strategies for the teaching of emotionally challenging literature to students with experiences of trauma. Her DPhil research will build on this project, exploring looked after children’s engagement with English education, and their outcomes in the subject.

Alongside her research, Pippa continues to teach English in a secondary school; she is therefore passionate about collaborations between practice and research. Her project seeks to develop our understanding of looked after children’s experiences in English classrooms, in order to facilitate the development of strategies to support these vulnerable learners.

Supervisors

Nicole Dingwall and Julie Selwyn

Yunfei Ma is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of international higher education.

Following his B.A. (First Class) at the University of Durham, Yunfei was awarded with MSc (Distinction) from the Department of Education, University of Oxford prior to his DPhil studies. He has also worked as a research assistant on the project Transnational academic mobility to global south: an exploratory study of international faculty in China.

Yunfei’s DPhil research focuses on global academic publishing and its relationship with knowledge formation, codification and dissemination. His research interest primarily lies in the geo-politics of knowledge production, global epistemic governance, China’s Humanities and Social Sciences research, and the philosophy of power.

Supervisors

Ariel Lindorff and Xin Xu

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Penny is a DPhil student whose research interests centre on classroom talk and international collaborations between secondary English classrooms.

Penny completed Oxford’s MSc in Learning and Teaching with distinction in 2019, focusing on methods for mitigating the impact of mind-wandering and misunderstanding as a means of enhancing student engagement in small-group and whole-class debates of interpretations of literature.  She has since won SHINE research funding to explore the impact of her methodology on students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Her DPhil continues her interest in student discussions of literature, exploring the impact on identity of online discussions between English classrooms in different countries.

Penny began her career as a secondary English Language Arts and journalism teacher in the USA but has taught secondary English predominantly in the UK in a career spanning 25 years.  She has overseen development of the global dimension and international collaboration at her current school for 14 years.

Supervisors

Victoria Elliott and Steven Puttick

Warda Arif is a doctoral student at the Department of Education. Her research aims to operationalise Critical Realist conceptions and methods to study Cultures of Higher Education in select Indian universities.

She completed her Master’s in Education and International Development from University College London’s – Institute of Education (UCL-IOE) as a Commonwealth Scholar and holds a B.Sc. in Biochemistry form Aligarh Muslim University (AMU).

Over her brief career, Warda has worked in the social development and impact sector in South Africa, India and Saudi Arabia, in teaching, research and advisory roles.

Supervisors

Dr Steven Puttick and Dr Aliya Khalid

Zak Devey is a passionate advocate for youth-led educational advocacy and equity – both within academia and in his work as co-founder of charitable trust Youth Arts New Zealand. In 2024, Zak continues to explore community conceptualisations of educational equity and their intersections with present and historic educational policy.

Zak also holds a deep care for youth-wellbeing, and its systemic determinants in the 21st century. His first publication, in the New Zealand Journal of Sociology, interrogates the ‘2021 World Happiness Report’ and that ways in which it constructs what it means to be happy.

Zak would be happy to hear from anyone looking to undertake a research journey in the Department, as well as scholars interested in educational equity, community-based participatory research, sociologies of well-being, and education in the political context of Aotearoa New Zealand.

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Pippa is a first-year DPhil student, whose research interests focus on vulnerable students’ outcomes and experiences of secondary school English education.

In 2023, Pippa completed an MSc in Learning and Teaching at the University of Oxford, researching pedagogical strategies for the teaching of emotionally challenging literature to students with experiences of trauma. Her DPhil research will build on this project, exploring looked after children’s engagement with English education, and their outcomes in the subject.

Alongside her research, Pippa continues to teach English in a secondary school; she is therefore passionate about collaborations between practice and research. Her project seeks to develop our understanding of looked after children’s experiences in English classrooms, in order to facilitate the development of strategies to support these vulnerable learners.

Supervisors

Nicole Dingwall and Julie Selwyn

Yunfei Ma is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of international higher education.

Following his B.A. (First Class) at the University of Durham, Yunfei was awarded with MSc (Distinction) from the Department of Education, University of Oxford prior to his DPhil studies. He has also worked as a research assistant on the project Transnational academic mobility to global south: an exploratory study of international faculty in China.

Yunfei’s DPhil research focuses on global academic publishing and its relationship with knowledge formation, codification and dissemination. His research interest primarily lies in the geo-politics of knowledge production, global epistemic governance, China’s Humanities and Social Sciences research, and the philosophy of power.

Supervisors

Ariel Lindorff and Xin Xu

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Penny is a DPhil student whose research interests centre on classroom talk and international collaborations between secondary English classrooms.

Penny completed Oxford’s MSc in Learning and Teaching with distinction in 2019, focusing on methods for mitigating the impact of mind-wandering and misunderstanding as a means of enhancing student engagement in small-group and whole-class debates of interpretations of literature.  She has since won SHINE research funding to explore the impact of her methodology on students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Her DPhil continues her interest in student discussions of literature, exploring the impact on identity of online discussions between English classrooms in different countries.

Penny began her career as a secondary English Language Arts and journalism teacher in the USA but has taught secondary English predominantly in the UK in a career spanning 25 years.  She has overseen development of the global dimension and international collaboration at her current school for 14 years.

Supervisors

Victoria Elliott and Steven Puttick

Warda Arif is a doctoral student at the Department of Education. Her research aims to operationalise Critical Realist conceptions and methods to study Cultures of Higher Education in select Indian universities.

She completed her Master’s in Education and International Development from University College London’s – Institute of Education (UCL-IOE) as a Commonwealth Scholar and holds a B.Sc. in Biochemistry form Aligarh Muslim University (AMU).

Over her brief career, Warda has worked in the social development and impact sector in South Africa, India and Saudi Arabia, in teaching, research and advisory roles.

Supervisors

Dr Steven Puttick and Dr Aliya Khalid

Zak Devey is a passionate advocate for youth-led educational advocacy and equity – both within academia and in his work as co-founder of charitable trust Youth Arts New Zealand. In 2024, Zak continues to explore community conceptualisations of educational equity and their intersections with present and historic educational policy.

Zak also holds a deep care for youth-wellbeing, and its systemic determinants in the 21st century. His first publication, in the New Zealand Journal of Sociology, interrogates the ‘2021 World Happiness Report’ and that ways in which it constructs what it means to be happy.

Zak would be happy to hear from anyone looking to undertake a research journey in the Department, as well as scholars interested in educational equity, community-based participatory research, sociologies of well-being, and education in the political context of Aotearoa New Zealand.

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Pippa is a first-year DPhil student, whose research interests focus on vulnerable students’ outcomes and experiences of secondary school English education.

In 2023, Pippa completed an MSc in Learning and Teaching at the University of Oxford, researching pedagogical strategies for the teaching of emotionally challenging literature to students with experiences of trauma. Her DPhil research will build on this project, exploring looked after children’s engagement with English education, and their outcomes in the subject.

Alongside her research, Pippa continues to teach English in a secondary school; she is therefore passionate about collaborations between practice and research. Her project seeks to develop our understanding of looked after children’s experiences in English classrooms, in order to facilitate the development of strategies to support these vulnerable learners.

Supervisors

Nicole Dingwall and Julie Selwyn

Yunfei Ma is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of international higher education.

Following his B.A. (First Class) at the University of Durham, Yunfei was awarded with MSc (Distinction) from the Department of Education, University of Oxford prior to his DPhil studies. He has also worked as a research assistant on the project Transnational academic mobility to global south: an exploratory study of international faculty in China.

Yunfei’s DPhil research focuses on global academic publishing and its relationship with knowledge formation, codification and dissemination. His research interest primarily lies in the geo-politics of knowledge production, global epistemic governance, China’s Humanities and Social Sciences research, and the philosophy of power.

Supervisors

Ariel Lindorff and Xin Xu

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Penny is a DPhil student whose research interests centre on classroom talk and international collaborations between secondary English classrooms.

Penny completed Oxford’s MSc in Learning and Teaching with distinction in 2019, focusing on methods for mitigating the impact of mind-wandering and misunderstanding as a means of enhancing student engagement in small-group and whole-class debates of interpretations of literature.  She has since won SHINE research funding to explore the impact of her methodology on students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Her DPhil continues her interest in student discussions of literature, exploring the impact on identity of online discussions between English classrooms in different countries.

Penny began her career as a secondary English Language Arts and journalism teacher in the USA but has taught secondary English predominantly in the UK in a career spanning 25 years.  She has overseen development of the global dimension and international collaboration at her current school for 14 years.

Supervisors

Victoria Elliott and Steven Puttick

Warda Arif is a doctoral student at the Department of Education. Her research aims to operationalise Critical Realist conceptions and methods to study Cultures of Higher Education in select Indian universities.

She completed her Master’s in Education and International Development from University College London’s – Institute of Education (UCL-IOE) as a Commonwealth Scholar and holds a B.Sc. in Biochemistry form Aligarh Muslim University (AMU).

Over her brief career, Warda has worked in the social development and impact sector in South Africa, India and Saudi Arabia, in teaching, research and advisory roles.

Supervisors

Dr Steven Puttick and Dr Aliya Khalid

Zak Devey is a passionate advocate for youth-led educational advocacy and equity – both within academia and in his work as co-founder of charitable trust Youth Arts New Zealand. In 2024, Zak continues to explore community conceptualisations of educational equity and their intersections with present and historic educational policy.

Zak also holds a deep care for youth-wellbeing, and its systemic determinants in the 21st century. His first publication, in the New Zealand Journal of Sociology, interrogates the ‘2021 World Happiness Report’ and that ways in which it constructs what it means to be happy.

Zak would be happy to hear from anyone looking to undertake a research journey in the Department, as well as scholars interested in educational equity, community-based participatory research, sociologies of well-being, and education in the political context of Aotearoa New Zealand.

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Pippa is a first-year DPhil student, whose research interests focus on vulnerable students’ outcomes and experiences of secondary school English education.

In 2023, Pippa completed an MSc in Learning and Teaching at the University of Oxford, researching pedagogical strategies for the teaching of emotionally challenging literature to students with experiences of trauma. Her DPhil research will build on this project, exploring looked after children’s engagement with English education, and their outcomes in the subject.

Alongside her research, Pippa continues to teach English in a secondary school; she is therefore passionate about collaborations between practice and research. Her project seeks to develop our understanding of looked after children’s experiences in English classrooms, in order to facilitate the development of strategies to support these vulnerable learners.

Supervisors

Nicole Dingwall and Julie Selwyn

Yunfei Ma is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of international higher education.

Following his B.A. (First Class) at the University of Durham, Yunfei was awarded with MSc (Distinction) from the Department of Education, University of Oxford prior to his DPhil studies. He has also worked as a research assistant on the project Transnational academic mobility to global south: an exploratory study of international faculty in China.

Yunfei’s DPhil research focuses on global academic publishing and its relationship with knowledge formation, codification and dissemination. His research interest primarily lies in the geo-politics of knowledge production, global epistemic governance, China’s Humanities and Social Sciences research, and the philosophy of power.

Supervisors

Ariel Lindorff and Xin Xu

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Penny is a DPhil student whose research interests centre on classroom talk and international collaborations between secondary English classrooms.

Penny completed Oxford’s MSc in Learning and Teaching with distinction in 2019, focusing on methods for mitigating the impact of mind-wandering and misunderstanding as a means of enhancing student engagement in small-group and whole-class debates of interpretations of literature.  She has since won SHINE research funding to explore the impact of her methodology on students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Her DPhil continues her interest in student discussions of literature, exploring the impact on identity of online discussions between English classrooms in different countries.

Penny began her career as a secondary English Language Arts and journalism teacher in the USA but has taught secondary English predominantly in the UK in a career spanning 25 years.  She has overseen development of the global dimension and international collaboration at her current school for 14 years.

Supervisors

Victoria Elliott and Steven Puttick

Warda Arif is a doctoral student at the Department of Education. Her research aims to operationalise Critical Realist conceptions and methods to study Cultures of Higher Education in select Indian universities.

She completed her Master’s in Education and International Development from University College London’s – Institute of Education (UCL-IOE) as a Commonwealth Scholar and holds a B.Sc. in Biochemistry form Aligarh Muslim University (AMU).

Over her brief career, Warda has worked in the social development and impact sector in South Africa, India and Saudi Arabia, in teaching, research and advisory roles.

Supervisors

Dr Steven Puttick and Dr Aliya Khalid

Zak Devey is a passionate advocate for youth-led educational advocacy and equity – both within academia and in his work as co-founder of charitable trust Youth Arts New Zealand. In 2024, Zak continues to explore community conceptualisations of educational equity and their intersections with present and historic educational policy.

Zak also holds a deep care for youth-wellbeing, and its systemic determinants in the 21st century. His first publication, in the New Zealand Journal of Sociology, interrogates the ‘2021 World Happiness Report’ and that ways in which it constructs what it means to be happy.

Zak would be happy to hear from anyone looking to undertake a research journey in the Department, as well as scholars interested in educational equity, community-based participatory research, sociologies of well-being, and education in the political context of Aotearoa New Zealand.

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Pippa is a first-year DPhil student, whose research interests focus on vulnerable students’ outcomes and experiences of secondary school English education.

In 2023, Pippa completed an MSc in Learning and Teaching at the University of Oxford, researching pedagogical strategies for the teaching of emotionally challenging literature to students with experiences of trauma. Her DPhil research will build on this project, exploring looked after children’s engagement with English education, and their outcomes in the subject.

Alongside her research, Pippa continues to teach English in a secondary school; she is therefore passionate about collaborations between practice and research. Her project seeks to develop our understanding of looked after children’s experiences in English classrooms, in order to facilitate the development of strategies to support these vulnerable learners.

Supervisors

Nicole Dingwall and Julie Selwyn

Yunfei Ma is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of international higher education.

Following his B.A. (First Class) at the University of Durham, Yunfei was awarded with MSc (Distinction) from the Department of Education, University of Oxford prior to his DPhil studies. He has also worked as a research assistant on the project Transnational academic mobility to global south: an exploratory study of international faculty in China.

Yunfei’s DPhil research focuses on global academic publishing and its relationship with knowledge formation, codification and dissemination. His research interest primarily lies in the geo-politics of knowledge production, global epistemic governance, China’s Humanities and Social Sciences research, and the philosophy of power.

Supervisors

Ariel Lindorff and Xin Xu

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Penny is a DPhil student whose research interests centre on classroom talk and international collaborations between secondary English classrooms.

Penny completed Oxford’s MSc in Learning and Teaching with distinction in 2019, focusing on methods for mitigating the impact of mind-wandering and misunderstanding as a means of enhancing student engagement in small-group and whole-class debates of interpretations of literature.  She has since won SHINE research funding to explore the impact of her methodology on students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Her DPhil continues her interest in student discussions of literature, exploring the impact on identity of online discussions between English classrooms in different countries.

Penny began her career as a secondary English Language Arts and journalism teacher in the USA but has taught secondary English predominantly in the UK in a career spanning 25 years.  She has overseen development of the global dimension and international collaboration at her current school for 14 years.

Supervisors

Victoria Elliott and Steven Puttick

Warda Arif is a doctoral student at the Department of Education. Her research aims to operationalise Critical Realist conceptions and methods to study Cultures of Higher Education in select Indian universities.

She completed her Master’s in Education and International Development from University College London’s – Institute of Education (UCL-IOE) as a Commonwealth Scholar and holds a B.Sc. in Biochemistry form Aligarh Muslim University (AMU).

Over her brief career, Warda has worked in the social development and impact sector in South Africa, India and Saudi Arabia, in teaching, research and advisory roles.

Supervisors

Dr Steven Puttick and Dr Aliya Khalid

Zak Devey is a passionate advocate for youth-led educational advocacy and equity – both within academia and in his work as co-founder of charitable trust Youth Arts New Zealand. In 2024, Zak continues to explore community conceptualisations of educational equity and their intersections with present and historic educational policy.

Zak also holds a deep care for youth-wellbeing, and its systemic determinants in the 21st century. His first publication, in the New Zealand Journal of Sociology, interrogates the ‘2021 World Happiness Report’ and that ways in which it constructs what it means to be happy.

Zak would be happy to hear from anyone looking to undertake a research journey in the Department, as well as scholars interested in educational equity, community-based participatory research, sociologies of well-being, and education in the political context of Aotearoa New Zealand.

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Pippa is a first-year DPhil student, whose research interests focus on vulnerable students’ outcomes and experiences of secondary school English education.

In 2023, Pippa completed an MSc in Learning and Teaching at the University of Oxford, researching pedagogical strategies for the teaching of emotionally challenging literature to students with experiences of trauma. Her DPhil research will build on this project, exploring looked after children’s engagement with English education, and their outcomes in the subject.

Alongside her research, Pippa continues to teach English in a secondary school; she is therefore passionate about collaborations between practice and research. Her project seeks to develop our understanding of looked after children’s experiences in English classrooms, in order to facilitate the development of strategies to support these vulnerable learners.

Supervisors

Nicole Dingwall and Julie Selwyn

Yunfei Ma is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of international higher education.

Following his B.A. (First Class) at the University of Durham, Yunfei was awarded with MSc (Distinction) from the Department of Education, University of Oxford prior to his DPhil studies. He has also worked as a research assistant on the project Transnational academic mobility to global south: an exploratory study of international faculty in China.

Yunfei’s DPhil research focuses on global academic publishing and its relationship with knowledge formation, codification and dissemination. His research interest primarily lies in the geo-politics of knowledge production, global epistemic governance, China’s Humanities and Social Sciences research, and the philosophy of power.

Supervisors

Ariel Lindorff and Xin Xu

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Penny is a DPhil student whose research interests centre on classroom talk and international collaborations between secondary English classrooms.

Penny completed Oxford’s MSc in Learning and Teaching with distinction in 2019, focusing on methods for mitigating the impact of mind-wandering and misunderstanding as a means of enhancing student engagement in small-group and whole-class debates of interpretations of literature.  She has since won SHINE research funding to explore the impact of her methodology on students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Her DPhil continues her interest in student discussions of literature, exploring the impact on identity of online discussions between English classrooms in different countries.

Penny began her career as a secondary English Language Arts and journalism teacher in the USA but has taught secondary English predominantly in the UK in a career spanning 25 years.  She has overseen development of the global dimension and international collaboration at her current school for 14 years.

Supervisors

Victoria Elliott and Steven Puttick

Warda Arif is a doctoral student at the Department of Education. Her research aims to operationalise Critical Realist conceptions and methods to study Cultures of Higher Education in select Indian universities.

She completed her Master’s in Education and International Development from University College London’s – Institute of Education (UCL-IOE) as a Commonwealth Scholar and holds a B.Sc. in Biochemistry form Aligarh Muslim University (AMU).

Over her brief career, Warda has worked in the social development and impact sector in South Africa, India and Saudi Arabia, in teaching, research and advisory roles.

Supervisors

Dr Steven Puttick and Dr Aliya Khalid

Zak Devey is a passionate advocate for youth-led educational advocacy and equity – both within academia and in his work as co-founder of charitable trust Youth Arts New Zealand. In 2024, Zak continues to explore community conceptualisations of educational equity and their intersections with present and historic educational policy.

Zak also holds a deep care for youth-wellbeing, and its systemic determinants in the 21st century. His first publication, in the New Zealand Journal of Sociology, interrogates the ‘2021 World Happiness Report’ and that ways in which it constructs what it means to be happy.

Zak would be happy to hear from anyone looking to undertake a research journey in the Department, as well as scholars interested in educational equity, community-based participatory research, sociologies of well-being, and education in the political context of Aotearoa New Zealand.

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Pippa is a first-year DPhil student, whose research interests focus on vulnerable students’ outcomes and experiences of secondary school English education.

In 2023, Pippa completed an MSc in Learning and Teaching at the University of Oxford, researching pedagogical strategies for the teaching of emotionally challenging literature to students with experiences of trauma. Her DPhil research will build on this project, exploring looked after children’s engagement with English education, and their outcomes in the subject.

Alongside her research, Pippa continues to teach English in a secondary school; she is therefore passionate about collaborations between practice and research. Her project seeks to develop our understanding of looked after children’s experiences in English classrooms, in order to facilitate the development of strategies to support these vulnerable learners.

Supervisors

Nicole Dingwall and Julie Selwyn

Yunfei Ma is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of international higher education.

Following his B.A. (First Class) at the University of Durham, Yunfei was awarded with MSc (Distinction) from the Department of Education, University of Oxford prior to his DPhil studies. He has also worked as a research assistant on the project Transnational academic mobility to global south: an exploratory study of international faculty in China.

Yunfei’s DPhil research focuses on global academic publishing and its relationship with knowledge formation, codification and dissemination. His research interest primarily lies in the geo-politics of knowledge production, global epistemic governance, China’s Humanities and Social Sciences research, and the philosophy of power.

Supervisors

Ariel Lindorff and Xin Xu

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Penny is a DPhil student whose research interests centre on classroom talk and international collaborations between secondary English classrooms.

Penny completed Oxford’s MSc in Learning and Teaching with distinction in 2019, focusing on methods for mitigating the impact of mind-wandering and misunderstanding as a means of enhancing student engagement in small-group and whole-class debates of interpretations of literature.  She has since won SHINE research funding to explore the impact of her methodology on students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Her DPhil continues her interest in student discussions of literature, exploring the impact on identity of online discussions between English classrooms in different countries.

Penny began her career as a secondary English Language Arts and journalism teacher in the USA but has taught secondary English predominantly in the UK in a career spanning 25 years.  She has overseen development of the global dimension and international collaboration at her current school for 14 years.

Supervisors

Victoria Elliott and Steven Puttick

Warda Arif is a doctoral student at the Department of Education. Her research aims to operationalise Critical Realist conceptions and methods to study Cultures of Higher Education in select Indian universities.

She completed her Master’s in Education and International Development from University College London’s – Institute of Education (UCL-IOE) as a Commonwealth Scholar and holds a B.Sc. in Biochemistry form Aligarh Muslim University (AMU).

Over her brief career, Warda has worked in the social development and impact sector in South Africa, India and Saudi Arabia, in teaching, research and advisory roles.

Supervisors

Dr Steven Puttick and Dr Aliya Khalid

Zak Devey is a passionate advocate for youth-led educational advocacy and equity – both within academia and in his work as co-founder of charitable trust Youth Arts New Zealand. In 2024, Zak continues to explore community conceptualisations of educational equity and their intersections with present and historic educational policy.

Zak also holds a deep care for youth-wellbeing, and its systemic determinants in the 21st century. His first publication, in the New Zealand Journal of Sociology, interrogates the ‘2021 World Happiness Report’ and that ways in which it constructs what it means to be happy.

Zak would be happy to hear from anyone looking to undertake a research journey in the Department, as well as scholars interested in educational equity, community-based participatory research, sociologies of well-being, and education in the political context of Aotearoa New Zealand.

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Pippa is a first-year DPhil student, whose research interests focus on vulnerable students’ outcomes and experiences of secondary school English education.

In 2023, Pippa completed an MSc in Learning and Teaching at the University of Oxford, researching pedagogical strategies for the teaching of emotionally challenging literature to students with experiences of trauma. Her DPhil research will build on this project, exploring looked after children’s engagement with English education, and their outcomes in the subject.

Alongside her research, Pippa continues to teach English in a secondary school; she is therefore passionate about collaborations between practice and research. Her project seeks to develop our understanding of looked after children’s experiences in English classrooms, in order to facilitate the development of strategies to support these vulnerable learners.

Supervisors

Nicole Dingwall and Julie Selwyn

Yunfei Ma is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of international higher education.

Following his B.A. (First Class) at the University of Durham, Yunfei was awarded with MSc (Distinction) from the Department of Education, University of Oxford prior to his DPhil studies. He has also worked as a research assistant on the project Transnational academic mobility to global south: an exploratory study of international faculty in China.

Yunfei’s DPhil research focuses on global academic publishing and its relationship with knowledge formation, codification and dissemination. His research interest primarily lies in the geo-politics of knowledge production, global epistemic governance, China’s Humanities and Social Sciences research, and the philosophy of power.

Supervisors

Ariel Lindorff and Xin Xu

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Penny is a DPhil student whose research interests centre on classroom talk and international collaborations between secondary English classrooms.

Penny completed Oxford’s MSc in Learning and Teaching with distinction in 2019, focusing on methods for mitigating the impact of mind-wandering and misunderstanding as a means of enhancing student engagement in small-group and whole-class debates of interpretations of literature.  She has since won SHINE research funding to explore the impact of her methodology on students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Her DPhil continues her interest in student discussions of literature, exploring the impact on identity of online discussions between English classrooms in different countries.

