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Alice Aldinucci is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford, Department of Education. She is part of the team working on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani, and she is a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group.

She holds a PhD in Education from the University of Glasgow (UK) where she was awarded the LKAS Interdisciplinary Scholarship. Her thesis applies a longitudinal qualitative research design and draws on the combination of Critical Realism and Capability Approach to explore aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to adulthood in Chile. Prior to her PhD, she completed a MA in International Education and Development from the University of Sussex (UK) where she was awarded the Centre for International Education Prize for the best overall MA performance. For her MA at Sussex, she conducted an empirical dissertation on the meaning making of Inclusive Education in Nepal. She holds a MA in Languages and Cultures for International Communication and Cooperation from the University of Milan (Italy) with a fieldwork research on tensions between policy and practice in bilingual multicultural education for indigenous students in Higher Education in Peru; and a BA in Languages and Intercultural Mediation from the University of Arezzo (Italy).

Alice’s research interests are interdisciplinary and relate to the critical linkages between intersecting inequalities, education, individual/societal development, and social justice at local and global levels, motivated by the question what education for what/whose development?

Areas, theoretical approaches and methodologies of interests:
• Sociology of education including aspirations in post-school transitions
• Cultural political economy of education and life chances/human flourishing/social justice
• Tensions between global educational frameworks and local knowledge and practices
• Critical Realism
• Capability Approach
• Qualitative and participatory methodologies
• Digital storytelling for social change

Besides her work in academia, Alice has gained experience as researcher, development practitioner and educator working in projects including early childhood education programmes, refugees’ education, girls’ education, SEN and inclusive education, TVET, global citizenship education, arts-based pedagogies. She lived and worked in different countries including in Nepal (a country she has developed a strong bond with), Tanzania, El Salvador, Italy and the UK. These experiences have reinforced her critical approach to international education and global development and to education as a catalyst for both inequalities, injustices, violence and more equitable social change and peace-building processes.

She served as Student Representative of the British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) from 2017 to 2019 and she is currently part of the college of reviewers of the editorial board of Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education.

Publications:

Aldinucci, A. (2022). Understanding aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to postschool trajectories in Chile. PhD thesis, University of Glasgow.
Aldinucci, A., Valiente, O., Hurrell S., and Zancajo, A. (2021). Understanding aspirations: Why do secondary TVET students aim so high in Chile? Journal of Vocational Education & Training.

Rawle, G., Riddle, N., Pettersson, G., Wallin, J., Bici, M., Jasper, P., Harb, J., Hebbar, M., Davis, J., Aldinucci, A., (2017), EQUIP-Tanzania Impact Evaluation. Midline Technical Report, Volume I and II. Oxford Policy Management.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.
Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Steph is a primary-trained teacher, maths specialist teacher (MaST) and Specialist Leader of Education (SLE) for mathematics in Oxfordshire. She trained as an NCETM mastery specialist and has NCETM PD Lead accreditation. Steph is currently undertaking a part-time PhD, exploring the experiences of teachers working in multi-academy trusts – how expertise is utilised and whether agency is possible.

Publications

Mastery and optional standardised tests: some tensions, Mathematics Teaching (2019), 268, p.18-20

Georgia is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre. She is currently working on the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, primarily involved in qualitative data analysis. Georgia is also working on a British Academy funded project about care-experienced academics working in higher education.

Georgia came to research from a legal background. She initially worked as a researcher in the Centre for Child and Family Research at Loughborough University, where she was involved in multiple research and evaluation projects including, a prospective longitudinal study of children identified in infancy as likely to suffer significant harm; evaluations for the Department for Education Children’s Social Care Innovation Programme; and research on return home from care. More recently, Georgia worked as a Development Researcher at the NSPCC, involved in the development of local services for children and families from concept through to scale up.

Her primary research interests are transitions from care (e.g. transitions from care into adulthood, returning home from care) and the role of education in supporting and providing opportunities for vulnerable children. Georgia’s PhD focused on care leavers’ experiences of higher education in England.

Publications

Journal articles

Harrington, L., McElearney, A. and Hyde-Dryden, G. (2021) Adapting the Pregnancy in Mind (PiM) support service to virtual delivery. Journal of Birth and Parent Education, 8 (3).

Margolis, R., Jackson-Hollis, V., Hyde-Dryden, G., Robson-Brown, E., Smith, E. and McConnell, N (2020) Families facing multiple adversities: impact and interventions. Paediatrics and Child Health 30(11), 390-394.

Ward, H., Brown, R., Blackmore, J., Hyde-Dryden, G. and Thomas, C. (2019) Identifying parents who show capacity to make and sustain positive changes when infants are at risk of significant harm. Developing Practice: The Child, Youth and Family Work Journal, 54, 45-61.

McDermid, S., Hyde-Dryden, G. and Ward, H. (2015) Looking for long-term outcomes: What early interventions are needed for children and young people at risk of maltreatment in England? Irish Journal of Applied Social Studies, 15 (2), 36-49.

Hyde-Dryden, G. (2015) Overcoming self-reliance and lack of expectation among care leavers in higher education in England: the role of inter-agency working. Swiss Journal of Social Work, 16, 75-93, (Special issue).

Munro, E., Pinkerton, J., Mendes, P., Hyde Dryden, G., Herczog, M. and Benbenishty, R. (2011) The contribution of the UNC for the rights of the child to understanding and promoting the interests of young people making the transition from care to adulthood. Children and Youth Services Review 33 (12), 2417-2423.

 

Reports

McElearney, A., Murphy, C., Fullerton, D., Hyde-Dryden, G., Cosette, A. and Morris, S. (2021) School staff, parents and carers’ views and experience of the Keeping Safe whole-school education programme: Lessons from the process evaluation for teaching children to recognise abusive behaviours and tell. London: NSPCC.

McElearney, A., Hyde-Dryden, G., Walters, H., Palmer, L., Coulter, K. and Adamson, G. (2021) Process evaluation of Virtual Pregnancy in Mind during the Covid-19 pandemic. London: NSPCC.

McElearney, A., Hyde-Dryden, G., Palmer, L. and Walters, H. (2021) Reflections and learning from our local service response to families during Covid-19. London: NSPCC.

McElearney, A., Palmer, L., Walters, H., and Hyde-Dryden, G. (2020) Learning from adapting the Baby Steps programme in response to COVID-19. London: NSPCC.

Hyde-Dryden, G. and Ward, H. (2017) Towards a Family Justice Observatory – A Scoping Study: Main Findings Report of the International Scoping Exercise. Available at: http://wp.lancs.ac.uk/observatory-scoping-study/

Lushey, C., Hyde-Dryden, G., Holmes, L. and Blackmore, J. (2017) No Wrong Door evaluation report. London: Department for Education.

Holmes, L, Thomas, C, Hyde-Dryden, G, Williams, A (2017) Firstline evaluation report. London: Department for Education

Brown, R., Ward, H., Blackmore, J., Thomas, C. and Hyde-Dryden, G. (2016) Children identified in infancy as likely to suffer, significant harm: a prospective longitudinal study: age eight follow-up, London: Department for Education.

Hyde-Dryden, G., Gibb, J., Lea, J., Buckley, E., Holmes, L., Wallace, E., Lushey, C. and Lawson, D. (2015) Improving practice in respect of children who return home from care: Research report. London: Department for Education.

Hyde-Dryden G., Holmes L., Lawson D. and Blackmore J. (2015) Taking Care Practice Framework for Reunification evaluation report. Loughborough: Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University.

Ward, H., Brown, R. and Hyde Dryden, G. (2014) Assessing Parental Capacity to Change when Children are on the Edge of Care: An Overview of Research Evidence, Childhood Wellbeing Research Centre Report, London: Department for Education.

Dr Selena Nemorin is a UKRI Future Leaders Fellow and researcher/lecturer in sociology of digital technology at the University of Oxford.

Selena’s research focuses on critical theories of technology, surveillance studies, tech ethics, and youth and future media/technologies. She is currently working on the Fair-AIEd project which examines the role that public-private partnerships play in access and use of AI in emerging market economies.

Her past work includes research projects that have examined AI, IoT and ethics, the uses of new technologies in digital schools, educational equity and inclusion, as well as human rights policies and procedures in K-12 and post-secondary institutions.

Publications

Books

Nemorin, S. (2018). Biosurveillance in New Media Marketing: World, Discourse, Representation. New York, NY: Palgrave Macmillan.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Johnson, N., & Bulfin, S. (2017). Everyday Schooling in the Digital Age: High School, High Tech? Oxford, UK: Routledge.

Journal articles

Bonami, B. & Nemorin, S. (2021). Through three levels of abstraction. Towards an ecological framework for making sense of new technologies in education. Education and Information Technologies. doi: 10.1007/s10639-020-10305-1

Gandy, Jr. O. H. & Nemorin, S. (2020). Transportation and smart city imaginaries: A critical analysis of proposals for the USDOT Smart City Challenge. International Journal of Communication, 14, 1232-1252.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Bulfin, S., & Johnson, N. F. (2020). The ‘obvious’ stuff: exploring the mundane realities of students’ digital technology use in school. Digital Education Review, 37, https://revistes.ub.edu/index.php/der/article/view/30670

Ustek-Spilda, F., Powell, A. & Nemorin, S. (2019). Engaging with ethics in Internet of Things: Imaginaries in the social milieu of technology developers. Big Data and Society. July-Dec 1-12. doi: 10.1177/2053951719879468

Selwyn, N., Pangrazio, L., Nemorin, S., & Perrotta, C. (2019). What might the school of 2030 be like? An exercise in social science fiction. Learning, Media and Technology, 1-17. doi:10.1080/17439884.2020.1694944

Gandy, Jr. O. H. & Nemorin, S. (2018). Toward the political economy of ‘nudge’: Smart city variations. Information, Communication & Society. doi.org/10.1080/1369118X.2018.1477969

Williamson, B., Pykett, J. & Nemorin, S. (2018). Biosocial spaces and neurocomputational governance: brain-based and brain-targeted technologies in education. Discourse, 39(2), 258-275. doi:10.1080/01596306.2018.1394421

Nemorin, S. (2017). Affective capture in digital school spaces and the modulation of student subjectivities. Emotion, Space & Society, 24, 11-18. doi:10.1016/j.emospa.2017.05.007

Nemorin, S. (2017). Post-panoptic pedagogies: The changing nature of school surveillance in the digital age. Surveillance & Society. 15 (2): 239-253.

Nemorin, S. (2017). Neuromarketing and the ‘poor in world’ consumer: How the animalization of thinking underpins contemporary market research discourses. Consumption, Markets & Culture, 20 (1), 59-80 22. doi: 10.1080/10253866.2016.1160897

Nemorin, S. & Gandy, Jr. O.H. (2017). Exploring neuromarketing and its reliance on remote sensing: Social and ethical implications. International Journal of Communication, 11, 4824-4844.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Bulfin, S., & Johnson. N. (2017). Left to their own devices: The everyday realities of ‘one-to-one’ classrooms. Oxford Review of Education. doi: 10.1080/03054985.2017.1305047

Nemorin, S. (2016). The frustrations of digital fabrication: An auto/ethnographic exploration of 3D ‘Making’ in school. International Journal of Technology and Design Education. doi: 10.1007/s10798-016-9366-z

Nemorin, S. & Selwyn, N. (2016). Making the best of it? Exploring the realities of 3D printing in school. Research Papers in Education. doi: 10.1080/02671522.2016.1225802

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., & Johnson, N. (2016). High-tech, hard work: An investigation of teachers’ work in the digital age. Learning Media and Technology. doi:10.1080/17439884.2016.1252770

Bulfin, S., Johnson, N., Nemorin, S., & Selwyn, N. (2016). Nagging, noobs and new tricks – student perceptions of school as a context for digital technology use. Educational Studies 42(3), 239-251. doi: 10.1080/03055698.2016.1160824

Pinto, L. E. & Nemorin, S. (2015). Normalizing panoptic surveillance among children. Our Schools Our Selves, 24(2), 53-62.

Book sections

 Nemorin, S. (2017). Online safety. In SAGE Encyclopedia of Out-of-School Learning, K. Peppler (Ed). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Bulfin, S., & Johnson, N. (2016). Toward a digital sociology of school. In Digital Sociologies, J. Daniels, K. Gregory, & T. McMillan Cottom (Eds). Bristol, UK: Policy Press.

Boler, M. & Nemorin, S. (2013). Dissent, truthiness, and war: New media landscapes of 21st century propaganda. In The Oxford Handbook of Propaganda Studies, R. Castronovo and J. Auerbach (Eds.). New York, NY: Oxford University Press.

Monographs and reports

Powell, A., Nemorin, S., Berner, A., Douglas-Jones, R., Fritsch, E., Hanteer, O., … Vega-Aurelio, D. (2017). Values and ethics in innovation for responsible technology in Europe. Report for the EU Commission: Enabling responsible ICT-related research and innovation.

Selwyn, N., Johnson, N., Nemorin, S., & Knight, E. (2016). Going online on behalf of others: An investigation of ‘proxy’ Internet consumers. Report for the Australian Communications Consumer Action Network, Sydney.

Alice Aldinucci is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford, Department of Education. She is part of the team working on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani, and she is a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group.

She holds a PhD in Education from the University of Glasgow (UK) where she was awarded the LKAS Interdisciplinary Scholarship. Her thesis applies a longitudinal qualitative research design and draws on the combination of Critical Realism and Capability Approach to explore aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to adulthood in Chile. Prior to her PhD, she completed a MA in International Education and Development from the University of Sussex (UK) where she was awarded the Centre for International Education Prize for the best overall MA performance. For her MA at Sussex, she conducted an empirical dissertation on the meaning making of Inclusive Education in Nepal. She holds a MA in Languages and Cultures for International Communication and Cooperation from the University of Milan (Italy) with a fieldwork research on tensions between policy and practice in bilingual multicultural education for indigenous students in Higher Education in Peru; and a BA in Languages and Intercultural Mediation from the University of Arezzo (Italy).

Alice’s research interests are interdisciplinary and relate to the critical linkages between intersecting inequalities, education, individual/societal development, and social justice at local and global levels, motivated by the question what education for what/whose development?

Areas, theoretical approaches and methodologies of interests:
• Sociology of education including aspirations in post-school transitions
• Cultural political economy of education and life chances/human flourishing/social justice
• Tensions between global educational frameworks and local knowledge and practices
• Critical Realism
• Capability Approach
• Qualitative and participatory methodologies
• Digital storytelling for social change

Besides her work in academia, Alice has gained experience as researcher, development practitioner and educator working in projects including early childhood education programmes, refugees’ education, girls’ education, SEN and inclusive education, TVET, global citizenship education, arts-based pedagogies. She lived and worked in different countries including in Nepal (a country she has developed a strong bond with), Tanzania, El Salvador, Italy and the UK. These experiences have reinforced her critical approach to international education and global development and to education as a catalyst for both inequalities, injustices, violence and more equitable social change and peace-building processes.

She served as Student Representative of the British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) from 2017 to 2019 and she is currently part of the college of reviewers of the editorial board of Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education.

Publications:

Aldinucci, A. (2022). Understanding aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to postschool trajectories in Chile. PhD thesis, University of Glasgow.
Aldinucci, A., Valiente, O., Hurrell S., and Zancajo, A. (2021). Understanding aspirations: Why do secondary TVET students aim so high in Chile? Journal of Vocational Education & Training.

Rawle, G., Riddle, N., Pettersson, G., Wallin, J., Bici, M., Jasper, P., Harb, J., Hebbar, M., Davis, J., Aldinucci, A., (2017), EQUIP-Tanzania Impact Evaluation. Midline Technical Report, Volume I and II. Oxford Policy Management.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.
Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Steph is a primary-trained teacher, maths specialist teacher (MaST) and Specialist Leader of Education (SLE) for mathematics in Oxfordshire. She trained as an NCETM mastery specialist and has NCETM PD Lead accreditation. Steph is currently undertaking a part-time PhD, exploring the experiences of teachers working in multi-academy trusts – how expertise is utilised and whether agency is possible.

Publications

Mastery and optional standardised tests: some tensions, Mathematics Teaching (2019), 268, p.18-20

Georgia is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre. She is currently working on the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, primarily involved in qualitative data analysis. Georgia is also working on a British Academy funded project about care-experienced academics working in higher education.

Georgia came to research from a legal background. She initially worked as a researcher in the Centre for Child and Family Research at Loughborough University, where she was involved in multiple research and evaluation projects including, a prospective longitudinal study of children identified in infancy as likely to suffer significant harm; evaluations for the Department for Education Children’s Social Care Innovation Programme; and research on return home from care. More recently, Georgia worked as a Development Researcher at the NSPCC, involved in the development of local services for children and families from concept through to scale up.

Her primary research interests are transitions from care (e.g. transitions from care into adulthood, returning home from care) and the role of education in supporting and providing opportunities for vulnerable children. Georgia’s PhD focused on care leavers’ experiences of higher education in England.

Publications

Journal articles

Harrington, L., McElearney, A. and Hyde-Dryden, G. (2021) Adapting the Pregnancy in Mind (PiM) support service to virtual delivery. Journal of Birth and Parent Education, 8 (3).

Margolis, R., Jackson-Hollis, V., Hyde-Dryden, G., Robson-Brown, E., Smith, E. and McConnell, N (2020) Families facing multiple adversities: impact and interventions. Paediatrics and Child Health 30(11), 390-394.

Ward, H., Brown, R., Blackmore, J., Hyde-Dryden, G. and Thomas, C. (2019) Identifying parents who show capacity to make and sustain positive changes when infants are at risk of significant harm. Developing Practice: The Child, Youth and Family Work Journal, 54, 45-61.

McDermid, S., Hyde-Dryden, G. and Ward, H. (2015) Looking for long-term outcomes: What early interventions are needed for children and young people at risk of maltreatment in England? Irish Journal of Applied Social Studies, 15 (2), 36-49.

Hyde-Dryden, G. (2015) Overcoming self-reliance and lack of expectation among care leavers in higher education in England: the role of inter-agency working. Swiss Journal of Social Work, 16, 75-93, (Special issue).

Munro, E., Pinkerton, J., Mendes, P., Hyde Dryden, G., Herczog, M. and Benbenishty, R. (2011) The contribution of the UNC for the rights of the child to understanding and promoting the interests of young people making the transition from care to adulthood. Children and Youth Services Review 33 (12), 2417-2423.

 

Reports

McElearney, A., Murphy, C., Fullerton, D., Hyde-Dryden, G., Cosette, A. and Morris, S. (2021) School staff, parents and carers’ views and experience of the Keeping Safe whole-school education programme: Lessons from the process evaluation for teaching children to recognise abusive behaviours and tell. London: NSPCC.

McElearney, A., Hyde-Dryden, G., Walters, H., Palmer, L., Coulter, K. and Adamson, G. (2021) Process evaluation of Virtual Pregnancy in Mind during the Covid-19 pandemic. London: NSPCC.

McElearney, A., Hyde-Dryden, G., Palmer, L. and Walters, H. (2021) Reflections and learning from our local service response to families during Covid-19. London: NSPCC.

McElearney, A., Palmer, L., Walters, H., and Hyde-Dryden, G. (2020) Learning from adapting the Baby Steps programme in response to COVID-19. London: NSPCC.

Hyde-Dryden, G. and Ward, H. (2017) Towards a Family Justice Observatory – A Scoping Study: Main Findings Report of the International Scoping Exercise. Available at: http://wp.lancs.ac.uk/observatory-scoping-study/

Lushey, C., Hyde-Dryden, G., Holmes, L. and Blackmore, J. (2017) No Wrong Door evaluation report. London: Department for Education.

Holmes, L, Thomas, C, Hyde-Dryden, G, Williams, A (2017) Firstline evaluation report. London: Department for Education

Brown, R., Ward, H., Blackmore, J., Thomas, C. and Hyde-Dryden, G. (2016) Children identified in infancy as likely to suffer, significant harm: a prospective longitudinal study: age eight follow-up, London: Department for Education.

Hyde-Dryden, G., Gibb, J., Lea, J., Buckley, E., Holmes, L., Wallace, E., Lushey, C. and Lawson, D. (2015) Improving practice in respect of children who return home from care: Research report. London: Department for Education.

Hyde-Dryden G., Holmes L., Lawson D. and Blackmore J. (2015) Taking Care Practice Framework for Reunification evaluation report. Loughborough: Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University.

Ward, H., Brown, R. and Hyde Dryden, G. (2014) Assessing Parental Capacity to Change when Children are on the Edge of Care: An Overview of Research Evidence, Childhood Wellbeing Research Centre Report, London: Department for Education.

Dr Selena Nemorin is a UKRI Future Leaders Fellow and researcher/lecturer in sociology of digital technology at the University of Oxford.

Selena’s research focuses on critical theories of technology, surveillance studies, tech ethics, and youth and future media/technologies. She is currently working on the Fair-AIEd project which examines the role that public-private partnerships play in access and use of AI in emerging market economies.

Her past work includes research projects that have examined AI, IoT and ethics, the uses of new technologies in digital schools, educational equity and inclusion, as well as human rights policies and procedures in K-12 and post-secondary institutions.

Publications

Books

Nemorin, S. (2018). Biosurveillance in New Media Marketing: World, Discourse, Representation. New York, NY: Palgrave Macmillan.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Johnson, N., & Bulfin, S. (2017). Everyday Schooling in the Digital Age: High School, High Tech? Oxford, UK: Routledge.

Journal articles

Bonami, B. & Nemorin, S. (2021). Through three levels of abstraction. Towards an ecological framework for making sense of new technologies in education. Education and Information Technologies. doi: 10.1007/s10639-020-10305-1

Gandy, Jr. O. H. & Nemorin, S. (2020). Transportation and smart city imaginaries: A critical analysis of proposals for the USDOT Smart City Challenge. International Journal of Communication, 14, 1232-1252.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Bulfin, S., & Johnson, N. F. (2020). The ‘obvious’ stuff: exploring the mundane realities of students’ digital technology use in school. Digital Education Review, 37, https://revistes.ub.edu/index.php/der/article/view/30670

Ustek-Spilda, F., Powell, A. & Nemorin, S. (2019). Engaging with ethics in Internet of Things: Imaginaries in the social milieu of technology developers. Big Data and Society. July-Dec 1-12. doi: 10.1177/2053951719879468

Selwyn, N., Pangrazio, L., Nemorin, S., & Perrotta, C. (2019). What might the school of 2030 be like? An exercise in social science fiction. Learning, Media and Technology, 1-17. doi:10.1080/17439884.2020.1694944

Gandy, Jr. O. H. & Nemorin, S. (2018). Toward the political economy of ‘nudge’: Smart city variations. Information, Communication & Society. doi.org/10.1080/1369118X.2018.1477969

Williamson, B., Pykett, J. & Nemorin, S. (2018). Biosocial spaces and neurocomputational governance: brain-based and brain-targeted technologies in education. Discourse, 39(2), 258-275. doi:10.1080/01596306.2018.1394421

Nemorin, S. (2017). Affective capture in digital school spaces and the modulation of student subjectivities. Emotion, Space & Society, 24, 11-18. doi:10.1016/j.emospa.2017.05.007

Nemorin, S. (2017). Post-panoptic pedagogies: The changing nature of school surveillance in the digital age. Surveillance & Society. 15 (2): 239-253.

Nemorin, S. (2017). Neuromarketing and the ‘poor in world’ consumer: How the animalization of thinking underpins contemporary market research discourses. Consumption, Markets & Culture, 20 (1), 59-80 22. doi: 10.1080/10253866.2016.1160897

Nemorin, S. & Gandy, Jr. O.H. (2017). Exploring neuromarketing and its reliance on remote sensing: Social and ethical implications. International Journal of Communication, 11, 4824-4844.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Bulfin, S., & Johnson. N. (2017). Left to their own devices: The everyday realities of ‘one-to-one’ classrooms. Oxford Review of Education. doi: 10.1080/03054985.2017.1305047

Nemorin, S. (2016). The frustrations of digital fabrication: An auto/ethnographic exploration of 3D ‘Making’ in school. International Journal of Technology and Design Education. doi: 10.1007/s10798-016-9366-z

Nemorin, S. & Selwyn, N. (2016). Making the best of it? Exploring the realities of 3D printing in school. Research Papers in Education. doi: 10.1080/02671522.2016.1225802

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., & Johnson, N. (2016). High-tech, hard work: An investigation of teachers’ work in the digital age. Learning Media and Technology. doi:10.1080/17439884.2016.1252770

Bulfin, S., Johnson, N., Nemorin, S., & Selwyn, N. (2016). Nagging, noobs and new tricks – student perceptions of school as a context for digital technology use. Educational Studies 42(3), 239-251. doi: 10.1080/03055698.2016.1160824

Pinto, L. E. & Nemorin, S. (2015). Normalizing panoptic surveillance among children. Our Schools Our Selves, 24(2), 53-62.