Penny began her career as a secondary English Language Arts and journalism teacher in the USA but has taught secondary English predominantly in the UK in a career spanning 25 years.  She has overseen development of the global dimension and international collaboration at her current school for 14 years.

Supervisors

Victoria Elliott and Steven Puttick

Warda Arif is a doctoral student at the Department of Education. Her research aims to operationalise Critical Realist conceptions and methods to study Cultures of Higher Education in select Indian universities.

She completed her Master’s in Education and International Development from University College London’s – Institute of Education (UCL-IOE) as a Commonwealth Scholar and holds a B.Sc. in Biochemistry form Aligarh Muslim University (AMU).

Over her brief career, Warda has worked in the social development and impact sector in South Africa, India and Saudi Arabia, in teaching, research and advisory roles.

Supervisors

Dr Steven Puttick and Dr Aliya Khalid

Zak Devey is a passionate advocate for youth-led educational advocacy and equity – both within academia and in his work as co-founder of charitable trust Youth Arts New Zealand. In 2024, Zak continues to explore community conceptualisations of educational equity and their intersections with present and historic educational policy.

Zak also holds a deep care for youth-wellbeing, and its systemic determinants in the 21st century. His first publication, in the New Zealand Journal of Sociology, interrogates the ‘2021 World Happiness Report’ and that ways in which it constructs what it means to be happy.

Zak would be happy to hear from anyone looking to undertake a research journey in the Department, as well as scholars interested in educational equity, community-based participatory research, sociologies of well-being, and education in the political context of Aotearoa New Zealand.

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Pippa is a first-year DPhil student, whose research interests focus on vulnerable students’ outcomes and experiences of secondary school English education.

In 2023, Pippa completed an MSc in Learning and Teaching at the University of Oxford, researching pedagogical strategies for the teaching of emotionally challenging literature to students with experiences of trauma. Her DPhil research will build on this project, exploring looked after children’s engagement with English education, and their outcomes in the subject.

Alongside her research, Pippa continues to teach English in a secondary school; she is therefore passionate about collaborations between practice and research. Her project seeks to develop our understanding of looked after children’s experiences in English classrooms, in order to facilitate the development of strategies to support these vulnerable learners.

Supervisors

Nicole Dingwall and Julie Selwyn

Yunfei Ma is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of international higher education.

Following his B.A. (First Class) at the University of Durham, Yunfei was awarded with MSc (Distinction) from the Department of Education, University of Oxford prior to his DPhil studies. He has also worked as a research assistant on the project Transnational academic mobility to global south: an exploratory study of international faculty in China.

Yunfei’s DPhil research focuses on global academic publishing and its relationship with knowledge formation, codification and dissemination. His research interest primarily lies in the geo-politics of knowledge production, global epistemic governance, China’s Humanities and Social Sciences research, and the philosophy of power.

Supervisors

Ariel Lindorff and Xin Xu

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Penny is a DPhil student whose research interests centre on classroom talk and international collaborations between secondary English classrooms.

Penny completed Oxford’s MSc in Learning and Teaching with distinction in 2019, focusing on methods for mitigating the impact of mind-wandering and misunderstanding as a means of enhancing student engagement in small-group and whole-class debates of interpretations of literature.  She has since won SHINE research funding to explore the impact of her methodology on students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Her DPhil continues her interest in student discussions of literature, exploring the impact on identity of online discussions between English classrooms in different countries.

Penny began her career as a secondary English Language Arts and journalism teacher in the USA but has taught secondary English predominantly in the UK in a career spanning 25 years.  She has overseen development of the global dimension and international collaboration at her current school for 14 years.

Supervisors

Victoria Elliott and Steven Puttick

Warda Arif is a doctoral student at the Department of Education. Her research aims to operationalise Critical Realist conceptions and methods to study Cultures of Higher Education in select Indian universities.

She completed her Master’s in Education and International Development from University College London’s – Institute of Education (UCL-IOE) as a Commonwealth Scholar and holds a B.Sc. in Biochemistry form Aligarh Muslim University (AMU).

Over her brief career, Warda has worked in the social development and impact sector in South Africa, India and Saudi Arabia, in teaching, research and advisory roles.

Supervisors

Dr Steven Puttick and Dr Aliya Khalid

Zak Devey is a passionate advocate for youth-led educational advocacy and equity – both within academia and in his work as co-founder of charitable trust Youth Arts New Zealand. In 2024, Zak continues to explore community conceptualisations of educational equity and their intersections with present and historic educational policy.

Zak also holds a deep care for youth-wellbeing, and its systemic determinants in the 21st century. His first publication, in the New Zealand Journal of Sociology, interrogates the ‘2021 World Happiness Report’ and that ways in which it constructs what it means to be happy.

Zak would be happy to hear from anyone looking to undertake a research journey in the Department, as well as scholars interested in educational equity, community-based participatory research, sociologies of well-being, and education in the political context of Aotearoa New Zealand.

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Pippa is a first-year DPhil student, whose research interests focus on vulnerable students’ outcomes and experiences of secondary school English education.

In 2023, Pippa completed an MSc in Learning and Teaching at the University of Oxford, researching pedagogical strategies for the teaching of emotionally challenging literature to students with experiences of trauma. Her DPhil research will build on this project, exploring looked after children’s engagement with English education, and their outcomes in the subject.

Alongside her research, Pippa continues to teach English in a secondary school; she is therefore passionate about collaborations between practice and research. Her project seeks to develop our understanding of looked after children’s experiences in English classrooms, in order to facilitate the development of strategies to support these vulnerable learners.

Supervisors

Nicole Dingwall and Julie Selwyn

Yunfei Ma is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of international higher education.

Following his B.A. (First Class) at the University of Durham, Yunfei was awarded with MSc (Distinction) from the Department of Education, University of Oxford prior to his DPhil studies. He has also worked as a research assistant on the project Transnational academic mobility to global south: an exploratory study of international faculty in China.

Yunfei’s DPhil research focuses on global academic publishing and its relationship with knowledge formation, codification and dissemination. His research interest primarily lies in the geo-politics of knowledge production, global epistemic governance, China’s Humanities and Social Sciences research, and the philosophy of power.

Supervisors

Ariel Lindorff and Xin Xu

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Penny is a DPhil student whose research interests centre on classroom talk and international collaborations between secondary English classrooms.

Penny completed Oxford’s MSc in Learning and Teaching with distinction in 2019, focusing on methods for mitigating the impact of mind-wandering and misunderstanding as a means of enhancing student engagement in small-group and whole-class debates of interpretations of literature.  She has since won SHINE research funding to explore the impact of her methodology on students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Her DPhil continues her interest in student discussions of literature, exploring the impact on identity of online discussions between English classrooms in different countries.

Penny began her career as a secondary English Language Arts and journalism teacher in the USA but has taught secondary English predominantly in the UK in a career spanning 25 years.  She has overseen development of the global dimension and international collaboration at her current school for 14 years.

Supervisors

Victoria Elliott and Steven Puttick

Warda Arif is a doctoral student at the Department of Education. Her research aims to operationalise Critical Realist conceptions and methods to study Cultures of Higher Education in select Indian universities.

She completed her Master’s in Education and International Development from University College London’s – Institute of Education (UCL-IOE) as a Commonwealth Scholar and holds a B.Sc. in Biochemistry form Aligarh Muslim University (AMU).

Over her brief career, Warda has worked in the social development and impact sector in South Africa, India and Saudi Arabia, in teaching, research and advisory roles.

Supervisors

Dr Steven Puttick and Dr Aliya Khalid

Zak Devey is a passionate advocate for youth-led educational advocacy and equity – both within academia and in his work as co-founder of charitable trust Youth Arts New Zealand. In 2024, Zak continues to explore community conceptualisations of educational equity and their intersections with present and historic educational policy.

Zak also holds a deep care for youth-wellbeing, and its systemic determinants in the 21st century. His first publication, in the New Zealand Journal of Sociology, interrogates the ‘2021 World Happiness Report’ and that ways in which it constructs what it means to be happy.

Zak would be happy to hear from anyone looking to undertake a research journey in the Department, as well as scholars interested in educational equity, community-based participatory research, sociologies of well-being, and education in the political context of Aotearoa New Zealand.

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Pippa is a first-year DPhil student, whose research interests focus on vulnerable students’ outcomes and experiences of secondary school English education.

In 2023, Pippa completed an MSc in Learning and Teaching at the University of Oxford, researching pedagogical strategies for the teaching of emotionally challenging literature to students with experiences of trauma. Her DPhil research will build on this project, exploring looked after children’s engagement with English education, and their outcomes in the subject.

Alongside her research, Pippa continues to teach English in a secondary school; she is therefore passionate about collaborations between practice and research. Her project seeks to develop our understanding of looked after children’s experiences in English classrooms, in order to facilitate the development of strategies to support these vulnerable learners.

Supervisors

Nicole Dingwall and Julie Selwyn

Yunfei Ma is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of international higher education.

Following his B.A. (First Class) at the University of Durham, Yunfei was awarded with MSc (Distinction) from the Department of Education, University of Oxford prior to his DPhil studies. He has also worked as a research assistant on the project Transnational academic mobility to global south: an exploratory study of international faculty in China.

Yunfei’s DPhil research focuses on global academic publishing and its relationship with knowledge formation, codification and dissemination. His research interest primarily lies in the geo-politics of knowledge production, global epistemic governance, China’s Humanities and Social Sciences research, and the philosophy of power.

Supervisors

Ariel Lindorff and Xin Xu

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Penny is a DPhil student whose research interests centre on classroom talk and international collaborations between secondary English classrooms.

Penny completed Oxford’s MSc in Learning and Teaching with distinction in 2019, focusing on methods for mitigating the impact of mind-wandering and misunderstanding as a means of enhancing student engagement in small-group and whole-class debates of interpretations of literature.  She has since won SHINE research funding to explore the impact of her methodology on students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Her DPhil continues her interest in student discussions of literature, exploring the impact on identity of online discussions between English classrooms in different countries.

Penny began her career as a secondary English Language Arts and journalism teacher in the USA but has taught secondary English predominantly in the UK in a career spanning 25 years.  She has overseen development of the global dimension and international collaboration at her current school for 14 years.

Supervisors

Victoria Elliott and Steven Puttick

Warda Arif is a doctoral student at the Department of Education. Her research aims to operationalise Critical Realist conceptions and methods to study Cultures of Higher Education in select Indian universities.

She completed her Master’s in Education and International Development from University College London’s – Institute of Education (UCL-IOE) as a Commonwealth Scholar and holds a B.Sc. in Biochemistry form Aligarh Muslim University (AMU).

Over her brief career, Warda has worked in the social development and impact sector in South Africa, India and Saudi Arabia, in teaching, research and advisory roles.

Supervisors

Dr Steven Puttick and Dr Aliya Khalid

Zak Devey is a passionate advocate for youth-led educational advocacy and equity – both within academia and in his work as co-founder of charitable trust Youth Arts New Zealand. In 2024, Zak continues to explore community conceptualisations of educational equity and their intersections with present and historic educational policy.

Zak also holds a deep care for youth-wellbeing, and its systemic determinants in the 21st century. His first publication, in the New Zealand Journal of Sociology, interrogates the ‘2021 World Happiness Report’ and that ways in which it constructs what it means to be happy.

Zak would be happy to hear from anyone looking to undertake a research journey in the Department, as well as scholars interested in educational equity, community-based participatory research, sociologies of well-being, and education in the political context of Aotearoa New Zealand.

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Pippa is a first-year DPhil student, whose research interests focus on vulnerable students’ outcomes and experiences of secondary school English education.

In 2023, Pippa completed an MSc in Learning and Teaching at the University of Oxford, researching pedagogical strategies for the teaching of emotionally challenging literature to students with experiences of trauma. Her DPhil research will build on this project, exploring looked after children’s engagement with English education, and their outcomes in the subject.

Alongside her research, Pippa continues to teach English in a secondary school; she is therefore passionate about collaborations between practice and research. Her project seeks to develop our understanding of looked after children’s experiences in English classrooms, in order to facilitate the development of strategies to support these vulnerable learners.

Supervisors

Nicole Dingwall and Julie Selwyn

Yunfei Ma is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of international higher education.

Following his B.A. (First Class) at the University of Durham, Yunfei was awarded with MSc (Distinction) from the Department of Education, University of Oxford prior to his DPhil studies. He has also worked as a research assistant on the project Transnational academic mobility to global south: an exploratory study of international faculty in China.

Yunfei’s DPhil research focuses on global academic publishing and its relationship with knowledge formation, codification and dissemination. His research interest primarily lies in the geo-politics of knowledge production, global epistemic governance, China’s Humanities and Social Sciences research, and the philosophy of power.

Supervisors

Ariel Lindorff and Xin Xu

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Penny is a DPhil student whose research interests centre on classroom talk and international collaborations between secondary English classrooms.

Penny completed Oxford’s MSc in Learning and Teaching with distinction in 2019, focusing on methods for mitigating the impact of mind-wandering and misunderstanding as a means of enhancing student engagement in small-group and whole-class debates of interpretations of literature.  She has since won SHINE research funding to explore the impact of her methodology on students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Her DPhil continues her interest in student discussions of literature, exploring the impact on identity of online discussions between English classrooms in different countries.

Penny began her career as a secondary English Language Arts and journalism teacher in the USA but has taught secondary English predominantly in the UK in a career spanning 25 years.  She has overseen development of the global dimension and international collaboration at her current school for 14 years.

Supervisors

Victoria Elliott and Steven Puttick

Warda Arif is a doctoral student at the Department of Education. Her research aims to operationalise Critical Realist conceptions and methods to study Cultures of Higher Education in select Indian universities.

She completed her Master’s in Education and International Development from University College London’s – Institute of Education (UCL-IOE) as a Commonwealth Scholar and holds a B.Sc. in Biochemistry form Aligarh Muslim University (AMU).

Over her brief career, Warda has worked in the social development and impact sector in South Africa, India and Saudi Arabia, in teaching, research and advisory roles.

Supervisors

Dr Steven Puttick and Dr Aliya Khalid

Zak Devey is a passionate advocate for youth-led educational advocacy and equity – both within academia and in his work as co-founder of charitable trust Youth Arts New Zealand. In 2024, Zak continues to explore community conceptualisations of educational equity and their intersections with present and historic educational policy.

Zak also holds a deep care for youth-wellbeing, and its systemic determinants in the 21st century. His first publication, in the New Zealand Journal of Sociology, interrogates the ‘2021 World Happiness Report’ and that ways in which it constructs what it means to be happy.

Zak would be happy to hear from anyone looking to undertake a research journey in the Department, as well as scholars interested in educational equity, community-based participatory research, sociologies of well-being, and education in the political context of Aotearoa New Zealand.

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Pippa is a first-year DPhil student, whose research interests focus on vulnerable students’ outcomes and experiences of secondary school English education.

In 2023, Pippa completed an MSc in Learning and Teaching at the University of Oxford, researching pedagogical strategies for the teaching of emotionally challenging literature to students with experiences of trauma. Her DPhil research will build on this project, exploring looked after children’s engagement with English education, and their outcomes in the subject.

Alongside her research, Pippa continues to teach English in a secondary school; she is therefore passionate about collaborations between practice and research. Her project seeks to develop our understanding of looked after children’s experiences in English classrooms, in order to facilitate the development of strategies to support these vulnerable learners.

Supervisors

Nicole Dingwall and Julie Selwyn

Yunfei Ma is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of international higher education.

Following his B.A. (First Class) at the University of Durham, Yunfei was awarded with MSc (Distinction) from the Department of Education, University of Oxford prior to his DPhil studies. He has also worked as a research assistant on the project Transnational academic mobility to global south: an exploratory study of international faculty in China.

Yunfei’s DPhil research focuses on global academic publishing and its relationship with knowledge formation, codification and dissemination. His research interest primarily lies in the geo-politics of knowledge production, global epistemic governance, China’s Humanities and Social Sciences research, and the philosophy of power.

Supervisors

Ariel Lindorff and Xin Xu

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Penny is a DPhil student whose research interests centre on classroom talk and international collaborations between secondary English classrooms.

Penny completed Oxford’s MSc in Learning and Teaching with distinction in 2019, focusing on methods for mitigating the impact of mind-wandering and misunderstanding as a means of enhancing student engagement in small-group and whole-class debates of interpretations of literature.  She has since won SHINE research funding to explore the impact of her methodology on students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Her DPhil continues her interest in student discussions of literature, exploring the impact on identity of online discussions between English classrooms in different countries.

Penny began her career as a secondary English Language Arts and journalism teacher in the USA but has taught secondary English predominantly in the UK in a career spanning 25 years.  She has overseen development of the global dimension and international collaboration at her current school for 14 years.

Supervisors

Victoria Elliott and Steven Puttick

Warda Arif is a doctoral student at the Department of Education. Her research aims to operationalise Critical Realist conceptions and methods to study Cultures of Higher Education in select Indian universities.

She completed her Master’s in Education and International Development from University College London’s – Institute of Education (UCL-IOE) as a Commonwealth Scholar and holds a B.Sc. in Biochemistry form Aligarh Muslim University (AMU).

Over her brief career, Warda has worked in the social development and impact sector in South Africa, India and Saudi Arabia, in teaching, research and advisory roles.

Supervisors

Dr Steven Puttick and Dr Aliya Khalid

Zak Devey is a passionate advocate for youth-led educational advocacy and equity – both within academia and in his work as co-founder of charitable trust Youth Arts New Zealand. In 2024, Zak continues to explore community conceptualisations of educational equity and their intersections with present and historic educational policy.

Zak also holds a deep care for youth-wellbeing, and its systemic determinants in the 21st century. His first publication, in the New Zealand Journal of Sociology, interrogates the ‘2021 World Happiness Report’ and that ways in which it constructs what it means to be happy.

Zak would be happy to hear from anyone looking to undertake a research journey in the Department, as well as scholars interested in educational equity, community-based participatory research, sociologies of well-being, and education in the political context of Aotearoa New Zealand.

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Pippa is a first-year DPhil student, whose research interests focus on vulnerable students’ outcomes and experiences of secondary school English education.

In 2023, Pippa completed an MSc in Learning and Teaching at the University of Oxford, researching pedagogical strategies for the teaching of emotionally challenging literature to students with experiences of trauma. Her DPhil research will build on this project, exploring looked after children’s engagement with English education, and their outcomes in the subject.

Alongside her research, Pippa continues to teach English in a secondary school; she is therefore passionate about collaborations between practice and research. Her project seeks to develop our understanding of looked after children’s experiences in English classrooms, in order to facilitate the development of strategies to support these vulnerable learners.

Supervisors

Nicole Dingwall and Julie Selwyn

Yunfei Ma is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of international higher education.

Following his B.A. (First Class) at the University of Durham, Yunfei was awarded with MSc (Distinction) from the Department of Education, University of Oxford prior to his DPhil studies. He has also worked as a research assistant on the project Transnational academic mobility to global south: an exploratory study of international faculty in China.

Yunfei’s DPhil research focuses on global academic publishing and its relationship with knowledge formation, codification and dissemination. His research interest primarily lies in the geo-politics of knowledge production, global epistemic governance, China’s Humanities and Social Sciences research, and the philosophy of power.

Supervisors

Ariel Lindorff and Xin Xu

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Penny is a DPhil student whose research interests centre on classroom talk and international collaborations between secondary English classrooms.

Penny completed Oxford’s MSc in Learning and Teaching with distinction in 2019, focusing on methods for mitigating the impact of mind-wandering and misunderstanding as a means of enhancing student engagement in small-group and whole-class debates of interpretations of literature.  She has since won SHINE research funding to explore the impact of her methodology on students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Her DPhil continues her interest in student discussions of literature, exploring the impact on identity of online discussions between English classrooms in different countries.

Penny began her career as a secondary English Language Arts and journalism teacher in the USA but has taught secondary English predominantly in the UK in a career spanning 25 years.  She has overseen development of the global dimension and international collaboration at her current school for 14 years.

Supervisors

Victoria Elliott and Steven Puttick

Warda Arif is a doctoral student at the Department of Education. Her research aims to operationalise Critical Realist conceptions and methods to study Cultures of Higher Education in select Indian universities.

She completed her Master’s in Education and International Development from University College London’s – Institute of Education (UCL-IOE) as a Commonwealth Scholar and holds a B.Sc. in Biochemistry form Aligarh Muslim University (AMU).

Over her brief career, Warda has worked in the social development and impact sector in South Africa, India and Saudi Arabia, in teaching, research and advisory roles.

Supervisors

Dr Steven Puttick and Dr Aliya Khalid

Zak Devey is a passionate advocate for youth-led educational advocacy and equity – both within academia and in his work as co-founder of charitable trust Youth Arts New Zealand. In 2024, Zak continues to explore community conceptualisations of educational equity and their intersections with present and historic educational policy.

Zak also holds a deep care for youth-wellbeing, and its systemic determinants in the 21st century. His first publication, in the New Zealand Journal of Sociology, interrogates the ‘2021 World Happiness Report’ and that ways in which it constructs what it means to be happy.

Zak would be happy to hear from anyone looking to undertake a research journey in the Department, as well as scholars interested in educational equity, community-based participatory research, sociologies of well-being, and education in the political context of Aotearoa New Zealand.

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Pippa is a first-year DPhil student, whose research interests focus on vulnerable students’ outcomes and experiences of secondary school English education.

In 2023, Pippa completed an MSc in Learning and Teaching at the University of Oxford, researching pedagogical strategies for the teaching of emotionally challenging literature to students with experiences of trauma. Her DPhil research will build on this project, exploring looked after children’s engagement with English education, and their outcomes in the subject.

Alongside her research, Pippa continues to teach English in a secondary school; she is therefore passionate about collaborations between practice and research. Her project seeks to develop our understanding of looked after children’s experiences in English classrooms, in order to facilitate the development of strategies to support these vulnerable learners.

Supervisors

Nicole Dingwall and Julie Selwyn

Yunfei Ma is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of international higher education.

Following his B.A. (First Class) at the University of Durham, Yunfei was awarded with MSc (Distinction) from the Department of Education, University of Oxford prior to his DPhil studies. He has also worked as a research assistant on the project Transnational academic mobility to global south: an exploratory study of international faculty in China.

Yunfei’s DPhil research focuses on global academic publishing and its relationship with knowledge formation, codification and dissemination. His research interest primarily lies in the geo-politics of knowledge production, global epistemic governance, China’s Humanities and Social Sciences research, and the philosophy of power.

Supervisors

Ariel Lindorff and Xin Xu

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Penny is a DPhil student whose research interests centre on classroom talk and international collaborations between secondary English classrooms.

Penny completed Oxford’s MSc in Learning and Teaching with distinction in 2019, focusing on methods for mitigating the impact of mind-wandering and misunderstanding as a means of enhancing student engagement in small-group and whole-class debates of interpretations of literature.  She has since won SHINE research funding to explore the impact of her methodology on students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Her DPhil continues her interest in student discussions of literature, exploring the impact on identity of online discussions between English classrooms in different countries.

Penny began her career as a secondary English Language Arts and journalism teacher in the USA but has taught secondary English predominantly in the UK in a career spanning 25 years.  She has overseen development of the global dimension and international collaboration at her current school for 14 years.

Supervisors

Victoria Elliott and Steven Puttick

Warda Arif is a doctoral student at the Department of Education. Her research aims to operationalise Critical Realist conceptions and methods to study Cultures of Higher Education in select Indian universities.

She completed her Master’s in Education and International Development from University College London’s – Institute of Education (UCL-IOE) as a Commonwealth Scholar and holds a B.Sc. in Biochemistry form Aligarh Muslim University (AMU).

Over her brief career, Warda has worked in the social development and impact sector in South Africa, India and Saudi Arabia, in teaching, research and advisory roles.

Supervisors

Dr Steven Puttick and Dr Aliya Khalid

Zak Devey is a passionate advocate for youth-led educational advocacy and equity – both within academia and in his work as co-founder of charitable trust Youth Arts New Zealand. In 2024, Zak continues to explore community conceptualisations of educational equity and their intersections with present and historic educational policy.

Zak also holds a deep care for youth-wellbeing, and its systemic determinants in the 21st century. His first publication, in the New Zealand Journal of Sociology, interrogates the ‘2021 World Happiness Report’ and that ways in which it constructs what it means to be happy.