Book sections

 Nemorin, S. (2017). Online safety. In SAGE Encyclopedia of Out-of-School Learning, K. Peppler (Ed). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Bulfin, S., & Johnson, N. (2016). Toward a digital sociology of school. In Digital Sociologies, J. Daniels, K. Gregory, & T. McMillan Cottom (Eds). Bristol, UK: Policy Press.

Boler, M. & Nemorin, S. (2013). Dissent, truthiness, and war: New media landscapes of 21st century propaganda. In The Oxford Handbook of Propaganda Studies, R. Castronovo and J. Auerbach (Eds.). New York, NY: Oxford University Press.

Monographs and reports

Powell, A., Nemorin, S., Berner, A., Douglas-Jones, R., Fritsch, E., Hanteer, O., … Vega-Aurelio, D. (2017). Values and ethics in innovation for responsible technology in Europe. Report for the EU Commission: Enabling responsible ICT-related research and innovation.

Selwyn, N., Johnson, N., Nemorin, S., & Knight, E. (2016). Going online on behalf of others: An investigation of ‘proxy’ Internet consumers. Report for the Australian Communications Consumer Action Network, Sydney.

Alice Aldinucci is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford, Department of Education. She is part of the team working on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani, and she is a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group.

She holds a PhD in Education from the University of Glasgow (UK) where she was awarded the LKAS Interdisciplinary Scholarship. Her thesis applies a longitudinal qualitative research design and draws on the combination of Critical Realism and Capability Approach to explore aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to adulthood in Chile. Prior to her PhD, she completed a MA in International Education and Development from the University of Sussex (UK) where she was awarded the Centre for International Education Prize for the best overall MA performance. For her MA at Sussex, she conducted an empirical dissertation on the meaning making of Inclusive Education in Nepal. She holds a MA in Languages and Cultures for International Communication and Cooperation from the University of Milan (Italy) with a fieldwork research on tensions between policy and practice in bilingual multicultural education for indigenous students in Higher Education in Peru; and a BA in Languages and Intercultural Mediation from the University of Arezzo (Italy).

Alice’s research interests are interdisciplinary and relate to the critical linkages between intersecting inequalities, education, individual/societal development, and social justice at local and global levels, motivated by the question what education for what/whose development?

Areas, theoretical approaches and methodologies of interests:
• Sociology of education including aspirations in post-school transitions
• Cultural political economy of education and life chances/human flourishing/social justice
• Tensions between global educational frameworks and local knowledge and practices
• Critical Realism
• Capability Approach
• Qualitative and participatory methodologies
• Digital storytelling for social change

Besides her work in academia, Alice has gained experience as researcher, development practitioner and educator working in projects including early childhood education programmes, refugees’ education, girls’ education, SEN and inclusive education, TVET, global citizenship education, arts-based pedagogies. She lived and worked in different countries including in Nepal (a country she has developed a strong bond with), Tanzania, El Salvador, Italy and the UK. These experiences have reinforced her critical approach to international education and global development and to education as a catalyst for both inequalities, injustices, violence and more equitable social change and peace-building processes.

She served as Student Representative of the British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) from 2017 to 2019 and she is currently part of the college of reviewers of the editorial board of Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education.

Publications:

Aldinucci, A. (2022). Understanding aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to postschool trajectories in Chile. PhD thesis, University of Glasgow.
Aldinucci, A., Valiente, O., Hurrell S., and Zancajo, A. (2021). Understanding aspirations: Why do secondary TVET students aim so high in Chile? Journal of Vocational Education & Training.

Rawle, G., Riddle, N., Pettersson, G., Wallin, J., Bici, M., Jasper, P., Harb, J., Hebbar, M., Davis, J., Aldinucci, A., (2017), EQUIP-Tanzania Impact Evaluation. Midline Technical Report, Volume I and II. Oxford Policy Management.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.
Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Steph is a primary-trained teacher, maths specialist teacher (MaST) and Specialist Leader of Education (SLE) for mathematics in Oxfordshire. She trained as an NCETM mastery specialist and has NCETM PD Lead accreditation. Steph is currently undertaking a part-time PhD, exploring the experiences of teachers working in multi-academy trusts – how expertise is utilised and whether agency is possible.

Publications

Mastery and optional standardised tests: some tensions, Mathematics Teaching (2019), 268, p.18-20

Georgia is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre. She is currently working on the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, primarily involved in qualitative data analysis. Georgia is also working on a British Academy funded project about care-experienced academics working in higher education.

Georgia came to research from a legal background. She initially worked as a researcher in the Centre for Child and Family Research at Loughborough University, where she was involved in multiple research and evaluation projects including, a prospective longitudinal study of children identified in infancy as likely to suffer significant harm; evaluations for the Department for Education Children’s Social Care Innovation Programme; and research on return home from care. More recently, Georgia worked as a Development Researcher at the NSPCC, involved in the development of local services for children and families from concept through to scale up.

Her primary research interests are transitions from care (e.g. transitions from care into adulthood, returning home from care) and the role of education in supporting and providing opportunities for vulnerable children. Georgia’s PhD focused on care leavers’ experiences of higher education in England.

Publications

Journal articles

Harrington, L., McElearney, A. and Hyde-Dryden, G. (2021) Adapting the Pregnancy in Mind (PiM) support service to virtual delivery. Journal of Birth and Parent Education, 8 (3).

Margolis, R., Jackson-Hollis, V., Hyde-Dryden, G., Robson-Brown, E., Smith, E. and McConnell, N (2020) Families facing multiple adversities: impact and interventions. Paediatrics and Child Health 30(11), 390-394.

Ward, H., Brown, R., Blackmore, J., Hyde-Dryden, G. and Thomas, C. (2019) Identifying parents who show capacity to make and sustain positive changes when infants are at risk of significant harm. Developing Practice: The Child, Youth and Family Work Journal, 54, 45-61.

McDermid, S., Hyde-Dryden, G. and Ward, H. (2015) Looking for long-term outcomes: What early interventions are needed for children and young people at risk of maltreatment in England? Irish Journal of Applied Social Studies, 15 (2), 36-49.

Hyde-Dryden, G. (2015) Overcoming self-reliance and lack of expectation among care leavers in higher education in England: the role of inter-agency working. Swiss Journal of Social Work, 16, 75-93, (Special issue).

Munro, E., Pinkerton, J., Mendes, P., Hyde Dryden, G., Herczog, M. and Benbenishty, R. (2011) The contribution of the UNC for the rights of the child to understanding and promoting the interests of young people making the transition from care to adulthood. Children and Youth Services Review 33 (12), 2417-2423.

 

Reports

McElearney, A., Murphy, C., Fullerton, D., Hyde-Dryden, G., Cosette, A. and Morris, S. (2021) School staff, parents and carers’ views and experience of the Keeping Safe whole-school education programme: Lessons from the process evaluation for teaching children to recognise abusive behaviours and tell. London: NSPCC.

McElearney, A., Hyde-Dryden, G., Walters, H., Palmer, L., Coulter, K. and Adamson, G. (2021) Process evaluation of Virtual Pregnancy in Mind during the Covid-19 pandemic. London: NSPCC.

McElearney, A., Hyde-Dryden, G., Palmer, L. and Walters, H. (2021) Reflections and learning from our local service response to families during Covid-19. London: NSPCC.

McElearney, A., Palmer, L., Walters, H., and Hyde-Dryden, G. (2020) Learning from adapting the Baby Steps programme in response to COVID-19. London: NSPCC.

Hyde-Dryden, G. and Ward, H. (2017) Towards a Family Justice Observatory – A Scoping Study: Main Findings Report of the International Scoping Exercise. Available at: http://wp.lancs.ac.uk/observatory-scoping-study/

Lushey, C., Hyde-Dryden, G., Holmes, L. and Blackmore, J. (2017) No Wrong Door evaluation report. London: Department for Education.

Holmes, L, Thomas, C, Hyde-Dryden, G, Williams, A (2017) Firstline evaluation report. London: Department for Education

Brown, R., Ward, H., Blackmore, J., Thomas, C. and Hyde-Dryden, G. (2016) Children identified in infancy as likely to suffer, significant harm: a prospective longitudinal study: age eight follow-up, London: Department for Education.

Hyde-Dryden, G., Gibb, J., Lea, J., Buckley, E., Holmes, L., Wallace, E., Lushey, C. and Lawson, D. (2015) Improving practice in respect of children who return home from care: Research report. London: Department for Education.

Hyde-Dryden G., Holmes L., Lawson D. and Blackmore J. (2015) Taking Care Practice Framework for Reunification evaluation report. Loughborough: Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University.

Ward, H., Brown, R. and Hyde Dryden, G. (2014) Assessing Parental Capacity to Change when Children are on the Edge of Care: An Overview of Research Evidence, Childhood Wellbeing Research Centre Report, London: Department for Education.

Dr Selena Nemorin is a UKRI Future Leaders Fellow and researcher/lecturer in sociology of digital technology at the University of Oxford.

Selena’s research focuses on critical theories of technology, surveillance studies, tech ethics, and youth and future media/technologies. She is currently working on the Fair-AIEd project which examines the role that public-private partnerships play in access and use of AI in emerging market economies.

Her past work includes research projects that have examined AI, IoT and ethics, the uses of new technologies in digital schools, educational equity and inclusion, as well as human rights policies and procedures in K-12 and post-secondary institutions.

Publications

Books

Nemorin, S. (2018). Biosurveillance in New Media Marketing: World, Discourse, Representation. New York, NY: Palgrave Macmillan.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Johnson, N., & Bulfin, S. (2017). Everyday Schooling in the Digital Age: High School, High Tech? Oxford, UK: Routledge.

Journal articles

Bonami, B. & Nemorin, S. (2021). Through three levels of abstraction. Towards an ecological framework for making sense of new technologies in education. Education and Information Technologies. doi: 10.1007/s10639-020-10305-1

Gandy, Jr. O. H. & Nemorin, S. (2020). Transportation and smart city imaginaries: A critical analysis of proposals for the USDOT Smart City Challenge. International Journal of Communication, 14, 1232-1252.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Bulfin, S., & Johnson, N. F. (2020). The ‘obvious’ stuff: exploring the mundane realities of students’ digital technology use in school. Digital Education Review, 37, https://revistes.ub.edu/index.php/der/article/view/30670

Ustek-Spilda, F., Powell, A. & Nemorin, S. (2019). Engaging with ethics in Internet of Things: Imaginaries in the social milieu of technology developers. Big Data and Society. July-Dec 1-12. doi: 10.1177/2053951719879468

Selwyn, N., Pangrazio, L., Nemorin, S., & Perrotta, C. (2019). What might the school of 2030 be like? An exercise in social science fiction. Learning, Media and Technology, 1-17. doi:10.1080/17439884.2020.1694944

Gandy, Jr. O. H. & Nemorin, S. (2018). Toward the political economy of ‘nudge’: Smart city variations. Information, Communication & Society. doi.org/10.1080/1369118X.2018.1477969

Williamson, B., Pykett, J. & Nemorin, S. (2018). Biosocial spaces and neurocomputational governance: brain-based and brain-targeted technologies in education. Discourse, 39(2), 258-275. doi:10.1080/01596306.2018.1394421

Nemorin, S. (2017). Affective capture in digital school spaces and the modulation of student subjectivities. Emotion, Space & Society, 24, 11-18. doi:10.1016/j.emospa.2017.05.007

Nemorin, S. (2017). Post-panoptic pedagogies: The changing nature of school surveillance in the digital age. Surveillance & Society. 15 (2): 239-253.

Nemorin, S. (2017). Neuromarketing and the ‘poor in world’ consumer: How the animalization of thinking underpins contemporary market research discourses. Consumption, Markets & Culture, 20 (1), 59-80 22. doi: 10.1080/10253866.2016.1160897

Nemorin, S. & Gandy, Jr. O.H. (2017). Exploring neuromarketing and its reliance on remote sensing: Social and ethical implications. International Journal of Communication, 11, 4824-4844.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Bulfin, S., & Johnson. N. (2017). Left to their own devices: The everyday realities of ‘one-to-one’ classrooms. Oxford Review of Education. doi: 10.1080/03054985.2017.1305047

Nemorin, S. (2016). The frustrations of digital fabrication: An auto/ethnographic exploration of 3D ‘Making’ in school. International Journal of Technology and Design Education. doi: 10.1007/s10798-016-9366-z

Nemorin, S. & Selwyn, N. (2016). Making the best of it? Exploring the realities of 3D printing in school. Research Papers in Education. doi: 10.1080/02671522.2016.1225802

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., & Johnson, N. (2016). High-tech, hard work: An investigation of teachers’ work in the digital age. Learning Media and Technology. doi:10.1080/17439884.2016.1252770

Bulfin, S., Johnson, N., Nemorin, S., & Selwyn, N. (2016). Nagging, noobs and new tricks – student perceptions of school as a context for digital technology use. Educational Studies 42(3), 239-251. doi: 10.1080/03055698.2016.1160824

Pinto, L. E. & Nemorin, S. (2015). Normalizing panoptic surveillance among children. Our Schools Our Selves, 24(2), 53-62.

Book sections

 Nemorin, S. (2017). Online safety. In SAGE Encyclopedia of Out-of-School Learning, K. Peppler (Ed). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Bulfin, S., & Johnson, N. (2016). Toward a digital sociology of school. In Digital Sociologies, J. Daniels, K. Gregory, & T. McMillan Cottom (Eds). Bristol, UK: Policy Press.

Boler, M. & Nemorin, S. (2013). Dissent, truthiness, and war: New media landscapes of 21st century propaganda. In The Oxford Handbook of Propaganda Studies, R. Castronovo and J. Auerbach (Eds.). New York, NY: Oxford University Press.

Monographs and reports

Powell, A., Nemorin, S., Berner, A., Douglas-Jones, R., Fritsch, E., Hanteer, O., … Vega-Aurelio, D. (2017). Values and ethics in innovation for responsible technology in Europe. Report for the EU Commission: Enabling responsible ICT-related research and innovation.

Selwyn, N., Johnson, N., Nemorin, S., & Knight, E. (2016). Going online on behalf of others: An investigation of ‘proxy’ Internet consumers. Report for the Australian Communications Consumer Action Network, Sydney.

Alice Aldinucci is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford, Department of Education. She is part of the team working on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani, and she is a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group.

She holds a PhD in Education from the University of Glasgow (UK) where she was awarded the LKAS Interdisciplinary Scholarship. Her thesis applies a longitudinal qualitative research design and draws on the combination of Critical Realism and Capability Approach to explore aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to adulthood in Chile. Prior to her PhD, she completed a MA in International Education and Development from the University of Sussex (UK) where she was awarded the Centre for International Education Prize for the best overall MA performance. For her MA at Sussex, she conducted an empirical dissertation on the meaning making of Inclusive Education in Nepal. She holds a MA in Languages and Cultures for International Communication and Cooperation from the University of Milan (Italy) with a fieldwork research on tensions between policy and practice in bilingual multicultural education for indigenous students in Higher Education in Peru; and a BA in Languages and Intercultural Mediation from the University of Arezzo (Italy).

Alice’s research interests are interdisciplinary and relate to the critical linkages between intersecting inequalities, education, individual/societal development, and social justice at local and global levels, motivated by the question what education for what/whose development?

Areas, theoretical approaches and methodologies of interests:
• Sociology of education including aspirations in post-school transitions
• Cultural political economy of education and life chances/human flourishing/social justice
• Tensions between global educational frameworks and local knowledge and practices
• Critical Realism
• Capability Approach
• Qualitative and participatory methodologies
• Digital storytelling for social change

Besides her work in academia, Alice has gained experience as researcher, development practitioner and educator working in projects including early childhood education programmes, refugees’ education, girls’ education, SEN and inclusive education, TVET, global citizenship education, arts-based pedagogies. She lived and worked in different countries including in Nepal (a country she has developed a strong bond with), Tanzania, El Salvador, Italy and the UK. These experiences have reinforced her critical approach to international education and global development and to education as a catalyst for both inequalities, injustices, violence and more equitable social change and peace-building processes.

She served as Student Representative of the British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) from 2017 to 2019 and she is currently part of the college of reviewers of the editorial board of Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education.

Publications:

Aldinucci, A. (2022). Understanding aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to postschool trajectories in Chile. PhD thesis, University of Glasgow.
Aldinucci, A., Valiente, O., Hurrell S., and Zancajo, A. (2021). Understanding aspirations: Why do secondary TVET students aim so high in Chile? Journal of Vocational Education & Training.

Rawle, G., Riddle, N., Pettersson, G., Wallin, J., Bici, M., Jasper, P., Harb, J., Hebbar, M., Davis, J., Aldinucci, A., (2017), EQUIP-Tanzania Impact Evaluation. Midline Technical Report, Volume I and II. Oxford Policy Management.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.
Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Steph is a primary-trained teacher, maths specialist teacher (MaST) and Specialist Leader of Education (SLE) for mathematics in Oxfordshire. She trained as an NCETM mastery specialist and has NCETM PD Lead accreditation. Steph is currently undertaking a part-time PhD, exploring the experiences of teachers working in multi-academy trusts – how expertise is utilised and whether agency is possible.

Publications

Mastery and optional standardised tests: some tensions, Mathematics Teaching (2019), 268, p.18-20

Georgia is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre. She is currently working on the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, primarily involved in qualitative data analysis. Georgia is also working on a British Academy funded project about care-experienced academics working in higher education.

Georgia came to research from a legal background. She initially worked as a researcher in the Centre for Child and Family Research at Loughborough University, where she was involved in multiple research and evaluation projects including, a prospective longitudinal study of children identified in infancy as likely to suffer significant harm; evaluations for the Department for Education Children’s Social Care Innovation Programme; and research on return home from care. More recently, Georgia worked as a Development Researcher at the NSPCC, involved in the development of local services for children and families from concept through to scale up.

Her primary research interests are transitions from care (e.g. transitions from care into adulthood, returning home from care) and the role of education in supporting and providing opportunities for vulnerable children. Georgia’s PhD focused on care leavers’ experiences of higher education in England.

Publications

Journal articles

Harrington, L., McElearney, A. and Hyde-Dryden, G. (2021) Adapting the Pregnancy in Mind (PiM) support service to virtual delivery. Journal of Birth and Parent Education, 8 (3).

Margolis, R., Jackson-Hollis, V., Hyde-Dryden, G., Robson-Brown, E., Smith, E. and McConnell, N (2020) Families facing multiple adversities: impact and interventions. Paediatrics and Child Health 30(11), 390-394.

Ward, H., Brown, R., Blackmore, J., Hyde-Dryden, G. and Thomas, C. (2019) Identifying parents who show capacity to make and sustain positive changes when infants are at risk of significant harm. Developing Practice: The Child, Youth and Family Work Journal, 54, 45-61.

McDermid, S., Hyde-Dryden, G. and Ward, H. (2015) Looking for long-term outcomes: What early interventions are needed for children and young people at risk of maltreatment in England? Irish Journal of Applied Social Studies, 15 (2), 36-49.

Hyde-Dryden, G. (2015) Overcoming self-reliance and lack of expectation among care leavers in higher education in England: the role of inter-agency working. Swiss Journal of Social Work, 16, 75-93, (Special issue).

Munro, E., Pinkerton, J., Mendes, P., Hyde Dryden, G., Herczog, M. and Benbenishty, R. (2011) The contribution of the UNC for the rights of the child to understanding and promoting the interests of young people making the transition from care to adulthood. Children and Youth Services Review 33 (12), 2417-2423.

 

Reports

McElearney, A., Murphy, C., Fullerton, D., Hyde-Dryden, G., Cosette, A. and Morris, S. (2021) School staff, parents and carers’ views and experience of the Keeping Safe whole-school education programme: Lessons from the process evaluation for teaching children to recognise abusive behaviours and tell. London: NSPCC.

McElearney, A., Hyde-Dryden, G., Walters, H., Palmer, L., Coulter, K. and Adamson, G. (2021) Process evaluation of Virtual Pregnancy in Mind during the Covid-19 pandemic. London: NSPCC.

McElearney, A., Hyde-Dryden, G., Palmer, L. and Walters, H. (2021) Reflections and learning from our local service response to families during Covid-19. London: NSPCC.

McElearney, A., Palmer, L., Walters, H., and Hyde-Dryden, G. (2020) Learning from adapting the Baby Steps programme in response to COVID-19. London: NSPCC.

Hyde-Dryden, G. and Ward, H. (2017) Towards a Family Justice Observatory – A Scoping Study: Main Findings Report of the International Scoping Exercise. Available at: http://wp.lancs.ac.uk/observatory-scoping-study/

Lushey, C., Hyde-Dryden, G., Holmes, L. and Blackmore, J. (2017) No Wrong Door evaluation report. London: Department for Education.

Holmes, L, Thomas, C, Hyde-Dryden, G, Williams, A (2017) Firstline evaluation report. London: Department for Education

Brown, R., Ward, H., Blackmore, J., Thomas, C. and Hyde-Dryden, G. (2016) Children identified in infancy as likely to suffer, significant harm: a prospective longitudinal study: age eight follow-up, London: Department for Education.

Hyde-Dryden, G., Gibb, J., Lea, J., Buckley, E., Holmes, L., Wallace, E., Lushey, C. and Lawson, D. (2015) Improving practice in respect of children who return home from care: Research report. London: Department for Education.

Hyde-Dryden G., Holmes L., Lawson D. and Blackmore J. (2015) Taking Care Practice Framework for Reunification evaluation report. Loughborough: Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University.

Ward, H., Brown, R. and Hyde Dryden, G. (2014) Assessing Parental Capacity to Change when Children are on the Edge of Care: An Overview of Research Evidence, Childhood Wellbeing Research Centre Report, London: Department for Education.

Dr Selena Nemorin is a UKRI Future Leaders Fellow and researcher/lecturer in sociology of digital technology at the University of Oxford.

Selena’s research focuses on critical theories of technology, surveillance studies, tech ethics, and youth and future media/technologies. She is currently working on the Fair-AIEd project which examines the role that public-private partnerships play in access and use of AI in emerging market economies.

Her past work includes research projects that have examined AI, IoT and ethics, the uses of new technologies in digital schools, educational equity and inclusion, as well as human rights policies and procedures in K-12 and post-secondary institutions.

Publications

Books

Nemorin, S. (2018). Biosurveillance in New Media Marketing: World, Discourse, Representation. New York, NY: Palgrave Macmillan.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Johnson, N., & Bulfin, S. (2017). Everyday Schooling in the Digital Age: High School, High Tech? Oxford, UK: Routledge.

Journal articles

Bonami, B. & Nemorin, S. (2021). Through three levels of abstraction. Towards an ecological framework for making sense of new technologies in education. Education and Information Technologies. doi: 10.1007/s10639-020-10305-1

Gandy, Jr. O. H. & Nemorin, S. (2020). Transportation and smart city imaginaries: A critical analysis of proposals for the USDOT Smart City Challenge. International Journal of Communication, 14, 1232-1252.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Bulfin, S., & Johnson, N. F. (2020). The ‘obvious’ stuff: exploring the mundane realities of students’ digital technology use in school. Digital Education Review, 37, https://revistes.ub.edu/index.php/der/article/view/30670

Ustek-Spilda, F., Powell, A. & Nemorin, S. (2019). Engaging with ethics in Internet of Things: Imaginaries in the social milieu of technology developers. Big Data and Society. July-Dec 1-12. doi: 10.1177/2053951719879468

Selwyn, N., Pangrazio, L., Nemorin, S., & Perrotta, C. (2019). What might the school of 2030 be like? An exercise in social science fiction. Learning, Media and Technology, 1-17. doi:10.1080/17439884.2020.1694944

Gandy, Jr. O. H. & Nemorin, S. (2018). Toward the political economy of ‘nudge’: Smart city variations. Information, Communication & Society. doi.org/10.1080/1369118X.2018.1477969

Williamson, B., Pykett, J. & Nemorin, S. (2018). Biosocial spaces and neurocomputational governance: brain-based and brain-targeted technologies in education. Discourse, 39(2), 258-275. doi:10.1080/01596306.2018.1394421

Nemorin, S. (2017). Affective capture in digital school spaces and the modulation of student subjectivities. Emotion, Space & Society, 24, 11-18. doi:10.1016/j.emospa.2017.05.007

Nemorin, S. (2017). Post-panoptic pedagogies: The changing nature of school surveillance in the digital age. Surveillance & Society. 15 (2): 239-253.