Zak would be happy to hear from anyone looking to undertake a research journey in the Department, as well as scholars interested in educational equity, community-based participatory research, sociologies of well-being, and education in the political context of Aotearoa New Zealand.

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Pippa is a first-year DPhil student, whose research interests focus on vulnerable students’ outcomes and experiences of secondary school English education.

In 2023, Pippa completed an MSc in Learning and Teaching at the University of Oxford, researching pedagogical strategies for the teaching of emotionally challenging literature to students with experiences of trauma. Her DPhil research will build on this project, exploring looked after children’s engagement with English education, and their outcomes in the subject.

Alongside her research, Pippa continues to teach English in a secondary school; she is therefore passionate about collaborations between practice and research. Her project seeks to develop our understanding of looked after children’s experiences in English classrooms, in order to facilitate the development of strategies to support these vulnerable learners.

Supervisors

Nicole Dingwall and Julie Selwyn

Yunfei Ma is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of international higher education.

Following his B.A. (First Class) at the University of Durham, Yunfei was awarded with MSc (Distinction) from the Department of Education, University of Oxford prior to his DPhil studies. He has also worked as a research assistant on the project Transnational academic mobility to global south: an exploratory study of international faculty in China.

Yunfei’s DPhil research focuses on global academic publishing and its relationship with knowledge formation, codification and dissemination. His research interest primarily lies in the geo-politics of knowledge production, global epistemic governance, China’s Humanities and Social Sciences research, and the philosophy of power.

Supervisors

Ariel Lindorff and Xin Xu

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Penny is a DPhil student whose research interests centre on classroom talk and international collaborations between secondary English classrooms.

Penny completed Oxford’s MSc in Learning and Teaching with distinction in 2019, focusing on methods for mitigating the impact of mind-wandering and misunderstanding as a means of enhancing student engagement in small-group and whole-class debates of interpretations of literature.  She has since won SHINE research funding to explore the impact of her methodology on students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Her DPhil continues her interest in student discussions of literature, exploring the impact on identity of online discussions between English classrooms in different countries.

Penny began her career as a secondary English Language Arts and journalism teacher in the USA but has taught secondary English predominantly in the UK in a career spanning 25 years.  She has overseen development of the global dimension and international collaboration at her current school for 14 years.

Supervisors

Victoria Elliott and Steven Puttick

Warda Arif is a doctoral student at the Department of Education. Her research aims to operationalise Critical Realist conceptions and methods to study Cultures of Higher Education in select Indian universities.

She completed her Master’s in Education and International Development from University College London’s – Institute of Education (UCL-IOE) as a Commonwealth Scholar and holds a B.Sc. in Biochemistry form Aligarh Muslim University (AMU).

Over her brief career, Warda has worked in the social development and impact sector in South Africa, India and Saudi Arabia, in teaching, research and advisory roles.

Supervisors

Dr Steven Puttick and Dr Aliya Khalid

Zak Devey is a passionate advocate for youth-led educational advocacy and equity – both within academia and in his work as co-founder of charitable trust Youth Arts New Zealand. In 2024, Zak continues to explore community conceptualisations of educational equity and their intersections with present and historic educational policy.

Zak also holds a deep care for youth-wellbeing, and its systemic determinants in the 21st century. His first publication, in the New Zealand Journal of Sociology, interrogates the ‘2021 World Happiness Report’ and that ways in which it constructs what it means to be happy.

Zak would be happy to hear from anyone looking to undertake a research journey in the Department, as well as scholars interested in educational equity, community-based participatory research, sociologies of well-being, and education in the political context of Aotearoa New Zealand.

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Pippa is a first-year DPhil student, whose research interests focus on vulnerable students’ outcomes and experiences of secondary school English education.

In 2023, Pippa completed an MSc in Learning and Teaching at the University of Oxford, researching pedagogical strategies for the teaching of emotionally challenging literature to students with experiences of trauma. Her DPhil research will build on this project, exploring looked after children’s engagement with English education, and their outcomes in the subject.

Alongside her research, Pippa continues to teach English in a secondary school; she is therefore passionate about collaborations between practice and research. Her project seeks to develop our understanding of looked after children’s experiences in English classrooms, in order to facilitate the development of strategies to support these vulnerable learners.

Supervisors

Nicole Dingwall and Julie Selwyn

Yunfei Ma is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of international higher education.

Following his B.A. (First Class) at the University of Durham, Yunfei was awarded with MSc (Distinction) from the Department of Education, University of Oxford prior to his DPhil studies. He has also worked as a research assistant on the project Transnational academic mobility to global south: an exploratory study of international faculty in China.

Yunfei’s DPhil research focuses on global academic publishing and its relationship with knowledge formation, codification and dissemination. His research interest primarily lies in the geo-politics of knowledge production, global epistemic governance, China’s Humanities and Social Sciences research, and the philosophy of power.

Supervisors

Ariel Lindorff and Xin Xu

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Penny is a DPhil student whose research interests centre on classroom talk and international collaborations between secondary English classrooms.

Penny completed Oxford’s MSc in Learning and Teaching with distinction in 2019, focusing on methods for mitigating the impact of mind-wandering and misunderstanding as a means of enhancing student engagement in small-group and whole-class debates of interpretations of literature.  She has since won SHINE research funding to explore the impact of her methodology on students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Her DPhil continues her interest in student discussions of literature, exploring the impact on identity of online discussions between English classrooms in different countries.

Penny began her career as a secondary English Language Arts and journalism teacher in the USA but has taught secondary English predominantly in the UK in a career spanning 25 years.  She has overseen development of the global dimension and international collaboration at her current school for 14 years.

Supervisors

Victoria Elliott and Steven Puttick

Warda Arif is a doctoral student at the Department of Education. Her research aims to operationalise Critical Realist conceptions and methods to study Cultures of Higher Education in select Indian universities.

She completed her Master’s in Education and International Development from University College London’s – Institute of Education (UCL-IOE) as a Commonwealth Scholar and holds a B.Sc. in Biochemistry form Aligarh Muslim University (AMU).

Over her brief career, Warda has worked in the social development and impact sector in South Africa, India and Saudi Arabia, in teaching, research and advisory roles.

Supervisors

Dr Steven Puttick and Dr Aliya Khalid

Zak Devey is a passionate advocate for youth-led educational advocacy and equity – both within academia and in his work as co-founder of charitable trust Youth Arts New Zealand. In 2024, Zak continues to explore community conceptualisations of educational equity and their intersections with present and historic educational policy.

Zak also holds a deep care for youth-wellbeing, and its systemic determinants in the 21st century. His first publication, in the New Zealand Journal of Sociology, interrogates the ‘2021 World Happiness Report’ and that ways in which it constructs what it means to be happy.

Zak would be happy to hear from anyone looking to undertake a research journey in the Department, as well as scholars interested in educational equity, community-based participatory research, sociologies of well-being, and education in the political context of Aotearoa New Zealand.

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Pippa is a first-year DPhil student, whose research interests focus on vulnerable students’ outcomes and experiences of secondary school English education.

In 2023, Pippa completed an MSc in Learning and Teaching at the University of Oxford, researching pedagogical strategies for the teaching of emotionally challenging literature to students with experiences of trauma. Her DPhil research will build on this project, exploring looked after children’s engagement with English education, and their outcomes in the subject.

Alongside her research, Pippa continues to teach English in a secondary school; she is therefore passionate about collaborations between practice and research. Her project seeks to develop our understanding of looked after children’s experiences in English classrooms, in order to facilitate the development of strategies to support these vulnerable learners.

Supervisors

Nicole Dingwall and Julie Selwyn

Yunfei Ma is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of international higher education.

Following his B.A. (First Class) at the University of Durham, Yunfei was awarded with MSc (Distinction) from the Department of Education, University of Oxford prior to his DPhil studies. He has also worked as a research assistant on the project Transnational academic mobility to global south: an exploratory study of international faculty in China.

Yunfei’s DPhil research focuses on global academic publishing and its relationship with knowledge formation, codification and dissemination. His research interest primarily lies in the geo-politics of knowledge production, global epistemic governance, China’s Humanities and Social Sciences research, and the philosophy of power.

Supervisors

Ariel Lindorff and Xin Xu

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Penny is a DPhil student whose research interests centre on classroom talk and international collaborations between secondary English classrooms.

Penny completed Oxford’s MSc in Learning and Teaching with distinction in 2019, focusing on methods for mitigating the impact of mind-wandering and misunderstanding as a means of enhancing student engagement in small-group and whole-class debates of interpretations of literature.  She has since won SHINE research funding to explore the impact of her methodology on students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Her DPhil continues her interest in student discussions of literature, exploring the impact on identity of online discussions between English classrooms in different countries.

Penny began her career as a secondary English Language Arts and journalism teacher in the USA but has taught secondary English predominantly in the UK in a career spanning 25 years.  She has overseen development of the global dimension and international collaboration at her current school for 14 years.

Supervisors

Victoria Elliott and Steven Puttick

Warda Arif is a doctoral student at the Department of Education. Her research aims to operationalise Critical Realist conceptions and methods to study Cultures of Higher Education in select Indian universities.

She completed her Master’s in Education and International Development from University College London’s – Institute of Education (UCL-IOE) as a Commonwealth Scholar and holds a B.Sc. in Biochemistry form Aligarh Muslim University (AMU).

Over her brief career, Warda has worked in the social development and impact sector in South Africa, India and Saudi Arabia, in teaching, research and advisory roles.

Supervisors

Dr Steven Puttick and Dr Aliya Khalid

Zak Devey is a passionate advocate for youth-led educational advocacy and equity – both within academia and in his work as co-founder of charitable trust Youth Arts New Zealand. In 2024, Zak continues to explore community conceptualisations of educational equity and their intersections with present and historic educational policy.

Zak also holds a deep care for youth-wellbeing, and its systemic determinants in the 21st century. His first publication, in the New Zealand Journal of Sociology, interrogates the ‘2021 World Happiness Report’ and that ways in which it constructs what it means to be happy.

Zak would be happy to hear from anyone looking to undertake a research journey in the Department, as well as scholars interested in educational equity, community-based participatory research, sociologies of well-being, and education in the political context of Aotearoa New Zealand.

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Pippa is a first-year DPhil student, whose research interests focus on vulnerable students’ outcomes and experiences of secondary school English education.

In 2023, Pippa completed an MSc in Learning and Teaching at the University of Oxford, researching pedagogical strategies for the teaching of emotionally challenging literature to students with experiences of trauma. Her DPhil research will build on this project, exploring looked after children’s engagement with English education, and their outcomes in the subject.

Alongside her research, Pippa continues to teach English in a secondary school; she is therefore passionate about collaborations between practice and research. Her project seeks to develop our understanding of looked after children’s experiences in English classrooms, in order to facilitate the development of strategies to support these vulnerable learners.

Supervisors

Nicole Dingwall and Julie Selwyn

Yunfei Ma is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of international higher education.

Following his B.A. (First Class) at the University of Durham, Yunfei was awarded with MSc (Distinction) from the Department of Education, University of Oxford prior to his DPhil studies. He has also worked as a research assistant on the project Transnational academic mobility to global south: an exploratory study of international faculty in China.

Yunfei’s DPhil research focuses on global academic publishing and its relationship with knowledge formation, codification and dissemination. His research interest primarily lies in the geo-politics of knowledge production, global epistemic governance, China’s Humanities and Social Sciences research, and the philosophy of power.

Supervisors

Ariel Lindorff and Xin Xu

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Penny is a DPhil student whose research interests centre on classroom talk and international collaborations between secondary English classrooms.

Penny completed Oxford’s MSc in Learning and Teaching with distinction in 2019, focusing on methods for mitigating the impact of mind-wandering and misunderstanding as a means of enhancing student engagement in small-group and whole-class debates of interpretations of literature.  She has since won SHINE research funding to explore the impact of her methodology on students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Her DPhil continues her interest in student discussions of literature, exploring the impact on identity of online discussions between English classrooms in different countries.

Penny began her career as a secondary English Language Arts and journalism teacher in the USA but has taught secondary English predominantly in the UK in a career spanning 25 years.  She has overseen development of the global dimension and international collaboration at her current school for 14 years.

Supervisors

Victoria Elliott and Steven Puttick

Warda Arif is a doctoral student at the Department of Education. Her research aims to operationalise Critical Realist conceptions and methods to study Cultures of Higher Education in select Indian universities.

She completed her Master’s in Education and International Development from University College London’s – Institute of Education (UCL-IOE) as a Commonwealth Scholar and holds a B.Sc. in Biochemistry form Aligarh Muslim University (AMU).

Over her brief career, Warda has worked in the social development and impact sector in South Africa, India and Saudi Arabia, in teaching, research and advisory roles.

Supervisors

Dr Steven Puttick and Dr Aliya Khalid

Zak Devey is a passionate advocate for youth-led educational advocacy and equity – both within academia and in his work as co-founder of charitable trust Youth Arts New Zealand. In 2024, Zak continues to explore community conceptualisations of educational equity and their intersections with present and historic educational policy.

Zak also holds a deep care for youth-wellbeing, and its systemic determinants in the 21st century. His first publication, in the New Zealand Journal of Sociology, interrogates the ‘2021 World Happiness Report’ and that ways in which it constructs what it means to be happy.

Zak would be happy to hear from anyone looking to undertake a research journey in the Department, as well as scholars interested in educational equity, community-based participatory research, sociologies of well-being, and education in the political context of Aotearoa New Zealand.

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Pippa is a first-year DPhil student, whose research interests focus on vulnerable students’ outcomes and experiences of secondary school English education.

In 2023, Pippa completed an MSc in Learning and Teaching at the University of Oxford, researching pedagogical strategies for the teaching of emotionally challenging literature to students with experiences of trauma. Her DPhil research will build on this project, exploring looked after children’s engagement with English education, and their outcomes in the subject.

Alongside her research, Pippa continues to teach English in a secondary school; she is therefore passionate about collaborations between practice and research. Her project seeks to develop our understanding of looked after children’s experiences in English classrooms, in order to facilitate the development of strategies to support these vulnerable learners.

Supervisors

Nicole Dingwall and Julie Selwyn

Yunfei Ma is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of international higher education.

Following his B.A. (First Class) at the University of Durham, Yunfei was awarded with MSc (Distinction) from the Department of Education, University of Oxford prior to his DPhil studies. He has also worked as a research assistant on the project Transnational academic mobility to global south: an exploratory study of international faculty in China.

Yunfei’s DPhil research focuses on global academic publishing and its relationship with knowledge formation, codification and dissemination. His research interest primarily lies in the geo-politics of knowledge production, global epistemic governance, China’s Humanities and Social Sciences research, and the philosophy of power.

Supervisors

Ariel Lindorff and Xin Xu

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Penny is a DPhil student whose research interests centre on classroom talk and international collaborations between secondary English classrooms.

Penny completed Oxford’s MSc in Learning and Teaching with distinction in 2019, focusing on methods for mitigating the impact of mind-wandering and misunderstanding as a means of enhancing student engagement in small-group and whole-class debates of interpretations of literature.  She has since won SHINE research funding to explore the impact of her methodology on students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Her DPhil continues her interest in student discussions of literature, exploring the impact on identity of online discussions between English classrooms in different countries.

Penny began her career as a secondary English Language Arts and journalism teacher in the USA but has taught secondary English predominantly in the UK in a career spanning 25 years.  She has overseen development of the global dimension and international collaboration at her current school for 14 years.

Supervisors

Victoria Elliott and Steven Puttick

Warda Arif is a doctoral student at the Department of Education. Her research aims to operationalise Critical Realist conceptions and methods to study Cultures of Higher Education in select Indian universities.

She completed her Master’s in Education and International Development from University College London’s – Institute of Education (UCL-IOE) as a Commonwealth Scholar and holds a B.Sc. in Biochemistry form Aligarh Muslim University (AMU).

Over her brief career, Warda has worked in the social development and impact sector in South Africa, India and Saudi Arabia, in teaching, research and advisory roles.

Supervisors

Dr Steven Puttick and Dr Aliya Khalid

Zak Devey is a passionate advocate for youth-led educational advocacy and equity – both within academia and in his work as co-founder of charitable trust Youth Arts New Zealand. In 2024, Zak continues to explore community conceptualisations of educational equity and their intersections with present and historic educational policy.

Zak also holds a deep care for youth-wellbeing, and its systemic determinants in the 21st century. His first publication, in the New Zealand Journal of Sociology, interrogates the ‘2021 World Happiness Report’ and that ways in which it constructs what it means to be happy.

Zak would be happy to hear from anyone looking to undertake a research journey in the Department, as well as scholars interested in educational equity, community-based participatory research, sociologies of well-being, and education in the political context of Aotearoa New Zealand.

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Pippa is a first-year DPhil student, whose research interests focus on vulnerable students’ outcomes and experiences of secondary school English education.

In 2023, Pippa completed an MSc in Learning and Teaching at the University of Oxford, researching pedagogical strategies for the teaching of emotionally challenging literature to students with experiences of trauma. Her DPhil research will build on this project, exploring looked after children’s engagement with English education, and their outcomes in the subject.

Alongside her research, Pippa continues to teach English in a secondary school; she is therefore passionate about collaborations between practice and research. Her project seeks to develop our understanding of looked after children’s experiences in English classrooms, in order to facilitate the development of strategies to support these vulnerable learners.

Supervisors

Nicole Dingwall and Julie Selwyn

Yunfei Ma is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of international higher education.

Following his B.A. (First Class) at the University of Durham, Yunfei was awarded with MSc (Distinction) from the Department of Education, University of Oxford prior to his DPhil studies. He has also worked as a research assistant on the project Transnational academic mobility to global south: an exploratory study of international faculty in China.

Yunfei’s DPhil research focuses on global academic publishing and its relationship with knowledge formation, codification and dissemination. His research interest primarily lies in the geo-politics of knowledge production, global epistemic governance, China’s Humanities and Social Sciences research, and the philosophy of power.

Supervisors

Ariel Lindorff and Xin Xu

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Penny is a DPhil student whose research interests centre on classroom talk and international collaborations between secondary English classrooms.

Penny completed Oxford’s MSc in Learning and Teaching with distinction in 2019, focusing on methods for mitigating the impact of mind-wandering and misunderstanding as a means of enhancing student engagement in small-group and whole-class debates of interpretations of literature.  She has since won SHINE research funding to explore the impact of her methodology on students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Her DPhil continues her interest in student discussions of literature, exploring the impact on identity of online discussions between English classrooms in different countries.

Penny began her career as a secondary English Language Arts and journalism teacher in the USA but has taught secondary English predominantly in the UK in a career spanning 25 years.  She has overseen development of the global dimension and international collaboration at her current school for 14 years.

Supervisors

Victoria Elliott and Steven Puttick

Warda Arif is a doctoral student at the Department of Education. Her research aims to operationalise Critical Realist conceptions and methods to study Cultures of Higher Education in select Indian universities.

She completed her Master’s in Education and International Development from University College London’s – Institute of Education (UCL-IOE) as a Commonwealth Scholar and holds a B.Sc. in Biochemistry form Aligarh Muslim University (AMU).

Over her brief career, Warda has worked in the social development and impact sector in South Africa, India and Saudi Arabia, in teaching, research and advisory roles.

Supervisors

Dr Steven Puttick and Dr Aliya Khalid

Zak Devey is a passionate advocate for youth-led educational advocacy and equity – both within academia and in his work as co-founder of charitable trust Youth Arts New Zealand. In 2024, Zak continues to explore community conceptualisations of educational equity and their intersections with present and historic educational policy.

Zak also holds a deep care for youth-wellbeing, and its systemic determinants in the 21st century. His first publication, in the New Zealand Journal of Sociology, interrogates the ‘2021 World Happiness Report’ and that ways in which it constructs what it means to be happy.

Zak would be happy to hear from anyone looking to undertake a research journey in the Department, as well as scholars interested in educational equity, community-based participatory research, sociologies of well-being, and education in the political context of Aotearoa New Zealand.

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Pippa is a first-year DPhil student, whose research interests focus on vulnerable students’ outcomes and experiences of secondary school English education.

In 2023, Pippa completed an MSc in Learning and Teaching at the University of Oxford, researching pedagogical strategies for the teaching of emotionally challenging literature to students with experiences of trauma. Her DPhil research will build on this project, exploring looked after children’s engagement with English education, and their outcomes in the subject.

Alongside her research, Pippa continues to teach English in a secondary school; she is therefore passionate about collaborations between practice and research. Her project seeks to develop our understanding of looked after children’s experiences in English classrooms, in order to facilitate the development of strategies to support these vulnerable learners.

Supervisors

Nicole Dingwall and Julie Selwyn

Yunfei Ma is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of international higher education.

Following his B.A. (First Class) at the University of Durham, Yunfei was awarded with MSc (Distinction) from the Department of Education, University of Oxford prior to his DPhil studies. He has also worked as a research assistant on the project Transnational academic mobility to global south: an exploratory study of international faculty in China.

Yunfei’s DPhil research focuses on global academic publishing and its relationship with knowledge formation, codification and dissemination. His research interest primarily lies in the geo-politics of knowledge production, global epistemic governance, China’s Humanities and Social Sciences research, and the philosophy of power.

Supervisors

Ariel Lindorff and Xin Xu

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Penny is a DPhil student whose research interests centre on classroom talk and international collaborations between secondary English classrooms.

Penny completed Oxford’s MSc in Learning and Teaching with distinction in 2019, focusing on methods for mitigating the impact of mind-wandering and misunderstanding as a means of enhancing student engagement in small-group and whole-class debates of interpretations of literature.  She has since won SHINE research funding to explore the impact of her methodology on students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Her DPhil continues her interest in student discussions of literature, exploring the impact on identity of online discussions between English classrooms in different countries.

Penny began her career as a secondary English Language Arts and journalism teacher in the USA but has taught secondary English predominantly in the UK in a career spanning 25 years.  She has overseen development of the global dimension and international collaboration at her current school for 14 years.

Supervisors

Victoria Elliott and Steven Puttick

Warda Arif is a doctoral student at the Department of Education. Her research aims to operationalise Critical Realist conceptions and methods to study Cultures of Higher Education in select Indian universities.

She completed her Master’s in Education and International Development from University College London’s – Institute of Education (UCL-IOE) as a Commonwealth Scholar and holds a B.Sc. in Biochemistry form Aligarh Muslim University (AMU).

Over her brief career, Warda has worked in the social development and impact sector in South Africa, India and Saudi Arabia, in teaching, research and advisory roles.

Supervisors

Dr Steven Puttick and Dr Aliya Khalid

Zak Devey is a passionate advocate for youth-led educational advocacy and equity – both within academia and in his work as co-founder of charitable trust Youth Arts New Zealand. In 2024, Zak continues to explore community conceptualisations of educational equity and their intersections with present and historic educational policy.

Zak also holds a deep care for youth-wellbeing, and its systemic determinants in the 21st century. His first publication, in the New Zealand Journal of Sociology, interrogates the ‘2021 World Happiness Report’ and that ways in which it constructs what it means to be happy.

Zak would be happy to hear from anyone looking to undertake a research journey in the Department, as well as scholars interested in educational equity, community-based participatory research, sociologies of well-being, and education in the political context of Aotearoa New Zealand.

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Pippa is a first-year DPhil student, whose research interests focus on vulnerable students’ outcomes and experiences of secondary school English education.

In 2023, Pippa completed an MSc in Learning and Teaching at the University of Oxford, researching pedagogical strategies for the teaching of emotionally challenging literature to students with experiences of trauma. Her DPhil research will build on this project, exploring looked after children’s engagement with English education, and their outcomes in the subject.

Alongside her research, Pippa continues to teach English in a secondary school; she is therefore passionate about collaborations between practice and research. Her project seeks to develop our understanding of looked after children’s experiences in English classrooms, in order to facilitate the development of strategies to support these vulnerable learners.

Supervisors

Nicole Dingwall and Julie Selwyn

Yunfei Ma is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of international higher education.

Following his B.A. (First Class) at the University of Durham, Yunfei was awarded with MSc (Distinction) from the Department of Education, University of Oxford prior to his DPhil studies. He has also worked as a research assistant on the project Transnational academic mobility to global south: an exploratory study of international faculty in China.

Yunfei’s DPhil research focuses on global academic publishing and its relationship with knowledge formation, codification and dissemination. His research interest primarily lies in the geo-politics of knowledge production, global epistemic governance, China’s Humanities and Social Sciences research, and the philosophy of power.

Supervisors

Ariel Lindorff and Xin Xu

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Penny is a DPhil student whose research interests centre on classroom talk and international collaborations between secondary English classrooms.

Penny completed Oxford’s MSc in Learning and Teaching with distinction in 2019, focusing on methods for mitigating the impact of mind-wandering and misunderstanding as a means of enhancing student engagement in small-group and whole-class debates of interpretations of literature.  She has since won SHINE research funding to explore the impact of her methodology on students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Her DPhil continues her interest in student discussions of literature, exploring the impact on identity of online discussions between English classrooms in different countries.

Penny began her career as a secondary English Language Arts and journalism teacher in the USA but has taught secondary English predominantly in the UK in a career spanning 25 years.  She has overseen development of the global dimension and international collaboration at her current school for 14 years.

Supervisors

Victoria Elliott and Steven Puttick

Warda Arif is a doctoral student at the Department of Education. Her research aims to operationalise Critical Realist conceptions and methods to study Cultures of Higher Education in select Indian universities.

She completed her Master’s in Education and International Development from University College London’s – Institute of Education (UCL-IOE) as a Commonwealth Scholar and holds a B.Sc. in Biochemistry form Aligarh Muslim University (AMU).

Over her brief career, Warda has worked in the social development and impact sector in South Africa, India and Saudi Arabia, in teaching, research and advisory roles.

Supervisors

Dr Steven Puttick and Dr Aliya Khalid

Zak Devey is a passionate advocate for youth-led educational advocacy and equity – both within academia and in his work as co-founder of charitable trust Youth Arts New Zealand. In 2024, Zak continues to explore community conceptualisations of educational equity and their intersections with present and historic educational policy.

Zak also holds a deep care for youth-wellbeing, and its systemic determinants in the 21st century. His first publication, in the New Zealand Journal of Sociology, interrogates the ‘2021 World Happiness Report’ and that ways in which it constructs what it means to be happy.

Zak would be happy to hear from anyone looking to undertake a research journey in the Department, as well as scholars interested in educational equity, community-based participatory research, sociologies of well-being, and education in the political context of Aotearoa New Zealand.

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Pippa is a first-year DPhil student, whose research interests focus on vulnerable students’ outcomes and experiences of secondary school English education.

In 2023, Pippa completed an MSc in Learning and Teaching at the University of Oxford, researching pedagogical strategies for the teaching of emotionally challenging literature to students with experiences of trauma. Her DPhil research will build on this project, exploring looked after children’s engagement with English education, and their outcomes in the subject.

Alongside her research, Pippa continues to teach English in a secondary school; she is therefore passionate about collaborations between practice and research. Her project seeks to develop our understanding of looked after children’s experiences in English classrooms, in order to facilitate the development of strategies to support these vulnerable learners.

Supervisors

Nicole Dingwall and Julie Selwyn

Yunfei Ma is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of international higher education.

Following his B.A. (First Class) at the University of Durham, Yunfei was awarded with MSc (Distinction) from the Department of Education, University of Oxford prior to his DPhil studies. He has also worked as a research assistant on the project Transnational academic mobility to global south: an exploratory study of international faculty in China.

Yunfei’s DPhil research focuses on global academic publishing and its relationship with knowledge formation, codification and dissemination. His research interest primarily lies in the geo-politics of knowledge production, global epistemic governance, China’s Humanities and Social Sciences research, and the philosophy of power.

Supervisors

Ariel Lindorff and Xin Xu

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Penny is a DPhil student whose research interests centre on classroom talk and international collaborations between secondary English classrooms.

Penny completed Oxford’s MSc in Learning and Teaching with distinction in 2019, focusing on methods for mitigating the impact of mind-wandering and misunderstanding as a means of enhancing student engagement in small-group and whole-class debates of interpretations of literature.  She has since won SHINE research funding to explore the impact of her methodology on students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Her DPhil continues her interest in student discussions of literature, exploring the impact on identity of online discussions between English classrooms in different countries.

Penny began her career as a secondary English Language Arts and journalism teacher in the USA but has taught secondary English predominantly in the UK in a career spanning 25 years.  She has overseen development of the global dimension and international collaboration at her current school for 14 years.

Supervisors

Victoria Elliott and Steven Puttick

Warda Arif is a doctoral student at the Department of Education. Her research aims to operationalise Critical Realist conceptions and methods to study Cultures of Higher Education in select Indian universities.

She completed her Master’s in Education and International Development from University College London’s – Institute of Education (UCL-IOE) as a Commonwealth Scholar and holds a B.Sc. in Biochemistry form Aligarh Muslim University (AMU).

Over her brief career, Warda has worked in the social development and impact sector in South Africa, India and Saudi Arabia, in teaching, research and advisory roles.

Supervisors

Dr Steven Puttick and Dr Aliya Khalid

Zak Devey is a passionate advocate for youth-led educational advocacy and equity – both within academia and in his work as co-founder of charitable trust Youth Arts New Zealand. In 2024, Zak continues to explore community conceptualisations of educational equity and their intersections with present and historic educational policy.

Zak also holds a deep care for youth-wellbeing, and its systemic determinants in the 21st century. His first publication, in the New Zealand Journal of Sociology, interrogates the ‘2021 World Happiness Report’ and that ways in which it constructs what it means to be happy.

Zak would be happy to hear from anyone looking to undertake a research journey in the Department, as well as scholars interested in educational equity, community-based participatory research, sociologies of well-being, and education in the political context of Aotearoa New Zealand.

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Pippa is a first-year DPhil student, whose research interests focus on vulnerable students’ outcomes and experiences of secondary school English education.

In 2023, Pippa completed an MSc in Learning and Teaching at the University of Oxford, researching pedagogical strategies for the teaching of emotionally challenging literature to students with experiences of trauma. Her DPhil research will build on this project, exploring looked after children’s engagement with English education, and their outcomes in the subject.

Alongside her research, Pippa continues to teach English in a secondary school; she is therefore passionate about collaborations between practice and research. Her project seeks to develop our understanding of looked after children’s experiences in English classrooms, in order to facilitate the development of strategies to support these vulnerable learners.

Supervisors

Nicole Dingwall and Julie Selwyn

Yunfei Ma is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of international higher education.

Following his B.A. (First Class) at the University of Durham, Yunfei was awarded with MSc (Distinction) from the Department of Education, University of Oxford prior to his DPhil studies. He has also worked as a research assistant on the project Transnational academic mobility to global south: an exploratory study of international faculty in China.

Yunfei’s DPhil research focuses on global academic publishing and its relationship with knowledge formation, codification and dissemination. His research interest primarily lies in the geo-politics of knowledge production, global epistemic governance, China’s Humanities and Social Sciences research, and the philosophy of power.

Supervisors

Ariel Lindorff and Xin Xu

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Penny is a DPhil student whose research interests centre on classroom talk and international collaborations between secondary English classrooms.

Penny completed Oxford’s MSc in Learning and Teaching with distinction in 2019, focusing on methods for mitigating the impact of mind-wandering and misunderstanding as a means of enhancing student engagement in small-group and whole-class debates of interpretations of literature.  She has since won SHINE research funding to explore the impact of her methodology on students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Her DPhil continues her interest in student discussions of literature, exploring the impact on identity of online discussions between English classrooms in different countries.

Penny began her career as a secondary English Language Arts and journalism teacher in the USA but has taught secondary English predominantly in the UK in a career spanning 25 years.  She has overseen development of the global dimension and international collaboration at her current school for 14 years.

Supervisors

Victoria Elliott and Steven Puttick

Warda Arif is a doctoral student at the Department of Education. Her research aims to operationalise Critical Realist conceptions and methods to study Cultures of Higher Education in select Indian universities.

She completed her Master’s in Education and International Development from University College London’s – Institute of Education (UCL-IOE) as a Commonwealth Scholar and holds a B.Sc. in Biochemistry form Aligarh Muslim University (AMU).

Over her brief career, Warda has worked in the social development and impact sector in South Africa, India and Saudi Arabia, in teaching, research and advisory roles.

Supervisors

Dr Steven Puttick and Dr Aliya Khalid

Zak Devey is a passionate advocate for youth-led educational advocacy and equity – both within academia and in his work as co-founder of charitable trust Youth Arts New Zealand. In 2024, Zak continues to explore community conceptualisations of educational equity and their intersections with present and historic educational policy.

Zak also holds a deep care for youth-wellbeing, and its systemic determinants in the 21st century. His first publication, in the New Zealand Journal of Sociology, interrogates the ‘2021 World Happiness Report’ and that ways in which it constructs what it means to be happy.

Zak would be happy to hear from anyone looking to undertake a research journey in the Department, as well as scholars interested in educational equity, community-based participatory research, sociologies of well-being, and education in the political context of Aotearoa New Zealand.

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Pippa is a first-year DPhil student, whose research interests focus on vulnerable students’ outcomes and experiences of secondary school English education.

In 2023, Pippa completed an MSc in Learning and Teaching at the University of Oxford, researching pedagogical strategies for the teaching of emotionally challenging literature to students with experiences of trauma. Her DPhil research will build on this project, exploring looked after children’s engagement with English education, and their outcomes in the subject.

Alongside her research, Pippa continues to teach English in a secondary school; she is therefore passionate about collaborations between practice and research. Her project seeks to develop our understanding of looked after children’s experiences in English classrooms, in order to facilitate the development of strategies to support these vulnerable learners.

Supervisors

Nicole Dingwall and Julie Selwyn

Yunfei Ma is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of international higher education.

Following his B.A. (First Class) at the University of Durham, Yunfei was awarded with MSc (Distinction) from the Department of Education, University of Oxford prior to his DPhil studies. He has also worked as a research assistant on the project Transnational academic mobility to global south: an exploratory study of international faculty in China.

Yunfei’s DPhil research focuses on global academic publishing and its relationship with knowledge formation, codification and dissemination. His research interest primarily lies in the geo-politics of knowledge production, global epistemic governance, China’s Humanities and Social Sciences research, and the philosophy of power.

Supervisors

Ariel Lindorff and Xin Xu

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Penny is a DPhil student whose research interests centre on classroom talk and international collaborations between secondary English classrooms.

Penny completed Oxford’s MSc in Learning and Teaching with distinction in 2019, focusing on methods for mitigating the impact of mind-wandering and misunderstanding as a means of enhancing student engagement in small-group and whole-class debates of interpretations of literature.  She has since won SHINE research funding to explore the impact of her methodology on students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Her DPhil continues her interest in student discussions of literature, exploring the impact on identity of online discussions between English classrooms in different countries.

Penny began her career as a secondary English Language Arts and journalism teacher in the USA but has taught secondary English predominantly in the UK in a career spanning 25 years.  She has overseen development of the global dimension and international collaboration at her current school for 14 years.

Supervisors

Victoria Elliott and Steven Puttick

Warda Arif is a doctoral student at the Department of Education. Her research aims to operationalise Critical Realist conceptions and methods to study Cultures of Higher Education in select Indian universities.

She completed her Master’s in Education and International Development from University College London’s – Institute of Education (UCL-IOE) as a Commonwealth Scholar and holds a B.Sc. in Biochemistry form Aligarh Muslim University (AMU).

Over her brief career, Warda has worked in the social development and impact sector in South Africa, India and Saudi Arabia, in teaching, research and advisory roles.

Supervisors

Dr Steven Puttick and Dr Aliya Khalid

Zak Devey is a passionate advocate for youth-led educational advocacy and equity – both within academia and in his work as co-founder of charitable trust Youth Arts New Zealand. In 2024, Zak continues to explore community conceptualisations of educational equity and their intersections with present and historic educational policy.

Zak also holds a deep care for youth-wellbeing, and its systemic determinants in the 21st century. His first publication, in the New Zealand Journal of Sociology, interrogates the ‘2021 World Happiness Report’ and that ways in which it constructs what it means to be happy.

Zak would be happy to hear from anyone looking to undertake a research journey in the Department, as well as scholars interested in educational equity, community-based participatory research, sociologies of well-being, and education in the political context of Aotearoa New Zealand.

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Pippa is a first-year DPhil student, whose research interests focus on vulnerable students’ outcomes and experiences of secondary school English education.

In 2023, Pippa completed an MSc in Learning and Teaching at the University of Oxford, researching pedagogical strategies for the teaching of emotionally challenging literature to students with experiences of trauma. Her DPhil research will build on this project, exploring looked after children’s engagement with English education, and their outcomes in the subject.

Alongside her research, Pippa continues to teach English in a secondary school; she is therefore passionate about collaborations between practice and research. Her project seeks to develop our understanding of looked after children’s experiences in English classrooms, in order to facilitate the development of strategies to support these vulnerable learners.

Supervisors

Nicole Dingwall and Julie Selwyn

Yunfei Ma is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of international higher education.

Following his B.A. (First Class) at the University of Durham, Yunfei was awarded with MSc (Distinction) from the Department of Education, University of Oxford prior to his DPhil studies. He has also worked as a research assistant on the project Transnational academic mobility to global south: an exploratory study of international faculty in China.

Yunfei’s DPhil research focuses on global academic publishing and its relationship with knowledge formation, codification and dissemination. His research interest primarily lies in the geo-politics of knowledge production, global epistemic governance, China’s Humanities and Social Sciences research, and the philosophy of power.

Supervisors

Ariel Lindorff and Xin Xu

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Penny is a DPhil student whose research interests centre on classroom talk and international collaborations between secondary English classrooms.

Penny completed Oxford’s MSc in Learning and Teaching with distinction in 2019, focusing on methods for mitigating the impact of mind-wandering and misunderstanding as a means of enhancing student engagement in small-group and whole-class debates of interpretations of literature.  She has since won SHINE research funding to explore the impact of her methodology on students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Her DPhil continues her interest in student discussions of literature, exploring the impact on identity of online discussions between English classrooms in different countries.

Penny began her career as a secondary English Language Arts and journalism teacher in the USA but has taught secondary English predominantly in the UK in a career spanning 25 years.  She has overseen development of the global dimension and international collaboration at her current school for 14 years.

Supervisors

Victoria Elliott and Steven Puttick

Warda Arif is a doctoral student at the Department of Education. Her research aims to operationalise Critical Realist conceptions and methods to study Cultures of Higher Education in select Indian universities.

She completed her Master’s in Education and International Development from University College London’s – Institute of Education (UCL-IOE) as a Commonwealth Scholar and holds a B.Sc. in Biochemistry form Aligarh Muslim University (AMU).

Over her brief career, Warda has worked in the social development and impact sector in South Africa, India and Saudi Arabia, in teaching, research and advisory roles.

Supervisors

Dr Steven Puttick and Dr Aliya Khalid

Zak Devey is a passionate advocate for youth-led educational advocacy and equity – both within academia and in his work as co-founder of charitable trust Youth Arts New Zealand. In 2024, Zak continues to explore community conceptualisations of educational equity and their intersections with present and historic educational policy.

Zak also holds a deep care for youth-wellbeing, and its systemic determinants in the 21st century. His first publication, in the New Zealand Journal of Sociology, interrogates the ‘2021 World Happiness Report’ and that ways in which it constructs what it means to be happy.

Zak would be happy to hear from anyone looking to undertake a research journey in the Department, as well as scholars interested in educational equity, community-based participatory research, sociologies of well-being, and education in the political context of Aotearoa New Zealand.

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Pippa is a first-year DPhil student, whose research interests focus on vulnerable students’ outcomes and experiences of secondary school English education.

In 2023, Pippa completed an MSc in Learning and Teaching at the University of Oxford, researching pedagogical strategies for the teaching of emotionally challenging literature to students with experiences of trauma. Her DPhil research will build on this project, exploring looked after children’s engagement with English education, and their outcomes in the subject.

Alongside her research, Pippa continues to teach English in a secondary school; she is therefore passionate about collaborations between practice and research. Her project seeks to develop our understanding of looked after children’s experiences in English classrooms, in order to facilitate the development of strategies to support these vulnerable learners.

Supervisors

Nicole Dingwall and Julie Selwyn

Yunfei Ma is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of international higher education.

Following his B.A. (First Class) at the University of Durham, Yunfei was awarded with MSc (Distinction) from the Department of Education, University of Oxford prior to his DPhil studies. He has also worked as a research assistant on the project Transnational academic mobility to global south: an exploratory study of international faculty in China.

Yunfei’s DPhil research focuses on global academic publishing and its relationship with knowledge formation, codification and dissemination. His research interest primarily lies in the geo-politics of knowledge production, global epistemic governance, China’s Humanities and Social Sciences research, and the philosophy of power.

Supervisors

Ariel Lindorff and Xin Xu

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Penny is a DPhil student whose research interests centre on classroom talk and international collaborations between secondary English classrooms.

Penny completed Oxford’s MSc in Learning and Teaching with distinction in 2019, focusing on methods for mitigating the impact of mind-wandering and misunderstanding as a means of enhancing student engagement in small-group and whole-class debates of interpretations of literature.  She has since won SHINE research funding to explore the impact of her methodology on students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Her DPhil continues her interest in student discussions of literature, exploring the impact on identity of online discussions between English classrooms in different countries.

Penny began her career as a secondary English Language Arts and journalism teacher in the USA but has taught secondary English predominantly in the UK in a career spanning 25 years.  She has overseen development of the global dimension and international collaboration at her current school for 14 years.

Supervisors

Victoria Elliott and Steven Puttick

Warda Arif is a doctoral student at the Department of Education. Her research aims to operationalise Critical Realist conceptions and methods to study Cultures of Higher Education in select Indian universities.

She completed her Master’s in Education and International Development from University College London’s – Institute of Education (UCL-IOE) as a Commonwealth Scholar and holds a B.Sc. in Biochemistry form Aligarh Muslim University (AMU).

Over her brief career, Warda has worked in the social development and impact sector in South Africa, India and Saudi Arabia, in teaching, research and advisory roles.

Supervisors

Dr Steven Puttick and Dr Aliya Khalid

Zak Devey is a passionate advocate for youth-led educational advocacy and equity – both within academia and in his work as co-founder of charitable trust Youth Arts New Zealand. In 2024, Zak continues to explore community conceptualisations of educational equity and their intersections with present and historic educational policy.

Zak also holds a deep care for youth-wellbeing, and its systemic determinants in the 21st century. His first publication, in the New Zealand Journal of Sociology, interrogates the ‘2021 World Happiness Report’ and that ways in which it constructs what it means to be happy.

Zak would be happy to hear from anyone looking to undertake a research journey in the Department, as well as scholars interested in educational equity, community-based participatory research, sociologies of well-being, and education in the political context of Aotearoa New Zealand.

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Pippa is a first-year DPhil student, whose research interests focus on vulnerable students’ outcomes and experiences of secondary school English education.

In 2023, Pippa completed an MSc in Learning and Teaching at the University of Oxford, researching pedagogical strategies for the teaching of emotionally challenging literature to students with experiences of trauma. Her DPhil research will build on this project, exploring looked after children’s engagement with English education, and their outcomes in the subject.

Alongside her research, Pippa continues to teach English in a secondary school; she is therefore passionate about collaborations between practice and research. Her project seeks to develop our understanding of looked after children’s experiences in English classrooms, in order to facilitate the development of strategies to support these vulnerable learners.

Supervisors

Nicole Dingwall and Julie Selwyn

Yunfei Ma is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of international higher education.

Following his B.A. (First Class) at the University of Durham, Yunfei was awarded with MSc (Distinction) from the Department of Education, University of Oxford prior to his DPhil studies. He has also worked as a research assistant on the project Transnational academic mobility to global south: an exploratory study of international faculty in China.

Yunfei’s DPhil research focuses on global academic publishing and its relationship with knowledge formation, codification and dissemination. His research interest primarily lies in the geo-politics of knowledge production, global epistemic governance, China’s Humanities and Social Sciences research, and the philosophy of power.

Supervisors

Ariel Lindorff and Xin Xu

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Penny is a DPhil student whose research interests centre on classroom talk and international collaborations between secondary English classrooms.

Penny completed Oxford’s MSc in Learning and Teaching with distinction in 2019, focusing on methods for mitigating the impact of mind-wandering and misunderstanding as a means of enhancing student engagement in small-group and whole-class debates of interpretations of literature.  She has since won SHINE research funding to explore the impact of her methodology on students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Her DPhil continues her interest in student discussions of literature, exploring the impact on identity of online discussions between English classrooms in different countries.

Penny began her career as a secondary English Language Arts and journalism teacher in the USA but has taught secondary English predominantly in the UK in a career spanning 25 years.  She has overseen development of the global dimension and international collaboration at her current school for 14 years.

Supervisors

Victoria Elliott and Steven Puttick

Warda Arif is a doctoral student at the Department of Education. Her research aims to operationalise Critical Realist conceptions and methods to study Cultures of Higher Education in select Indian universities.

She completed her Master’s in Education and International Development from University College London’s – Institute of Education (UCL-IOE) as a Commonwealth Scholar and holds a B.Sc. in Biochemistry form Aligarh Muslim University (AMU).

Over her brief career, Warda has worked in the social development and impact sector in South Africa, India and Saudi Arabia, in teaching, research and advisory roles.

Supervisors

Dr Steven Puttick and Dr Aliya Khalid

Zak Devey is a passionate advocate for youth-led educational advocacy and equity – both within academia and in his work as co-founder of charitable trust Youth Arts New Zealand. In 2024, Zak continues to explore community conceptualisations of educational equity and their intersections with present and historic educational policy.

Zak also holds a deep care for youth-wellbeing, and its systemic determinants in the 21st century. His first publication, in the New Zealand Journal of Sociology, interrogates the ‘2021 World Happiness Report’ and that ways in which it constructs what it means to be happy.

Zak would be happy to hear from anyone looking to undertake a research journey in the Department, as well as scholars interested in educational equity, community-based participatory research, sociologies of well-being, and education in the political context of Aotearoa New Zealand.

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Pippa is a first-year DPhil student, whose research interests focus on vulnerable students’ outcomes and experiences of secondary school English education.

In 2023, Pippa completed an MSc in Learning and Teaching at the University of Oxford, researching pedagogical strategies for the teaching of emotionally challenging literature to students with experiences of trauma. Her DPhil research will build on this project, exploring looked after children’s engagement with English education, and their outcomes in the subject.

Alongside her research, Pippa continues to teach English in a secondary school; she is therefore passionate about collaborations between practice and research. Her project seeks to develop our understanding of looked after children’s experiences in English classrooms, in order to facilitate the development of strategies to support these vulnerable learners.

Supervisors

Nicole Dingwall and Julie Selwyn

Yunfei Ma is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of international higher education.

Following his B.A. (First Class) at the University of Durham, Yunfei was awarded with MSc (Distinction) from the Department of Education, University of Oxford prior to his DPhil studies. He has also worked as a research assistant on the project Transnational academic mobility to global south: an exploratory study of international faculty in China.

Yunfei’s DPhil research focuses on global academic publishing and its relationship with knowledge formation, codification and dissemination. His research interest primarily lies in the geo-politics of knowledge production, global epistemic governance, China’s Humanities and Social Sciences research, and the philosophy of power.

Supervisors

Ariel Lindorff and Xin Xu

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Penny is a DPhil student whose research interests centre on classroom talk and international collaborations between secondary English classrooms.

Penny completed Oxford’s MSc in Learning and Teaching with distinction in 2019, focusing on methods for mitigating the impact of mind-wandering and misunderstanding as a means of enhancing student engagement in small-group and whole-class debates of interpretations of literature.  She has since won SHINE research funding to explore the impact of her methodology on students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Her DPhil continues her interest in student discussions of literature, exploring the impact on identity of online discussions between English classrooms in different countries.

Penny began her career as a secondary English Language Arts and journalism teacher in the USA but has taught secondary English predominantly in the UK in a career spanning 25 years.  She has overseen development of the global dimension and international collaboration at her current school for 14 years.

Supervisors

Victoria Elliott and Steven Puttick

Warda Arif is a doctoral student at the Department of Education. Her research aims to operationalise Critical Realist conceptions and methods to study Cultures of Higher Education in select Indian universities.

She completed her Master’s in Education and International Development from University College London’s – Institute of Education (UCL-IOE) as a Commonwealth Scholar and holds a B.Sc. in Biochemistry form Aligarh Muslim University (AMU).

Over her brief career, Warda has worked in the social development and impact sector in South Africa, India and Saudi Arabia, in teaching, research and advisory roles.

Supervisors

Dr Steven Puttick and Dr Aliya Khalid

Zak Devey is a passionate advocate for youth-led educational advocacy and equity – both within academia and in his work as co-founder of charitable trust Youth Arts New Zealand. In 2024, Zak continues to explore community conceptualisations of educational equity and their intersections with present and historic educational policy.