Nemorin, S. (2017). Neuromarketing and the ‘poor in world’ consumer: How the animalization of thinking underpins contemporary market research discourses. Consumption, Markets & Culture, 20 (1), 59-80 22. doi: 10.1080/10253866.2016.1160897

Nemorin, S. & Gandy, Jr. O.H. (2017). Exploring neuromarketing and its reliance on remote sensing: Social and ethical implications. International Journal of Communication, 11, 4824-4844.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Bulfin, S., & Johnson. N. (2017). Left to their own devices: The everyday realities of ‘one-to-one’ classrooms. Oxford Review of Education. doi: 10.1080/03054985.2017.1305047

Nemorin, S. (2016). The frustrations of digital fabrication: An auto/ethnographic exploration of 3D ‘Making’ in school. International Journal of Technology and Design Education. doi: 10.1007/s10798-016-9366-z

Nemorin, S. & Selwyn, N. (2016). Making the best of it? Exploring the realities of 3D printing in school. Research Papers in Education. doi: 10.1080/02671522.2016.1225802

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., & Johnson, N. (2016). High-tech, hard work: An investigation of teachers’ work in the digital age. Learning Media and Technology. doi:10.1080/17439884.2016.1252770

Bulfin, S., Johnson, N., Nemorin, S., & Selwyn, N. (2016). Nagging, noobs and new tricks – student perceptions of school as a context for digital technology use. Educational Studies 42(3), 239-251. doi: 10.1080/03055698.2016.1160824

Pinto, L. E. & Nemorin, S. (2015). Normalizing panoptic surveillance among children. Our Schools Our Selves, 24(2), 53-62.

Book sections

 Nemorin, S. (2017). Online safety. In SAGE Encyclopedia of Out-of-School Learning, K. Peppler (Ed). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Bulfin, S., & Johnson, N. (2016). Toward a digital sociology of school. In Digital Sociologies, J. Daniels, K. Gregory, & T. McMillan Cottom (Eds). Bristol, UK: Policy Press.

Boler, M. & Nemorin, S. (2013). Dissent, truthiness, and war: New media landscapes of 21st century propaganda. In The Oxford Handbook of Propaganda Studies, R. Castronovo and J. Auerbach (Eds.). New York, NY: Oxford University Press.

Monographs and reports

Powell, A., Nemorin, S., Berner, A., Douglas-Jones, R., Fritsch, E., Hanteer, O., … Vega-Aurelio, D. (2017). Values and ethics in innovation for responsible technology in Europe. Report for the EU Commission: Enabling responsible ICT-related research and innovation.

Selwyn, N., Johnson, N., Nemorin, S., & Knight, E. (2016). Going online on behalf of others: An investigation of ‘proxy’ Internet consumers. Report for the Australian Communications Consumer Action Network, Sydney.

Alice Aldinucci is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford, Department of Education. She is part of the team working on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani, and she is a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group.

She holds a PhD in Education from the University of Glasgow (UK) where she was awarded the LKAS Interdisciplinary Scholarship. Her thesis applies a longitudinal qualitative research design and draws on the combination of Critical Realism and Capability Approach to explore aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to adulthood in Chile. Prior to her PhD, she completed a MA in International Education and Development from the University of Sussex (UK) where she was awarded the Centre for International Education Prize for the best overall MA performance. For her MA at Sussex, she conducted an empirical dissertation on the meaning making of Inclusive Education in Nepal. She holds a MA in Languages and Cultures for International Communication and Cooperation from the University of Milan (Italy) with a fieldwork research on tensions between policy and practice in bilingual multicultural education for indigenous students in Higher Education in Peru; and a BA in Languages and Intercultural Mediation from the University of Arezzo (Italy).

Alice’s research interests are interdisciplinary and relate to the critical linkages between intersecting inequalities, education, individual/societal development, and social justice at local and global levels, motivated by the question what education for what/whose development?

Areas, theoretical approaches and methodologies of interests:
• Sociology of education including aspirations in post-school transitions
• Cultural political economy of education and life chances/human flourishing/social justice
• Tensions between global educational frameworks and local knowledge and practices
• Critical Realism
• Capability Approach
• Qualitative and participatory methodologies
• Digital storytelling for social change

Besides her work in academia, Alice has gained experience as researcher, development practitioner and educator working in projects including early childhood education programmes, refugees’ education, girls’ education, SEN and inclusive education, TVET, global citizenship education, arts-based pedagogies. She lived and worked in different countries including in Nepal (a country she has developed a strong bond with), Tanzania, El Salvador, Italy and the UK. These experiences have reinforced her critical approach to international education and global development and to education as a catalyst for both inequalities, injustices, violence and more equitable social change and peace-building processes.

She served as Student Representative of the British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) from 2017 to 2019 and she is currently part of the college of reviewers of the editorial board of Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education.

Publications:

Aldinucci, A. (2022). Understanding aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to postschool trajectories in Chile. PhD thesis, University of Glasgow.
Aldinucci, A., Valiente, O., Hurrell S., and Zancajo, A. (2021). Understanding aspirations: Why do secondary TVET students aim so high in Chile? Journal of Vocational Education & Training.

Rawle, G., Riddle, N., Pettersson, G., Wallin, J., Bici, M., Jasper, P., Harb, J., Hebbar, M., Davis, J., Aldinucci, A., (2017), EQUIP-Tanzania Impact Evaluation. Midline Technical Report, Volume I and II. Oxford Policy Management.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.
Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Steph is a primary-trained teacher, maths specialist teacher (MaST) and Specialist Leader of Education (SLE) for mathematics in Oxfordshire. She trained as an NCETM mastery specialist and has NCETM PD Lead accreditation. Steph is currently undertaking a part-time PhD, exploring the experiences of teachers working in multi-academy trusts – how expertise is utilised and whether agency is possible.

Publications

Mastery and optional standardised tests: some tensions, Mathematics Teaching (2019), 268, p.18-20

Georgia is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre. She is currently working on the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, primarily involved in qualitative data analysis. Georgia is also working on a British Academy funded project about care-experienced academics working in higher education.

Georgia came to research from a legal background. She initially worked as a researcher in the Centre for Child and Family Research at Loughborough University, where she was involved in multiple research and evaluation projects including, a prospective longitudinal study of children identified in infancy as likely to suffer significant harm; evaluations for the Department for Education Children’s Social Care Innovation Programme; and research on return home from care. More recently, Georgia worked as a Development Researcher at the NSPCC, involved in the development of local services for children and families from concept through to scale up.

Her primary research interests are transitions from care (e.g. transitions from care into adulthood, returning home from care) and the role of education in supporting and providing opportunities for vulnerable children. Georgia’s PhD focused on care leavers’ experiences of higher education in England.

Publications

Journal articles

Harrington, L., McElearney, A. and Hyde-Dryden, G. (2021) Adapting the Pregnancy in Mind (PiM) support service to virtual delivery. Journal of Birth and Parent Education, 8 (3).

Margolis, R., Jackson-Hollis, V., Hyde-Dryden, G., Robson-Brown, E., Smith, E. and McConnell, N (2020) Families facing multiple adversities: impact and interventions. Paediatrics and Child Health 30(11), 390-394.

Ward, H., Brown, R., Blackmore, J., Hyde-Dryden, G. and Thomas, C. (2019) Identifying parents who show capacity to make and sustain positive changes when infants are at risk of significant harm. Developing Practice: The Child, Youth and Family Work Journal, 54, 45-61.

McDermid, S., Hyde-Dryden, G. and Ward, H. (2015) Looking for long-term outcomes: What early interventions are needed for children and young people at risk of maltreatment in England? Irish Journal of Applied Social Studies, 15 (2), 36-49.

Hyde-Dryden, G. (2015) Overcoming self-reliance and lack of expectation among care leavers in higher education in England: the role of inter-agency working. Swiss Journal of Social Work, 16, 75-93, (Special issue).

Munro, E., Pinkerton, J., Mendes, P., Hyde Dryden, G., Herczog, M. and Benbenishty, R. (2011) The contribution of the UNC for the rights of the child to understanding and promoting the interests of young people making the transition from care to adulthood. Children and Youth Services Review 33 (12), 2417-2423.

 

Reports

McElearney, A., Murphy, C., Fullerton, D., Hyde-Dryden, G., Cosette, A. and Morris, S. (2021) School staff, parents and carers’ views and experience of the Keeping Safe whole-school education programme: Lessons from the process evaluation for teaching children to recognise abusive behaviours and tell. London: NSPCC.

McElearney, A., Hyde-Dryden, G., Walters, H., Palmer, L., Coulter, K. and Adamson, G. (2021) Process evaluation of Virtual Pregnancy in Mind during the Covid-19 pandemic. London: NSPCC.

McElearney, A., Hyde-Dryden, G., Palmer, L. and Walters, H. (2021) Reflections and learning from our local service response to families during Covid-19. London: NSPCC.

McElearney, A., Palmer, L., Walters, H., and Hyde-Dryden, G. (2020) Learning from adapting the Baby Steps programme in response to COVID-19. London: NSPCC.

Hyde-Dryden, G. and Ward, H. (2017) Towards a Family Justice Observatory – A Scoping Study: Main Findings Report of the International Scoping Exercise. Available at: http://wp.lancs.ac.uk/observatory-scoping-study/

Lushey, C., Hyde-Dryden, G., Holmes, L. and Blackmore, J. (2017) No Wrong Door evaluation report. London: Department for Education.

Holmes, L, Thomas, C, Hyde-Dryden, G, Williams, A (2017) Firstline evaluation report. London: Department for Education

Brown, R., Ward, H., Blackmore, J., Thomas, C. and Hyde-Dryden, G. (2016) Children identified in infancy as likely to suffer, significant harm: a prospective longitudinal study: age eight follow-up, London: Department for Education.

Hyde-Dryden, G., Gibb, J., Lea, J., Buckley, E., Holmes, L., Wallace, E., Lushey, C. and Lawson, D. (2015) Improving practice in respect of children who return home from care: Research report. London: Department for Education.

Hyde-Dryden G., Holmes L., Lawson D. and Blackmore J. (2015) Taking Care Practice Framework for Reunification evaluation report. Loughborough: Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University.

Ward, H., Brown, R. and Hyde Dryden, G. (2014) Assessing Parental Capacity to Change when Children are on the Edge of Care: An Overview of Research Evidence, Childhood Wellbeing Research Centre Report, London: Department for Education.

Dr Selena Nemorin is a UKRI Future Leaders Fellow and researcher/lecturer in sociology of digital technology at the University of Oxford.

Selena’s research focuses on critical theories of technology, surveillance studies, tech ethics, and youth and future media/technologies. She is currently working on the Fair-AIEd project which examines the role that public-private partnerships play in access and use of AI in emerging market economies.

Her past work includes research projects that have examined AI, IoT and ethics, the uses of new technologies in digital schools, educational equity and inclusion, as well as human rights policies and procedures in K-12 and post-secondary institutions.

Publications

Books

Nemorin, S. (2018). Biosurveillance in New Media Marketing: World, Discourse, Representation. New York, NY: Palgrave Macmillan.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Johnson, N., & Bulfin, S. (2017). Everyday Schooling in the Digital Age: High School, High Tech? Oxford, UK: Routledge.

Journal articles

Bonami, B. & Nemorin, S. (2021). Through three levels of abstraction. Towards an ecological framework for making sense of new technologies in education. Education and Information Technologies. doi: 10.1007/s10639-020-10305-1

Gandy, Jr. O. H. & Nemorin, S. (2020). Transportation and smart city imaginaries: A critical analysis of proposals for the USDOT Smart City Challenge. International Journal of Communication, 14, 1232-1252.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Bulfin, S., & Johnson, N. F. (2020). The ‘obvious’ stuff: exploring the mundane realities of students’ digital technology use in school. Digital Education Review, 37, https://revistes.ub.edu/index.php/der/article/view/30670

Ustek-Spilda, F., Powell, A. & Nemorin, S. (2019). Engaging with ethics in Internet of Things: Imaginaries in the social milieu of technology developers. Big Data and Society. July-Dec 1-12. doi: 10.1177/2053951719879468

Selwyn, N., Pangrazio, L., Nemorin, S., & Perrotta, C. (2019). What might the school of 2030 be like? An exercise in social science fiction. Learning, Media and Technology, 1-17. doi:10.1080/17439884.2020.1694944

Gandy, Jr. O. H. & Nemorin, S. (2018). Toward the political economy of ‘nudge’: Smart city variations. Information, Communication & Society. doi.org/10.1080/1369118X.2018.1477969

Williamson, B., Pykett, J. & Nemorin, S. (2018). Biosocial spaces and neurocomputational governance: brain-based and brain-targeted technologies in education. Discourse, 39(2), 258-275. doi:10.1080/01596306.2018.1394421

Nemorin, S. (2017). Affective capture in digital school spaces and the modulation of student subjectivities. Emotion, Space & Society, 24, 11-18. doi:10.1016/j.emospa.2017.05.007

Nemorin, S. (2017). Post-panoptic pedagogies: The changing nature of school surveillance in the digital age. Surveillance & Society. 15 (2): 239-253.

Nemorin, S. (2017). Neuromarketing and the ‘poor in world’ consumer: How the animalization of thinking underpins contemporary market research discourses. Consumption, Markets & Culture, 20 (1), 59-80 22. doi: 10.1080/10253866.2016.1160897

Nemorin, S. & Gandy, Jr. O.H. (2017). Exploring neuromarketing and its reliance on remote sensing: Social and ethical implications. International Journal of Communication, 11, 4824-4844.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Bulfin, S., & Johnson. N. (2017). Left to their own devices: The everyday realities of ‘one-to-one’ classrooms. Oxford Review of Education. doi: 10.1080/03054985.2017.1305047

Nemorin, S. (2016). The frustrations of digital fabrication: An auto/ethnographic exploration of 3D ‘Making’ in school. International Journal of Technology and Design Education. doi: 10.1007/s10798-016-9366-z

Nemorin, S. & Selwyn, N. (2016). Making the best of it? Exploring the realities of 3D printing in school. Research Papers in Education. doi: 10.1080/02671522.2016.1225802

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., & Johnson, N. (2016). High-tech, hard work: An investigation of teachers’ work in the digital age. Learning Media and Technology. doi:10.1080/17439884.2016.1252770

Bulfin, S., Johnson, N., Nemorin, S., & Selwyn, N. (2016). Nagging, noobs and new tricks – student perceptions of school as a context for digital technology use. Educational Studies 42(3), 239-251. doi: 10.1080/03055698.2016.1160824

Pinto, L. E. & Nemorin, S. (2015). Normalizing panoptic surveillance among children. Our Schools Our Selves, 24(2), 53-62.

Book sections

 Nemorin, S. (2017). Online safety. In SAGE Encyclopedia of Out-of-School Learning, K. Peppler (Ed). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Bulfin, S., & Johnson, N. (2016). Toward a digital sociology of school. In Digital Sociologies, J. Daniels, K. Gregory, & T. McMillan Cottom (Eds). Bristol, UK: Policy Press.

Boler, M. & Nemorin, S. (2013). Dissent, truthiness, and war: New media landscapes of 21st century propaganda. In The Oxford Handbook of Propaganda Studies, R. Castronovo and J. Auerbach (Eds.). New York, NY: Oxford University Press.

Monographs and reports

Powell, A., Nemorin, S., Berner, A., Douglas-Jones, R., Fritsch, E., Hanteer, O., … Vega-Aurelio, D. (2017). Values and ethics in innovation for responsible technology in Europe. Report for the EU Commission: Enabling responsible ICT-related research and innovation.

Selwyn, N., Johnson, N., Nemorin, S., & Knight, E. (2016). Going online on behalf of others: An investigation of ‘proxy’ Internet consumers. Report for the Australian Communications Consumer Action Network, Sydney.

Alice Aldinucci is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford, Department of Education. She is part of the team working on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani, and she is a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group.

She holds a PhD in Education from the University of Glasgow (UK) where she was awarded the LKAS Interdisciplinary Scholarship. Her thesis applies a longitudinal qualitative research design and draws on the combination of Critical Realism and Capability Approach to explore aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to adulthood in Chile. Prior to her PhD, she completed a MA in International Education and Development from the University of Sussex (UK) where she was awarded the Centre for International Education Prize for the best overall MA performance. For her MA at Sussex, she conducted an empirical dissertation on the meaning making of Inclusive Education in Nepal. She holds a MA in Languages and Cultures for International Communication and Cooperation from the University of Milan (Italy) with a fieldwork research on tensions between policy and practice in bilingual multicultural education for indigenous students in Higher Education in Peru; and a BA in Languages and Intercultural Mediation from the University of Arezzo (Italy).

Alice’s research interests are interdisciplinary and relate to the critical linkages between intersecting inequalities, education, individual/societal development, and social justice at local and global levels, motivated by the question what education for what/whose development?

Areas, theoretical approaches and methodologies of interests:
• Sociology of education including aspirations in post-school transitions
• Cultural political economy of education and life chances/human flourishing/social justice
• Tensions between global educational frameworks and local knowledge and practices
• Critical Realism
• Capability Approach
• Qualitative and participatory methodologies
• Digital storytelling for social change

Besides her work in academia, Alice has gained experience as researcher, development practitioner and educator working in projects including early childhood education programmes, refugees’ education, girls’ education, SEN and inclusive education, TVET, global citizenship education, arts-based pedagogies. She lived and worked in different countries including in Nepal (a country she has developed a strong bond with), Tanzania, El Salvador, Italy and the UK. These experiences have reinforced her critical approach to international education and global development and to education as a catalyst for both inequalities, injustices, violence and more equitable social change and peace-building processes.

She served as Student Representative of the British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) from 2017 to 2019 and she is currently part of the college of reviewers of the editorial board of Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education.

Publications:

Aldinucci, A. (2022). Understanding aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to postschool trajectories in Chile. PhD thesis, University of Glasgow.
Aldinucci, A., Valiente, O., Hurrell S., and Zancajo, A. (2021). Understanding aspirations: Why do secondary TVET students aim so high in Chile? Journal of Vocational Education & Training.

Rawle, G., Riddle, N., Pettersson, G., Wallin, J., Bici, M., Jasper, P., Harb, J., Hebbar, M., Davis, J., Aldinucci, A., (2017), EQUIP-Tanzania Impact Evaluation. Midline Technical Report, Volume I and II. Oxford Policy Management.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.
Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Steph is a primary-trained teacher, maths specialist teacher (MaST) and Specialist Leader of Education (SLE) for mathematics in Oxfordshire. She trained as an NCETM mastery specialist and has NCETM PD Lead accreditation. Steph is currently undertaking a part-time PhD, exploring the experiences of teachers working in multi-academy trusts – how expertise is utilised and whether agency is possible.

Publications

Mastery and optional standardised tests: some tensions, Mathematics Teaching (2019), 268, p.18-20

Georgia is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre. She is currently working on the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, primarily involved in qualitative data analysis. Georgia is also working on a British Academy funded project about care-experienced academics working in higher education.

Georgia came to research from a legal background. She initially worked as a researcher in the Centre for Child and Family Research at Loughborough University, where she was involved in multiple research and evaluation projects including, a prospective longitudinal study of children identified in infancy as likely to suffer significant harm; evaluations for the Department for Education Children’s Social Care Innovation Programme; and research on return home from care. More recently, Georgia worked as a Development Researcher at the NSPCC, involved in the development of local services for children and families from concept through to scale up.

Her primary research interests are transitions from care (e.g. transitions from care into adulthood, returning home from care) and the role of education in supporting and providing opportunities for vulnerable children. Georgia’s PhD focused on care leavers’ experiences of higher education in England.

Publications

Journal articles

Harrington, L., McElearney, A. and Hyde-Dryden, G. (2021) Adapting the Pregnancy in Mind (PiM) support service to virtual delivery. Journal of Birth and Parent Education, 8 (3).

Margolis, R., Jackson-Hollis, V., Hyde-Dryden, G., Robson-Brown, E., Smith, E. and McConnell, N (2020) Families facing multiple adversities: impact and interventions. Paediatrics and Child Health 30(11), 390-394.

Ward, H., Brown, R., Blackmore, J., Hyde-Dryden, G. and Thomas, C. (2019) Identifying parents who show capacity to make and sustain positive changes when infants are at risk of significant harm. Developing Practice: The Child, Youth and Family Work Journal, 54, 45-61.

McDermid, S., Hyde-Dryden, G. and Ward, H. (2015) Looking for long-term outcomes: What early interventions are needed for children and young people at risk of maltreatment in England? Irish Journal of Applied Social Studies, 15 (2), 36-49.

Hyde-Dryden, G. (2015) Overcoming self-reliance and lack of expectation among care leavers in higher education in England: the role of inter-agency working. Swiss Journal of Social Work, 16, 75-93, (Special issue).

Munro, E., Pinkerton, J., Mendes, P., Hyde Dryden, G., Herczog, M. and Benbenishty, R. (2011) The contribution of the UNC for the rights of the child to understanding and promoting the interests of young people making the transition from care to adulthood. Children and Youth Services Review 33 (12), 2417-2423.

 

Reports

McElearney, A., Murphy, C., Fullerton, D., Hyde-Dryden, G., Cosette, A. and Morris, S. (2021) School staff, parents and carers’ views and experience of the Keeping Safe whole-school education programme: Lessons from the process evaluation for teaching children to recognise abusive behaviours and tell. London: NSPCC.

McElearney, A., Hyde-Dryden, G., Walters, H., Palmer, L., Coulter, K. and Adamson, G. (2021) Process evaluation of Virtual Pregnancy in Mind during the Covid-19 pandemic. London: NSPCC.

McElearney, A., Hyde-Dryden, G., Palmer, L. and Walters, H. (2021) Reflections and learning from our local service response to families during Covid-19. London: NSPCC.

McElearney, A., Palmer, L., Walters, H., and Hyde-Dryden, G. (2020) Learning from adapting the Baby Steps programme in response to COVID-19. London: NSPCC.

Hyde-Dryden, G. and Ward, H. (2017) Towards a Family Justice Observatory – A Scoping Study: Main Findings Report of the International Scoping Exercise. Available at: http://wp.lancs.ac.uk/observatory-scoping-study/

Lushey, C., Hyde-Dryden, G., Holmes, L. and Blackmore, J. (2017) No Wrong Door evaluation report. London: Department for Education.

Holmes, L, Thomas, C, Hyde-Dryden, G, Williams, A (2017) Firstline evaluation report. London: Department for Education

Brown, R., Ward, H., Blackmore, J., Thomas, C. and Hyde-Dryden, G. (2016) Children identified in infancy as likely to suffer, significant harm: a prospective longitudinal study: age eight follow-up, London: Department for Education.

Hyde-Dryden, G., Gibb, J., Lea, J., Buckley, E., Holmes, L., Wallace, E., Lushey, C. and Lawson, D. (2015) Improving practice in respect of children who return home from care: Research report. London: Department for Education.

Hyde-Dryden G., Holmes L., Lawson D. and Blackmore J. (2015) Taking Care Practice Framework for Reunification evaluation report. Loughborough: Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University.

Ward, H., Brown, R. and Hyde Dryden, G. (2014) Assessing Parental Capacity to Change when Children are on the Edge of Care: An Overview of Research Evidence, Childhood Wellbeing Research Centre Report, London: Department for Education.

Dr Selena Nemorin is a UKRI Future Leaders Fellow and researcher/lecturer in sociology of digital technology at the University of Oxford.

Selena’s research focuses on critical theories of technology, surveillance studies, tech ethics, and youth and future media/technologies. She is currently working on the Fair-AIEd project which examines the role that public-private partnerships play in access and use of AI in emerging market economies.

Her past work includes research projects that have examined AI, IoT and ethics, the uses of new technologies in digital schools, educational equity and inclusion, as well as human rights policies and procedures in K-12 and post-secondary institutions.

Publications

Books

Nemorin, S. (2018). Biosurveillance in New Media Marketing: World, Discourse, Representation. New York, NY: Palgrave Macmillan.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Johnson, N., & Bulfin, S. (2017). Everyday Schooling in the Digital Age: High School, High Tech? Oxford, UK: Routledge.