Zak also holds a deep care for youth-wellbeing, and its systemic determinants in the 21st century. His first publication, in the New Zealand Journal of Sociology, interrogates the ‘2021 World Happiness Report’ and that ways in which it constructs what it means to be happy.

Zak would be happy to hear from anyone looking to undertake a research journey in the Department, as well as scholars interested in educational equity, community-based participatory research, sociologies of well-being, and education in the political context of Aotearoa New Zealand.

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Pippa is a first-year DPhil student, whose research interests focus on vulnerable students’ outcomes and experiences of secondary school English education.

In 2023, Pippa completed an MSc in Learning and Teaching at the University of Oxford, researching pedagogical strategies for the teaching of emotionally challenging literature to students with experiences of trauma. Her DPhil research will build on this project, exploring looked after children’s engagement with English education, and their outcomes in the subject.

Alongside her research, Pippa continues to teach English in a secondary school; she is therefore passionate about collaborations between practice and research. Her project seeks to develop our understanding of looked after children’s experiences in English classrooms, in order to facilitate the development of strategies to support these vulnerable learners.

Supervisors

Nicole Dingwall and Julie Selwyn

Yunfei Ma is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of international higher education.

Following his B.A. (First Class) at the University of Durham, Yunfei was awarded with MSc (Distinction) from the Department of Education, University of Oxford prior to his DPhil studies. He has also worked as a research assistant on the project Transnational academic mobility to global south: an exploratory study of international faculty in China.

Yunfei’s DPhil research focuses on global academic publishing and its relationship with knowledge formation, codification and dissemination. His research interest primarily lies in the geo-politics of knowledge production, global epistemic governance, China’s Humanities and Social Sciences research, and the philosophy of power.

Supervisors

Ariel Lindorff and Xin Xu

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Penny is a DPhil student whose research interests centre on classroom talk and international collaborations between secondary English classrooms.

Penny completed Oxford’s MSc in Learning and Teaching with distinction in 2019, focusing on methods for mitigating the impact of mind-wandering and misunderstanding as a means of enhancing student engagement in small-group and whole-class debates of interpretations of literature.  She has since won SHINE research funding to explore the impact of her methodology on students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Her DPhil continues her interest in student discussions of literature, exploring the impact on identity of online discussions between English classrooms in different countries.

Penny began her career as a secondary English Language Arts and journalism teacher in the USA but has taught secondary English predominantly in the UK in a career spanning 25 years.  She has overseen development of the global dimension and international collaboration at her current school for 14 years.

Supervisors

Victoria Elliott and Steven Puttick

Warda Arif is a doctoral student at the Department of Education. Her research aims to operationalise Critical Realist conceptions and methods to study Cultures of Higher Education in select Indian universities.

She completed her Master’s in Education and International Development from University College London’s – Institute of Education (UCL-IOE) as a Commonwealth Scholar and holds a B.Sc. in Biochemistry form Aligarh Muslim University (AMU).

Over her brief career, Warda has worked in the social development and impact sector in South Africa, India and Saudi Arabia, in teaching, research and advisory roles.

Supervisors

Dr Steven Puttick and Dr Aliya Khalid

Zak Devey is a passionate advocate for youth-led educational advocacy and equity – both within academia and in his work as co-founder of charitable trust Youth Arts New Zealand. In 2024, Zak continues to explore community conceptualisations of educational equity and their intersections with present and historic educational policy.

Zak also holds a deep care for youth-wellbeing, and its systemic determinants in the 21st century. His first publication, in the New Zealand Journal of Sociology, interrogates the ‘2021 World Happiness Report’ and that ways in which it constructs what it means to be happy.

Zak would be happy to hear from anyone looking to undertake a research journey in the Department, as well as scholars interested in educational equity, community-based participatory research, sociologies of well-being, and education in the political context of Aotearoa New Zealand.

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Pippa is a first-year DPhil student, whose research interests focus on vulnerable students’ outcomes and experiences of secondary school English education.

In 2023, Pippa completed an MSc in Learning and Teaching at the University of Oxford, researching pedagogical strategies for the teaching of emotionally challenging literature to students with experiences of trauma. Her DPhil research will build on this project, exploring looked after children’s engagement with English education, and their outcomes in the subject.

Alongside her research, Pippa continues to teach English in a secondary school; she is therefore passionate about collaborations between practice and research. Her project seeks to develop our understanding of looked after children’s experiences in English classrooms, in order to facilitate the development of strategies to support these vulnerable learners.

Supervisors

Nicole Dingwall and Julie Selwyn

Yunfei Ma is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of international higher education.

Following his B.A. (First Class) at the University of Durham, Yunfei was awarded with MSc (Distinction) from the Department of Education, University of Oxford prior to his DPhil studies. He has also worked as a research assistant on the project Transnational academic mobility to global south: an exploratory study of international faculty in China.

Yunfei’s DPhil research focuses on global academic publishing and its relationship with knowledge formation, codification and dissemination. His research interest primarily lies in the geo-politics of knowledge production, global epistemic governance, China’s Humanities and Social Sciences research, and the philosophy of power.

Supervisors

Ariel Lindorff and Xin Xu

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Penny is a DPhil student whose research interests centre on classroom talk and international collaborations between secondary English classrooms.

Penny completed Oxford’s MSc in Learning and Teaching with distinction in 2019, focusing on methods for mitigating the impact of mind-wandering and misunderstanding as a means of enhancing student engagement in small-group and whole-class debates of interpretations of literature.  She has since won SHINE research funding to explore the impact of her methodology on students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Her DPhil continues her interest in student discussions of literature, exploring the impact on identity of online discussions between English classrooms in different countries.

Penny began her career as a secondary English Language Arts and journalism teacher in the USA but has taught secondary English predominantly in the UK in a career spanning 25 years.  She has overseen development of the global dimension and international collaboration at her current school for 14 years.

Supervisors

Victoria Elliott and Steven Puttick

Warda Arif is a doctoral student at the Department of Education. Her research aims to operationalise Critical Realist conceptions and methods to study Cultures of Higher Education in select Indian universities.

She completed her Master’s in Education and International Development from University College London’s – Institute of Education (UCL-IOE) as a Commonwealth Scholar and holds a B.Sc. in Biochemistry form Aligarh Muslim University (AMU).

Over her brief career, Warda has worked in the social development and impact sector in South Africa, India and Saudi Arabia, in teaching, research and advisory roles.

Supervisors

Dr Steven Puttick and Dr Aliya Khalid

Zak Devey is a passionate advocate for youth-led educational advocacy and equity – both within academia and in his work as co-founder of charitable trust Youth Arts New Zealand. In 2024, Zak continues to explore community conceptualisations of educational equity and their intersections with present and historic educational policy.

Zak also holds a deep care for youth-wellbeing, and its systemic determinants in the 21st century. His first publication, in the New Zealand Journal of Sociology, interrogates the ‘2021 World Happiness Report’ and that ways in which it constructs what it means to be happy.

Zak would be happy to hear from anyone looking to undertake a research journey in the Department, as well as scholars interested in educational equity, community-based participatory research, sociologies of well-being, and education in the political context of Aotearoa New Zealand.

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Pippa is a first-year DPhil student, whose research interests focus on vulnerable students’ outcomes and experiences of secondary school English education.

In 2023, Pippa completed an MSc in Learning and Teaching at the University of Oxford, researching pedagogical strategies for the teaching of emotionally challenging literature to students with experiences of trauma. Her DPhil research will build on this project, exploring looked after children’s engagement with English education, and their outcomes in the subject.

Alongside her research, Pippa continues to teach English in a secondary school; she is therefore passionate about collaborations between practice and research. Her project seeks to develop our understanding of looked after children’s experiences in English classrooms, in order to facilitate the development of strategies to support these vulnerable learners.

Supervisors

Nicole Dingwall and Julie Selwyn

Yunfei Ma is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of international higher education.

Following his B.A. (First Class) at the University of Durham, Yunfei was awarded with MSc (Distinction) from the Department of Education, University of Oxford prior to his DPhil studies. He has also worked as a research assistant on the project Transnational academic mobility to global south: an exploratory study of international faculty in China.

Yunfei’s DPhil research focuses on global academic publishing and its relationship with knowledge formation, codification and dissemination. His research interest primarily lies in the geo-politics of knowledge production, global epistemic governance, China’s Humanities and Social Sciences research, and the philosophy of power.

Supervisors

Ariel Lindorff and Xin Xu

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Penny is a DPhil student whose research interests centre on classroom talk and international collaborations between secondary English classrooms.

Penny completed Oxford’s MSc in Learning and Teaching with distinction in 2019, focusing on methods for mitigating the impact of mind-wandering and misunderstanding as a means of enhancing student engagement in small-group and whole-class debates of interpretations of literature.  She has since won SHINE research funding to explore the impact of her methodology on students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Her DPhil continues her interest in student discussions of literature, exploring the impact on identity of online discussions between English classrooms in different countries.

Penny began her career as a secondary English Language Arts and journalism teacher in the USA but has taught secondary English predominantly in the UK in a career spanning 25 years.  She has overseen development of the global dimension and international collaboration at her current school for 14 years.

Supervisors

Victoria Elliott and Steven Puttick

Warda Arif is a doctoral student at the Department of Education. Her research aims to operationalise Critical Realist conceptions and methods to study Cultures of Higher Education in select Indian universities.

She completed her Master’s in Education and International Development from University College London’s – Institute of Education (UCL-IOE) as a Commonwealth Scholar and holds a B.Sc. in Biochemistry form Aligarh Muslim University (AMU).

Over her brief career, Warda has worked in the social development and impact sector in South Africa, India and Saudi Arabia, in teaching, research and advisory roles.

Supervisors

Dr Steven Puttick and Dr Aliya Khalid

Zak Devey is a passionate advocate for youth-led educational advocacy and equity – both within academia and in his work as co-founder of charitable trust Youth Arts New Zealand. In 2024, Zak continues to explore community conceptualisations of educational equity and their intersections with present and historic educational policy.

Zak also holds a deep care for youth-wellbeing, and its systemic determinants in the 21st century. His first publication, in the New Zealand Journal of Sociology, interrogates the ‘2021 World Happiness Report’ and that ways in which it constructs what it means to be happy.

Zak would be happy to hear from anyone looking to undertake a research journey in the Department, as well as scholars interested in educational equity, community-based participatory research, sociologies of well-being, and education in the political context of Aotearoa New Zealand.

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Pippa is a first-year DPhil student, whose research interests focus on vulnerable students’ outcomes and experiences of secondary school English education.

In 2023, Pippa completed an MSc in Learning and Teaching at the University of Oxford, researching pedagogical strategies for the teaching of emotionally challenging literature to students with experiences of trauma. Her DPhil research will build on this project, exploring looked after children’s engagement with English education, and their outcomes in the subject.

Alongside her research, Pippa continues to teach English in a secondary school; she is therefore passionate about collaborations between practice and research. Her project seeks to develop our understanding of looked after children’s experiences in English classrooms, in order to facilitate the development of strategies to support these vulnerable learners.

Supervisors

Nicole Dingwall and Julie Selwyn

Yunfei Ma is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of international higher education.

Following his B.A. (First Class) at the University of Durham, Yunfei was awarded with MSc (Distinction) from the Department of Education, University of Oxford prior to his DPhil studies. He has also worked as a research assistant on the project Transnational academic mobility to global south: an exploratory study of international faculty in China.

Yunfei’s DPhil research focuses on global academic publishing and its relationship with knowledge formation, codification and dissemination. His research interest primarily lies in the geo-politics of knowledge production, global epistemic governance, China’s Humanities and Social Sciences research, and the philosophy of power.

Supervisors

Ariel Lindorff and Xin Xu

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Penny is a DPhil student whose research interests centre on classroom talk and international collaborations between secondary English classrooms.

Penny completed Oxford’s MSc in Learning and Teaching with distinction in 2019, focusing on methods for mitigating the impact of mind-wandering and misunderstanding as a means of enhancing student engagement in small-group and whole-class debates of interpretations of literature.  She has since won SHINE research funding to explore the impact of her methodology on students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Her DPhil continues her interest in student discussions of literature, exploring the impact on identity of online discussions between English classrooms in different countries.

Penny began her career as a secondary English Language Arts and journalism teacher in the USA but has taught secondary English predominantly in the UK in a career spanning 25 years.  She has overseen development of the global dimension and international collaboration at her current school for 14 years.

Supervisors

Victoria Elliott and Steven Puttick

Warda Arif is a doctoral student at the Department of Education. Her research aims to operationalise Critical Realist conceptions and methods to study Cultures of Higher Education in select Indian universities.

She completed her Master’s in Education and International Development from University College London’s – Institute of Education (UCL-IOE) as a Commonwealth Scholar and holds a B.Sc. in Biochemistry form Aligarh Muslim University (AMU).

Over her brief career, Warda has worked in the social development and impact sector in South Africa, India and Saudi Arabia, in teaching, research and advisory roles.

Supervisors

Dr Steven Puttick and Dr Aliya Khalid

Zak Devey is a passionate advocate for youth-led educational advocacy and equity – both within academia and in his work as co-founder of charitable trust Youth Arts New Zealand. In 2024, Zak continues to explore community conceptualisations of educational equity and their intersections with present and historic educational policy.

Zak also holds a deep care for youth-wellbeing, and its systemic determinants in the 21st century. His first publication, in the New Zealand Journal of Sociology, interrogates the ‘2021 World Happiness Report’ and that ways in which it constructs what it means to be happy.

Zak would be happy to hear from anyone looking to undertake a research journey in the Department, as well as scholars interested in educational equity, community-based participatory research, sociologies of well-being, and education in the political context of Aotearoa New Zealand.

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Pippa is a first-year DPhil student, whose research interests focus on vulnerable students’ outcomes and experiences of secondary school English education.

In 2023, Pippa completed an MSc in Learning and Teaching at the University of Oxford, researching pedagogical strategies for the teaching of emotionally challenging literature to students with experiences of trauma. Her DPhil research will build on this project, exploring looked after children’s engagement with English education, and their outcomes in the subject.

Alongside her research, Pippa continues to teach English in a secondary school; she is therefore passionate about collaborations between practice and research. Her project seeks to develop our understanding of looked after children’s experiences in English classrooms, in order to facilitate the development of strategies to support these vulnerable learners.

Supervisors

Nicole Dingwall and Julie Selwyn

Yunfei Ma is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of international higher education.

Following his B.A. (First Class) at the University of Durham, Yunfei was awarded with MSc (Distinction) from the Department of Education, University of Oxford prior to his DPhil studies. He has also worked as a research assistant on the project Transnational academic mobility to global south: an exploratory study of international faculty in China.

Yunfei’s DPhil research focuses on global academic publishing and its relationship with knowledge formation, codification and dissemination. His research interest primarily lies in the geo-politics of knowledge production, global epistemic governance, China’s Humanities and Social Sciences research, and the philosophy of power.

Supervisors

Ariel Lindorff and Xin Xu

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Penny is a DPhil student whose research interests centre on classroom talk and international collaborations between secondary English classrooms.

Penny completed Oxford’s MSc in Learning and Teaching with distinction in 2019, focusing on methods for mitigating the impact of mind-wandering and misunderstanding as a means of enhancing student engagement in small-group and whole-class debates of interpretations of literature.  She has since won SHINE research funding to explore the impact of her methodology on students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Her DPhil continues her interest in student discussions of literature, exploring the impact on identity of online discussions between English classrooms in different countries.

Penny began her career as a secondary English Language Arts and journalism teacher in the USA but has taught secondary English predominantly in the UK in a career spanning 25 years.  She has overseen development of the global dimension and international collaboration at her current school for 14 years.

Supervisors

Victoria Elliott and Steven Puttick

Warda Arif is a doctoral student at the Department of Education. Her research aims to operationalise Critical Realist conceptions and methods to study Cultures of Higher Education in select Indian universities.

She completed her Master’s in Education and International Development from University College London’s – Institute of Education (UCL-IOE) as a Commonwealth Scholar and holds a B.Sc. in Biochemistry form Aligarh Muslim University (AMU).

Over her brief career, Warda has worked in the social development and impact sector in South Africa, India and Saudi Arabia, in teaching, research and advisory roles.

Supervisors

Dr Steven Puttick and Dr Aliya Khalid

Zak Devey is a passionate advocate for youth-led educational advocacy and equity – both within academia and in his work as co-founder of charitable trust Youth Arts New Zealand. In 2024, Zak continues to explore community conceptualisations of educational equity and their intersections with present and historic educational policy.

Zak also holds a deep care for youth-wellbeing, and its systemic determinants in the 21st century. His first publication, in the New Zealand Journal of Sociology, interrogates the ‘2021 World Happiness Report’ and that ways in which it constructs what it means to be happy.

Zak would be happy to hear from anyone looking to undertake a research journey in the Department, as well as scholars interested in educational equity, community-based participatory research, sociologies of well-being, and education in the political context of Aotearoa New Zealand.

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Pippa is a first-year DPhil student, whose research interests focus on vulnerable students’ outcomes and experiences of secondary school English education.

In 2023, Pippa completed an MSc in Learning and Teaching at the University of Oxford, researching pedagogical strategies for the teaching of emotionally challenging literature to students with experiences of trauma. Her DPhil research will build on this project, exploring looked after children’s engagement with English education, and their outcomes in the subject.

Alongside her research, Pippa continues to teach English in a secondary school; she is therefore passionate about collaborations between practice and research. Her project seeks to develop our understanding of looked after children’s experiences in English classrooms, in order to facilitate the development of strategies to support these vulnerable learners.

Supervisors

Nicole Dingwall and Julie Selwyn

Yunfei Ma is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of international higher education.

Following his B.A. (First Class) at the University of Durham, Yunfei was awarded with MSc (Distinction) from the Department of Education, University of Oxford prior to his DPhil studies. He has also worked as a research assistant on the project Transnational academic mobility to global south: an exploratory study of international faculty in China.

Yunfei’s DPhil research focuses on global academic publishing and its relationship with knowledge formation, codification and dissemination. His research interest primarily lies in the geo-politics of knowledge production, global epistemic governance, China’s Humanities and Social Sciences research, and the philosophy of power.

Supervisors

Ariel Lindorff and Xin Xu

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Penny is a DPhil student whose research interests centre on classroom talk and international collaborations between secondary English classrooms.

Penny completed Oxford’s MSc in Learning and Teaching with distinction in 2019, focusing on methods for mitigating the impact of mind-wandering and misunderstanding as a means of enhancing student engagement in small-group and whole-class debates of interpretations of literature.  She has since won SHINE research funding to explore the impact of her methodology on students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Her DPhil continues her interest in student discussions of literature, exploring the impact on identity of online discussions between English classrooms in different countries.

Penny began her career as a secondary English Language Arts and journalism teacher in the USA but has taught secondary English predominantly in the UK in a career spanning 25 years.  She has overseen development of the global dimension and international collaboration at her current school for 14 years.

Supervisors

Victoria Elliott and Steven Puttick

Warda Arif is a doctoral student at the Department of Education. Her research aims to operationalise Critical Realist conceptions and methods to study Cultures of Higher Education in select Indian universities.

She completed her Master’s in Education and International Development from University College London’s – Institute of Education (UCL-IOE) as a Commonwealth Scholar and holds a B.Sc. in Biochemistry form Aligarh Muslim University (AMU).

Over her brief career, Warda has worked in the social development and impact sector in South Africa, India and Saudi Arabia, in teaching, research and advisory roles.

Supervisors

Dr Steven Puttick and Dr Aliya Khalid

Zak Devey is a passionate advocate for youth-led educational advocacy and equity – both within academia and in his work as co-founder of charitable trust Youth Arts New Zealand. In 2024, Zak continues to explore community conceptualisations of educational equity and their intersections with present and historic educational policy.

Zak also holds a deep care for youth-wellbeing, and its systemic determinants in the 21st century. His first publication, in the New Zealand Journal of Sociology, interrogates the ‘2021 World Happiness Report’ and that ways in which it constructs what it means to be happy.

Zak would be happy to hear from anyone looking to undertake a research journey in the Department, as well as scholars interested in educational equity, community-based participatory research, sociologies of well-being, and education in the political context of Aotearoa New Zealand.

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Pippa is a first-year DPhil student, whose research interests focus on vulnerable students’ outcomes and experiences of secondary school English education.

In 2023, Pippa completed an MSc in Learning and Teaching at the University of Oxford, researching pedagogical strategies for the teaching of emotionally challenging literature to students with experiences of trauma. Her DPhil research will build on this project, exploring looked after children’s engagement with English education, and their outcomes in the subject.

Alongside her research, Pippa continues to teach English in a secondary school; she is therefore passionate about collaborations between practice and research. Her project seeks to develop our understanding of looked after children’s experiences in English classrooms, in order to facilitate the development of strategies to support these vulnerable learners.

Supervisors

Nicole Dingwall and Julie Selwyn

Yunfei Ma is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of international higher education.

Following his B.A. (First Class) at the University of Durham, Yunfei was awarded with MSc (Distinction) from the Department of Education, University of Oxford prior to his DPhil studies. He has also worked as a research assistant on the project Transnational academic mobility to global south: an exploratory study of international faculty in China.

Yunfei’s DPhil research focuses on global academic publishing and its relationship with knowledge formation, codification and dissemination. His research interest primarily lies in the geo-politics of knowledge production, global epistemic governance, China’s Humanities and Social Sciences research, and the philosophy of power.

Supervisors

Ariel Lindorff and Xin Xu

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Penny is a DPhil student whose research interests centre on classroom talk and international collaborations between secondary English classrooms.

Penny completed Oxford’s MSc in Learning and Teaching with distinction in 2019, focusing on methods for mitigating the impact of mind-wandering and misunderstanding as a means of enhancing student engagement in small-group and whole-class debates of interpretations of literature.  She has since won SHINE research funding to explore the impact of her methodology on students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Her DPhil continues her interest in student discussions of literature, exploring the impact on identity of online discussions between English classrooms in different countries.

Penny began her career as a secondary English Language Arts and journalism teacher in the USA but has taught secondary English predominantly in the UK in a career spanning 25 years.  She has overseen development of the global dimension and international collaboration at her current school for 14 years.

Supervisors

Victoria Elliott and Steven Puttick

Warda Arif is a doctoral student at the Department of Education. Her research aims to operationalise Critical Realist conceptions and methods to study Cultures of Higher Education in select Indian universities.

She completed her Master’s in Education and International Development from University College London’s – Institute of Education (UCL-IOE) as a Commonwealth Scholar and holds a B.Sc. in Biochemistry form Aligarh Muslim University (AMU).

Over her brief career, Warda has worked in the social development and impact sector in South Africa, India and Saudi Arabia, in teaching, research and advisory roles.

Supervisors

Dr Steven Puttick and Dr Aliya Khalid

Zak Devey is a passionate advocate for youth-led educational advocacy and equity – both within academia and in his work as co-founder of charitable trust Youth Arts New Zealand. In 2024, Zak continues to explore community conceptualisations of educational equity and their intersections with present and historic educational policy.

Zak also holds a deep care for youth-wellbeing, and its systemic determinants in the 21st century. His first publication, in the New Zealand Journal of Sociology, interrogates the ‘2021 World Happiness Report’ and that ways in which it constructs what it means to be happy.

Zak would be happy to hear from anyone looking to undertake a research journey in the Department, as well as scholars interested in educational equity, community-based participatory research, sociologies of well-being, and education in the political context of Aotearoa New Zealand.

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Pippa is a first-year DPhil student, whose research interests focus on vulnerable students’ outcomes and experiences of secondary school English education.

In 2023, Pippa completed an MSc in Learning and Teaching at the University of Oxford, researching pedagogical strategies for the teaching of emotionally challenging literature to students with experiences of trauma. Her DPhil research will build on this project, exploring looked after children’s engagement with English education, and their outcomes in the subject.

Alongside her research, Pippa continues to teach English in a secondary school; she is therefore passionate about collaborations between practice and research. Her project seeks to develop our understanding of looked after children’s experiences in English classrooms, in order to facilitate the development of strategies to support these vulnerable learners.

Supervisors

Nicole Dingwall and Julie Selwyn

Yunfei Ma is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of international higher education.

Following his B.A. (First Class) at the University of Durham, Yunfei was awarded with MSc (Distinction) from the Department of Education, University of Oxford prior to his DPhil studies. He has also worked as a research assistant on the project Transnational academic mobility to global south: an exploratory study of international faculty in China.