Journal articles

Bonami, B. & Nemorin, S. (2021). Through three levels of abstraction. Towards an ecological framework for making sense of new technologies in education. Education and Information Technologies. doi: 10.1007/s10639-020-10305-1

Gandy, Jr. O. H. & Nemorin, S. (2020). Transportation and smart city imaginaries: A critical analysis of proposals for the USDOT Smart City Challenge. International Journal of Communication, 14, 1232-1252.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Bulfin, S., & Johnson, N. F. (2020). The ‘obvious’ stuff: exploring the mundane realities of students’ digital technology use in school. Digital Education Review, 37, https://revistes.ub.edu/index.php/der/article/view/30670

Ustek-Spilda, F., Powell, A. & Nemorin, S. (2019). Engaging with ethics in Internet of Things: Imaginaries in the social milieu of technology developers. Big Data and Society. July-Dec 1-12. doi: 10.1177/2053951719879468

Selwyn, N., Pangrazio, L., Nemorin, S., & Perrotta, C. (2019). What might the school of 2030 be like? An exercise in social science fiction. Learning, Media and Technology, 1-17. doi:10.1080/17439884.2020.1694944

Gandy, Jr. O. H. & Nemorin, S. (2018). Toward the political economy of ‘nudge’: Smart city variations. Information, Communication & Society. doi.org/10.1080/1369118X.2018.1477969

Williamson, B., Pykett, J. & Nemorin, S. (2018). Biosocial spaces and neurocomputational governance: brain-based and brain-targeted technologies in education. Discourse, 39(2), 258-275. doi:10.1080/01596306.2018.1394421

Nemorin, S. (2017). Affective capture in digital school spaces and the modulation of student subjectivities. Emotion, Space & Society, 24, 11-18. doi:10.1016/j.emospa.2017.05.007

Nemorin, S. (2017). Post-panoptic pedagogies: The changing nature of school surveillance in the digital age. Surveillance & Society. 15 (2): 239-253.

Nemorin, S. (2017). Neuromarketing and the ‘poor in world’ consumer: How the animalization of thinking underpins contemporary market research discourses. Consumption, Markets & Culture, 20 (1), 59-80 22. doi: 10.1080/10253866.2016.1160897

Nemorin, S. & Gandy, Jr. O.H. (2017). Exploring neuromarketing and its reliance on remote sensing: Social and ethical implications. International Journal of Communication, 11, 4824-4844.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Bulfin, S., & Johnson. N. (2017). Left to their own devices: The everyday realities of ‘one-to-one’ classrooms. Oxford Review of Education. doi: 10.1080/03054985.2017.1305047

Nemorin, S. (2016). The frustrations of digital fabrication: An auto/ethnographic exploration of 3D ‘Making’ in school. International Journal of Technology and Design Education. doi: 10.1007/s10798-016-9366-z

Nemorin, S. & Selwyn, N. (2016). Making the best of it? Exploring the realities of 3D printing in school. Research Papers in Education. doi: 10.1080/02671522.2016.1225802

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., & Johnson, N. (2016). High-tech, hard work: An investigation of teachers’ work in the digital age. Learning Media and Technology. doi:10.1080/17439884.2016.1252770

Bulfin, S., Johnson, N., Nemorin, S., & Selwyn, N. (2016). Nagging, noobs and new tricks – student perceptions of school as a context for digital technology use. Educational Studies 42(3), 239-251. doi: 10.1080/03055698.2016.1160824

Pinto, L. E. & Nemorin, S. (2015). Normalizing panoptic surveillance among children. Our Schools Our Selves, 24(2), 53-62.

Book sections

 Nemorin, S. (2017). Online safety. In SAGE Encyclopedia of Out-of-School Learning, K. Peppler (Ed). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Bulfin, S., & Johnson, N. (2016). Toward a digital sociology of school. In Digital Sociologies, J. Daniels, K. Gregory, & T. McMillan Cottom (Eds). Bristol, UK: Policy Press.

Boler, M. & Nemorin, S. (2013). Dissent, truthiness, and war: New media landscapes of 21st century propaganda. In The Oxford Handbook of Propaganda Studies, R. Castronovo and J. Auerbach (Eds.). New York, NY: Oxford University Press.

Monographs and reports

Powell, A., Nemorin, S., Berner, A., Douglas-Jones, R., Fritsch, E., Hanteer, O., … Vega-Aurelio, D. (2017). Values and ethics in innovation for responsible technology in Europe. Report for the EU Commission: Enabling responsible ICT-related research and innovation.

Selwyn, N., Johnson, N., Nemorin, S., & Knight, E. (2016). Going online on behalf of others: An investigation of ‘proxy’ Internet consumers. Report for the Australian Communications Consumer Action Network, Sydney.

Alice Aldinucci is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford, Department of Education. She is part of the team working on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani, and she is a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group.

She holds a PhD in Education from the University of Glasgow (UK) where she was awarded the LKAS Interdisciplinary Scholarship. Her thesis applies a longitudinal qualitative research design and draws on the combination of Critical Realism and Capability Approach to explore aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to adulthood in Chile. Prior to her PhD, she completed a MA in International Education and Development from the University of Sussex (UK) where she was awarded the Centre for International Education Prize for the best overall MA performance. For her MA at Sussex, she conducted an empirical dissertation on the meaning making of Inclusive Education in Nepal. She holds a MA in Languages and Cultures for International Communication and Cooperation from the University of Milan (Italy) with a fieldwork research on tensions between policy and practice in bilingual multicultural education for indigenous students in Higher Education in Peru; and a BA in Languages and Intercultural Mediation from the University of Arezzo (Italy).

Alice’s research interests are interdisciplinary and relate to the critical linkages between intersecting inequalities, education, individual/societal development, and social justice at local and global levels, motivated by the question what education for what/whose development?

Areas, theoretical approaches and methodologies of interests:
• Sociology of education including aspirations in post-school transitions
• Cultural political economy of education and life chances/human flourishing/social justice
• Tensions between global educational frameworks and local knowledge and practices
• Critical Realism
• Capability Approach
• Qualitative and participatory methodologies
• Digital storytelling for social change

Besides her work in academia, Alice has gained experience as researcher, development practitioner and educator working in projects including early childhood education programmes, refugees’ education, girls’ education, SEN and inclusive education, TVET, global citizenship education, arts-based pedagogies. She lived and worked in different countries including in Nepal (a country she has developed a strong bond with), Tanzania, El Salvador, Italy and the UK. These experiences have reinforced her critical approach to international education and global development and to education as a catalyst for both inequalities, injustices, violence and more equitable social change and peace-building processes.

She served as Student Representative of the British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) from 2017 to 2019 and she is currently part of the college of reviewers of the editorial board of Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education.

Publications:

Aldinucci, A. (2022). Understanding aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to postschool trajectories in Chile. PhD thesis, University of Glasgow.
Aldinucci, A., Valiente, O., Hurrell S., and Zancajo, A. (2021). Understanding aspirations: Why do secondary TVET students aim so high in Chile? Journal of Vocational Education & Training.

Rawle, G., Riddle, N., Pettersson, G., Wallin, J., Bici, M., Jasper, P., Harb, J., Hebbar, M., Davis, J., Aldinucci, A., (2017), EQUIP-Tanzania Impact Evaluation. Midline Technical Report, Volume I and II. Oxford Policy Management.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.
Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Steph is a primary-trained teacher, maths specialist teacher (MaST) and Specialist Leader of Education (SLE) for mathematics in Oxfordshire. She trained as an NCETM mastery specialist and has NCETM PD Lead accreditation. Steph is currently undertaking a part-time PhD, exploring the experiences of teachers working in multi-academy trusts – how expertise is utilised and whether agency is possible.

Publications

Mastery and optional standardised tests: some tensions, Mathematics Teaching (2019), 268, p.18-20

Georgia is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre. She is currently working on the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, primarily involved in qualitative data analysis. Georgia is also working on a British Academy funded project about care-experienced academics working in higher education.

Georgia came to research from a legal background. She initially worked as a researcher in the Centre for Child and Family Research at Loughborough University, where she was involved in multiple research and evaluation projects including, a prospective longitudinal study of children identified in infancy as likely to suffer significant harm; evaluations for the Department for Education Children’s Social Care Innovation Programme; and research on return home from care. More recently, Georgia worked as a Development Researcher at the NSPCC, involved in the development of local services for children and families from concept through to scale up.

Her primary research interests are transitions from care (e.g. transitions from care into adulthood, returning home from care) and the role of education in supporting and providing opportunities for vulnerable children. Georgia’s PhD focused on care leavers’ experiences of higher education in England.

Publications

Journal articles

Harrington, L., McElearney, A. and Hyde-Dryden, G. (2021) Adapting the Pregnancy in Mind (PiM) support service to virtual delivery. Journal of Birth and Parent Education, 8 (3).

Margolis, R., Jackson-Hollis, V., Hyde-Dryden, G., Robson-Brown, E., Smith, E. and McConnell, N (2020) Families facing multiple adversities: impact and interventions. Paediatrics and Child Health 30(11), 390-394.

Ward, H., Brown, R., Blackmore, J., Hyde-Dryden, G. and Thomas, C. (2019) Identifying parents who show capacity to make and sustain positive changes when infants are at risk of significant harm. Developing Practice: The Child, Youth and Family Work Journal, 54, 45-61.

McDermid, S., Hyde-Dryden, G. and Ward, H. (2015) Looking for long-term outcomes: What early interventions are needed for children and young people at risk of maltreatment in England? Irish Journal of Applied Social Studies, 15 (2), 36-49.

Hyde-Dryden, G. (2015) Overcoming self-reliance and lack of expectation among care leavers in higher education in England: the role of inter-agency working. Swiss Journal of Social Work, 16, 75-93, (Special issue).

Munro, E., Pinkerton, J., Mendes, P., Hyde Dryden, G., Herczog, M. and Benbenishty, R. (2011) The contribution of the UNC for the rights of the child to understanding and promoting the interests of young people making the transition from care to adulthood. Children and Youth Services Review 33 (12), 2417-2423.

 

Reports

McElearney, A., Murphy, C., Fullerton, D., Hyde-Dryden, G., Cosette, A. and Morris, S. (2021) School staff, parents and carers’ views and experience of the Keeping Safe whole-school education programme: Lessons from the process evaluation for teaching children to recognise abusive behaviours and tell. London: NSPCC.

McElearney, A., Hyde-Dryden, G., Walters, H., Palmer, L., Coulter, K. and Adamson, G. (2021) Process evaluation of Virtual Pregnancy in Mind during the Covid-19 pandemic. London: NSPCC.

McElearney, A., Hyde-Dryden, G., Palmer, L. and Walters, H. (2021) Reflections and learning from our local service response to families during Covid-19. London: NSPCC.

McElearney, A., Palmer, L., Walters, H., and Hyde-Dryden, G. (2020) Learning from adapting the Baby Steps programme in response to COVID-19. London: NSPCC.

Hyde-Dryden, G. and Ward, H. (2017) Towards a Family Justice Observatory – A Scoping Study: Main Findings Report of the International Scoping Exercise. Available at: http://wp.lancs.ac.uk/observatory-scoping-study/

Lushey, C., Hyde-Dryden, G., Holmes, L. and Blackmore, J. (2017) No Wrong Door evaluation report. London: Department for Education.

Holmes, L, Thomas, C, Hyde-Dryden, G, Williams, A (2017) Firstline evaluation report. London: Department for Education

Brown, R., Ward, H., Blackmore, J., Thomas, C. and Hyde-Dryden, G. (2016) Children identified in infancy as likely to suffer, significant harm: a prospective longitudinal study: age eight follow-up, London: Department for Education.

Hyde-Dryden, G., Gibb, J., Lea, J., Buckley, E., Holmes, L., Wallace, E., Lushey, C. and Lawson, D. (2015) Improving practice in respect of children who return home from care: Research report. London: Department for Education.

Hyde-Dryden G., Holmes L., Lawson D. and Blackmore J. (2015) Taking Care Practice Framework for Reunification evaluation report. Loughborough: Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University.

Ward, H., Brown, R. and Hyde Dryden, G. (2014) Assessing Parental Capacity to Change when Children are on the Edge of Care: An Overview of Research Evidence, Childhood Wellbeing Research Centre Report, London: Department for Education.

Dr Selena Nemorin is a UKRI Future Leaders Fellow and researcher/lecturer in sociology of digital technology at the University of Oxford.

Selena’s research focuses on critical theories of technology, surveillance studies, tech ethics, and youth and future media/technologies. She is currently working on the Fair-AIEd project which examines the role that public-private partnerships play in access and use of AI in emerging market economies.

Her past work includes research projects that have examined AI, IoT and ethics, the uses of new technologies in digital schools, educational equity and inclusion, as well as human rights policies and procedures in K-12 and post-secondary institutions.

Publications

Books

Nemorin, S. (2018). Biosurveillance in New Media Marketing: World, Discourse, Representation. New York, NY: Palgrave Macmillan.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Johnson, N., & Bulfin, S. (2017). Everyday Schooling in the Digital Age: High School, High Tech? Oxford, UK: Routledge.

Journal articles

Bonami, B. & Nemorin, S. (2021). Through three levels of abstraction. Towards an ecological framework for making sense of new technologies in education. Education and Information Technologies. doi: 10.1007/s10639-020-10305-1

Gandy, Jr. O. H. & Nemorin, S. (2020). Transportation and smart city imaginaries: A critical analysis of proposals for the USDOT Smart City Challenge. International Journal of Communication, 14, 1232-1252.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Bulfin, S., & Johnson, N. F. (2020). The ‘obvious’ stuff: exploring the mundane realities of students’ digital technology use in school. Digital Education Review, 37, https://revistes.ub.edu/index.php/der/article/view/30670

Ustek-Spilda, F., Powell, A. & Nemorin, S. (2019). Engaging with ethics in Internet of Things: Imaginaries in the social milieu of technology developers. Big Data and Society. July-Dec 1-12. doi: 10.1177/2053951719879468

Selwyn, N., Pangrazio, L., Nemorin, S., & Perrotta, C. (2019). What might the school of 2030 be like? An exercise in social science fiction. Learning, Media and Technology, 1-17. doi:10.1080/17439884.2020.1694944

Gandy, Jr. O. H. & Nemorin, S. (2018). Toward the political economy of ‘nudge’: Smart city variations. Information, Communication & Society. doi.org/10.1080/1369118X.2018.1477969

Williamson, B., Pykett, J. & Nemorin, S. (2018). Biosocial spaces and neurocomputational governance: brain-based and brain-targeted technologies in education. Discourse, 39(2), 258-275. doi:10.1080/01596306.2018.1394421

Nemorin, S. (2017). Affective capture in digital school spaces and the modulation of student subjectivities. Emotion, Space & Society, 24, 11-18. doi:10.1016/j.emospa.2017.05.007

Nemorin, S. (2017). Post-panoptic pedagogies: The changing nature of school surveillance in the digital age. Surveillance & Society. 15 (2): 239-253.

Nemorin, S. (2017). Neuromarketing and the ‘poor in world’ consumer: How the animalization of thinking underpins contemporary market research discourses. Consumption, Markets & Culture, 20 (1), 59-80 22. doi: 10.1080/10253866.2016.1160897

Nemorin, S. & Gandy, Jr. O.H. (2017). Exploring neuromarketing and its reliance on remote sensing: Social and ethical implications. International Journal of Communication, 11, 4824-4844.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Bulfin, S., & Johnson. N. (2017). Left to their own devices: The everyday realities of ‘one-to-one’ classrooms. Oxford Review of Education. doi: 10.1080/03054985.2017.1305047

Nemorin, S. (2016). The frustrations of digital fabrication: An auto/ethnographic exploration of 3D ‘Making’ in school. International Journal of Technology and Design Education. doi: 10.1007/s10798-016-9366-z

Nemorin, S. & Selwyn, N. (2016). Making the best of it? Exploring the realities of 3D printing in school. Research Papers in Education. doi: 10.1080/02671522.2016.1225802

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., & Johnson, N. (2016). High-tech, hard work: An investigation of teachers’ work in the digital age. Learning Media and Technology. doi:10.1080/17439884.2016.1252770

Bulfin, S., Johnson, N., Nemorin, S., & Selwyn, N. (2016). Nagging, noobs and new tricks – student perceptions of school as a context for digital technology use. Educational Studies 42(3), 239-251. doi: 10.1080/03055698.2016.1160824

Pinto, L. E. & Nemorin, S. (2015). Normalizing panoptic surveillance among children. Our Schools Our Selves, 24(2), 53-62.

Book sections

 Nemorin, S. (2017). Online safety. In SAGE Encyclopedia of Out-of-School Learning, K. Peppler (Ed). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Bulfin, S., & Johnson, N. (2016). Toward a digital sociology of school. In Digital Sociologies, J. Daniels, K. Gregory, & T. McMillan Cottom (Eds). Bristol, UK: Policy Press.

Boler, M. & Nemorin, S. (2013). Dissent, truthiness, and war: New media landscapes of 21st century propaganda. In The Oxford Handbook of Propaganda Studies, R. Castronovo and J. Auerbach (Eds.). New York, NY: Oxford University Press.

Monographs and reports

Powell, A., Nemorin, S., Berner, A., Douglas-Jones, R., Fritsch, E., Hanteer, O., … Vega-Aurelio, D. (2017). Values and ethics in innovation for responsible technology in Europe. Report for the EU Commission: Enabling responsible ICT-related research and innovation.

Selwyn, N., Johnson, N., Nemorin, S., & Knight, E. (2016). Going online on behalf of others: An investigation of ‘proxy’ Internet consumers. Report for the Australian Communications Consumer Action Network, Sydney.

Alice Aldinucci is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford, Department of Education. She is part of the team working on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani, and she is a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group.

She holds a PhD in Education from the University of Glasgow (UK) where she was awarded the LKAS Interdisciplinary Scholarship. Her thesis applies a longitudinal qualitative research design and draws on the combination of Critical Realism and Capability Approach to explore aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to adulthood in Chile. Prior to her PhD, she completed a MA in International Education and Development from the University of Sussex (UK) where she was awarded the Centre for International Education Prize for the best overall MA performance. For her MA at Sussex, she conducted an empirical dissertation on the meaning making of Inclusive Education in Nepal. She holds a MA in Languages and Cultures for International Communication and Cooperation from the University of Milan (Italy) with a fieldwork research on tensions between policy and practice in bilingual multicultural education for indigenous students in Higher Education in Peru; and a BA in Languages and Intercultural Mediation from the University of Arezzo (Italy).

Alice’s research interests are interdisciplinary and relate to the critical linkages between intersecting inequalities, education, individual/societal development, and social justice at local and global levels, motivated by the question what education for what/whose development?

Areas, theoretical approaches and methodologies of interests:
• Sociology of education including aspirations in post-school transitions
• Cultural political economy of education and life chances/human flourishing/social justice
• Tensions between global educational frameworks and local knowledge and practices
• Critical Realism
• Capability Approach
• Qualitative and participatory methodologies
• Digital storytelling for social change

Besides her work in academia, Alice has gained experience as researcher, development practitioner and educator working in projects including early childhood education programmes, refugees’ education, girls’ education, SEN and inclusive education, TVET, global citizenship education, arts-based pedagogies. She lived and worked in different countries including in Nepal (a country she has developed a strong bond with), Tanzania, El Salvador, Italy and the UK. These experiences have reinforced her critical approach to international education and global development and to education as a catalyst for both inequalities, injustices, violence and more equitable social change and peace-building processes.

She served as Student Representative of the British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) from 2017 to 2019 and she is currently part of the college of reviewers of the editorial board of Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education.

Publications:

Aldinucci, A. (2022). Understanding aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to postschool trajectories in Chile. PhD thesis, University of Glasgow.
Aldinucci, A., Valiente, O., Hurrell S., and Zancajo, A. (2021). Understanding aspirations: Why do secondary TVET students aim so high in Chile? Journal of Vocational Education & Training.

Rawle, G., Riddle, N., Pettersson, G., Wallin, J., Bici, M., Jasper, P., Harb, J., Hebbar, M., Davis, J., Aldinucci, A., (2017), EQUIP-Tanzania Impact Evaluation. Midline Technical Report, Volume I and II. Oxford Policy Management.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.
Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Steph is a primary-trained teacher, maths specialist teacher (MaST) and Specialist Leader of Education (SLE) for mathematics in Oxfordshire. She trained as an NCETM mastery specialist and has NCETM PD Lead accreditation. Steph is currently undertaking a part-time PhD, exploring the experiences of teachers working in multi-academy trusts – how expertise is utilised and whether agency is possible.

Publications

Mastery and optional standardised tests: some tensions, Mathematics Teaching (2019), 268, p.18-20

Georgia is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre. She is currently working on the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, primarily involved in qualitative data analysis. Georgia is also working on a British Academy funded project about care-experienced academics working in higher education.

Georgia came to research from a legal background. She initially worked as a researcher in the Centre for Child and Family Research at Loughborough University, where she was involved in multiple research and evaluation projects including, a prospective longitudinal study of children identified in infancy as likely to suffer significant harm; evaluations for the Department for Education Children’s Social Care Innovation Programme; and research on return home from care. More recently, Georgia worked as a Development Researcher at the NSPCC, involved in the development of local services for children and families from concept through to scale up.

Her primary research interests are transitions from care (e.g. transitions from care into adulthood, returning home from care) and the role of education in supporting and providing opportunities for vulnerable children. Georgia’s PhD focused on care leavers’ experiences of higher education in England.

Publications

Journal articles

Harrington, L., McElearney, A. and Hyde-Dryden, G. (2021) Adapting the Pregnancy in Mind (PiM) support service to virtual delivery. Journal of Birth and Parent Education, 8 (3).

Margolis, R., Jackson-Hollis, V., Hyde-Dryden, G., Robson-Brown, E., Smith, E. and McConnell, N (2020) Families facing multiple adversities: impact and interventions. Paediatrics and Child Health 30(11), 390-394.

Ward, H., Brown, R., Blackmore, J., Hyde-Dryden, G. and Thomas, C. (2019) Identifying parents who show capacity to make and sustain positive changes when infants are at risk of significant harm. Developing Practice: The Child, Youth and Family Work Journal, 54, 45-61.

McDermid, S., Hyde-Dryden, G. and Ward, H. (2015) Looking for long-term outcomes: What early interventions are needed for children and young people at risk of maltreatment in England? Irish Journal of Applied Social Studies, 15 (2), 36-49.

Hyde-Dryden, G. (2015) Overcoming self-reliance and lack of expectation among care leavers in higher education in England: the role of inter-agency working. Swiss Journal of Social Work, 16, 75-93, (Special issue).

Munro, E., Pinkerton, J., Mendes, P., Hyde Dryden, G., Herczog, M. and Benbenishty, R. (2011) The contribution of the UNC for the rights of the child to understanding and promoting the interests of young people making the transition from care to adulthood. Children and Youth Services Review 33 (12), 2417-2423.

 

Reports

McElearney, A., Murphy, C., Fullerton, D., Hyde-Dryden, G., Cosette, A. and Morris, S. (2021) School staff, parents and carers’ views and experience of the Keeping Safe whole-school education programme: Lessons from the process evaluation for teaching children to recognise abusive behaviours and tell. London: NSPCC.

McElearney, A., Hyde-Dryden, G., Walters, H., Palmer, L., Coulter, K. and Adamson, G. (2021) Process evaluation of Virtual Pregnancy in Mind during the Covid-19 pandemic. London: NSPCC.

McElearney, A., Hyde-Dryden, G., Palmer, L. and Walters, H. (2021) Reflections and learning from our local service response to families during Covid-19. London: NSPCC.

McElearney, A., Palmer, L., Walters, H., and Hyde-Dryden, G. (2020) Learning from adapting the Baby Steps programme in response to COVID-19. London: NSPCC.

Hyde-Dryden, G. and Ward, H. (2017) Towards a Family Justice Observatory – A Scoping Study: Main Findings Report of the International Scoping Exercise. Available at: http://wp.lancs.ac.uk/observatory-scoping-study/

Lushey, C., Hyde-Dryden, G., Holmes, L. and Blackmore, J. (2017) No Wrong Door evaluation report. London: Department for Education.

Holmes, L, Thomas, C, Hyde-Dryden, G, Williams, A (2017) Firstline evaluation report. London: Department for Education

Brown, R., Ward, H., Blackmore, J., Thomas, C. and Hyde-Dryden, G. (2016) Children identified in infancy as likely to suffer, significant harm: a prospective longitudinal study: age eight follow-up, London: Department for Education.

Hyde-Dryden, G., Gibb, J., Lea, J., Buckley, E., Holmes, L., Wallace, E., Lushey, C. and Lawson, D. (2015) Improving practice in respect of children who return home from care: Research report. London: Department for Education.

Hyde-Dryden G., Holmes L., Lawson D. and Blackmore J. (2015) Taking Care Practice Framework for Reunification evaluation report. Loughborough: Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University.

Ward, H., Brown, R. and Hyde Dryden, G. (2014) Assessing Parental Capacity to Change when Children are on the Edge of Care: An Overview of Research Evidence, Childhood Wellbeing Research Centre Report, London: Department for Education.

Dr Selena Nemorin is a UKRI Future Leaders Fellow and researcher/lecturer in sociology of digital technology at the University of Oxford.

Selena’s research focuses on critical theories of technology, surveillance studies, tech ethics, and youth and future media/technologies. She is currently working on the Fair-AIEd project which examines the role that public-private partnerships play in access and use of AI in emerging market economies.

Her past work includes research projects that have examined AI, IoT and ethics, the uses of new technologies in digital schools, educational equity and inclusion, as well as human rights policies and procedures in K-12 and post-secondary institutions.

Publications

Books

Nemorin, S. (2018). Biosurveillance in New Media Marketing: World, Discourse, Representation. New York, NY: Palgrave Macmillan.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Johnson, N., & Bulfin, S. (2017). Everyday Schooling in the Digital Age: High School, High Tech? Oxford, UK: Routledge.

Journal articles

Bonami, B. & Nemorin, S. (2021). Through three levels of abstraction. Towards an ecological framework for making sense of new technologies in education. Education and Information Technologies. doi: 10.1007/s10639-020-10305-1

Gandy, Jr. O. H. & Nemorin, S. (2020). Transportation and smart city imaginaries: A critical analysis of proposals for the USDOT Smart City Challenge. International Journal of Communication, 14, 1232-1252.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Bulfin, S., & Johnson, N. F. (2020). The ‘obvious’ stuff: exploring the mundane realities of students’ digital technology use in school. Digital Education Review, 37, https://revistes.ub.edu/index.php/der/article/view/30670

Ustek-Spilda, F., Powell, A. & Nemorin, S. (2019). Engaging with ethics in Internet of Things: Imaginaries in the social milieu of technology developers. Big Data and Society. July-Dec 1-12. doi: 10.1177/2053951719879468

Selwyn, N., Pangrazio, L., Nemorin, S., & Perrotta, C. (2019). What might the school of 2030 be like? An exercise in social science fiction. Learning, Media and Technology, 1-17. doi:10.1080/17439884.2020.1694944

Gandy, Jr. O. H. & Nemorin, S. (2018). Toward the political economy of ‘nudge’: Smart city variations. Information, Communication & Society. doi.org/10.1080/1369118X.2018.1477969

Williamson, B., Pykett, J. & Nemorin, S. (2018). Biosocial spaces and neurocomputational governance: brain-based and brain-targeted technologies in education. Discourse, 39(2), 258-275. doi:10.1080/01596306.2018.1394421

Nemorin, S. (2017). Affective capture in digital school spaces and the modulation of student subjectivities. Emotion, Space & Society, 24, 11-18. doi:10.1016/j.emospa.2017.05.007

Nemorin, S. (2017). Post-panoptic pedagogies: The changing nature of school surveillance in the digital age. Surveillance & Society. 15 (2): 239-253.

Nemorin, S. (2017). Neuromarketing and the ‘poor in world’ consumer: How the animalization of thinking underpins contemporary market research discourses. Consumption, Markets & Culture, 20 (1), 59-80 22. doi: 10.1080/10253866.2016.1160897

Nemorin, S. & Gandy, Jr. O.H. (2017). Exploring neuromarketing and its reliance on remote sensing: Social and ethical implications. International Journal of Communication, 11, 4824-4844.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Bulfin, S., & Johnson. N. (2017). Left to their own devices: The everyday realities of ‘one-to-one’ classrooms. Oxford Review of Education. doi: 10.1080/03054985.2017.1305047

Nemorin, S. (2016). The frustrations of digital fabrication: An auto/ethnographic exploration of 3D ‘Making’ in school. International Journal of Technology and Design Education. doi: 10.1007/s10798-016-9366-z

Nemorin, S. & Selwyn, N. (2016). Making the best of it? Exploring the realities of 3D printing in school. Research Papers in Education. doi: 10.1080/02671522.2016.1225802

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., & Johnson, N. (2016). High-tech, hard work: An investigation of teachers’ work in the digital age. Learning Media and Technology. doi:10.1080/17439884.2016.1252770

Bulfin, S., Johnson, N., Nemorin, S., & Selwyn, N. (2016). Nagging, noobs and new tricks – student perceptions of school as a context for digital technology use. Educational Studies 42(3), 239-251. doi: 10.1080/03055698.2016.1160824

Pinto, L. E. & Nemorin, S. (2015). Normalizing panoptic surveillance among children. Our Schools Our Selves, 24(2), 53-62.

Book sections

 Nemorin, S. (2017). Online safety. In SAGE Encyclopedia of Out-of-School Learning, K. Peppler (Ed). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Bulfin, S., & Johnson, N. (2016). Toward a digital sociology of school. In Digital Sociologies, J. Daniels, K. Gregory, & T. McMillan Cottom (Eds). Bristol, UK: Policy Press.

Boler, M. & Nemorin, S. (2013). Dissent, truthiness, and war: New media landscapes of 21st century propaganda. In The Oxford Handbook of Propaganda Studies, R. Castronovo and J. Auerbach (Eds.). New York, NY: Oxford University Press.

Monographs and reports

Powell, A., Nemorin, S., Berner, A., Douglas-Jones, R., Fritsch, E., Hanteer, O., … Vega-Aurelio, D. (2017). Values and ethics in innovation for responsible technology in Europe. Report for the EU Commission: Enabling responsible ICT-related research and innovation.

Selwyn, N., Johnson, N., Nemorin, S., & Knight, E. (2016). Going online on behalf of others: An investigation of ‘proxy’ Internet consumers. Report for the Australian Communications Consumer Action Network, Sydney.

Alice Aldinucci is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford, Department of Education. She is part of the team working on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani, and she is a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group.

She holds a PhD in Education from the University of Glasgow (UK) where she was awarded the LKAS Interdisciplinary Scholarship. Her thesis applies a longitudinal qualitative research design and draws on the combination of Critical Realism and Capability Approach to explore aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to adulthood in Chile. Prior to her PhD, she completed a MA in International Education and Development from the University of Sussex (UK) where she was awarded the Centre for International Education Prize for the best overall MA performance. For her MA at Sussex, she conducted an empirical dissertation on the meaning making of Inclusive Education in Nepal. She holds a MA in Languages and Cultures for International Communication and Cooperation from the University of Milan (Italy) with a fieldwork research on tensions between policy and practice in bilingual multicultural education for indigenous students in Higher Education in Peru; and a BA in Languages and Intercultural Mediation from the University of Arezzo (Italy).

Alice’s research interests are interdisciplinary and relate to the critical linkages between intersecting inequalities, education, individual/societal development, and social justice at local and global levels, motivated by the question what education for what/whose development?

Areas, theoretical approaches and methodologies of interests:
• Sociology of education including aspirations in post-school transitions
• Cultural political economy of education and life chances/human flourishing/social justice
• Tensions between global educational frameworks and local knowledge and practices
• Critical Realism
• Capability Approach
• Qualitative and participatory methodologies
• Digital storytelling for social change

Besides her work in academia, Alice has gained experience as researcher, development practitioner and educator working in projects including early childhood education programmes, refugees’ education, girls’ education, SEN and inclusive education, TVET, global citizenship education, arts-based pedagogies. She lived and worked in different countries including in Nepal (a country she has developed a strong bond with), Tanzania, El Salvador, Italy and the UK. These experiences have reinforced her critical approach to international education and global development and to education as a catalyst for both inequalities, injustices, violence and more equitable social change and peace-building processes.

She served as Student Representative of the British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) from 2017 to 2019 and she is currently part of the college of reviewers of the editorial board of Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education.

Publications:

Aldinucci, A. (2022). Understanding aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to postschool trajectories in Chile. PhD thesis, University of Glasgow.
Aldinucci, A., Valiente, O., Hurrell S., and Zancajo, A. (2021). Understanding aspirations: Why do secondary TVET students aim so high in Chile? Journal of Vocational Education & Training.

Rawle, G., Riddle, N., Pettersson, G., Wallin, J., Bici, M., Jasper, P., Harb, J., Hebbar, M., Davis, J., Aldinucci, A., (2017), EQUIP-Tanzania Impact Evaluation. Midline Technical Report, Volume I and II. Oxford Policy Management.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.
Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Steph is a primary-trained teacher, maths specialist teacher (MaST) and Specialist Leader of Education (SLE) for mathematics in Oxfordshire. She trained as an NCETM mastery specialist and has NCETM PD Lead accreditation. Steph is currently undertaking a part-time PhD, exploring the experiences of teachers working in multi-academy trusts – how expertise is utilised and whether agency is possible.

Publications

Mastery and optional standardised tests: some tensions, Mathematics Teaching (2019), 268, p.18-20

Georgia is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre. She is currently working on the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, primarily involved in qualitative data analysis. Georgia is also working on a British Academy funded project about care-experienced academics working in higher education.

Georgia came to research from a legal background. She initially worked as a researcher in the Centre for Child and Family Research at Loughborough University, where she was involved in multiple research and evaluation projects including, a prospective longitudinal study of children identified in infancy as likely to suffer significant harm; evaluations for the Department for Education Children’s Social Care Innovation Programme; and research on return home from care. More recently, Georgia worked as a Development Researcher at the NSPCC, involved in the development of local services for children and families from concept through to scale up.

Her primary research interests are transitions from care (e.g. transitions from care into adulthood, returning home from care) and the role of education in supporting and providing opportunities for vulnerable children. Georgia’s PhD focused on care leavers’ experiences of higher education in England.

Publications

Journal articles

Harrington, L., McElearney, A. and Hyde-Dryden, G. (2021) Adapting the Pregnancy in Mind (PiM) support service to virtual delivery. Journal of Birth and Parent Education, 8 (3).

Margolis, R., Jackson-Hollis, V., Hyde-Dryden, G., Robson-Brown, E., Smith, E. and McConnell, N (2020) Families facing multiple adversities: impact and interventions. Paediatrics and Child Health 30(11), 390-394.

Ward, H., Brown, R., Blackmore, J., Hyde-Dryden, G. and Thomas, C. (2019) Identifying parents who show capacity to make and sustain positive changes when infants are at risk of significant harm. Developing Practice: The Child, Youth and Family Work Journal, 54, 45-61.

McDermid, S., Hyde-Dryden, G. and Ward, H. (2015) Looking for long-term outcomes: What early interventions are needed for children and young people at risk of maltreatment in England? Irish Journal of Applied Social Studies, 15 (2), 36-49.

Hyde-Dryden, G. (2015) Overcoming self-reliance and lack of expectation among care leavers in higher education in England: the role of inter-agency working. Swiss Journal of Social Work, 16, 75-93, (Special issue).

Munro, E., Pinkerton, J., Mendes, P., Hyde Dryden, G., Herczog, M. and Benbenishty, R. (2011) The contribution of the UNC for the rights of the child to understanding and promoting the interests of young people making the transition from care to adulthood. Children and Youth Services Review 33 (12), 2417-2423.

 

Reports

McElearney, A., Murphy, C., Fullerton, D., Hyde-Dryden, G., Cosette, A. and Morris, S. (2021) School staff, parents and carers’ views and experience of the Keeping Safe whole-school education programme: Lessons from the process evaluation for teaching children to recognise abusive behaviours and tell. London: NSPCC.

McElearney, A., Hyde-Dryden, G., Walters, H., Palmer, L., Coulter, K. and Adamson, G. (2021) Process evaluation of Virtual Pregnancy in Mind during the Covid-19 pandemic. London: NSPCC.

McElearney, A., Hyde-Dryden, G., Palmer, L. and Walters, H. (2021) Reflections and learning from our local service response to families during Covid-19. London: NSPCC.

McElearney, A., Palmer, L., Walters, H., and Hyde-Dryden, G. (2020) Learning from adapting the Baby Steps programme in response to COVID-19. London: NSPCC.

Hyde-Dryden, G. and Ward, H. (2017) Towards a Family Justice Observatory – A Scoping Study: Main Findings Report of the International Scoping Exercise. Available at: http://wp.lancs.ac.uk/observatory-scoping-study/

Lushey, C., Hyde-Dryden, G., Holmes, L. and Blackmore, J. (2017) No Wrong Door evaluation report. London: Department for Education.

Holmes, L, Thomas, C, Hyde-Dryden, G, Williams, A (2017) Firstline evaluation report. London: Department for Education

Brown, R., Ward, H., Blackmore, J., Thomas, C. and Hyde-Dryden, G. (2016) Children identified in infancy as likely to suffer, significant harm: a prospective longitudinal study: age eight follow-up, London: Department for Education.

Hyde-Dryden, G., Gibb, J., Lea, J., Buckley, E., Holmes, L., Wallace, E., Lushey, C. and Lawson, D. (2015) Improving practice in respect of children who return home from care: Research report. London: Department for Education.

Hyde-Dryden G., Holmes L., Lawson D. and Blackmore J. (2015) Taking Care Practice Framework for Reunification evaluation report. Loughborough: Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University.

Ward, H., Brown, R. and Hyde Dryden, G. (2014) Assessing Parental Capacity to Change when Children are on the Edge of Care: An Overview of Research Evidence, Childhood Wellbeing Research Centre Report, London: Department for Education.

Dr Selena Nemorin is a UKRI Future Leaders Fellow and researcher/lecturer in sociology of digital technology at the University of Oxford.

Selena’s research focuses on critical theories of technology, surveillance studies, tech ethics, and youth and future media/technologies. She is currently working on the Fair-AIEd project which examines the role that public-private partnerships play in access and use of AI in emerging market economies.

Her past work includes research projects that have examined AI, IoT and ethics, the uses of new technologies in digital schools, educational equity and inclusion, as well as human rights policies and procedures in K-12 and post-secondary institutions.

Publications

Books

Nemorin, S. (2018). Biosurveillance in New Media Marketing: World, Discourse, Representation. New York, NY: Palgrave Macmillan.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Johnson, N., & Bulfin, S. (2017). Everyday Schooling in the Digital Age: High School, High Tech? Oxford, UK: Routledge.

Journal articles

Bonami, B. & Nemorin, S. (2021). Through three levels of abstraction. Towards an ecological framework for making sense of new technologies in education. Education and Information Technologies. doi: 10.1007/s10639-020-10305-1

Gandy, Jr. O. H. & Nemorin, S. (2020). Transportation and smart city imaginaries: A critical analysis of proposals for the USDOT Smart City Challenge. International Journal of Communication, 14, 1232-1252.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Bulfin, S., & Johnson, N. F. (2020). The ‘obvious’ stuff: exploring the mundane realities of students’ digital technology use in school. Digital Education Review, 37, https://revistes.ub.edu/index.php/der/article/view/30670

Ustek-Spilda, F., Powell, A. & Nemorin, S. (2019). Engaging with ethics in Internet of Things: Imaginaries in the social milieu of technology developers. Big Data and Society. July-Dec 1-12. doi: 10.1177/2053951719879468

Selwyn, N., Pangrazio, L., Nemorin, S., & Perrotta, C. (2019). What might the school of 2030 be like? An exercise in social science fiction. Learning, Media and Technology, 1-17. doi:10.1080/17439884.2020.1694944

Gandy, Jr. O. H. & Nemorin, S. (2018). Toward the political economy of ‘nudge’: Smart city variations. Information, Communication & Society. doi.org/10.1080/1369118X.2018.1477969

Williamson, B., Pykett, J. & Nemorin, S. (2018). Biosocial spaces and neurocomputational governance: brain-based and brain-targeted technologies in education. Discourse, 39(2), 258-275. doi:10.1080/01596306.2018.1394421

Nemorin, S. (2017). Affective capture in digital school spaces and the modulation of student subjectivities. Emotion, Space & Society, 24, 11-18. doi:10.1016/j.emospa.2017.05.007

Nemorin, S. (2017). Post-panoptic pedagogies: The changing nature of school surveillance in the digital age. Surveillance & Society. 15 (2): 239-253.

Nemorin, S. (2017). Neuromarketing and the ‘poor in world’ consumer: How the animalization of thinking underpins contemporary market research discourses. Consumption, Markets & Culture, 20 (1), 59-80 22. doi: 10.1080/10253866.2016.1160897

Nemorin, S. & Gandy, Jr. O.H. (2017). Exploring neuromarketing and its reliance on remote sensing: Social and ethical implications. International Journal of Communication, 11, 4824-4844.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Bulfin, S., & Johnson. N. (2017). Left to their own devices: The everyday realities of ‘one-to-one’ classrooms. Oxford Review of Education. doi: 10.1080/03054985.2017.1305047

Nemorin, S. (2016). The frustrations of digital fabrication: An auto/ethnographic exploration of 3D ‘Making’ in school. International Journal of Technology and Design Education. doi: 10.1007/s10798-016-9366-z

Nemorin, S. & Selwyn, N. (2016). Making the best of it? Exploring the realities of 3D printing in school. Research Papers in Education. doi: 10.1080/02671522.2016.1225802

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., & Johnson, N. (2016). High-tech, hard work: An investigation of teachers’ work in the digital age. Learning Media and Technology. doi:10.1080/17439884.2016.1252770

Bulfin, S., Johnson, N., Nemorin, S., & Selwyn, N. (2016). Nagging, noobs and new tricks – student perceptions of school as a context for digital technology use. Educational Studies 42(3), 239-251. doi: 10.1080/03055698.2016.1160824

Pinto, L. E. & Nemorin, S. (2015). Normalizing panoptic surveillance among children. Our Schools Our Selves, 24(2), 53-62.

Book sections

 Nemorin, S. (2017). Online safety. In SAGE Encyclopedia of Out-of-School Learning, K. Peppler (Ed). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Bulfin, S., & Johnson, N. (2016). Toward a digital sociology of school. In Digital Sociologies, J. Daniels, K. Gregory, & T. McMillan Cottom (Eds). Bristol, UK: Policy Press.

Boler, M. & Nemorin, S. (2013). Dissent, truthiness, and war: New media landscapes of 21st century propaganda. In The Oxford Handbook of Propaganda Studies, R. Castronovo and J. Auerbach (Eds.). New York, NY: Oxford University Press.

Monographs and reports

Powell, A., Nemorin, S., Berner, A., Douglas-Jones, R., Fritsch, E., Hanteer, O., … Vega-Aurelio, D. (2017). Values and ethics in innovation for responsible technology in Europe. Report for the EU Commission: Enabling responsible ICT-related research and innovation.

Selwyn, N., Johnson, N., Nemorin, S., & Knight, E. (2016). Going online on behalf of others: An investigation of ‘proxy’ Internet consumers. Report for the Australian Communications Consumer Action Network, Sydney.

Alice Aldinucci is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford, Department of Education. She is part of the team working on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani, and she is a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group.

She holds a PhD in Education from the University of Glasgow (UK) where she was awarded the LKAS Interdisciplinary Scholarship. Her thesis applies a longitudinal qualitative research design and draws on the combination of Critical Realism and Capability Approach to explore aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to adulthood in Chile. Prior to her PhD, she completed a MA in International Education and Development from the University of Sussex (UK) where she was awarded the Centre for International Education Prize for the best overall MA performance. For her MA at Sussex, she conducted an empirical dissertation on the meaning making of Inclusive Education in Nepal. She holds a MA in Languages and Cultures for International Communication and Cooperation from the University of Milan (Italy) with a fieldwork research on tensions between policy and practice in bilingual multicultural education for indigenous students in Higher Education in Peru; and a BA in Languages and Intercultural Mediation from the University of Arezzo (Italy).

Alice’s research interests are interdisciplinary and relate to the critical linkages between intersecting inequalities, education, individual/societal development, and social justice at local and global levels, motivated by the question what education for what/whose development?

Areas, theoretical approaches and methodologies of interests:
• Sociology of education including aspirations in post-school transitions
• Cultural political economy of education and life chances/human flourishing/social justice
• Tensions between global educational frameworks and local knowledge and practices
• Critical Realism
• Capability Approach
• Qualitative and participatory methodologies
• Digital storytelling for social change

Besides her work in academia, Alice has gained experience as researcher, development practitioner and educator working in projects including early childhood education programmes, refugees’ education, girls’ education, SEN and inclusive education, TVET, global citizenship education, arts-based pedagogies. She lived and worked in different countries including in Nepal (a country she has developed a strong bond with), Tanzania, El Salvador, Italy and the UK. These experiences have reinforced her critical approach to international education and global development and to education as a catalyst for both inequalities, injustices, violence and more equitable social change and peace-building processes.

She served as Student Representative of the British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) from 2017 to 2019 and she is currently part of the college of reviewers of the editorial board of Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education.

Publications:

Aldinucci, A. (2022). Understanding aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to postschool trajectories in Chile. PhD thesis, University of Glasgow.
Aldinucci, A., Valiente, O., Hurrell S., and Zancajo, A. (2021). Understanding aspirations: Why do secondary TVET students aim so high in Chile? Journal of Vocational Education & Training.

Rawle, G., Riddle, N., Pettersson, G., Wallin, J., Bici, M., Jasper, P., Harb, J., Hebbar, M., Davis, J., Aldinucci, A., (2017), EQUIP-Tanzania Impact Evaluation. Midline Technical Report, Volume I and II. Oxford Policy Management.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.
Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Steph is a primary-trained teacher, maths specialist teacher (MaST) and Specialist Leader of Education (SLE) for mathematics in Oxfordshire. She trained as an NCETM mastery specialist and has NCETM PD Lead accreditation. Steph is currently undertaking a part-time PhD, exploring the experiences of teachers working in multi-academy trusts – how expertise is utilised and whether agency is possible.

Publications

Mastery and optional standardised tests: some tensions, Mathematics Teaching (2019), 268, p.18-20

Georgia is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre. She is currently working on the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, primarily involved in qualitative data analysis. Georgia is also working on a British Academy funded project about care-experienced academics working in higher education.

Georgia came to research from a legal background. She initially worked as a researcher in the Centre for Child and Family Research at Loughborough University, where she was involved in multiple research and evaluation projects including, a prospective longitudinal study of children identified in infancy as likely to suffer significant harm; evaluations for the Department for Education Children’s Social Care Innovation Programme; and research on return home from care. More recently, Georgia worked as a Development Researcher at the NSPCC, involved in the development of local services for children and families from concept through to scale up.

Her primary research interests are transitions from care (e.g. transitions from care into adulthood, returning home from care) and the role of education in supporting and providing opportunities for vulnerable children. Georgia’s PhD focused on care leavers’ experiences of higher education in England.

Publications

Journal articles

Harrington, L., McElearney, A. and Hyde-Dryden, G. (2021) Adapting the Pregnancy in Mind (PiM) support service to virtual delivery. Journal of Birth and Parent Education, 8 (3).

Margolis, R., Jackson-Hollis, V., Hyde-Dryden, G., Robson-Brown, E., Smith, E. and McConnell, N (2020) Families facing multiple adversities: impact and interventions. Paediatrics and Child Health 30(11), 390-394.

Ward, H., Brown, R., Blackmore, J., Hyde-Dryden, G. and Thomas, C. (2019) Identifying parents who show capacity to make and sustain positive changes when infants are at risk of significant harm. Developing Practice: The Child, Youth and Family Work Journal, 54, 45-61.

McDermid, S., Hyde-Dryden, G. and Ward, H. (2015) Looking for long-term outcomes: What early interventions are needed for children and young people at risk of maltreatment in England? Irish Journal of Applied Social Studies, 15 (2), 36-49.

Hyde-Dryden, G. (2015) Overcoming self-reliance and lack of expectation among care leavers in higher education in England: the role of inter-agency working. Swiss Journal of Social Work, 16, 75-93, (Special issue).

Munro, E., Pinkerton, J., Mendes, P., Hyde Dryden, G., Herczog, M. and Benbenishty, R. (2011) The contribution of the UNC for the rights of the child to understanding and promoting the interests of young people making the transition from care to adulthood. Children and Youth Services Review 33 (12), 2417-2423.