Yunfei’s DPhil research focuses on global academic publishing and its relationship with knowledge formation, codification and dissemination. His research interest primarily lies in the geo-politics of knowledge production, global epistemic governance, China’s Humanities and Social Sciences research, and the philosophy of power.

Supervisors

Ariel Lindorff and Xin Xu

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Penny is a DPhil student whose research interests centre on classroom talk and international collaborations between secondary English classrooms.

Penny completed Oxford’s MSc in Learning and Teaching with distinction in 2019, focusing on methods for mitigating the impact of mind-wandering and misunderstanding as a means of enhancing student engagement in small-group and whole-class debates of interpretations of literature.  She has since won SHINE research funding to explore the impact of her methodology on students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Her DPhil continues her interest in student discussions of literature, exploring the impact on identity of online discussions between English classrooms in different countries.

Penny began her career as a secondary English Language Arts and journalism teacher in the USA but has taught secondary English predominantly in the UK in a career spanning 25 years.  She has overseen development of the global dimension and international collaboration at her current school for 14 years.

Supervisors

Victoria Elliott and Steven Puttick

Warda Arif is a doctoral student at the Department of Education. Her research aims to operationalise Critical Realist conceptions and methods to study Cultures of Higher Education in select Indian universities.

She completed her Master’s in Education and International Development from University College London’s – Institute of Education (UCL-IOE) as a Commonwealth Scholar and holds a B.Sc. in Biochemistry form Aligarh Muslim University (AMU).

Over her brief career, Warda has worked in the social development and impact sector in South Africa, India and Saudi Arabia, in teaching, research and advisory roles.

Supervisors

Dr Steven Puttick and Dr Aliya Khalid

Zak Devey is a passionate advocate for youth-led educational advocacy and equity – both within academia and in his work as co-founder of charitable trust Youth Arts New Zealand. In 2024, Zak continues to explore community conceptualisations of educational equity and their intersections with present and historic educational policy.

Zak also holds a deep care for youth-wellbeing, and its systemic determinants in the 21st century. His first publication, in the New Zealand Journal of Sociology, interrogates the ‘2021 World Happiness Report’ and that ways in which it constructs what it means to be happy.

Zak would be happy to hear from anyone looking to undertake a research journey in the Department, as well as scholars interested in educational equity, community-based participatory research, sociologies of well-being, and education in the political context of Aotearoa New Zealand.

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Pippa is a first-year DPhil student, whose research interests focus on vulnerable students’ outcomes and experiences of secondary school English education.

In 2023, Pippa completed an MSc in Learning and Teaching at the University of Oxford, researching pedagogical strategies for the teaching of emotionally challenging literature to students with experiences of trauma. Her DPhil research will build on this project, exploring looked after children’s engagement with English education, and their outcomes in the subject.

Alongside her research, Pippa continues to teach English in a secondary school; she is therefore passionate about collaborations between practice and research. Her project seeks to develop our understanding of looked after children’s experiences in English classrooms, in order to facilitate the development of strategies to support these vulnerable learners.

Supervisors

Nicole Dingwall and Julie Selwyn

Yunfei Ma is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of international higher education.

Following his B.A. (First Class) at the University of Durham, Yunfei was awarded with MSc (Distinction) from the Department of Education, University of Oxford prior to his DPhil studies. He has also worked as a research assistant on the project Transnational academic mobility to global south: an exploratory study of international faculty in China.

Yunfei’s DPhil research focuses on global academic publishing and its relationship with knowledge formation, codification and dissemination. His research interest primarily lies in the geo-politics of knowledge production, global epistemic governance, China’s Humanities and Social Sciences research, and the philosophy of power.

Supervisors

Ariel Lindorff and Xin Xu

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Penny is a DPhil student whose research interests centre on classroom talk and international collaborations between secondary English classrooms.

Penny completed Oxford’s MSc in Learning and Teaching with distinction in 2019, focusing on methods for mitigating the impact of mind-wandering and misunderstanding as a means of enhancing student engagement in small-group and whole-class debates of interpretations of literature.  She has since won SHINE research funding to explore the impact of her methodology on students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Her DPhil continues her interest in student discussions of literature, exploring the impact on identity of online discussions between English classrooms in different countries.

Penny began her career as a secondary English Language Arts and journalism teacher in the USA but has taught secondary English predominantly in the UK in a career spanning 25 years.  She has overseen development of the global dimension and international collaboration at her current school for 14 years.

Supervisors

Victoria Elliott and Steven Puttick

Warda Arif is a doctoral student at the Department of Education. Her research aims to operationalise Critical Realist conceptions and methods to study Cultures of Higher Education in select Indian universities.

She completed her Master’s in Education and International Development from University College London’s – Institute of Education (UCL-IOE) as a Commonwealth Scholar and holds a B.Sc. in Biochemistry form Aligarh Muslim University (AMU).

Over her brief career, Warda has worked in the social development and impact sector in South Africa, India and Saudi Arabia, in teaching, research and advisory roles.

Supervisors

Dr Steven Puttick and Dr Aliya Khalid

Zak Devey is a passionate advocate for youth-led educational advocacy and equity – both within academia and in his work as co-founder of charitable trust Youth Arts New Zealand. In 2024, Zak continues to explore community conceptualisations of educational equity and their intersections with present and historic educational policy.

Zak also holds a deep care for youth-wellbeing, and its systemic determinants in the 21st century. His first publication, in the New Zealand Journal of Sociology, interrogates the ‘2021 World Happiness Report’ and that ways in which it constructs what it means to be happy.

Zak would be happy to hear from anyone looking to undertake a research journey in the Department, as well as scholars interested in educational equity, community-based participatory research, sociologies of well-being, and education in the political context of Aotearoa New Zealand.

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Pippa is a first-year DPhil student, whose research interests focus on vulnerable students’ outcomes and experiences of secondary school English education.

In 2023, Pippa completed an MSc in Learning and Teaching at the University of Oxford, researching pedagogical strategies for the teaching of emotionally challenging literature to students with experiences of trauma. Her DPhil research will build on this project, exploring looked after children’s engagement with English education, and their outcomes in the subject.

Alongside her research, Pippa continues to teach English in a secondary school; she is therefore passionate about collaborations between practice and research. Her project seeks to develop our understanding of looked after children’s experiences in English classrooms, in order to facilitate the development of strategies to support these vulnerable learners.

Supervisors

Nicole Dingwall and Julie Selwyn

Yunfei Ma is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of international higher education.

Following his B.A. (First Class) at the University of Durham, Yunfei was awarded with MSc (Distinction) from the Department of Education, University of Oxford prior to his DPhil studies. He has also worked as a research assistant on the project Transnational academic mobility to global south: an exploratory study of international faculty in China.

Yunfei’s DPhil research focuses on global academic publishing and its relationship with knowledge formation, codification and dissemination. His research interest primarily lies in the geo-politics of knowledge production, global epistemic governance, China’s Humanities and Social Sciences research, and the philosophy of power.

Supervisors

Ariel Lindorff and Xin Xu

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Penny is a DPhil student whose research interests centre on classroom talk and international collaborations between secondary English classrooms.

Penny completed Oxford’s MSc in Learning and Teaching with distinction in 2019, focusing on methods for mitigating the impact of mind-wandering and misunderstanding as a means of enhancing student engagement in small-group and whole-class debates of interpretations of literature.  She has since won SHINE research funding to explore the impact of her methodology on students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Her DPhil continues her interest in student discussions of literature, exploring the impact on identity of online discussions between English classrooms in different countries.

Penny began her career as a secondary English Language Arts and journalism teacher in the USA but has taught secondary English predominantly in the UK in a career spanning 25 years.  She has overseen development of the global dimension and international collaboration at her current school for 14 years.

Supervisors

Victoria Elliott and Steven Puttick

Warda Arif is a doctoral student at the Department of Education. Her research aims to operationalise Critical Realist conceptions and methods to study Cultures of Higher Education in select Indian universities.

She completed her Master’s in Education and International Development from University College London’s – Institute of Education (UCL-IOE) as a Commonwealth Scholar and holds a B.Sc. in Biochemistry form Aligarh Muslim University (AMU).

Over her brief career, Warda has worked in the social development and impact sector in South Africa, India and Saudi Arabia, in teaching, research and advisory roles.

Supervisors

Dr Steven Puttick and Dr Aliya Khalid

Zak Devey is a passionate advocate for youth-led educational advocacy and equity – both within academia and in his work as co-founder of charitable trust Youth Arts New Zealand. In 2024, Zak continues to explore community conceptualisations of educational equity and their intersections with present and historic educational policy.

Zak also holds a deep care for youth-wellbeing, and its systemic determinants in the 21st century. His first publication, in the New Zealand Journal of Sociology, interrogates the ‘2021 World Happiness Report’ and that ways in which it constructs what it means to be happy.

Zak would be happy to hear from anyone looking to undertake a research journey in the Department, as well as scholars interested in educational equity, community-based participatory research, sociologies of well-being, and education in the political context of Aotearoa New Zealand.

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Pippa is a first-year DPhil student, whose research interests focus on vulnerable students’ outcomes and experiences of secondary school English education.

In 2023, Pippa completed an MSc in Learning and Teaching at the University of Oxford, researching pedagogical strategies for the teaching of emotionally challenging literature to students with experiences of trauma. Her DPhil research will build on this project, exploring looked after children’s engagement with English education, and their outcomes in the subject.

Alongside her research, Pippa continues to teach English in a secondary school; she is therefore passionate about collaborations between practice and research. Her project seeks to develop our understanding of looked after children’s experiences in English classrooms, in order to facilitate the development of strategies to support these vulnerable learners.

Supervisors

Nicole Dingwall and Julie Selwyn

Yunfei Ma is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of international higher education.

Following his B.A. (First Class) at the University of Durham, Yunfei was awarded with MSc (Distinction) from the Department of Education, University of Oxford prior to his DPhil studies. He has also worked as a research assistant on the project Transnational academic mobility to global south: an exploratory study of international faculty in China.

Yunfei’s DPhil research focuses on global academic publishing and its relationship with knowledge formation, codification and dissemination. His research interest primarily lies in the geo-politics of knowledge production, global epistemic governance, China’s Humanities and Social Sciences research, and the philosophy of power.

Supervisors

Ariel Lindorff and Xin Xu

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Penny is a DPhil student whose research interests centre on classroom talk and international collaborations between secondary English classrooms.

Penny completed Oxford’s MSc in Learning and Teaching with distinction in 2019, focusing on methods for mitigating the impact of mind-wandering and misunderstanding as a means of enhancing student engagement in small-group and whole-class debates of interpretations of literature.  She has since won SHINE research funding to explore the impact of her methodology on students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Her DPhil continues her interest in student discussions of literature, exploring the impact on identity of online discussions between English classrooms in different countries.

Penny began her career as a secondary English Language Arts and journalism teacher in the USA but has taught secondary English predominantly in the UK in a career spanning 25 years.  She has overseen development of the global dimension and international collaboration at her current school for 14 years.

Supervisors

Victoria Elliott and Steven Puttick

Warda Arif is a doctoral student at the Department of Education. Her research aims to operationalise Critical Realist conceptions and methods to study Cultures of Higher Education in select Indian universities.

She completed her Master’s in Education and International Development from University College London’s – Institute of Education (UCL-IOE) as a Commonwealth Scholar and holds a B.Sc. in Biochemistry form Aligarh Muslim University (AMU).

Over her brief career, Warda has worked in the social development and impact sector in South Africa, India and Saudi Arabia, in teaching, research and advisory roles.

Supervisors

Dr Steven Puttick and Dr Aliya Khalid

Zak Devey is a passionate advocate for youth-led educational advocacy and equity – both within academia and in his work as co-founder of charitable trust Youth Arts New Zealand. In 2024, Zak continues to explore community conceptualisations of educational equity and their intersections with present and historic educational policy.

Zak also holds a deep care for youth-wellbeing, and its systemic determinants in the 21st century. His first publication, in the New Zealand Journal of Sociology, interrogates the ‘2021 World Happiness Report’ and that ways in which it constructs what it means to be happy.

Zak would be happy to hear from anyone looking to undertake a research journey in the Department, as well as scholars interested in educational equity, community-based participatory research, sociologies of well-being, and education in the political context of Aotearoa New Zealand.

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Pippa is a first-year DPhil student, whose research interests focus on vulnerable students’ outcomes and experiences of secondary school English education.

In 2023, Pippa completed an MSc in Learning and Teaching at the University of Oxford, researching pedagogical strategies for the teaching of emotionally challenging literature to students with experiences of trauma. Her DPhil research will build on this project, exploring looked after children’s engagement with English education, and their outcomes in the subject.

Alongside her research, Pippa continues to teach English in a secondary school; she is therefore passionate about collaborations between practice and research. Her project seeks to develop our understanding of looked after children’s experiences in English classrooms, in order to facilitate the development of strategies to support these vulnerable learners.

Supervisors

Nicole Dingwall and Julie Selwyn

Yunfei Ma is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of international higher education.

Following his B.A. (First Class) at the University of Durham, Yunfei was awarded with MSc (Distinction) from the Department of Education, University of Oxford prior to his DPhil studies. He has also worked as a research assistant on the project Transnational academic mobility to global south: an exploratory study of international faculty in China.

Yunfei’s DPhil research focuses on global academic publishing and its relationship with knowledge formation, codification and dissemination. His research interest primarily lies in the geo-politics of knowledge production, global epistemic governance, China’s Humanities and Social Sciences research, and the philosophy of power.

Supervisors

Ariel Lindorff and Xin Xu

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Penny is a DPhil student whose research interests centre on classroom talk and international collaborations between secondary English classrooms.

Penny completed Oxford’s MSc in Learning and Teaching with distinction in 2019, focusing on methods for mitigating the impact of mind-wandering and misunderstanding as a means of enhancing student engagement in small-group and whole-class debates of interpretations of literature.  She has since won SHINE research funding to explore the impact of her methodology on students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Her DPhil continues her interest in student discussions of literature, exploring the impact on identity of online discussions between English classrooms in different countries.

Penny began her career as a secondary English Language Arts and journalism teacher in the USA but has taught secondary English predominantly in the UK in a career spanning 25 years.  She has overseen development of the global dimension and international collaboration at her current school for 14 years.

Supervisors

Victoria Elliott and Steven Puttick

Warda Arif is a doctoral student at the Department of Education. Her research aims to operationalise Critical Realist conceptions and methods to study Cultures of Higher Education in select Indian universities.

She completed her Master’s in Education and International Development from University College London’s – Institute of Education (UCL-IOE) as a Commonwealth Scholar and holds a B.Sc. in Biochemistry form Aligarh Muslim University (AMU).

Over her brief career, Warda has worked in the social development and impact sector in South Africa, India and Saudi Arabia, in teaching, research and advisory roles.

Supervisors

Dr Steven Puttick and Dr Aliya Khalid

Zak Devey is a passionate advocate for youth-led educational advocacy and equity – both within academia and in his work as co-founder of charitable trust Youth Arts New Zealand. In 2024, Zak continues to explore community conceptualisations of educational equity and their intersections with present and historic educational policy.

Zak also holds a deep care for youth-wellbeing, and its systemic determinants in the 21st century. His first publication, in the New Zealand Journal of Sociology, interrogates the ‘2021 World Happiness Report’ and that ways in which it constructs what it means to be happy.

Zak would be happy to hear from anyone looking to undertake a research journey in the Department, as well as scholars interested in educational equity, community-based participatory research, sociologies of well-being, and education in the political context of Aotearoa New Zealand.

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Pippa is a first-year DPhil student, whose research interests focus on vulnerable students’ outcomes and experiences of secondary school English education.

In 2023, Pippa completed an MSc in Learning and Teaching at the University of Oxford, researching pedagogical strategies for the teaching of emotionally challenging literature to students with experiences of trauma. Her DPhil research will build on this project, exploring looked after children’s engagement with English education, and their outcomes in the subject.

Alongside her research, Pippa continues to teach English in a secondary school; she is therefore passionate about collaborations between practice and research. Her project seeks to develop our understanding of looked after children’s experiences in English classrooms, in order to facilitate the development of strategies to support these vulnerable learners.

Supervisors

Nicole Dingwall and Julie Selwyn

Yunfei Ma is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of international higher education.

Following his B.A. (First Class) at the University of Durham, Yunfei was awarded with MSc (Distinction) from the Department of Education, University of Oxford prior to his DPhil studies. He has also worked as a research assistant on the project Transnational academic mobility to global south: an exploratory study of international faculty in China.

Yunfei’s DPhil research focuses on global academic publishing and its relationship with knowledge formation, codification and dissemination. His research interest primarily lies in the geo-politics of knowledge production, global epistemic governance, China’s Humanities and Social Sciences research, and the philosophy of power.

Supervisors

Ariel Lindorff and Xin Xu

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Penny is a DPhil student whose research interests centre on classroom talk and international collaborations between secondary English classrooms.

Penny completed Oxford’s MSc in Learning and Teaching with distinction in 2019, focusing on methods for mitigating the impact of mind-wandering and misunderstanding as a means of enhancing student engagement in small-group and whole-class debates of interpretations of literature.  She has since won SHINE research funding to explore the impact of her methodology on students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Her DPhil continues her interest in student discussions of literature, exploring the impact on identity of online discussions between English classrooms in different countries.

Penny began her career as a secondary English Language Arts and journalism teacher in the USA but has taught secondary English predominantly in the UK in a career spanning 25 years.  She has overseen development of the global dimension and international collaboration at her current school for 14 years.

Supervisors

Victoria Elliott and Steven Puttick

Warda Arif is a doctoral student at the Department of Education. Her research aims to operationalise Critical Realist conceptions and methods to study Cultures of Higher Education in select Indian universities.

She completed her Master’s in Education and International Development from University College London’s – Institute of Education (UCL-IOE) as a Commonwealth Scholar and holds a B.Sc. in Biochemistry form Aligarh Muslim University (AMU).

Over her brief career, Warda has worked in the social development and impact sector in South Africa, India and Saudi Arabia, in teaching, research and advisory roles.

Supervisors

Dr Steven Puttick and Dr Aliya Khalid

Zak Devey is a passionate advocate for youth-led educational advocacy and equity – both within academia and in his work as co-founder of charitable trust Youth Arts New Zealand. In 2024, Zak continues to explore community conceptualisations of educational equity and their intersections with present and historic educational policy.

Zak also holds a deep care for youth-wellbeing, and its systemic determinants in the 21st century. His first publication, in the New Zealand Journal of Sociology, interrogates the ‘2021 World Happiness Report’ and that ways in which it constructs what it means to be happy.

Zak would be happy to hear from anyone looking to undertake a research journey in the Department, as well as scholars interested in educational equity, community-based participatory research, sociologies of well-being, and education in the political context of Aotearoa New Zealand.

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Pippa is a first-year DPhil student, whose research interests focus on vulnerable students’ outcomes and experiences of secondary school English education.

In 2023, Pippa completed an MSc in Learning and Teaching at the University of Oxford, researching pedagogical strategies for the teaching of emotionally challenging literature to students with experiences of trauma. Her DPhil research will build on this project, exploring looked after children’s engagement with English education, and their outcomes in the subject.

Alongside her research, Pippa continues to teach English in a secondary school; she is therefore passionate about collaborations between practice and research. Her project seeks to develop our understanding of looked after children’s experiences in English classrooms, in order to facilitate the development of strategies to support these vulnerable learners.

Supervisors

Nicole Dingwall and Julie Selwyn

Yunfei Ma is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of international higher education.

Following his B.A. (First Class) at the University of Durham, Yunfei was awarded with MSc (Distinction) from the Department of Education, University of Oxford prior to his DPhil studies. He has also worked as a research assistant on the project Transnational academic mobility to global south: an exploratory study of international faculty in China.

Yunfei’s DPhil research focuses on global academic publishing and its relationship with knowledge formation, codification and dissemination. His research interest primarily lies in the geo-politics of knowledge production, global epistemic governance, China’s Humanities and Social Sciences research, and the philosophy of power.

Supervisors

Ariel Lindorff and Xin Xu

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Penny is a DPhil student whose research interests centre on classroom talk and international collaborations between secondary English classrooms.

Penny completed Oxford’s MSc in Learning and Teaching with distinction in 2019, focusing on methods for mitigating the impact of mind-wandering and misunderstanding as a means of enhancing student engagement in small-group and whole-class debates of interpretations of literature.  She has since won SHINE research funding to explore the impact of her methodology on students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Her DPhil continues her interest in student discussions of literature, exploring the impact on identity of online discussions between English classrooms in different countries.

Penny began her career as a secondary English Language Arts and journalism teacher in the USA but has taught secondary English predominantly in the UK in a career spanning 25 years.  She has overseen development of the global dimension and international collaboration at her current school for 14 years.

Supervisors

Victoria Elliott and Steven Puttick

Warda Arif is a doctoral student at the Department of Education. Her research aims to operationalise Critical Realist conceptions and methods to study Cultures of Higher Education in select Indian universities.

She completed her Master’s in Education and International Development from University College London’s – Institute of Education (UCL-IOE) as a Commonwealth Scholar and holds a B.Sc. in Biochemistry form Aligarh Muslim University (AMU).

Over her brief career, Warda has worked in the social development and impact sector in South Africa, India and Saudi Arabia, in teaching, research and advisory roles.

Supervisors

Dr Steven Puttick and Dr Aliya Khalid

Zak Devey is a passionate advocate for youth-led educational advocacy and equity – both within academia and in his work as co-founder of charitable trust Youth Arts New Zealand. In 2024, Zak continues to explore community conceptualisations of educational equity and their intersections with present and historic educational policy.

Zak also holds a deep care for youth-wellbeing, and its systemic determinants in the 21st century. His first publication, in the New Zealand Journal of Sociology, interrogates the ‘2021 World Happiness Report’ and that ways in which it constructs what it means to be happy.

Zak would be happy to hear from anyone looking to undertake a research journey in the Department, as well as scholars interested in educational equity, community-based participatory research, sociologies of well-being, and education in the political context of Aotearoa New Zealand.

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Pippa is a first-year DPhil student, whose research interests focus on vulnerable students’ outcomes and experiences of secondary school English education.

In 2023, Pippa completed an MSc in Learning and Teaching at the University of Oxford, researching pedagogical strategies for the teaching of emotionally challenging literature to students with experiences of trauma. Her DPhil research will build on this project, exploring looked after children’s engagement with English education, and their outcomes in the subject.

Alongside her research, Pippa continues to teach English in a secondary school; she is therefore passionate about collaborations between practice and research. Her project seeks to develop our understanding of looked after children’s experiences in English classrooms, in order to facilitate the development of strategies to support these vulnerable learners.

Supervisors

Nicole Dingwall and Julie Selwyn

Yunfei Ma is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of international higher education.

Following his B.A. (First Class) at the University of Durham, Yunfei was awarded with MSc (Distinction) from the Department of Education, University of Oxford prior to his DPhil studies. He has also worked as a research assistant on the project Transnational academic mobility to global south: an exploratory study of international faculty in China.

Yunfei’s DPhil research focuses on global academic publishing and its relationship with knowledge formation, codification and dissemination. His research interest primarily lies in the geo-politics of knowledge production, global epistemic governance, China’s Humanities and Social Sciences research, and the philosophy of power.

Supervisors

Ariel Lindorff and Xin Xu

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Penny is a DPhil student whose research interests centre on classroom talk and international collaborations between secondary English classrooms.

Penny completed Oxford’s MSc in Learning and Teaching with distinction in 2019, focusing on methods for mitigating the impact of mind-wandering and misunderstanding as a means of enhancing student engagement in small-group and whole-class debates of interpretations of literature.  She has since won SHINE research funding to explore the impact of her methodology on students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Her DPhil continues her interest in student discussions of literature, exploring the impact on identity of online discussions between English classrooms in different countries.

Penny began her career as a secondary English Language Arts and journalism teacher in the USA but has taught secondary English predominantly in the UK in a career spanning 25 years.  She has overseen development of the global dimension and international collaboration at her current school for 14 years.

Supervisors

Victoria Elliott and Steven Puttick

Warda Arif is a doctoral student at the Department of Education. Her research aims to operationalise Critical Realist conceptions and methods to study Cultures of Higher Education in select Indian universities.

She completed her Master’s in Education and International Development from University College London’s – Institute of Education (UCL-IOE) as a Commonwealth Scholar and holds a B.Sc. in Biochemistry form Aligarh Muslim University (AMU).

Over her brief career, Warda has worked in the social development and impact sector in South Africa, India and Saudi Arabia, in teaching, research and advisory roles.

Supervisors

Dr Steven Puttick and Dr Aliya Khalid

Zak Devey is a passionate advocate for youth-led educational advocacy and equity – both within academia and in his work as co-founder of charitable trust Youth Arts New Zealand. In 2024, Zak continues to explore community conceptualisations of educational equity and their intersections with present and historic educational policy.

Zak also holds a deep care for youth-wellbeing, and its systemic determinants in the 21st century. His first publication, in the New Zealand Journal of Sociology, interrogates the ‘2021 World Happiness Report’ and that ways in which it constructs what it means to be happy.

Zak would be happy to hear from anyone looking to undertake a research journey in the Department, as well as scholars interested in educational equity, community-based participatory research, sociologies of well-being, and education in the political context of Aotearoa New Zealand.

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Pippa is a first-year DPhil student, whose research interests focus on vulnerable students’ outcomes and experiences of secondary school English education.

In 2023, Pippa completed an MSc in Learning and Teaching at the University of Oxford, researching pedagogical strategies for the teaching of emotionally challenging literature to students with experiences of trauma. Her DPhil research will build on this project, exploring looked after children’s engagement with English education, and their outcomes in the subject.

Alongside her research, Pippa continues to teach English in a secondary school; she is therefore passionate about collaborations between practice and research. Her project seeks to develop our understanding of looked after children’s experiences in English classrooms, in order to facilitate the development of strategies to support these vulnerable learners.

Supervisors

Nicole Dingwall and Julie Selwyn

Yunfei Ma is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of international higher education.

Following his B.A. (First Class) at the University of Durham, Yunfei was awarded with MSc (Distinction) from the Department of Education, University of Oxford prior to his DPhil studies. He has also worked as a research assistant on the project Transnational academic mobility to global south: an exploratory study of international faculty in China.

Yunfei’s DPhil research focuses on global academic publishing and its relationship with knowledge formation, codification and dissemination. His research interest primarily lies in the geo-politics of knowledge production, global epistemic governance, China’s Humanities and Social Sciences research, and the philosophy of power.

Supervisors

Ariel Lindorff and Xin Xu

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Penny is a DPhil student whose research interests centre on classroom talk and international collaborations between secondary English classrooms.

Penny completed Oxford’s MSc in Learning and Teaching with distinction in 2019, focusing on methods for mitigating the impact of mind-wandering and misunderstanding as a means of enhancing student engagement in small-group and whole-class debates of interpretations of literature.  She has since won SHINE research funding to explore the impact of her methodology on students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Her DPhil continues her interest in student discussions of literature, exploring the impact on identity of online discussions between English classrooms in different countries.

Penny began her career as a secondary English Language Arts and journalism teacher in the USA but has taught secondary English predominantly in the UK in a career spanning 25 years.  She has overseen development of the global dimension and international collaboration at her current school for 14 years.

Supervisors

Victoria Elliott and Steven Puttick

Warda Arif is a doctoral student at the Department of Education. Her research aims to operationalise Critical Realist conceptions and methods to study Cultures of Higher Education in select Indian universities.

She completed her Master’s in Education and International Development from University College London’s – Institute of Education (UCL-IOE) as a Commonwealth Scholar and holds a B.Sc. in Biochemistry form Aligarh Muslim University (AMU).

Over her brief career, Warda has worked in the social development and impact sector in South Africa, India and Saudi Arabia, in teaching, research and advisory roles.

Supervisors

Dr Steven Puttick and Dr Aliya Khalid

Zak Devey is a passionate advocate for youth-led educational advocacy and equity – both within academia and in his work as co-founder of charitable trust Youth Arts New Zealand. In 2024, Zak continues to explore community conceptualisations of educational equity and their intersections with present and historic educational policy.

Zak also holds a deep care for youth-wellbeing, and its systemic determinants in the 21st century. His first publication, in the New Zealand Journal of Sociology, interrogates the ‘2021 World Happiness Report’ and that ways in which it constructs what it means to be happy.

Zak would be happy to hear from anyone looking to undertake a research journey in the Department, as well as scholars interested in educational equity, community-based participatory research, sociologies of well-being, and education in the political context of Aotearoa New Zealand.

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Pippa is a first-year DPhil student, whose research interests focus on vulnerable students’ outcomes and experiences of secondary school English education.

In 2023, Pippa completed an MSc in Learning and Teaching at the University of Oxford, researching pedagogical strategies for the teaching of emotionally challenging literature to students with experiences of trauma. Her DPhil research will build on this project, exploring looked after children’s engagement with English education, and their outcomes in the subject.

Alongside her research, Pippa continues to teach English in a secondary school; she is therefore passionate about collaborations between practice and research. Her project seeks to develop our understanding of looked after children’s experiences in English classrooms, in order to facilitate the development of strategies to support these vulnerable learners.

Supervisors

Nicole Dingwall and Julie Selwyn

Yunfei Ma is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of international higher education.

Following his B.A. (First Class) at the University of Durham, Yunfei was awarded with MSc (Distinction) from the Department of Education, University of Oxford prior to his DPhil studies. He has also worked as a research assistant on the project Transnational academic mobility to global south: an exploratory study of international faculty in China.

Yunfei’s DPhil research focuses on global academic publishing and its relationship with knowledge formation, codification and dissemination. His research interest primarily lies in the geo-politics of knowledge production, global epistemic governance, China’s Humanities and Social Sciences research, and the philosophy of power.

Supervisors

Ariel Lindorff and Xin Xu

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Penny is a DPhil student whose research interests centre on classroom talk and international collaborations between secondary English classrooms.

Penny completed Oxford’s MSc in Learning and Teaching with distinction in 2019, focusing on methods for mitigating the impact of mind-wandering and misunderstanding as a means of enhancing student engagement in small-group and whole-class debates of interpretations of literature.  She has since won SHINE research funding to explore the impact of her methodology on students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Her DPhil continues her interest in student discussions of literature, exploring the impact on identity of online discussions between English classrooms in different countries.

Penny began her career as a secondary English Language Arts and journalism teacher in the USA but has taught secondary English predominantly in the UK in a career spanning 25 years.  She has overseen development of the global dimension and international collaboration at her current school for 14 years.

Supervisors

Victoria Elliott and Steven Puttick

Warda Arif is a doctoral student at the Department of Education. Her research aims to operationalise Critical Realist conceptions and methods to study Cultures of Higher Education in select Indian universities.

She completed her Master’s in Education and International Development from University College London’s – Institute of Education (UCL-IOE) as a Commonwealth Scholar and holds a B.Sc. in Biochemistry form Aligarh Muslim University (AMU).

Over her brief career, Warda has worked in the social development and impact sector in South Africa, India and Saudi Arabia, in teaching, research and advisory roles.

Supervisors

Dr Steven Puttick and Dr Aliya Khalid

Zak Devey is a passionate advocate for youth-led educational advocacy and equity – both within academia and in his work as co-founder of charitable trust Youth Arts New Zealand. In 2024, Zak continues to explore community conceptualisations of educational equity and their intersections with present and historic educational policy.

Zak also holds a deep care for youth-wellbeing, and its systemic determinants in the 21st century. His first publication, in the New Zealand Journal of Sociology, interrogates the ‘2021 World Happiness Report’ and that ways in which it constructs what it means to be happy.

Zak would be happy to hear from anyone looking to undertake a research journey in the Department, as well as scholars interested in educational equity, community-based participatory research, sociologies of well-being, and education in the political context of Aotearoa New Zealand.

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Pippa is a first-year DPhil student, whose research interests focus on vulnerable students’ outcomes and experiences of secondary school English education.

In 2023, Pippa completed an MSc in Learning and Teaching at the University of Oxford, researching pedagogical strategies for the teaching of emotionally challenging literature to students with experiences of trauma. Her DPhil research will build on this project, exploring looked after children’s engagement with English education, and their outcomes in the subject.

Alongside her research, Pippa continues to teach English in a secondary school; she is therefore passionate about collaborations between practice and research. Her project seeks to develop our understanding of looked after children’s experiences in English classrooms, in order to facilitate the development of strategies to support these vulnerable learners.

Supervisors

Nicole Dingwall and Julie Selwyn

Yunfei Ma is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of international higher education.

Following his B.A. (First Class) at the University of Durham, Yunfei was awarded with MSc (Distinction) from the Department of Education, University of Oxford prior to his DPhil studies. He has also worked as a research assistant on the project Transnational academic mobility to global south: an exploratory study of international faculty in China.

Yunfei’s DPhil research focuses on global academic publishing and its relationship with knowledge formation, codification and dissemination. His research interest primarily lies in the geo-politics of knowledge production, global epistemic governance, China’s Humanities and Social Sciences research, and the philosophy of power.

Supervisors

Ariel Lindorff and Xin Xu

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Penny is a DPhil student whose research interests centre on classroom talk and international collaborations between secondary English classrooms.

Penny completed Oxford’s MSc in Learning and Teaching with distinction in 2019, focusing on methods for mitigating the impact of mind-wandering and misunderstanding as a means of enhancing student engagement in small-group and whole-class debates of interpretations of literature.  She has since won SHINE research funding to explore the impact of her methodology on students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Her DPhil continues her interest in student discussions of literature, exploring the impact on identity of online discussions between English classrooms in different countries.

Penny began her career as a secondary English Language Arts and journalism teacher in the USA but has taught secondary English predominantly in the UK in a career spanning 25 years.  She has overseen development of the global dimension and international collaboration at her current school for 14 years.

Supervisors

Victoria Elliott and Steven Puttick

Warda Arif is a doctoral student at the Department of Education. Her research aims to operationalise Critical Realist conceptions and methods to study Cultures of Higher Education in select Indian universities.

She completed her Master’s in Education and International Development from University College London’s – Institute of Education (UCL-IOE) as a Commonwealth Scholar and holds a B.Sc. in Biochemistry form Aligarh Muslim University (AMU).

Over her brief career, Warda has worked in the social development and impact sector in South Africa, India and Saudi Arabia, in teaching, research and advisory roles.

Supervisors

Dr Steven Puttick and Dr Aliya Khalid

Zak Devey is a passionate advocate for youth-led educational advocacy and equity – both within academia and in his work as co-founder of charitable trust Youth Arts New Zealand. In 2024, Zak continues to explore community conceptualisations of educational equity and their intersections with present and historic educational policy.

Zak also holds a deep care for youth-wellbeing, and its systemic determinants in the 21st century. His first publication, in the New Zealand Journal of Sociology, interrogates the ‘2021 World Happiness Report’ and that ways in which it constructs what it means to be happy.

Zak would be happy to hear from anyone looking to undertake a research journey in the Department, as well as scholars interested in educational equity, community-based participatory research, sociologies of well-being, and education in the political context of Aotearoa New Zealand.

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Pippa is a first-year DPhil student, whose research interests focus on vulnerable students’ outcomes and experiences of secondary school English education.

In 2023, Pippa completed an MSc in Learning and Teaching at the University of Oxford, researching pedagogical strategies for the teaching of emotionally challenging literature to students with experiences of trauma. Her DPhil research will build on this project, exploring looked after children’s engagement with English education, and their outcomes in the subject.

Alongside her research, Pippa continues to teach English in a secondary school; she is therefore passionate about collaborations between practice and research. Her project seeks to develop our understanding of looked after children’s experiences in English classrooms, in order to facilitate the development of strategies to support these vulnerable learners.

Supervisors

Nicole Dingwall and Julie Selwyn

Yunfei Ma is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of international higher education.

Following his B.A. (First Class) at the University of Durham, Yunfei was awarded with MSc (Distinction) from the Department of Education, University of Oxford prior to his DPhil studies. He has also worked as a research assistant on the project Transnational academic mobility to global south: an exploratory study of international faculty in China.

Yunfei’s DPhil research focuses on global academic publishing and its relationship with knowledge formation, codification and dissemination. His research interest primarily lies in the geo-politics of knowledge production, global epistemic governance, China’s Humanities and Social Sciences research, and the philosophy of power.

Supervisors

Ariel Lindorff and Xin Xu

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Penny is a DPhil student whose research interests centre on classroom talk and international collaborations between secondary English classrooms.

Penny completed Oxford’s MSc in Learning and Teaching with distinction in 2019, focusing on methods for mitigating the impact of mind-wandering and misunderstanding as a means of enhancing student engagement in small-group and whole-class debates of interpretations of literature.  She has since won SHINE research funding to explore the impact of her methodology on students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Her DPhil continues her interest in student discussions of literature, exploring the impact on identity of online discussions between English classrooms in different countries.

Penny began her career as a secondary English Language Arts and journalism teacher in the USA but has taught secondary English predominantly in the UK in a career spanning 25 years.  She has overseen development of the global dimension and international collaboration at her current school for 14 years.

Supervisors

Victoria Elliott and Steven Puttick

Warda Arif is a doctoral student at the Department of Education. Her research aims to operationalise Critical Realist conceptions and methods to study Cultures of Higher Education in select Indian universities.

She completed her Master’s in Education and International Development from University College London’s – Institute of Education (UCL-IOE) as a Commonwealth Scholar and holds a B.Sc. in Biochemistry form Aligarh Muslim University (AMU).

Over her brief career, Warda has worked in the social development and impact sector in South Africa, India and Saudi Arabia, in teaching, research and advisory roles.

Supervisors

Dr Steven Puttick and Dr Aliya Khalid

Zak Devey is a passionate advocate for youth-led educational advocacy and equity – both within academia and in his work as co-founder of charitable trust Youth Arts New Zealand. In 2024, Zak continues to explore community conceptualisations of educational equity and their intersections with present and historic educational policy.

Zak also holds a deep care for youth-wellbeing, and its systemic determinants in the 21st century. His first publication, in the New Zealand Journal of Sociology, interrogates the ‘2021 World Happiness Report’ and that ways in which it constructs what it means to be happy.

Zak would be happy to hear from anyone looking to undertake a research journey in the Department, as well as scholars interested in educational equity, community-based participatory research, sociologies of well-being, and education in the political context of Aotearoa New Zealand.

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Pippa is a first-year DPhil student, whose research interests focus on vulnerable students’ outcomes and experiences of secondary school English education.

In 2023, Pippa completed an MSc in Learning and Teaching at the University of Oxford, researching pedagogical strategies for the teaching of emotionally challenging literature to students with experiences of trauma. Her DPhil research will build on this project, exploring looked after children’s engagement with English education, and their outcomes in the subject.

Alongside her research, Pippa continues to teach English in a secondary school; she is therefore passionate about collaborations between practice and research. Her project seeks to develop our understanding of looked after children’s experiences in English classrooms, in order to facilitate the development of strategies to support these vulnerable learners.

Supervisors

Nicole Dingwall and Julie Selwyn

Yunfei Ma is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of international higher education.

Following his B.A. (First Class) at the University of Durham, Yunfei was awarded with MSc (Distinction) from the Department of Education, University of Oxford prior to his DPhil studies. He has also worked as a research assistant on the project Transnational academic mobility to global south: an exploratory study of international faculty in China.

Yunfei’s DPhil research focuses on global academic publishing and its relationship with knowledge formation, codification and dissemination. His research interest primarily lies in the geo-politics of knowledge production, global epistemic governance, China’s Humanities and Social Sciences research, and the philosophy of power.

Supervisors

Ariel Lindorff and Xin Xu

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Penny is a DPhil student whose research interests centre on classroom talk and international collaborations between secondary English classrooms.

Penny completed Oxford’s MSc in Learning and Teaching with distinction in 2019, focusing on methods for mitigating the impact of mind-wandering and misunderstanding as a means of enhancing student engagement in small-group and whole-class debates of interpretations of literature.  She has since won SHINE research funding to explore the impact of her methodology on students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Her DPhil continues her interest in student discussions of literature, exploring the impact on identity of online discussions between English classrooms in different countries.

Penny began her career as a secondary English Language Arts and journalism teacher in the USA but has taught secondary English predominantly in the UK in a career spanning 25 years.  She has overseen development of the global dimension and international collaboration at her current school for 14 years.

Supervisors

Victoria Elliott and Steven Puttick

Warda Arif is a doctoral student at the Department of Education. Her research aims to operationalise Critical Realist conceptions and methods to study Cultures of Higher Education in select Indian universities.

She completed her Master’s in Education and International Development from University College London’s – Institute of Education (UCL-IOE) as a Commonwealth Scholar and holds a B.Sc. in Biochemistry form Aligarh Muslim University (AMU).

Over her brief career, Warda has worked in the social development and impact sector in South Africa, India and Saudi Arabia, in teaching, research and advisory roles.

Supervisors

Dr Steven Puttick and Dr Aliya Khalid

Zak Devey is a passionate advocate for youth-led educational advocacy and equity – both within academia and in his work as co-founder of charitable trust Youth Arts New Zealand. In 2024, Zak continues to explore community conceptualisations of educational equity and their intersections with present and historic educational policy.

Zak also holds a deep care for youth-wellbeing, and its systemic determinants in the 21st century. His first publication, in the New Zealand Journal of Sociology, interrogates the ‘2021 World Happiness Report’ and that ways in which it constructs what it means to be happy.

Zak would be happy to hear from anyone looking to undertake a research journey in the Department, as well as scholars interested in educational equity, community-based participatory research, sociologies of well-being, and education in the political context of Aotearoa New Zealand.

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Pippa is a first-year DPhil student, whose research interests focus on vulnerable students’ outcomes and experiences of secondary school English education.

In 2023, Pippa completed an MSc in Learning and Teaching at the University of Oxford, researching pedagogical strategies for the teaching of emotionally challenging literature to students with experiences of trauma. Her DPhil research will build on this project, exploring looked after children’s engagement with English education, and their outcomes in the subject.

Alongside her research, Pippa continues to teach English in a secondary school; she is therefore passionate about collaborations between practice and research. Her project seeks to develop our understanding of looked after children’s experiences in English classrooms, in order to facilitate the development of strategies to support these vulnerable learners.

Supervisors

Nicole Dingwall and Julie Selwyn

Yunfei Ma is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of international higher education.

Following his B.A. (First Class) at the University of Durham, Yunfei was awarded with MSc (Distinction) from the Department of Education, University of Oxford prior to his DPhil studies. He has also worked as a research assistant on the project Transnational academic mobility to global south: an exploratory study of international faculty in China.

Yunfei’s DPhil research focuses on global academic publishing and its relationship with knowledge formation, codification and dissemination. His research interest primarily lies in the geo-politics of knowledge production, global epistemic governance, China’s Humanities and Social Sciences research, and the philosophy of power.

Supervisors

Ariel Lindorff and Xin Xu

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Penny is a DPhil student whose research interests centre on classroom talk and international collaborations between secondary English classrooms.

Penny completed Oxford’s MSc in Learning and Teaching with distinction in 2019, focusing on methods for mitigating the impact of mind-wandering and misunderstanding as a means of enhancing student engagement in small-group and whole-class debates of interpretations of literature.  She has since won SHINE research funding to explore the impact of her methodology on students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Her DPhil continues her interest in student discussions of literature, exploring the impact on identity of online discussions between English classrooms in different countries.

Penny began her career as a secondary English Language Arts and journalism teacher in the USA but has taught secondary English predominantly in the UK in a career spanning 25 years.  She has overseen development of the global dimension and international collaboration at her current school for 14 years.

Supervisors

Victoria Elliott and Steven Puttick

Warda Arif is a doctoral student at the Department of Education. Her research aims to operationalise Critical Realist conceptions and methods to study Cultures of Higher Education in select Indian universities.

She completed her Master’s in Education and International Development from University College London’s – Institute of Education (UCL-IOE) as a Commonwealth Scholar and holds a B.Sc. in Biochemistry form Aligarh Muslim University (AMU).

Over her brief career, Warda has worked in the social development and impact sector in South Africa, India and Saudi Arabia, in teaching, research and advisory roles.

Supervisors

Dr Steven Puttick and Dr Aliya Khalid

Zak Devey is a passionate advocate for youth-led educational advocacy and equity – both within academia and in his work as co-founder of charitable trust Youth Arts New Zealand. In 2024, Zak continues to explore community conceptualisations of educational equity and their intersections with present and historic educational policy.

Zak also holds a deep care for youth-wellbeing, and its systemic determinants in the 21st century. His first publication, in the New Zealand Journal of Sociology, interrogates the ‘2021 World Happiness Report’ and that ways in which it constructs what it means to be happy.

Zak would be happy to hear from anyone looking to undertake a research journey in the Department, as well as scholars interested in educational equity, community-based participatory research, sociologies of well-being, and education in the political context of Aotearoa New Zealand.

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Pippa is a first-year DPhil student, whose research interests focus on vulnerable students’ outcomes and experiences of secondary school English education.

In 2023, Pippa completed an MSc in Learning and Teaching at the University of Oxford, researching pedagogical strategies for the teaching of emotionally challenging literature to students with experiences of trauma. Her DPhil research will build on this project, exploring looked after children’s engagement with English education, and their outcomes in the subject.

Alongside her research, Pippa continues to teach English in a secondary school; she is therefore passionate about collaborations between practice and research. Her project seeks to develop our understanding of looked after children’s experiences in English classrooms, in order to facilitate the development of strategies to support these vulnerable learners.

Supervisors

Nicole Dingwall and Julie Selwyn

Yunfei Ma is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of international higher education.

Following his B.A. (First Class) at the University of Durham, Yunfei was awarded with MSc (Distinction) from the Department of Education, University of Oxford prior to his DPhil studies. He has also worked as a research assistant on the project Transnational academic mobility to global south: an exploratory study of international faculty in China.

Yunfei’s DPhil research focuses on global academic publishing and its relationship with knowledge formation, codification and dissemination. His research interest primarily lies in the geo-politics of knowledge production, global epistemic governance, China’s Humanities and Social Sciences research, and the philosophy of power.

Supervisors

Ariel Lindorff and Xin Xu

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Penny is a DPhil student whose research interests centre on classroom talk and international collaborations between secondary English classrooms.

Penny completed Oxford’s MSc in Learning and Teaching with distinction in 2019, focusing on methods for mitigating the impact of mind-wandering and misunderstanding as a means of enhancing student engagement in small-group and whole-class debates of interpretations of literature.  She has since won SHINE research funding to explore the impact of her methodology on students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Her DPhil continues her interest in student discussions of literature, exploring the impact on identity of online discussions between English classrooms in different countries.

Penny began her career as a secondary English Language Arts and journalism teacher in the USA but has taught secondary English predominantly in the UK in a career spanning 25 years.  She has overseen development of the global dimension and international collaboration at her current school for 14 years.

Supervisors

Victoria Elliott and Steven Puttick

Warda Arif is a doctoral student at the Department of Education. Her research aims to operationalise Critical Realist conceptions and methods to study Cultures of Higher Education in select Indian universities.

She completed her Master’s in Education and International Development from University College London’s – Institute of Education (UCL-IOE) as a Commonwealth Scholar and holds a B.Sc. in Biochemistry form Aligarh Muslim University (AMU).

Over her brief career, Warda has worked in the social development and impact sector in South Africa, India and Saudi Arabia, in teaching, research and advisory roles.

Supervisors

Dr Steven Puttick and Dr Aliya Khalid

Zak Devey is a passionate advocate for youth-led educational advocacy and equity – both within academia and in his work as co-founder of charitable trust Youth Arts New Zealand. In 2024, Zak continues to explore community conceptualisations of educational equity and their intersections with present and historic educational policy.

Zak also holds a deep care for youth-wellbeing, and its systemic determinants in the 21st century. His first publication, in the New Zealand Journal of Sociology, interrogates the ‘2021 World Happiness Report’ and that ways in which it constructs what it means to be happy.

Zak would be happy to hear from anyone looking to undertake a research journey in the Department, as well as scholars interested in educational equity, community-based participatory research, sociologies of well-being, and education in the political context of Aotearoa New Zealand.

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Pippa is a first-year DPhil student, whose research interests focus on vulnerable students’ outcomes and experiences of secondary school English education.

In 2023, Pippa completed an MSc in Learning and Teaching at the University of Oxford, researching pedagogical strategies for the teaching of emotionally challenging literature to students with experiences of trauma. Her DPhil research will build on this project, exploring looked after children’s engagement with English education, and their outcomes in the subject.

Alongside her research, Pippa continues to teach English in a secondary school; she is therefore passionate about collaborations between practice and research. Her project seeks to develop our understanding of looked after children’s experiences in English classrooms, in order to facilitate the development of strategies to support these vulnerable learners.