 

Reports

McElearney, A., Murphy, C., Fullerton, D., Hyde-Dryden, G., Cosette, A. and Morris, S. (2021) School staff, parents and carers’ views and experience of the Keeping Safe whole-school education programme: Lessons from the process evaluation for teaching children to recognise abusive behaviours and tell. London: NSPCC.

McElearney, A., Hyde-Dryden, G., Walters, H., Palmer, L., Coulter, K. and Adamson, G. (2021) Process evaluation of Virtual Pregnancy in Mind during the Covid-19 pandemic. London: NSPCC.

McElearney, A., Hyde-Dryden, G., Palmer, L. and Walters, H. (2021) Reflections and learning from our local service response to families during Covid-19. London: NSPCC.

McElearney, A., Palmer, L., Walters, H., and Hyde-Dryden, G. (2020) Learning from adapting the Baby Steps programme in response to COVID-19. London: NSPCC.

Hyde-Dryden, G. and Ward, H. (2017) Towards a Family Justice Observatory – A Scoping Study: Main Findings Report of the International Scoping Exercise. Available at: http://wp.lancs.ac.uk/observatory-scoping-study/

Lushey, C., Hyde-Dryden, G., Holmes, L. and Blackmore, J. (2017) No Wrong Door evaluation report. London: Department for Education.

Holmes, L, Thomas, C, Hyde-Dryden, G, Williams, A (2017) Firstline evaluation report. London: Department for Education

Brown, R., Ward, H., Blackmore, J., Thomas, C. and Hyde-Dryden, G. (2016) Children identified in infancy as likely to suffer, significant harm: a prospective longitudinal study: age eight follow-up, London: Department for Education.

Hyde-Dryden, G., Gibb, J., Lea, J., Buckley, E., Holmes, L., Wallace, E., Lushey, C. and Lawson, D. (2015) Improving practice in respect of children who return home from care: Research report. London: Department for Education.

Hyde-Dryden G., Holmes L., Lawson D. and Blackmore J. (2015) Taking Care Practice Framework for Reunification evaluation report. Loughborough: Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University.

Ward, H., Brown, R. and Hyde Dryden, G. (2014) Assessing Parental Capacity to Change when Children are on the Edge of Care: An Overview of Research Evidence, Childhood Wellbeing Research Centre Report, London: Department for Education.

Dr Selena Nemorin is a UKRI Future Leaders Fellow and researcher/lecturer in sociology of digital technology at the University of Oxford.

Selena’s research focuses on critical theories of technology, surveillance studies, tech ethics, and youth and future media/technologies. She is currently working on the Fair-AIEd project which examines the role that public-private partnerships play in access and use of AI in emerging market economies.

Her past work includes research projects that have examined AI, IoT and ethics, the uses of new technologies in digital schools, educational equity and inclusion, as well as human rights policies and procedures in K-12 and post-secondary institutions.

Publications

Books

Nemorin, S. (2018). Biosurveillance in New Media Marketing: World, Discourse, Representation. New York, NY: Palgrave Macmillan.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Johnson, N., & Bulfin, S. (2017). Everyday Schooling in the Digital Age: High School, High Tech? Oxford, UK: Routledge.

Journal articles

Bonami, B. & Nemorin, S. (2021). Through three levels of abstraction. Towards an ecological framework for making sense of new technologies in education. Education and Information Technologies. doi: 10.1007/s10639-020-10305-1

Gandy, Jr. O. H. & Nemorin, S. (2020). Transportation and smart city imaginaries: A critical analysis of proposals for the USDOT Smart City Challenge. International Journal of Communication, 14, 1232-1252.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Bulfin, S., & Johnson, N. F. (2020). The ‘obvious’ stuff: exploring the mundane realities of students’ digital technology use in school. Digital Education Review, 37, https://revistes.ub.edu/index.php/der/article/view/30670

Ustek-Spilda, F., Powell, A. & Nemorin, S. (2019). Engaging with ethics in Internet of Things: Imaginaries in the social milieu of technology developers. Big Data and Society. July-Dec 1-12. doi: 10.1177/2053951719879468

Selwyn, N., Pangrazio, L., Nemorin, S., & Perrotta, C. (2019). What might the school of 2030 be like? An exercise in social science fiction. Learning, Media and Technology, 1-17. doi:10.1080/17439884.2020.1694944

Gandy, Jr. O. H. & Nemorin, S. (2018). Toward the political economy of ‘nudge’: Smart city variations. Information, Communication & Society. doi.org/10.1080/1369118X.2018.1477969

Williamson, B., Pykett, J. & Nemorin, S. (2018). Biosocial spaces and neurocomputational governance: brain-based and brain-targeted technologies in education. Discourse, 39(2), 258-275. doi:10.1080/01596306.2018.1394421

Nemorin, S. (2017). Affective capture in digital school spaces and the modulation of student subjectivities. Emotion, Space & Society, 24, 11-18. doi:10.1016/j.emospa.2017.05.007

Nemorin, S. (2017). Post-panoptic pedagogies: The changing nature of school surveillance in the digital age. Surveillance & Society. 15 (2): 239-253.

Nemorin, S. (2017). Neuromarketing and the ‘poor in world’ consumer: How the animalization of thinking underpins contemporary market research discourses. Consumption, Markets & Culture, 20 (1), 59-80 22. doi: 10.1080/10253866.2016.1160897

Nemorin, S. & Gandy, Jr. O.H. (2017). Exploring neuromarketing and its reliance on remote sensing: Social and ethical implications. International Journal of Communication, 11, 4824-4844.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Bulfin, S., & Johnson. N. (2017). Left to their own devices: The everyday realities of ‘one-to-one’ classrooms. Oxford Review of Education. doi: 10.1080/03054985.2017.1305047

Nemorin, S. (2016). The frustrations of digital fabrication: An auto/ethnographic exploration of 3D ‘Making’ in school. International Journal of Technology and Design Education. doi: 10.1007/s10798-016-9366-z

Nemorin, S. & Selwyn, N. (2016). Making the best of it? Exploring the realities of 3D printing in school. Research Papers in Education. doi: 10.1080/02671522.2016.1225802

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., & Johnson, N. (2016). High-tech, hard work: An investigation of teachers’ work in the digital age. Learning Media and Technology. doi:10.1080/17439884.2016.1252770

Bulfin, S., Johnson, N., Nemorin, S., & Selwyn, N. (2016). Nagging, noobs and new tricks – student perceptions of school as a context for digital technology use. Educational Studies 42(3), 239-251. doi: 10.1080/03055698.2016.1160824

Pinto, L. E. & Nemorin, S. (2015). Normalizing panoptic surveillance among children. Our Schools Our Selves, 24(2), 53-62.

Book sections

 Nemorin, S. (2017). Online safety. In SAGE Encyclopedia of Out-of-School Learning, K. Peppler (Ed). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Bulfin, S., & Johnson, N. (2016). Toward a digital sociology of school. In Digital Sociologies, J. Daniels, K. Gregory, & T. McMillan Cottom (Eds). Bristol, UK: Policy Press.

Boler, M. & Nemorin, S. (2013). Dissent, truthiness, and war: New media landscapes of 21st century propaganda. In The Oxford Handbook of Propaganda Studies, R. Castronovo and J. Auerbach (Eds.). New York, NY: Oxford University Press.

Monographs and reports

Powell, A., Nemorin, S., Berner, A., Douglas-Jones, R., Fritsch, E., Hanteer, O., … Vega-Aurelio, D. (2017). Values and ethics in innovation for responsible technology in Europe. Report for the EU Commission: Enabling responsible ICT-related research and innovation.

Selwyn, N., Johnson, N., Nemorin, S., & Knight, E. (2016). Going online on behalf of others: An investigation of ‘proxy’ Internet consumers. Report for the Australian Communications Consumer Action Network, Sydney.

Alice Aldinucci is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford, Department of Education. She is part of the team working on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani, and she is a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group.

She holds a PhD in Education from the University of Glasgow (UK) where she was awarded the LKAS Interdisciplinary Scholarship. Her thesis applies a longitudinal qualitative research design and draws on the combination of Critical Realism and Capability Approach to explore aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to adulthood in Chile. Prior to her PhD, she completed a MA in International Education and Development from the University of Sussex (UK) where she was awarded the Centre for International Education Prize for the best overall MA performance. For her MA at Sussex, she conducted an empirical dissertation on the meaning making of Inclusive Education in Nepal. She holds a MA in Languages and Cultures for International Communication and Cooperation from the University of Milan (Italy) with a fieldwork research on tensions between policy and practice in bilingual multicultural education for indigenous students in Higher Education in Peru; and a BA in Languages and Intercultural Mediation from the University of Arezzo (Italy).

Alice’s research interests are interdisciplinary and relate to the critical linkages between intersecting inequalities, education, individual/societal development, and social justice at local and global levels, motivated by the question what education for what/whose development?

Areas, theoretical approaches and methodologies of interests:
• Sociology of education including aspirations in post-school transitions
• Cultural political economy of education and life chances/human flourishing/social justice
• Tensions between global educational frameworks and local knowledge and practices
• Critical Realism
• Capability Approach
• Qualitative and participatory methodologies
• Digital storytelling for social change

Besides her work in academia, Alice has gained experience as researcher, development practitioner and educator working in projects including early childhood education programmes, refugees’ education, girls’ education, SEN and inclusive education, TVET, global citizenship education, arts-based pedagogies. She lived and worked in different countries including in Nepal (a country she has developed a strong bond with), Tanzania, El Salvador, Italy and the UK. These experiences have reinforced her critical approach to international education and global development and to education as a catalyst for both inequalities, injustices, violence and more equitable social change and peace-building processes.

She served as Student Representative of the British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) from 2017 to 2019 and she is currently part of the college of reviewers of the editorial board of Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education.

Publications:

Aldinucci, A. (2022). Understanding aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to postschool trajectories in Chile. PhD thesis, University of Glasgow.
Aldinucci, A., Valiente, O., Hurrell S., and Zancajo, A. (2021). Understanding aspirations: Why do secondary TVET students aim so high in Chile? Journal of Vocational Education & Training.

Rawle, G., Riddle, N., Pettersson, G., Wallin, J., Bici, M., Jasper, P., Harb, J., Hebbar, M., Davis, J., Aldinucci, A., (2017), EQUIP-Tanzania Impact Evaluation. Midline Technical Report, Volume I and II. Oxford Policy Management.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.
Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Steph is a primary-trained teacher, maths specialist teacher (MaST) and Specialist Leader of Education (SLE) for mathematics in Oxfordshire. She trained as an NCETM mastery specialist and has NCETM PD Lead accreditation. Steph is currently undertaking a part-time PhD, exploring the experiences of teachers working in multi-academy trusts – how expertise is utilised and whether agency is possible.

Publications

Mastery and optional standardised tests: some tensions, Mathematics Teaching (2019), 268, p.18-20

Georgia is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre. She is currently working on the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, primarily involved in qualitative data analysis. Georgia is also working on a British Academy funded project about care-experienced academics working in higher education.

Georgia came to research from a legal background. She initially worked as a researcher in the Centre for Child and Family Research at Loughborough University, where she was involved in multiple research and evaluation projects including, a prospective longitudinal study of children identified in infancy as likely to suffer significant harm; evaluations for the Department for Education Children’s Social Care Innovation Programme; and research on return home from care. More recently, Georgia worked as a Development Researcher at the NSPCC, involved in the development of local services for children and families from concept through to scale up.

Her primary research interests are transitions from care (e.g. transitions from care into adulthood, returning home from care) and the role of education in supporting and providing opportunities for vulnerable children. Georgia’s PhD focused on care leavers’ experiences of higher education in England.

Publications

Journal articles

Harrington, L., McElearney, A. and Hyde-Dryden, G. (2021) Adapting the Pregnancy in Mind (PiM) support service to virtual delivery. Journal of Birth and Parent Education, 8 (3).

Margolis, R., Jackson-Hollis, V., Hyde-Dryden, G., Robson-Brown, E., Smith, E. and McConnell, N (2020) Families facing multiple adversities: impact and interventions. Paediatrics and Child Health 30(11), 390-394.

Ward, H., Brown, R., Blackmore, J., Hyde-Dryden, G. and Thomas, C. (2019) Identifying parents who show capacity to make and sustain positive changes when infants are at risk of significant harm. Developing Practice: The Child, Youth and Family Work Journal, 54, 45-61.

McDermid, S., Hyde-Dryden, G. and Ward, H. (2015) Looking for long-term outcomes: What early interventions are needed for children and young people at risk of maltreatment in England? Irish Journal of Applied Social Studies, 15 (2), 36-49.

Hyde-Dryden, G. (2015) Overcoming self-reliance and lack of expectation among care leavers in higher education in England: the role of inter-agency working. Swiss Journal of Social Work, 16, 75-93, (Special issue).

Munro, E., Pinkerton, J., Mendes, P., Hyde Dryden, G., Herczog, M. and Benbenishty, R. (2011) The contribution of the UNC for the rights of the child to understanding and promoting the interests of young people making the transition from care to adulthood. Children and Youth Services Review 33 (12), 2417-2423.

 

Reports

McElearney, A., Murphy, C., Fullerton, D., Hyde-Dryden, G., Cosette, A. and Morris, S. (2021) School staff, parents and carers’ views and experience of the Keeping Safe whole-school education programme: Lessons from the process evaluation for teaching children to recognise abusive behaviours and tell. London: NSPCC.

McElearney, A., Hyde-Dryden, G., Walters, H., Palmer, L., Coulter, K. and Adamson, G. (2021) Process evaluation of Virtual Pregnancy in Mind during the Covid-19 pandemic. London: NSPCC.

McElearney, A., Hyde-Dryden, G., Palmer, L. and Walters, H. (2021) Reflections and learning from our local service response to families during Covid-19. London: NSPCC.

McElearney, A., Palmer, L., Walters, H., and Hyde-Dryden, G. (2020) Learning from adapting the Baby Steps programme in response to COVID-19. London: NSPCC.

Hyde-Dryden, G. and Ward, H. (2017) Towards a Family Justice Observatory – A Scoping Study: Main Findings Report of the International Scoping Exercise. Available at: http://wp.lancs.ac.uk/observatory-scoping-study/

Lushey, C., Hyde-Dryden, G., Holmes, L. and Blackmore, J. (2017) No Wrong Door evaluation report. London: Department for Education.

Holmes, L, Thomas, C, Hyde-Dryden, G, Williams, A (2017) Firstline evaluation report. London: Department for Education

Brown, R., Ward, H., Blackmore, J., Thomas, C. and Hyde-Dryden, G. (2016) Children identified in infancy as likely to suffer, significant harm: a prospective longitudinal study: age eight follow-up, London: Department for Education.

Hyde-Dryden, G., Gibb, J., Lea, J., Buckley, E., Holmes, L., Wallace, E., Lushey, C. and Lawson, D. (2015) Improving practice in respect of children who return home from care: Research report. London: Department for Education.

Hyde-Dryden G., Holmes L., Lawson D. and Blackmore J. (2015) Taking Care Practice Framework for Reunification evaluation report. Loughborough: Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University.

Ward, H., Brown, R. and Hyde Dryden, G. (2014) Assessing Parental Capacity to Change when Children are on the Edge of Care: An Overview of Research Evidence, Childhood Wellbeing Research Centre Report, London: Department for Education.

Dr Selena Nemorin is a UKRI Future Leaders Fellow and researcher/lecturer in sociology of digital technology at the University of Oxford.

Selena’s research focuses on critical theories of technology, surveillance studies, tech ethics, and youth and future media/technologies. She is currently working on the Fair-AIEd project which examines the role that public-private partnerships play in access and use of AI in emerging market economies.

Her past work includes research projects that have examined AI, IoT and ethics, the uses of new technologies in digital schools, educational equity and inclusion, as well as human rights policies and procedures in K-12 and post-secondary institutions.

Publications

Books

Nemorin, S. (2018). Biosurveillance in New Media Marketing: World, Discourse, Representation. New York, NY: Palgrave Macmillan.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Johnson, N., & Bulfin, S. (2017). Everyday Schooling in the Digital Age: High School, High Tech? Oxford, UK: Routledge.

Journal articles

Bonami, B. & Nemorin, S. (2021). Through three levels of abstraction. Towards an ecological framework for making sense of new technologies in education. Education and Information Technologies. doi: 10.1007/s10639-020-10305-1

Gandy, Jr. O. H. & Nemorin, S. (2020). Transportation and smart city imaginaries: A critical analysis of proposals for the USDOT Smart City Challenge. International Journal of Communication, 14, 1232-1252.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Bulfin, S., & Johnson, N. F. (2020). The ‘obvious’ stuff: exploring the mundane realities of students’ digital technology use in school. Digital Education Review, 37, https://revistes.ub.edu/index.php/der/article/view/30670

Ustek-Spilda, F., Powell, A. & Nemorin, S. (2019). Engaging with ethics in Internet of Things: Imaginaries in the social milieu of technology developers. Big Data and Society. July-Dec 1-12. doi: 10.1177/2053951719879468

Selwyn, N., Pangrazio, L., Nemorin, S., & Perrotta, C. (2019). What might the school of 2030 be like? An exercise in social science fiction. Learning, Media and Technology, 1-17. doi:10.1080/17439884.2020.1694944

Gandy, Jr. O. H. & Nemorin, S. (2018). Toward the political economy of ‘nudge’: Smart city variations. Information, Communication & Society. doi.org/10.1080/1369118X.2018.1477969

Williamson, B., Pykett, J. & Nemorin, S. (2018). Biosocial spaces and neurocomputational governance: brain-based and brain-targeted technologies in education. Discourse, 39(2), 258-275. doi:10.1080/01596306.2018.1394421

Nemorin, S. (2017). Affective capture in digital school spaces and the modulation of student subjectivities. Emotion, Space & Society, 24, 11-18. doi:10.1016/j.emospa.2017.05.007

Nemorin, S. (2017). Post-panoptic pedagogies: The changing nature of school surveillance in the digital age. Surveillance & Society. 15 (2): 239-253.

Nemorin, S. (2017). Neuromarketing and the ‘poor in world’ consumer: How the animalization of thinking underpins contemporary market research discourses. Consumption, Markets & Culture, 20 (1), 59-80 22. doi: 10.1080/10253866.2016.1160897

Nemorin, S. & Gandy, Jr. O.H. (2017). Exploring neuromarketing and its reliance on remote sensing: Social and ethical implications. International Journal of Communication, 11, 4824-4844.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Bulfin, S., & Johnson. N. (2017). Left to their own devices: The everyday realities of ‘one-to-one’ classrooms. Oxford Review of Education. doi: 10.1080/03054985.2017.1305047

Nemorin, S. (2016). The frustrations of digital fabrication: An auto/ethnographic exploration of 3D ‘Making’ in school. International Journal of Technology and Design Education. doi: 10.1007/s10798-016-9366-z

Nemorin, S. & Selwyn, N. (2016). Making the best of it? Exploring the realities of 3D printing in school. Research Papers in Education. doi: 10.1080/02671522.2016.1225802

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., & Johnson, N. (2016). High-tech, hard work: An investigation of teachers’ work in the digital age. Learning Media and Technology. doi:10.1080/17439884.2016.1252770

Bulfin, S., Johnson, N., Nemorin, S., & Selwyn, N. (2016). Nagging, noobs and new tricks – student perceptions of school as a context for digital technology use. Educational Studies 42(3), 239-251. doi: 10.1080/03055698.2016.1160824

Pinto, L. E. & Nemorin, S. (2015). Normalizing panoptic surveillance among children. Our Schools Our Selves, 24(2), 53-62.

Book sections

 Nemorin, S. (2017). Online safety. In SAGE Encyclopedia of Out-of-School Learning, K. Peppler (Ed). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Bulfin, S., & Johnson, N. (2016). Toward a digital sociology of school. In Digital Sociologies, J. Daniels, K. Gregory, & T. McMillan Cottom (Eds). Bristol, UK: Policy Press.

Boler, M. & Nemorin, S. (2013). Dissent, truthiness, and war: New media landscapes of 21st century propaganda. In The Oxford Handbook of Propaganda Studies, R. Castronovo and J. Auerbach (Eds.). New York, NY: Oxford University Press.

Monographs and reports

Powell, A., Nemorin, S., Berner, A., Douglas-Jones, R., Fritsch, E., Hanteer, O., … Vega-Aurelio, D. (2017). Values and ethics in innovation for responsible technology in Europe. Report for the EU Commission: Enabling responsible ICT-related research and innovation.

Selwyn, N., Johnson, N., Nemorin, S., & Knight, E. (2016). Going online on behalf of others: An investigation of ‘proxy’ Internet consumers. Report for the Australian Communications Consumer Action Network, Sydney.

Alice Aldinucci is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford, Department of Education. She is part of the team working on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani, and she is a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group.

She holds a PhD in Education from the University of Glasgow (UK) where she was awarded the LKAS Interdisciplinary Scholarship. Her thesis applies a longitudinal qualitative research design and draws on the combination of Critical Realism and Capability Approach to explore aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to adulthood in Chile. Prior to her PhD, she completed a MA in International Education and Development from the University of Sussex (UK) where she was awarded the Centre for International Education Prize for the best overall MA performance. For her MA at Sussex, she conducted an empirical dissertation on the meaning making of Inclusive Education in Nepal. She holds a MA in Languages and Cultures for International Communication and Cooperation from the University of Milan (Italy) with a fieldwork research on tensions between policy and practice in bilingual multicultural education for indigenous students in Higher Education in Peru; and a BA in Languages and Intercultural Mediation from the University of Arezzo (Italy).

Alice’s research interests are interdisciplinary and relate to the critical linkages between intersecting inequalities, education, individual/societal development, and social justice at local and global levels, motivated by the question what education for what/whose development?

Areas, theoretical approaches and methodologies of interests:
• Sociology of education including aspirations in post-school transitions
• Cultural political economy of education and life chances/human flourishing/social justice
• Tensions between global educational frameworks and local knowledge and practices
• Critical Realism
• Capability Approach
• Qualitative and participatory methodologies
• Digital storytelling for social change

Besides her work in academia, Alice has gained experience as researcher, development practitioner and educator working in projects including early childhood education programmes, refugees’ education, girls’ education, SEN and inclusive education, TVET, global citizenship education, arts-based pedagogies. She lived and worked in different countries including in Nepal (a country she has developed a strong bond with), Tanzania, El Salvador, Italy and the UK. These experiences have reinforced her critical approach to international education and global development and to education as a catalyst for both inequalities, injustices, violence and more equitable social change and peace-building processes.

She served as Student Representative of the British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) from 2017 to 2019 and she is currently part of the college of reviewers of the editorial board of Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education.

Publications:

Aldinucci, A. (2022). Understanding aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to postschool trajectories in Chile. PhD thesis, University of Glasgow.
Aldinucci, A., Valiente, O., Hurrell S., and Zancajo, A. (2021). Understanding aspirations: Why do secondary TVET students aim so high in Chile? Journal of Vocational Education & Training.

Rawle, G., Riddle, N., Pettersson, G., Wallin, J., Bici, M., Jasper, P., Harb, J., Hebbar, M., Davis, J., Aldinucci, A., (2017), EQUIP-Tanzania Impact Evaluation. Midline Technical Report, Volume I and II. Oxford Policy Management.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.
Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Steph is a primary-trained teacher, maths specialist teacher (MaST) and Specialist Leader of Education (SLE) for mathematics in Oxfordshire. She trained as an NCETM mastery specialist and has NCETM PD Lead accreditation. Steph is currently undertaking a part-time PhD, exploring the experiences of teachers working in multi-academy trusts – how expertise is utilised and whether agency is possible.

Publications

Mastery and optional standardised tests: some tensions, Mathematics Teaching (2019), 268, p.18-20

Georgia is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre. She is currently working on the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, primarily involved in qualitative data analysis. Georgia is also working on a British Academy funded project about care-experienced academics working in higher education.

Georgia came to research from a legal background. She initially worked as a researcher in the Centre for Child and Family Research at Loughborough University, where she was involved in multiple research and evaluation projects including, a prospective longitudinal study of children identified in infancy as likely to suffer significant harm; evaluations for the Department for Education Children’s Social Care Innovation Programme; and research on return home from care. More recently, Georgia worked as a Development Researcher at the NSPCC, involved in the development of local services for children and families from concept through to scale up.