Supervisors

Nicole Dingwall and Julie Selwyn

Yunfei Ma is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of international higher education.

Following his B.A. (First Class) at the University of Durham, Yunfei was awarded with MSc (Distinction) from the Department of Education, University of Oxford prior to his DPhil studies. He has also worked as a research assistant on the project Transnational academic mobility to global south: an exploratory study of international faculty in China.

Yunfei’s DPhil research focuses on global academic publishing and its relationship with knowledge formation, codification and dissemination. His research interest primarily lies in the geo-politics of knowledge production, global epistemic governance, China’s Humanities and Social Sciences research, and the philosophy of power.

Supervisors

Ariel Lindorff and Xin Xu

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Penny is a DPhil student whose research interests centre on classroom talk and international collaborations between secondary English classrooms.

Penny completed Oxford’s MSc in Learning and Teaching with distinction in 2019, focusing on methods for mitigating the impact of mind-wandering and misunderstanding as a means of enhancing student engagement in small-group and whole-class debates of interpretations of literature.  She has since won SHINE research funding to explore the impact of her methodology on students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Her DPhil continues her interest in student discussions of literature, exploring the impact on identity of online discussions between English classrooms in different countries.

Penny began her career as a secondary English Language Arts and journalism teacher in the USA but has taught secondary English predominantly in the UK in a career spanning 25 years.  She has overseen development of the global dimension and international collaboration at her current school for 14 years.

Supervisors

Victoria Elliott and Steven Puttick

Warda Arif is a doctoral student at the Department of Education. Her research aims to operationalise Critical Realist conceptions and methods to study Cultures of Higher Education in select Indian universities.

She completed her Master’s in Education and International Development from University College London’s – Institute of Education (UCL-IOE) as a Commonwealth Scholar and holds a B.Sc. in Biochemistry form Aligarh Muslim University (AMU).

Over her brief career, Warda has worked in the social development and impact sector in South Africa, India and Saudi Arabia, in teaching, research and advisory roles.

Supervisors

Dr Steven Puttick and Dr Aliya Khalid

Zak Devey is a passionate advocate for youth-led educational advocacy and equity – both within academia and in his work as co-founder of charitable trust Youth Arts New Zealand. In 2024, Zak continues to explore community conceptualisations of educational equity and their intersections with present and historic educational policy.

Zak also holds a deep care for youth-wellbeing, and its systemic determinants in the 21st century. His first publication, in the New Zealand Journal of Sociology, interrogates the ‘2021 World Happiness Report’ and that ways in which it constructs what it means to be happy.

Zak would be happy to hear from anyone looking to undertake a research journey in the Department, as well as scholars interested in educational equity, community-based participatory research, sociologies of well-being, and education in the political context of Aotearoa New Zealand.

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Pippa is a first-year DPhil student, whose research interests focus on vulnerable students’ outcomes and experiences of secondary school English education.

In 2023, Pippa completed an MSc in Learning and Teaching at the University of Oxford, researching pedagogical strategies for the teaching of emotionally challenging literature to students with experiences of trauma. Her DPhil research will build on this project, exploring looked after children’s engagement with English education, and their outcomes in the subject.

Alongside her research, Pippa continues to teach English in a secondary school; she is therefore passionate about collaborations between practice and research. Her project seeks to develop our understanding of looked after children’s experiences in English classrooms, in order to facilitate the development of strategies to support these vulnerable learners.

Supervisors

Nicole Dingwall and Julie Selwyn

Yunfei Ma is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of international higher education.

Following his B.A. (First Class) at the University of Durham, Yunfei was awarded with MSc (Distinction) from the Department of Education, University of Oxford prior to his DPhil studies. He has also worked as a research assistant on the project Transnational academic mobility to global south: an exploratory study of international faculty in China.

Yunfei’s DPhil research focuses on global academic publishing and its relationship with knowledge formation, codification and dissemination. His research interest primarily lies in the geo-politics of knowledge production, global epistemic governance, China’s Humanities and Social Sciences research, and the philosophy of power.

Supervisors

Ariel Lindorff and Xin Xu

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Penny is a DPhil student whose research interests centre on classroom talk and international collaborations between secondary English classrooms.

Penny completed Oxford’s MSc in Learning and Teaching with distinction in 2019, focusing on methods for mitigating the impact of mind-wandering and misunderstanding as a means of enhancing student engagement in small-group and whole-class debates of interpretations of literature.  She has since won SHINE research funding to explore the impact of her methodology on students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Her DPhil continues her interest in student discussions of literature, exploring the impact on identity of online discussions between English classrooms in different countries.

Penny began her career as a secondary English Language Arts and journalism teacher in the USA but has taught secondary English predominantly in the UK in a career spanning 25 years.  She has overseen development of the global dimension and international collaboration at her current school for 14 years.

Supervisors

Victoria Elliott and Steven Puttick

Warda Arif is a doctoral student at the Department of Education. Her research aims to operationalise Critical Realist conceptions and methods to study Cultures of Higher Education in select Indian universities.

She completed her Master’s in Education and International Development from University College London’s – Institute of Education (UCL-IOE) as a Commonwealth Scholar and holds a B.Sc. in Biochemistry form Aligarh Muslim University (AMU).

Over her brief career, Warda has worked in the social development and impact sector in South Africa, India and Saudi Arabia, in teaching, research and advisory roles.

Supervisors

Dr Steven Puttick and Dr Aliya Khalid

Zak Devey is a passionate advocate for youth-led educational advocacy and equity – both within academia and in his work as co-founder of charitable trust Youth Arts New Zealand. In 2024, Zak continues to explore community conceptualisations of educational equity and their intersections with present and historic educational policy.

Zak also holds a deep care for youth-wellbeing, and its systemic determinants in the 21st century. His first publication, in the New Zealand Journal of Sociology, interrogates the ‘2021 World Happiness Report’ and that ways in which it constructs what it means to be happy.

Zak would be happy to hear from anyone looking to undertake a research journey in the Department, as well as scholars interested in educational equity, community-based participatory research, sociologies of well-being, and education in the political context of Aotearoa New Zealand.

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Pippa is a first-year DPhil student, whose research interests focus on vulnerable students’ outcomes and experiences of secondary school English education.

In 2023, Pippa completed an MSc in Learning and Teaching at the University of Oxford, researching pedagogical strategies for the teaching of emotionally challenging literature to students with experiences of trauma. Her DPhil research will build on this project, exploring looked after children’s engagement with English education, and their outcomes in the subject.

Alongside her research, Pippa continues to teach English in a secondary school; she is therefore passionate about collaborations between practice and research. Her project seeks to develop our understanding of looked after children’s experiences in English classrooms, in order to facilitate the development of strategies to support these vulnerable learners.

Supervisors

Nicole Dingwall and Julie Selwyn

Yunfei Ma is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of international higher education.

Following his B.A. (First Class) at the University of Durham, Yunfei was awarded with MSc (Distinction) from the Department of Education, University of Oxford prior to his DPhil studies. He has also worked as a research assistant on the project Transnational academic mobility to global south: an exploratory study of international faculty in China.

Yunfei’s DPhil research focuses on global academic publishing and its relationship with knowledge formation, codification and dissemination. His research interest primarily lies in the geo-politics of knowledge production, global epistemic governance, China’s Humanities and Social Sciences research, and the philosophy of power.

Supervisors

Ariel Lindorff and Xin Xu

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Penny is a DPhil student whose research interests centre on classroom talk and international collaborations between secondary English classrooms.

Penny completed Oxford’s MSc in Learning and Teaching with distinction in 2019, focusing on methods for mitigating the impact of mind-wandering and misunderstanding as a means of enhancing student engagement in small-group and whole-class debates of interpretations of literature.  She has since won SHINE research funding to explore the impact of her methodology on students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Her DPhil continues her interest in student discussions of literature, exploring the impact on identity of online discussions between English classrooms in different countries.

Penny began her career as a secondary English Language Arts and journalism teacher in the USA but has taught secondary English predominantly in the UK in a career spanning 25 years.  She has overseen development of the global dimension and international collaboration at her current school for 14 years.

Supervisors

Victoria Elliott and Steven Puttick

Warda Arif is a doctoral student at the Department of Education. Her research aims to operationalise Critical Realist conceptions and methods to study Cultures of Higher Education in select Indian universities.

She completed her Master’s in Education and International Development from University College London’s – Institute of Education (UCL-IOE) as a Commonwealth Scholar and holds a B.Sc. in Biochemistry form Aligarh Muslim University (AMU).

Over her brief career, Warda has worked in the social development and impact sector in South Africa, India and Saudi Arabia, in teaching, research and advisory roles.

Supervisors

Dr Steven Puttick and Dr Aliya Khalid

Zak Devey is a passionate advocate for youth-led educational advocacy and equity – both within academia and in his work as co-founder of charitable trust Youth Arts New Zealand. In 2024, Zak continues to explore community conceptualisations of educational equity and their intersections with present and historic educational policy.

Zak also holds a deep care for youth-wellbeing, and its systemic determinants in the 21st century. His first publication, in the New Zealand Journal of Sociology, interrogates the ‘2021 World Happiness Report’ and that ways in which it constructs what it means to be happy.

Zak would be happy to hear from anyone looking to undertake a research journey in the Department, as well as scholars interested in educational equity, community-based participatory research, sociologies of well-being, and education in the political context of Aotearoa New Zealand.

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Pippa is a first-year DPhil student, whose research interests focus on vulnerable students’ outcomes and experiences of secondary school English education.

In 2023, Pippa completed an MSc in Learning and Teaching at the University of Oxford, researching pedagogical strategies for the teaching of emotionally challenging literature to students with experiences of trauma. Her DPhil research will build on this project, exploring looked after children’s engagement with English education, and their outcomes in the subject.

Alongside her research, Pippa continues to teach English in a secondary school; she is therefore passionate about collaborations between practice and research. Her project seeks to develop our understanding of looked after children’s experiences in English classrooms, in order to facilitate the development of strategies to support these vulnerable learners.

Supervisors

Nicole Dingwall and Julie Selwyn

Yunfei Ma is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of international higher education.

Following his B.A. (First Class) at the University of Durham, Yunfei was awarded with MSc (Distinction) from the Department of Education, University of Oxford prior to his DPhil studies. He has also worked as a research assistant on the project Transnational academic mobility to global south: an exploratory study of international faculty in China.

Yunfei’s DPhil research focuses on global academic publishing and its relationship with knowledge formation, codification and dissemination. His research interest primarily lies in the geo-politics of knowledge production, global epistemic governance, China’s Humanities and Social Sciences research, and the philosophy of power.

Supervisors

Ariel Lindorff and Xin Xu

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Penny is a DPhil student whose research interests centre on classroom talk and international collaborations between secondary English classrooms.

Penny completed Oxford’s MSc in Learning and Teaching with distinction in 2019, focusing on methods for mitigating the impact of mind-wandering and misunderstanding as a means of enhancing student engagement in small-group and whole-class debates of interpretations of literature.  She has since won SHINE research funding to explore the impact of her methodology on students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Her DPhil continues her interest in student discussions of literature, exploring the impact on identity of online discussions between English classrooms in different countries.

Penny began her career as a secondary English Language Arts and journalism teacher in the USA but has taught secondary English predominantly in the UK in a career spanning 25 years.  She has overseen development of the global dimension and international collaboration at her current school for 14 years.

Supervisors

Victoria Elliott and Steven Puttick

Warda Arif is a doctoral student at the Department of Education. Her research aims to operationalise Critical Realist conceptions and methods to study Cultures of Higher Education in select Indian universities.

She completed her Master’s in Education and International Development from University College London’s – Institute of Education (UCL-IOE) as a Commonwealth Scholar and holds a B.Sc. in Biochemistry form Aligarh Muslim University (AMU).

Over her brief career, Warda has worked in the social development and impact sector in South Africa, India and Saudi Arabia, in teaching, research and advisory roles.

Supervisors

Dr Steven Puttick and Dr Aliya Khalid

Zak Devey is a passionate advocate for youth-led educational advocacy and equity – both within academia and in his work as co-founder of charitable trust Youth Arts New Zealand. In 2024, Zak continues to explore community conceptualisations of educational equity and their intersections with present and historic educational policy.

Zak also holds a deep care for youth-wellbeing, and its systemic determinants in the 21st century. His first publication, in the New Zealand Journal of Sociology, interrogates the ‘2021 World Happiness Report’ and that ways in which it constructs what it means to be happy.

Zak would be happy to hear from anyone looking to undertake a research journey in the Department, as well as scholars interested in educational equity, community-based participatory research, sociologies of well-being, and education in the political context of Aotearoa New Zealand.

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Pippa is a first-year DPhil student, whose research interests focus on vulnerable students’ outcomes and experiences of secondary school English education.

In 2023, Pippa completed an MSc in Learning and Teaching at the University of Oxford, researching pedagogical strategies for the teaching of emotionally challenging literature to students with experiences of trauma. Her DPhil research will build on this project, exploring looked after children’s engagement with English education, and their outcomes in the subject.

Alongside her research, Pippa continues to teach English in a secondary school; she is therefore passionate about collaborations between practice and research. Her project seeks to develop our understanding of looked after children’s experiences in English classrooms, in order to facilitate the development of strategies to support these vulnerable learners.

Supervisors

Nicole Dingwall and Julie Selwyn

Yunfei Ma is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of international higher education.

Following his B.A. (First Class) at the University of Durham, Yunfei was awarded with MSc (Distinction) from the Department of Education, University of Oxford prior to his DPhil studies. He has also worked as a research assistant on the project Transnational academic mobility to global south: an exploratory study of international faculty in China.

Yunfei’s DPhil research focuses on global academic publishing and its relationship with knowledge formation, codification and dissemination. His research interest primarily lies in the geo-politics of knowledge production, global epistemic governance, China’s Humanities and Social Sciences research, and the philosophy of power.

Supervisors

Ariel Lindorff and Xin Xu

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Penny is a DPhil student whose research interests centre on classroom talk and international collaborations between secondary English classrooms.

Penny completed Oxford’s MSc in Learning and Teaching with distinction in 2019, focusing on methods for mitigating the impact of mind-wandering and misunderstanding as a means of enhancing student engagement in small-group and whole-class debates of interpretations of literature.  She has since won SHINE research funding to explore the impact of her methodology on students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Her DPhil continues her interest in student discussions of literature, exploring the impact on identity of online discussions between English classrooms in different countries.

Penny began her career as a secondary English Language Arts and journalism teacher in the USA but has taught secondary English predominantly in the UK in a career spanning 25 years.  She has overseen development of the global dimension and international collaboration at her current school for 14 years.

Supervisors

Victoria Elliott and Steven Puttick

Warda Arif is a doctoral student at the Department of Education. Her research aims to operationalise Critical Realist conceptions and methods to study Cultures of Higher Education in select Indian universities.

She completed her Master’s in Education and International Development from University College London’s – Institute of Education (UCL-IOE) as a Commonwealth Scholar and holds a B.Sc. in Biochemistry form Aligarh Muslim University (AMU).

Over her brief career, Warda has worked in the social development and impact sector in South Africa, India and Saudi Arabia, in teaching, research and advisory roles.

Supervisors

Dr Steven Puttick and Dr Aliya Khalid

Zak Devey is a passionate advocate for youth-led educational advocacy and equity – both within academia and in his work as co-founder of charitable trust Youth Arts New Zealand. In 2024, Zak continues to explore community conceptualisations of educational equity and their intersections with present and historic educational policy.

Zak also holds a deep care for youth-wellbeing, and its systemic determinants in the 21st century. His first publication, in the New Zealand Journal of Sociology, interrogates the ‘2021 World Happiness Report’ and that ways in which it constructs what it means to be happy.

Zak would be happy to hear from anyone looking to undertake a research journey in the Department, as well as scholars interested in educational equity, community-based participatory research, sociologies of well-being, and education in the political context of Aotearoa New Zealand.

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Pippa is a first-year DPhil student, whose research interests focus on vulnerable students’ outcomes and experiences of secondary school English education.

In 2023, Pippa completed an MSc in Learning and Teaching at the University of Oxford, researching pedagogical strategies for the teaching of emotionally challenging literature to students with experiences of trauma. Her DPhil research will build on this project, exploring looked after children’s engagement with English education, and their outcomes in the subject.

Alongside her research, Pippa continues to teach English in a secondary school; she is therefore passionate about collaborations between practice and research. Her project seeks to develop our understanding of looked after children’s experiences in English classrooms, in order to facilitate the development of strategies to support these vulnerable learners.

Supervisors

Nicole Dingwall and Julie Selwyn

Yunfei Ma is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of international higher education.

Following his B.A. (First Class) at the University of Durham, Yunfei was awarded with MSc (Distinction) from the Department of Education, University of Oxford prior to his DPhil studies. He has also worked as a research assistant on the project Transnational academic mobility to global south: an exploratory study of international faculty in China.

Yunfei’s DPhil research focuses on global academic publishing and its relationship with knowledge formation, codification and dissemination. His research interest primarily lies in the geo-politics of knowledge production, global epistemic governance, China’s Humanities and Social Sciences research, and the philosophy of power.

Supervisors

Ariel Lindorff and Xin Xu

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Penny is a DPhil student whose research interests centre on classroom talk and international collaborations between secondary English classrooms.

Penny completed Oxford’s MSc in Learning and Teaching with distinction in 2019, focusing on methods for mitigating the impact of mind-wandering and misunderstanding as a means of enhancing student engagement in small-group and whole-class debates of interpretations of literature.  She has since won SHINE research funding to explore the impact of her methodology on students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Her DPhil continues her interest in student discussions of literature, exploring the impact on identity of online discussions between English classrooms in different countries.

Penny began her career as a secondary English Language Arts and journalism teacher in the USA but has taught secondary English predominantly in the UK in a career spanning 25 years.  She has overseen development of the global dimension and international collaboration at her current school for 14 years.

Supervisors

Victoria Elliott and Steven Puttick

Warda Arif is a doctoral student at the Department of Education. Her research aims to operationalise Critical Realist conceptions and methods to study Cultures of Higher Education in select Indian universities.

She completed her Master’s in Education and International Development from University College London’s – Institute of Education (UCL-IOE) as a Commonwealth Scholar and holds a B.Sc. in Biochemistry form Aligarh Muslim University (AMU).

Over her brief career, Warda has worked in the social development and impact sector in South Africa, India and Saudi Arabia, in teaching, research and advisory roles.

Supervisors

Dr Steven Puttick and Dr Aliya Khalid

Zak Devey is a passionate advocate for youth-led educational advocacy and equity – both within academia and in his work as co-founder of charitable trust Youth Arts New Zealand. In 2024, Zak continues to explore community conceptualisations of educational equity and their intersections with present and historic educational policy.

Zak also holds a deep care for youth-wellbeing, and its systemic determinants in the 21st century. His first publication, in the New Zealand Journal of Sociology, interrogates the ‘2021 World Happiness Report’ and that ways in which it constructs what it means to be happy.

Zak would be happy to hear from anyone looking to undertake a research journey in the Department, as well as scholars interested in educational equity, community-based participatory research, sociologies of well-being, and education in the political context of Aotearoa New Zealand.

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Pippa is a first-year DPhil student, whose research interests focus on vulnerable students’ outcomes and experiences of secondary school English education.

In 2023, Pippa completed an MSc in Learning and Teaching at the University of Oxford, researching pedagogical strategies for the teaching of emotionally challenging literature to students with experiences of trauma. Her DPhil research will build on this project, exploring looked after children’s engagement with English education, and their outcomes in the subject.

Alongside her research, Pippa continues to teach English in a secondary school; she is therefore passionate about collaborations between practice and research. Her project seeks to develop our understanding of looked after children’s experiences in English classrooms, in order to facilitate the development of strategies to support these vulnerable learners.

Supervisors

Nicole Dingwall and Julie Selwyn

Yunfei Ma is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of international higher education.

Following his B.A. (First Class) at the University of Durham, Yunfei was awarded with MSc (Distinction) from the Department of Education, University of Oxford prior to his DPhil studies. He has also worked as a research assistant on the project Transnational academic mobility to global south: an exploratory study of international faculty in China.

Yunfei’s DPhil research focuses on global academic publishing and its relationship with knowledge formation, codification and dissemination. His research interest primarily lies in the geo-politics of knowledge production, global epistemic governance, China’s Humanities and Social Sciences research, and the philosophy of power.

Supervisors

Ariel Lindorff and Xin Xu

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Penny is a DPhil student whose research interests centre on classroom talk and international collaborations between secondary English classrooms.

Penny completed Oxford’s MSc in Learning and Teaching with distinction in 2019, focusing on methods for mitigating the impact of mind-wandering and misunderstanding as a means of enhancing student engagement in small-group and whole-class debates of interpretations of literature.  She has since won SHINE research funding to explore the impact of her methodology on students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Her DPhil continues her interest in student discussions of literature, exploring the impact on identity of online discussions between English classrooms in different countries.

Penny began her career as a secondary English Language Arts and journalism teacher in the USA but has taught secondary English predominantly in the UK in a career spanning 25 years.  She has overseen development of the global dimension and international collaboration at her current school for 14 years.

Supervisors

Victoria Elliott and Steven Puttick

Warda Arif is a doctoral student at the Department of Education. Her research aims to operationalise Critical Realist conceptions and methods to study Cultures of Higher Education in select Indian universities.

She completed her Master’s in Education and International Development from University College London’s – Institute of Education (UCL-IOE) as a Commonwealth Scholar and holds a B.Sc. in Biochemistry form Aligarh Muslim University (AMU).

Over her brief career, Warda has worked in the social development and impact sector in South Africa, India and Saudi Arabia, in teaching, research and advisory roles.

Supervisors

Dr Steven Puttick and Dr Aliya Khalid

Zak Devey is a passionate advocate for youth-led educational advocacy and equity – both within academia and in his work as co-founder of charitable trust Youth Arts New Zealand. In 2024, Zak continues to explore community conceptualisations of educational equity and their intersections with present and historic educational policy.

Zak also holds a deep care for youth-wellbeing, and its systemic determinants in the 21st century. His first publication, in the New Zealand Journal of Sociology, interrogates the ‘2021 World Happiness Report’ and that ways in which it constructs what it means to be happy.

Zak would be happy to hear from anyone looking to undertake a research journey in the Department, as well as scholars interested in educational equity, community-based participatory research, sociologies of well-being, and education in the political context of Aotearoa New Zealand.

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Pippa is a first-year DPhil student, whose research interests focus on vulnerable students’ outcomes and experiences of secondary school English education.

In 2023, Pippa completed an MSc in Learning and Teaching at the University of Oxford, researching pedagogical strategies for the teaching of emotionally challenging literature to students with experiences of trauma. Her DPhil research will build on this project, exploring looked after children’s engagement with English education, and their outcomes in the subject.

Alongside her research, Pippa continues to teach English in a secondary school; she is therefore passionate about collaborations between practice and research. Her project seeks to develop our understanding of looked after children’s experiences in English classrooms, in order to facilitate the development of strategies to support these vulnerable learners.

Supervisors

Nicole Dingwall and Julie Selwyn

Yunfei Ma is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of international higher education.

Following his B.A. (First Class) at the University of Durham, Yunfei was awarded with MSc (Distinction) from the Department of Education, University of Oxford prior to his DPhil studies. He has also worked as a research assistant on the project Transnational academic mobility to global south: an exploratory study of international faculty in China.

Yunfei’s DPhil research focuses on global academic publishing and its relationship with knowledge formation, codification and dissemination. His research interest primarily lies in the geo-politics of knowledge production, global epistemic governance, China’s Humanities and Social Sciences research, and the philosophy of power.

Supervisors

Ariel Lindorff and Xin Xu

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Penny is a DPhil student whose research interests centre on classroom talk and international collaborations between secondary English classrooms.

Penny completed Oxford’s MSc in Learning and Teaching with distinction in 2019, focusing on methods for mitigating the impact of mind-wandering and misunderstanding as a means of enhancing student engagement in small-group and whole-class debates of interpretations of literature.  She has since won SHINE research funding to explore the impact of her methodology on students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Her DPhil continues her interest in student discussions of literature, exploring the impact on identity of online discussions between English classrooms in different countries.

Penny began her career as a secondary English Language Arts and journalism teacher in the USA but has taught secondary English predominantly in the UK in a career spanning 25 years.  She has overseen development of the global dimension and international collaboration at her current school for 14 years.

Supervisors

Victoria Elliott and Steven Puttick

Warda Arif is a doctoral student at the Department of Education. Her research aims to operationalise C