Her primary research interests are transitions from care (e.g. transitions from care into adulthood, returning home from care) and the role of education in supporting and providing opportunities for vulnerable children. Georgia’s PhD focused on care leavers’ experiences of higher education in England.

Publications

Journal articles

Harrington, L., McElearney, A. and Hyde-Dryden, G. (2021) Adapting the Pregnancy in Mind (PiM) support service to virtual delivery. Journal of Birth and Parent Education, 8 (3).

Margolis, R., Jackson-Hollis, V., Hyde-Dryden, G., Robson-Brown, E., Smith, E. and McConnell, N (2020) Families facing multiple adversities: impact and interventions. Paediatrics and Child Health 30(11), 390-394.

Ward, H., Brown, R., Blackmore, J., Hyde-Dryden, G. and Thomas, C. (2019) Identifying parents who show capacity to make and sustain positive changes when infants are at risk of significant harm. Developing Practice: The Child, Youth and Family Work Journal, 54, 45-61.

McDermid, S., Hyde-Dryden, G. and Ward, H. (2015) Looking for long-term outcomes: What early interventions are needed for children and young people at risk of maltreatment in England? Irish Journal of Applied Social Studies, 15 (2), 36-49.

Hyde-Dryden, G. (2015) Overcoming self-reliance and lack of expectation among care leavers in higher education in England: the role of inter-agency working. Swiss Journal of Social Work, 16, 75-93, (Special issue).

Munro, E., Pinkerton, J., Mendes, P., Hyde Dryden, G., Herczog, M. and Benbenishty, R. (2011) The contribution of the UNC for the rights of the child to understanding and promoting the interests of young people making the transition from care to adulthood. Children and Youth Services Review 33 (12), 2417-2423.

 

Reports

McElearney, A., Murphy, C., Fullerton, D., Hyde-Dryden, G., Cosette, A. and Morris, S. (2021) School staff, parents and carers’ views and experience of the Keeping Safe whole-school education programme: Lessons from the process evaluation for teaching children to recognise abusive behaviours and tell. London: NSPCC.

McElearney, A., Hyde-Dryden, G., Walters, H., Palmer, L., Coulter, K. and Adamson, G. (2021) Process evaluation of Virtual Pregnancy in Mind during the Covid-19 pandemic. London: NSPCC.

McElearney, A., Hyde-Dryden, G., Palmer, L. and Walters, H. (2021) Reflections and learning from our local service response to families during Covid-19. London: NSPCC.

McElearney, A., Palmer, L., Walters, H., and Hyde-Dryden, G. (2020) Learning from adapting the Baby Steps programme in response to COVID-19. London: NSPCC.

Hyde-Dryden, G. and Ward, H. (2017) Towards a Family Justice Observatory – A Scoping Study: Main Findings Report of the International Scoping Exercise. Available at: http://wp.lancs.ac.uk/observatory-scoping-study/

Lushey, C., Hyde-Dryden, G., Holmes, L. and Blackmore, J. (2017) No Wrong Door evaluation report. London: Department for Education.

Holmes, L, Thomas, C, Hyde-Dryden, G, Williams, A (2017) Firstline evaluation report. London: Department for Education

Brown, R., Ward, H., Blackmore, J., Thomas, C. and Hyde-Dryden, G. (2016) Children identified in infancy as likely to suffer, significant harm: a prospective longitudinal study: age eight follow-up, London: Department for Education.

Hyde-Dryden, G., Gibb, J., Lea, J., Buckley, E., Holmes, L., Wallace, E., Lushey, C. and Lawson, D. (2015) Improving practice in respect of children who return home from care: Research report. London: Department for Education.

Hyde-Dryden G., Holmes L., Lawson D. and Blackmore J. (2015) Taking Care Practice Framework for Reunification evaluation report. Loughborough: Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University.

Ward, H., Brown, R. and Hyde Dryden, G. (2014) Assessing Parental Capacity to Change when Children are on the Edge of Care: An Overview of Research Evidence, Childhood Wellbeing Research Centre Report, London: Department for Education.

Dr Selena Nemorin is a UKRI Future Leaders Fellow and researcher/lecturer in sociology of digital technology at the University of Oxford.

Selena’s research focuses on critical theories of technology, surveillance studies, tech ethics, and youth and future media/technologies. She is currently working on the Fair-AIEd project which examines the role that public-private partnerships play in access and use of AI in emerging market economies.

Her past work includes research projects that have examined AI, IoT and ethics, the uses of new technologies in digital schools, educational equity and inclusion, as well as human rights policies and procedures in K-12 and post-secondary institutions.

Publications

Books

Nemorin, S. (2018). Biosurveillance in New Media Marketing: World, Discourse, Representation. New York, NY: Palgrave Macmillan.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Johnson, N., & Bulfin, S. (2017). Everyday Schooling in the Digital Age: High School, High Tech? Oxford, UK: Routledge.

Journal articles

Bonami, B. & Nemorin, S. (2021). Through three levels of abstraction. Towards an ecological framework for making sense of new technologies in education. Education and Information Technologies. doi: 10.1007/s10639-020-10305-1

Gandy, Jr. O. H. & Nemorin, S. (2020). Transportation and smart city imaginaries: A critical analysis of proposals for the USDOT Smart City Challenge. International Journal of Communication, 14, 1232-1252.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Bulfin, S., & Johnson, N. F. (2020). The ‘obvious’ stuff: exploring the mundane realities of students’ digital technology use in school. Digital Education Review, 37, https://revistes.ub.edu/index.php/der/article/view/30670

Ustek-Spilda, F., Powell, A. & Nemorin, S. (2019). Engaging with ethics in Internet of Things: Imaginaries in the social milieu of technology developers. Big Data and Society. July-Dec 1-12. doi: 10.1177/2053951719879468

Selwyn, N., Pangrazio, L., Nemorin, S., & Perrotta, C. (2019). What might the school of 2030 be like? An exercise in social science fiction. Learning, Media and Technology, 1-17. doi:10.1080/17439884.2020.1694944

Gandy, Jr. O. H. & Nemorin, S. (2018). Toward the political economy of ‘nudge’: Smart city variations. Information, Communication & Society. doi.org/10.1080/1369118X.2018.1477969

Williamson, B., Pykett, J. & Nemorin, S. (2018). Biosocial spaces and neurocomputational governance: brain-based and brain-targeted technologies in education. Discourse, 39(2), 258-275. doi:10.1080/01596306.2018.1394421

Nemorin, S. (2017). Affective capture in digital school spaces and the modulation of student subjectivities. Emotion, Space & Society, 24, 11-18. doi:10.1016/j.emospa.2017.05.007

Nemorin, S. (2017). Post-panoptic pedagogies: The changing nature of school surveillance in the digital age. Surveillance & Society. 15 (2): 239-253.

Nemorin, S. (2017). Neuromarketing and the ‘poor in world’ consumer: How the animalization of thinking underpins contemporary market research discourses. Consumption, Markets & Culture, 20 (1), 59-80 22. doi: 10.1080/10253866.2016.1160897

Nemorin, S. & Gandy, Jr. O.H. (2017). Exploring neuromarketing and its reliance on remote sensing: Social and ethical implications. International Journal of Communication, 11, 4824-4844.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Bulfin, S., & Johnson. N. (2017). Left to their own devices: The everyday realities of ‘one-to-one’ classrooms. Oxford Review of Education. doi: 10.1080/03054985.2017.1305047

Nemorin, S. (2016). The frustrations of digital fabrication: An auto/ethnographic exploration of 3D ‘Making’ in school. International Journal of Technology and Design Education. doi: 10.1007/s10798-016-9366-z

Nemorin, S. & Selwyn, N. (2016). Making the best of it? Exploring the realities of 3D printing in school. Research Papers in Education. doi: 10.1080/02671522.2016.1225802

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., & Johnson, N. (2016). High-tech, hard work: An investigation of teachers’ work in the digital age. Learning Media and Technology. doi:10.1080/17439884.2016.1252770

Bulfin, S., Johnson, N., Nemorin, S., & Selwyn, N. (2016). Nagging, noobs and new tricks – student perceptions of school as a context for digital technology use. Educational Studies 42(3), 239-251. doi: 10.1080/03055698.2016.1160824

Pinto, L. E. & Nemorin, S. (2015). Normalizing panoptic surveillance among children. Our Schools Our Selves, 24(2), 53-62.

Book sections

 Nemorin, S. (2017). Online safety. In SAGE Encyclopedia of Out-of-School Learning, K. Peppler (Ed). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Bulfin, S., & Johnson, N. (2016). Toward a digital sociology of school. In Digital Sociologies, J. Daniels, K. Gregory, & T. McMillan Cottom (Eds). Bristol, UK: Policy Press.

Boler, M. & Nemorin, S. (2013). Dissent, truthiness, and war: New media landscapes of 21st century propaganda. In The Oxford Handbook of Propaganda Studies, R. Castronovo and J. Auerbach (Eds.). New York, NY: Oxford University Press.

Monographs and reports

Powell, A., Nemorin, S., Berner, A., Douglas-Jones, R., Fritsch, E., Hanteer, O., … Vega-Aurelio, D. (2017). Values and ethics in innovation for responsible technology in Europe. Report for the EU Commission: Enabling responsible ICT-related research and innovation.

Selwyn, N., Johnson, N., Nemorin, S., & Knight, E. (2016). Going online on behalf of others: An investigation of ‘proxy’ Internet consumers. Report for the Australian Communications Consumer Action Network, Sydney.

Alice Aldinucci is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford, Department of Education. She is part of the team working on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani, and she is a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group.

She holds a PhD in Education from the University of Glasgow (UK) where she was awarded the LKAS Interdisciplinary Scholarship. Her thesis applies a longitudinal qualitative research design and draws on the combination of Critical Realism and Capability Approach to explore aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to adulthood in Chile. Prior to her PhD, she completed a MA in International Education and Development from the University of Sussex (UK) where she was awarded the Centre for International Education Prize for the best overall MA performance. For her MA at Sussex, she conducted an empirical dissertation on the meaning making of Inclusive Education in Nepal. She holds a MA in Languages and Cultures for International Communication and Cooperation from the University of Milan (Italy) with a fieldwork research on tensions between policy and practice in bilingual multicultural education for indigenous students in Higher Education in Peru; and a BA in Languages and Intercultural Mediation from the University of Arezzo (Italy).

Alice’s research interests are interdisciplinary and relate to the critical linkages between intersecting inequalities, education, individual/societal development, and social justice at local and global levels, motivated by the question what education for what/whose development?

Areas, theoretical approaches and methodologies of interests:
• Sociology of education including aspirations in post-school transitions
• Cultural political economy of education and life chances/human flourishing/social justice
• Tensions between global educational frameworks and local knowledge and practices
• Critical Realism
• Capability Approach
• Qualitative and participatory methodologies
• Digital storytelling for social change

Besides her work in academia, Alice has gained experience as researcher, development practitioner and educator working in projects including early childhood education programmes, refugees’ education, girls’ education, SEN and inclusive education, TVET, global citizenship education, arts-based pedagogies. She lived and worked in different countries including in Nepal (a country she has developed a strong bond with), Tanzania, El Salvador, Italy and the UK. These experiences have reinforced her critical approach to international education and global development and to education as a catalyst for both inequalities, injustices, violence and more equitable social change and peace-building processes.

She served as Student Representative of the British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) from 2017 to 2019 and she is currently part of the college of reviewers of the editorial board of Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education.

Publications:

Aldinucci, A. (2022). Understanding aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to postschool trajectories in Chile. PhD thesis, University of Glasgow.
Aldinucci, A., Valiente, O., Hurrell S., and Zancajo, A. (2021). Understanding aspirations: Why do secondary TVET students aim so high in Chile? Journal of Vocational Education & Training.

Rawle, G., Riddle, N., Pettersson, G., Wallin, J., Bici, M., Jasper, P., Harb, J., Hebbar, M., Davis, J., Aldinucci, A., (2017), EQUIP-Tanzania Impact Evaluation. Midline Technical Report, Volume I and II. Oxford Policy Management.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.
Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Steph is a primary-trained teacher, maths specialist teacher (MaST) and Specialist Leader of Education (SLE) for mathematics in Oxfordshire. She trained as an NCETM mastery specialist and has NCETM PD Lead accreditation. Steph is currently undertaking a part-time PhD, exploring the experiences of teachers working in multi-academy trusts – how expertise is utilised and whether agency is possible.

Publications

Mastery and optional standardised tests: some tensions, Mathematics Teaching (2019), 268, p.18-20

Georgia is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre. She is currently working on the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, primarily involved in qualitative data analysis. Georgia is also working on a British Academy funded project about care-experienced academics working in higher education.

Georgia came to research from a legal background. She initially worked as a researcher in the Centre for Child and Family Research at Loughborough University, where she was involved in multiple research and evaluation projects including, a prospective longitudinal study of children identified in infancy as likely to suffer significant harm; evaluations for the Department for Education Children’s Social Care Innovation Programme; and research on return home from care. More recently, Georgia worked as a Development Researcher at the NSPCC, involved in the development of local services for children and families from concept through to scale up.

Her primary research interests are transitions from care (e.g. transitions from care into adulthood, returning home from care) and the role of education in supporting and providing opportunities for vulnerable children. Georgia’s PhD focused on care leavers’ experiences of higher education in England.

Publications

Journal articles

Harrington, L., McElearney, A. and Hyde-Dryden, G. (2021) Adapting the Pregnancy in Mind (PiM) support service to virtual delivery. Journal of Birth and Parent Education, 8 (3).

Margolis, R., Jackson-Hollis, V., Hyde-Dryden, G., Robson-Brown, E., Smith, E. and McConnell, N (2020) Families facing multiple adversities: impact and interventions. Paediatrics and Child Health 30(11), 390-394.

Ward, H., Brown, R., Blackmore, J., Hyde-Dryden, G. and Thomas, C. (2019) Identifying parents who show capacity to make and sustain positive changes when infants are at risk of significant harm. Developing Practice: The Child, Youth and Family Work Journal, 54, 45-61.

McDermid, S., Hyde-Dryden, G. and Ward, H. (2015) Looking for long-term outcomes: What early interventions are needed for children and young people at risk of maltreatment in England? Irish Journal of Applied Social Studies, 15 (2), 36-49.

Hyde-Dryden, G. (2015) Overcoming self-reliance and lack of expectation among care leavers in higher education in England: the role of inter-agency working. Swiss Journal of Social Work, 16, 75-93, (Special issue).

Munro, E., Pinkerton, J., Mendes, P., Hyde Dryden, G., Herczog, M. and Benbenishty, R. (2011) The contribution of the UNC for the rights of the child to understanding and promoting the interests of young people making the transition from care to adulthood. Children and Youth Services Review 33 (12), 2417-2423.

 

Reports

McElearney, A., Murphy, C., Fullerton, D., Hyde-Dryden, G., Cosette, A. and Morris, S. (2021) School staff, parents and carers’ views and experience of the Keeping Safe whole-school education programme: Lessons from the process evaluation for teaching children to recognise abusive behaviours and tell. London: NSPCC.

McElearney, A., Hyde-Dryden, G., Walters, H., Palmer, L., Coulter, K. and Adamson, G. (2021) Process evaluation of Virtual Pregnancy in Mind during the Covid-19 pandemic. London: NSPCC.

McElearney, A., Hyde-Dryden, G., Palmer, L. and Walters, H. (2021) Reflections and learning from our local service response to families during Covid-19. London: NSPCC.

McElearney, A., Palmer, L., Walters, H., and Hyde-Dryden, G. (2020) Learning from adapting the Baby Steps programme in response to COVID-19. London: NSPCC.

Hyde-Dryden, G. and Ward, H. (2017) Towards a Family Justice Observatory – A Scoping Study: Main Findings Report of the International Scoping Exercise. Available at: http://wp.lancs.ac.uk/observatory-scoping-study/

Lushey, C., Hyde-Dryden, G., Holmes, L. and Blackmore, J. (2017) No Wrong Door evaluation report. London: Department for Education.

Holmes, L, Thomas, C, Hyde-Dryden, G, Williams, A (2017) Firstline evaluation report. London: Department for Education

Brown, R., Ward, H., Blackmore, J., Thomas, C. and Hyde-Dryden, G. (2016) Children identified in infancy as likely to suffer, significant harm: a prospective longitudinal study: age eight follow-up, London: Department for Education.

Hyde-Dryden, G., Gibb, J., Lea, J., Buckley, E., Holmes, L., Wallace, E., Lushey, C. and Lawson, D. (2015) Improving practice in respect of children who return home from care: Research report. London: Department for Education.

Hyde-Dryden G., Holmes L., Lawson D. and Blackmore J. (2015) Taking Care Practice Framework for Reunification evaluation report. Loughborough: Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University.

Ward, H., Brown, R. and Hyde Dryden, G. (2014) Assessing Parental Capacity to Change when Children are on the Edge of Care: An Overview of Research Evidence, Childhood Wellbeing Research Centre Report, London: Department for Education.

Dr Selena Nemorin is a UKRI Future Leaders Fellow and researcher/lecturer in sociology of digital technology at the University of Oxford.

Selena’s research focuses on critical theories of technology, surveillance studies, tech ethics, and youth and future media/technologies. She is currently working on the Fair-AIEd project which examines the role that public-private partnerships play in access and use of AI in emerging market economies.

Her past work includes research projects that have examined AI, IoT and ethics, the uses of new technologies in digital schools, educational equity and inclusion, as well as human rights policies and procedures in K-12 and post-secondary institutions.

Publications

Books

Nemorin, S. (2018). Biosurveillance in New Media Marketing: World, Discourse, Representation. New York, NY: Palgrave Macmillan.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Johnson, N., & Bulfin, S. (2017). Everyday Schooling in the Digital Age: High School, High Tech? Oxford, UK: Routledge.

Journal articles

Bonami, B. & Nemorin, S. (2021). Through three levels of abstraction. Towards an ecological framework for making sense of new technologies in education. Education and Information Technologies. doi: 10.1007/s10639-020-10305-1

Gandy, Jr. O. H. & Nemorin, S. (2020). Transportation and smart city imaginaries: A critical analysis of proposals for the USDOT Smart City Challenge. International Journal of Communication, 14, 1232-1252.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Bulfin, S., & Johnson, N. F. (2020). The ‘obvious’ stuff: exploring the mundane realities of students’ digital technology use in school. Digital Education Review, 37, https://revistes.ub.edu/index.php/der/article/view/30670

Ustek-Spilda, F., Powell, A. & Nemorin, S. (2019). Engaging with ethics in Internet of Things: Imaginaries in the social milieu of technology developers. Big Data and Society. July-Dec 1-12. doi: 10.1177/2053951719879468

Selwyn, N., Pangrazio, L., Nemorin, S., & Perrotta, C. (2019). What might the school of 2030 be like? An exercise in social science fiction. Learning, Media and Technology, 1-17. doi:10.1080/17439884.2020.1694944

Gandy, Jr. O. H. & Nemorin, S. (2018). Toward the political economy of ‘nudge’: Smart city variations. Information, Communication & Society. doi.org/10.1080/1369118X.2018.1477969

Williamson, B., Pykett, J. & Nemorin, S. (2018). Biosocial spaces and neurocomputational governance: brain-based and brain-targeted technologies in education. Discourse, 39(2), 258-275. doi:10.1080/01596306.2018.1394421

Nemorin, S. (2017). Affective capture in digital school spaces and the modulation of student subjectivities. Emotion, Space & Society, 24, 11-18. doi:10.1016/j.emospa.2017.05.007

Nemorin, S. (2017). Post-panoptic pedagogies: The changing nature of school surveillance in the digital age. Surveillance & Society. 15 (2): 239-253.

Nemorin, S. (2017). Neuromarketing and the ‘poor in world’ consumer: How the animalization of thinking underpins contemporary market research discourses. Consumption, Markets & Culture, 20 (1), 59-80 22. doi: 10.1080/10253866.2016.1160897

Nemorin, S. & Gandy, Jr. O.H. (2017). Exploring neuromarketing and its reliance on remote sensing: Social and ethical implications. International Journal of Communication, 11, 4824-4844.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Bulfin, S., & Johnson. N. (2017). Left to their own devices: The everyday realities of ‘one-to-one’ classrooms. Oxford Review of Education. doi: 10.1080/03054985.2017.1305047

Nemorin, S. (2016). The frustrations of digital fabrication: An auto/ethnographic exploration of 3D ‘Making’ in school. International Journal of Technology and Design Education. doi: 10.1007/s10798-016-9366-z

Nemorin, S. & Selwyn, N. (2016). Making the best of it? Exploring the realities of 3D printing in school. Research Papers in Education. doi: 10.1080/02671522.2016.1225802

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., & Johnson, N. (2016). High-tech, hard work: An investigation of teachers’ work in the digital age. Learning Media and Technology. doi:10.1080/17439884.2016.1252770

Bulfin, S., Johnson, N., Nemorin, S., & Selwyn, N. (2016). Nagging, noobs and new tricks – student perceptions of school as a context for digital technology use. Educational Studies 42(3), 239-251. doi: 10.1080/03055698.2016.1160824

Pinto, L. E. & Nemorin, S. (2015). Normalizing panoptic surveillance among children. Our Schools Our Selves, 24(2), 53-62.

Book sections

 Nemorin, S. (2017). Online safety. In SAGE Encyclopedia of Out-of-School Learning, K. Peppler (Ed). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Bulfin, S., & Johnson, N. (2016). Toward a digital sociology of school. In Digital Sociologies, J. Daniels, K. Gregory, & T. McMillan Cottom (Eds). Bristol, UK: Policy Press.

Boler, M. & Nemorin, S. (2013). Dissent, truthiness, and war: New media landscapes of 21st century propaganda. In The Oxford Handbook of Propaganda Studies, R. Castronovo and J. Auerbach (Eds.). New York, NY: Oxford University Press.

Monographs and reports

Powell, A., Nemorin, S., Berner, A., Douglas-Jones, R., Fritsch, E., Hanteer, O., … Vega-Aurelio, D. (2017). Values and ethics in innovation for responsible technology in Europe. Report for the EU Commission: Enabling responsible ICT-related research and innovation.

Selwyn, N., Johnson, N., Nemorin, S., & Knight, E. (2016). Going online on behalf of others: An investigation of ‘proxy’ Internet consumers. Report for the Australian Communications Consumer Action Network, Sydney.

Alice Aldinucci is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford, Department of Education. She is part of the team working on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani, and she is a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group.

She holds a PhD in Education from the University of Glasgow (UK) where she was awarded the LKAS Interdisciplinary Scholarship. Her thesis applies a longitudinal qualitative research design and draws on the combination of Critical Realism and Capability Approach to explore aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to adulthood in Chile. Prior to her PhD, she completed a MA in International Education and Development from the University of Sussex (UK) where she was awarded the Centre for International Education Prize for the best overall MA performance. For her MA at Sussex, she conducted an empirical dissertation on the meaning making of Inclusive Education in Nepal. She holds a MA in Languages and Cultures for International Communication and Cooperation from the University of Milan (Italy) with a fieldwork research on tensions between policy and practice in bilingual multicultural education for indigenous students in Higher Education in Peru; and a BA in Languages and Intercultural Mediation from the University of Arezzo (Italy).

Alice’s research interests are interdisciplinary and relate to the critical linkages between intersecting inequalities, education, individual/societal development, and social justice at local and global levels, motivated by the question what education for what/whose development?

Areas, theoretical approaches and methodologies of interests:
• Sociology of education including aspirations in post-school transitions
• Cultural political economy of education and life chances/human flourishing/social justice
• Tensions between global educational frameworks and local knowledge and practices
• Critical Realism
• Capability Approach
• Qualitative and participatory methodologies
• Digital storytelling for social change

Besides her work in academia, Alice has gained experience as researcher, development practitioner and educator working in projects including early childhood education programmes, refugees’ education, girls’ education, SEN and inclusive education, TVET, global citizenship education, arts-based pedagogies. She lived and worked in different countries including in Nepal (a country she has developed a strong bond with), Tanzania, El Salvador, Italy and the UK. These experiences have reinforced her critical approach to international education and global development and to education as a catalyst for both inequalities, injustices, violence and more equitable social change and peace-building processes.

She served as Student Representative of the British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) from 2017 to 2019 and she is currently part of the college of reviewers of the editorial board of Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education.

Publications:

Aldinucci, A. (2022). Understanding aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to postschool trajectories in Chile. PhD thesis, University of Glasgow.
Aldinucci, A., Valiente, O., Hurrell S., and Zancajo, A. (2021). Understanding aspirations: Why do secondary TVET students aim so high in Chile? Journal of Vocational Education & Training.

Rawle, G., Riddle, N., Pettersson, G., Wallin, J., Bici, M., Jasper, P., Harb, J., Hebbar, M., Davis, J., Aldinucci, A., (2017), EQUIP-Tanzania Impact Evaluation. Midline Technical Report, Volume I and II. Oxford Policy Management.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.
Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Steph is a primary-trained teacher, maths specialist teacher (MaST) and Specialist Leader of Education (SLE) for mathematics in Oxfordshire. She trained as an NCETM mastery specialist and has NCETM PD Lead accreditation. Steph is currently undertaking a part-time PhD, exploring the experiences of teachers working in multi-academy trusts – how expertise is utilised and whether agency is possible.

Publications

Mastery and optional standardised tests: some tensions, Mathematics Teaching (2019), 268, p.18-20

Georgia is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre. She is currently working on the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, primarily involved in qualitative data analysis. Georgia is also working on a British Academy funded project about care-experienced academics working in higher education.

Georgia came to research from a legal background. She initially worked as a researcher in the Centre for Child and Family Research at Loughborough University, where she was involved in multiple research and evaluation projects including, a prospective longitudinal study of children identified in infancy as likely to suffer significant harm; evaluations for the Department for Education Children’s Social Care Innovation Programme; and research on return home from care. More recently, Georgia worked as a Development Researcher at the NSPCC, involved in the development of local services for children and families from concept through to scale up.

Her primary research interests are transitions from care (e.g. transitions from care into adulthood, returning home from care) and the role of education in supporting and providing opportunities for vulnerable children. Georgia’s PhD focused on care leavers’ experiences of higher education in England.

Publications

Journal articles

Harrington, L., McElearney, A. and Hyde-Dryden, G. (2021) Adapting the Pregnancy in Mind (PiM) support service to virtual delivery. Journal of Birth and Parent Education, 8 (3).

Margolis, R., Jackson-Hollis, V., Hyde-Dryden, G., Robson-Brown, E., Smith, E. and McConnell, N (2020) Families facing multiple adversities: impact and interventions. Paediatrics and Child Health 30(11), 390-394.

Ward, H., Brown, R., Blackmore, J., Hyde-Dryden, G. and Thomas, C. (2019) Identifying parents who show capacity to make and sustain positive changes when infants are at risk of significant harm. Developing Practice: The Child, Youth and Family Work Journal, 54, 45-61.

McDermid, S., Hyde-Dryden, G. and Ward, H. (2015) Looking for long-term outcomes: What early interventions are needed for children and young people at risk of maltreatment in England? Irish Journal of Applied Social Studies, 15 (2), 36-49.

Hyde-Dryden, G. (2015) Overcoming self-reliance and lack of expectation among care leavers in higher education in England: the role of inter-agency working. Swiss Journal of Social Work, 16, 75-93, (Special issue).

Munro, E., Pinkerton, J., Mendes, P., Hyde Dryden, G., Herczog, M. and Benbenishty, R. (2011) The contribution of the UNC for the rights of the child to understanding and promoting the interests of young people making the transition from care to adulthood. Children and Youth Services Review 33 (12), 2417-2423.

 

Reports

McElearney, A., Murphy, C., Fullerton, D., Hyde-Dryden, G., Cosette, A. and Morris, S. (2021) School staff, parents and carers’ views and experience of the Keeping Safe whole-school education programme: Lessons from the process evaluation for teaching children to recognise abusive behaviours and tell. London: NSPCC.

McElearney, A., Hyde-Dryden, G., Walters, H., Palmer, L., Coulter, K. and Adamson, G. (2021) Process evaluation of Virtual Pregnancy in Mind during the Covid-19 pandemic. London: NSPCC.

McElearney, A., Hyde-Dryden, G., Palmer, L. and Walters, H. (2021) Reflections and learning from our local service response to families during Covid-19. London: NSPCC.

McElearney, A., Palmer, L., Walters, H., and Hyde-Dryden, G. (2020) Learning from adapting the Baby Steps programme in response to COVID-19. London: NSPCC.

Hyde-Dryden, G. and Ward, H. (2017) Towards a Family Justice Observatory – A Scoping Study: Main Findings Report of the International Scoping Exercise. Available at: http://wp.lancs.ac.uk/observatory-scoping-study/

Lushey, C., Hyde-Dryden, G., Holmes, L. and Blackmore, J. (2017) No Wrong Door evaluation report. London: Department for Education.

Holmes, L, Thomas, C, Hyde-Dryden, G, Williams, A (2017) Firstline evaluation report. London: Department for Education

Brown, R., Ward, H., Blackmore, J., Thomas, C. and Hyde-Dryden, G. (2016) Children identified in infancy as likely to suffer, significant harm: a prospective longitudinal study: age eight follow-up, London: Department for Education.

Hyde-Dryden, G., Gibb, J., Lea, J., Buckley, E., Holmes, L., Wallace, E., Lushey, C. and Lawson, D. (2015) Improving practice in respect of children who return home from care: Research report. London: Department for Education.

Hyde-Dryden G., Holmes L., Lawson D. and Blackmore J. (2015) Taking Care Practice Framework for Reunification evaluation report. Loughborough: Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University.

Ward, H., Brown, R. and Hyde Dryden, G. (2014) Assessing Parental Capacity to Change when Children are on the Edge of Care: An Overview of Research Evidence, Childhood Wellbeing Research Centre Report, London: Department for Education.

Dr Selena Nemorin is a UKRI Future Leaders Fellow and researcher/lecturer in sociology of digital technology at the University of Oxford.

Selena’s research focuses on critical theories of technology, surveillance studies, tech ethics, and youth and future media/technologies. She is currently working on the Fair-AIEd project which examines the role that public-private partnerships play in access and use of AI in emerging market economies.

Her past work includes research projects that have examined AI, IoT and ethics, the uses of new technologies in digital schools, educational equity and inclusion, as well as human rights policies and procedures in K-12 and post-secondary institutions.

Publications

Books

Nemorin, S. (2018). Biosurveillance in New Media Marketing: World, Discourse, Representation. New York, NY: Palgrave Macmillan.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Johnson, N., & Bulfin, S. (2017). Everyday Schooling in the Digital Age: High School, High Tech? Oxford, UK: Routledge.

Journal articles

Bonami, B. & Nemorin, S. (2021). Through three levels of abstraction. Towards an ecological framework for making sense of new technologies in education. Education and Information Technologies. doi: 10.1007/s10639-020-10305-1

Gandy, Jr. O. H. & Nemorin, S. (2020). Transportation and smart city imaginaries: A critical analysis of proposals for the USDOT Smart City Challenge. International Journal of Communication, 14, 1232-1252.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Bulfin, S., & Johnson, N. F. (2020). The ‘obvious’ stuff: exploring the mundane realities of students’ digital technology use in school. Digital Education Review, 37, https://revistes.ub.edu/index.php/der/article/view/30670

Ustek-Spilda, F., Powell, A. & Nemorin, S. (2019). Engaging with ethics in Internet of Things: Imaginaries in the social milieu of technology developers. Big Data and Society. July-Dec 1-12. doi: 10.1177/2053951719879468

Selwyn, N., Pangrazio, L., Nemorin, S., & Perrotta, C. (2019). What might the school of 2030 be like? An exercise in social science fiction. Learning, Media and Technology, 1-17. doi:10.1080/17439884.2020.1694944

Gandy, Jr. O. H. & Nemorin, S. (2018). Toward the political economy of ‘nudge’: Smart city variations. Information, Communication & Society. doi.org/10.1080/1369118X.2018.1477969

Williamson, B., Pykett, J. & Nemorin, S. (2018). Biosocial spaces and neurocomputational governance: brain-based and brain-targeted technologies in education. Discourse, 39(2), 258-275. doi:10.1080/01596306.2018.1394421

Nemorin, S. (2017). Affective capture in digital school spaces and the modulation of student subjectivities. Emotion, Space & Society, 24, 11-18. doi:10.1016/j.emospa.2017.05.007

Nemorin, S. (2017). Post-panoptic pedagogies: The changing nature of school surveillance in the digital age. Surveillance & Society. 15 (2): 239-253.

Nemorin, S. (2017). Neuromarketing and the ‘poor in world’ consumer: How the animalization of thinking underpins contemporary market research discourses. Consumption, Markets & Culture, 20 (1), 59-80 22. doi: 10.1080/10253866.2016.1160897

Nemorin, S. & Gandy, Jr. O.H. (2017). Exploring neuromarketing and its reliance on remote sensing: Social and ethical implications. International Journal of Communication, 11, 4824-4844.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Bulfin, S., & Johnson. N. (2017). Left to their own devices: The everyday realities of ‘one-to-one’ classrooms. Oxford Review of Education. doi: 10.1080/03054985.2017.1305047

Nemorin, S. (2016). The frustrations of digital fabrication: An auto/ethnographic exploration of 3D ‘Making’ in school. International Journal of Technology and Design Education. doi: 10.1007/s10798-016-9366-z

Nemorin, S. & Selwyn, N. (2016). Making the best of it? Exploring the realities of 3D printing in school. Research Papers in Education. doi: 10.1080/02671522.2016.1225802

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., & Johnson, N. (2016). High-tech, hard work: An investigation of teachers’ work in the digital age. Learning Media and Technology. doi:10.1080/17439884.2016.1252770

Bulfin, S., Johnson, N., Nemorin, S., & Selwyn, N. (2016). Nagging, noobs and new tricks – student perceptions of school as a context for digital technology use. Educational Studies 42(3), 239-251. doi: 10.1080/03055698.2016.1160824

Pinto, L. E. & Nemorin, S. (2015). Normalizing panoptic surveillance among children. Our Schools Our Selves, 24(2), 53-62.

Book sections

 Nemorin, S. (2017). Online safety. In SAGE Encyclopedia of Out-of-School Learning, K. Peppler (Ed). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Bulfin, S., & Johnson, N. (2016). Toward a digital sociology of school. In Digital Sociologies, J. Daniels, K. Gregory, & T. McMillan Cottom (Eds). Bristol, UK: Policy Press.

Boler, M. & Nemorin, S. (2013). Dissent, truthiness, and war: New media landscapes of 21st century propaganda. In The Oxford Handbook of Propaganda Studies, R. Castronovo and J. Auerbach (Eds.). New York, NY: Oxford University Press.

Monographs and reports

Powell, A., Nemorin, S., Berner, A., Douglas-Jones, R., Fritsch, E., Hanteer, O., … Vega-Aurelio, D. (2017). Values and ethics in innovation for responsible technology in Europe. Report for the EU Commission: Enabling responsible ICT-related research and innovation.

Selwyn, N., Johnson, N., Nemorin, S., & Knight, E. (2016). Going online on behalf of others: An investigation of ‘proxy’ Internet consumers. Report for the Australian Communications Consumer Action Network, Sydney.

Alice Aldinucci is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford, Department of Education. She is part of the team working on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani, and she is a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group.

She holds a PhD in Education from the University of Glasgow (UK) where she was awarded the LKAS Interdisciplinary Scholarship. Her thesis applies a longitudinal qualitative research design and draws on the combination of Critical Realism and Capability Approach to explore aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to adulthood in Chile. Prior to her PhD, she completed a MA in International Education and Development from the University of Sussex (UK) where she was awarded the Centre for International Education Prize for the best overall MA performance. For her MA at Sussex, she conducted an empirical dissertation on the meaning making of Inclusive Education in Nepal. She holds a MA in Languages and Cultures for International Communication and Cooperation from the University of Milan (Italy) with a fieldwork research on tensions between policy and practice in bilingual multicultural education for indigenous students in Higher Education in Peru; and a BA in Languages and Intercultural Mediation from the University of Arezzo (Italy).

Alice’s research interests are interdisciplinary and relate to the critical linkages between intersecting inequalities, education, individual/societal development, and social justice at local and global levels, motivated by the question what education for what/whose development?

Areas, theoretical approaches and methodologies of interests:
• Sociology of education including aspirations in post-school transitions
• Cultural political economy of education and life chances/human flourishing/social justice
• Tensions between global educational frameworks and local knowledge and practices
• Critical Realism
• Capability Approach
• Qualitative and participatory methodologies
• Digital storytelling for social change

Besides her work in academia, Alice has gained experience as researcher, development practitioner and educator working in projects including early childhood education programmes, refugees’ education, girls’ education, SEN and inclusive education, TVET, global citizenship education, arts-based pedagogies. She lived and worked in different countries including in Nepal (a country she has developed a strong bond with), Tanzania, El Salvador, Italy and the UK. These experiences have reinforced her critical approach to international education and global development and to education as a catalyst for both inequalities, injustices, violence and more equitable social change and peace-building processes.

She served as Student Representative of the British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) from 2017 to 2019 and she is currently part of the college of reviewers of the editorial board of Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education.

Publications:

Aldinucci, A. (2022). Understanding aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to postschool trajectories in Chile. PhD thesis, University of Glasgow.
Aldinucci, A., Valiente, O., Hurrell S., and Zancajo, A. (2021). Understanding aspirations: Why do secondary TVET students aim so high in Chile? Journal of Vocational Education & Training.

Rawle, G., Riddle, N., Pettersson, G., Wallin, J., Bici, M., Jasper, P., Harb, J., Hebbar, M., Davis, J., Aldinucci, A., (2017), EQUIP-Tanzania Impact Evaluation. Midline Technical Report, Volume I and II. Oxford Policy Management.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.
Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Steph is a primary-trained teacher, maths specialist teacher (MaST) and Specialist Leader of Education (SLE) for mathematics in Oxfordshire. She trained as an NCETM mastery specialist and has NCETM PD Lead accreditation. Steph is currently undertaking a part-time PhD, exploring the experiences of teachers working in multi-academy trusts – how expertise is utilised and whether agency is possible.

Publications

Mastery and optional standardised tests: some tensions, Mathematics Teaching (2019), 268, p.18-20

Georgia is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre. She is currently working on the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, primarily involved in qualitative data analysis. Georgia is also working on a British Academy funded project about care-experienced academics working in higher education.

Georgia came to research from a legal background. She initially worked as a researcher in the Centre for Child and Family Research at Loughborough University, where she was involved in multiple research and evaluation projects including, a prospective longitudinal study of children identified in infancy as likely to suffer significant harm; evaluations for the Department for Education Children’s Social Care Innovation Programme; and research on return home from care. More recently, Georgia worked as a Development Researcher at the NSPCC, involved in the development of local services for children and families from concept through to scale up.

Her primary research interests are transitions from care (e.g. transitions from care into adulthood, returning home from care) and the role of education in supporting and providing opportunities for vulnerable children. Georgia’s PhD focused on care leavers’ experiences of higher education in England.

Publications

Journal articles

Harrington, L., McElearney, A. and Hyde-Dryden, G. (2021) Adapting the Pregnancy in Mind (PiM) support service to virtual delivery. Journal of Birth and Parent Education, 8 (3).

Margolis, R., Jackson-Hollis, V., Hyde-Dryden, G., Robson-Brown, E., Smith, E. and McConnell, N (2020) Families facing multiple adversities: impact and interventions. Paediatrics and Child Health 30(11), 390-394.

Ward, H., Brown, R., Blackmore, J., Hyde-Dryden, G. and Thomas, C. (2019) Identifying parents who show capacity to make and sustain positive changes when infants are at risk of significant harm. Developing Practice: The Child, Youth and Family Work Journal, 54, 45-61.

McDermid, S., Hyde-Dryden, G. and Ward, H. (2015) Looking for long-term outcomes: What early interventions are needed for children and young people at risk of maltreatment in England? Irish Journal of Applied Social Studies, 15 (2), 36-49.

Hyde-Dryden, G. (2015) Overcoming self-reliance and lack of expectation among care leavers in higher education in England: the role of inter-agency working. Swiss Journal of Social Work, 16, 75-93, (Special issue).

Munro, E., Pinkerton, J., Mendes, P., Hyde Dryden, G., Herczog, M. and Benbenishty, R. (2011) The contribution of the UNC for the rights of the child to understanding and promoting the interests of young people making the transition from care to adulthood. Children and Youth Services Review 33 (12), 2417-2423.

 

Reports

McElearney, A., Murphy, C., Fullerton, D., Hyde-Dryden, G., Cosette, A. and Morris, S. (2021) School staff, parents and carers’ views and experience of the Keeping Safe whole-school education programme: Lessons from the process evaluation for teaching children to recognise abusive behaviours and tell. London: NSPCC.

McElearney, A., Hyde-Dryden, G., Walters, H., Palmer, L., Coulter, K. and Adamson, G. (2021) Process evaluation of Virtual Pregnancy in Mind during the Covid-19 pandemic. London: NSPCC.

McElearney, A., Hyde-Dryden, G., Palmer, L. and Walters, H. (2021) Reflections and learning from our local service response to families during Covid-19. London: NSPCC.

McElearney, A., Palmer, L., Walters, H., and Hyde-Dryden, G. (2020) Learning from adapting the Baby Steps programme in response to COVID-19. London: NSPCC.

Hyde-Dryden, G. and Ward, H. (2017) Towards a Family Justice Observatory – A Scoping Study: Main Findings Report of the International Scoping Exercise. Available at: http://wp.lancs.ac.uk/observatory-scoping-study/

Lushey, C., Hyde-Dryden, G., Holmes, L. and Blackmore, J. (2017) No Wrong Door evaluation report. London: Department for Education.

Holmes, L, Thomas, C, Hyde-Dryden, G, Williams, A (2017) Firstline evaluation report. London: Department for Education

Brown, R., Ward, H., Blackmore, J., Thomas, C. and Hyde-Dryden, G. (2016) Children identified in infancy as likely to suffer, significant harm: a prospective longitudinal study: age eight follow-up, London: Department for Education.

Hyde-Dryden, G., Gibb, J., Lea, J., Buckley, E., Holmes, L., Wallace, E., Lushey, C. and Lawson, D. (2015) Improving practice in respect of children who return home from care: Research report. London: Department for Education.

Hyde-Dryden G., Holmes L., Lawson D. and Blackmore J. (2015) Taking Care Practice Framework for Reunification evaluation report. Loughborough: Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University.

Ward, H., Brown, R. and Hyde Dryden, G. (2014) Assessing Parental Capacity to Change when Children are on the Edge of Care: An Overview of Research Evidence, Childhood Wellbeing Research Centre Report, London: Department for Education.

Dr Selena Nemorin is a UKRI Future Leaders Fellow and researcher/lecturer in sociology of digital technology at the University of Oxford.

Selena’s research focuses on critical theories of technology, surveillance studies, tech ethics, and youth and future media/technologies. She is currently working on the Fair-AIEd project which examines the role that public-private partnerships play in access and use of AI in emerging market economies.

Her past work includes research projects that have examined AI, IoT and ethics, the uses of new technologies in digital schools, educational equity and inclusion, as well as human rights policies and procedures in K-12 and post-secondary institutions.

Publications

Books

Nemorin, S. (2018). Biosurveillance in New Media Marketing: World, Discourse, Representation. New York, NY: Palgrave Macmillan.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Johnson, N., & Bulfin, S. (2017). Everyday Schooling in the Digital Age: High School, High Tech? Oxford, UK: Routledge.

Journal articles

Bonami, B. & Nemorin, S. (2021). Through three levels of abstraction. Towards an ecological framework for making sense of new technologies in education. Education and Information Technologies. doi: 10.1007/s10639-020-10305-1

Gandy, Jr. O. H. & Nemorin, S. (2020). Transportation and smart city imaginaries: A critical analysis of proposals for the USDOT Smart City Challenge. International Journal of Communication, 14, 1232-1252.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Bulfin, S., & Johnson, N. F. (2020). The ‘obvious’ stuff: exploring the mundane realities of students’ digital technology use in school. Digital Education Review, 37, https://revistes.ub.edu/index.php/der/article/view/30670

Ustek-Spilda, F., Powell, A. & Nemorin, S. (2019). Engaging with ethics in Internet of Things: Imaginaries in the social milieu of technology developers. Big Data and Society. July-Dec 1-12. doi: 10.1177/2053951719879468

Selwyn, N., Pangrazio, L., Nemorin, S., & Perrotta, C. (2019). What might the school of 2030 be like? An exercise in social science fiction. Learning, Media and Technology, 1-17. doi:10.1080/17439884.2020.1694944

Gandy, Jr. O. H. & Nemorin, S. (2018). Toward the political economy of ‘nudge’: Smart city variations. Information, Communication & Society. doi.org/10.1080/1369118X.2018.1477969

Williamson, B., Pykett, J. & Nemorin, S. (2018). Biosocial spaces and neurocomputational governance: brain-based and brain-targeted technologies in education. Discourse, 39(2), 258-275. doi:10.1080/01596306.2018.1394421

Nemorin, S. (2017). Affective capture in digital school spaces and the modulation of student subjectivities. Emotion, Space & Society, 24, 11-18. doi:10.1016/j.emospa.2017.05.007

Nemorin, S. (2017). Post-panoptic pedagogies: The changing nature of school surveillance in the digital age. Surveillance & Society. 15 (2): 239-253.

Nemorin, S. (2017). Neuromarketing and the ‘poor in world’ consumer: How the animalization of thinking underpins contemporary market research discourses. Consumption, Markets & Culture, 20 (1), 59-80 22. doi: 10.1080/10253866.2016.1160897

Nemorin, S. & Gandy, Jr. O.H. (2017). Exploring neuromarketing and its reliance on remote sensing: Social and ethical implications. International Journal of Communication, 11, 4824-4844.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Bulfin, S., & Johnson. N. (2017). Left to their own devices: The everyday realities of ‘one-to-one’ classrooms. Oxford Review of Education. doi: 10.1080/03054985.2017.1305047

Nemorin, S. (2016). The frustrations of digital fabrication: An auto/ethnographic exploration of 3D ‘Making’ in school. International Journal of Technology and Design Education. doi: 10.1007/s10798-016-9366-z

Nemorin, S. & Selwyn, N. (2016). Making the best of it? Exploring the realities of 3D printing in school. Research Papers in Education. doi: 10.1080/02671522.2016.1225802

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., & Johnson, N. (2016). High-tech, hard work: An investigation of teachers’ work in the digital age. Learning Media and Technology. doi:10.1080/17439884.2016.1252770

Bulfin, S., Johnson, N., Nemorin, S., & Selwyn, N. (2016). Nagging, noobs and new tricks – student perceptions of school as a context for digital technology use. Educational Studies 42(3), 239-251. doi: 10.1080/03055698.2016.1160824

Pinto, L. E. & Nemorin, S. (2015). Normalizing panoptic surveillance among children. Our Schools Our Selves, 24(2), 53-62.

Book sections

 Nemorin, S. (2017). Online safety. In SAGE Encyclopedia of Out-of-School Learning, K. Peppler (Ed). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Bulfin, S., & Johnson, N. (2016). Toward a digital sociology of school. In Digital Sociologies, J. Daniels, K. Gregory, & T. McMillan Cottom (Eds). Bristol, UK: Policy Press.

Boler, M. & Nemorin, S. (2013). Dissent, truthiness, and war: New media landscapes of 21st century propaganda. In The Oxford Handbook of Propaganda Studies, R. Castronovo and J. Auerbach (Eds.). New York, NY: Oxford University Press.

Monographs and reports

Powell, A., Nemorin, S., Berner, A., Douglas-Jones, R., Fritsch, E., Hanteer, O., … Vega-Aurelio, D. (2017). Values and ethics in innovation for responsible technology in Europe. Report for the EU Commission: Enabling responsible ICT-related research and innovation.

Selwyn, N., Johnson, N., Nemorin, S., & Knight, E. (2016). Going online on behalf of others: An investigation of ‘proxy’ Internet consumers. Report for the Australian Communications Consumer Action Network, Sydney.

Alice Aldinucci is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford, Department of Education. She is part of the team working on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani, and she is a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group.

She holds a PhD in Education from the University of Glasgow (UK) where she was awarded the LKAS Interdisciplinary Scholarship. Her thesis applies a longitudinal qualitative research design and draws on the combination of Critical Realism and Capability Approach to explore aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to adulthood in Chile. Prior to her PhD, she completed a MA in International Education and Development from the University of Sussex (UK) where she was awarded the Centre for International Education Prize for the best overall MA performance. For her MA at Sussex, she conducted an empirical dissertation on the meaning making of Inclusive Education in Nepal. She holds a MA in Languages and Cultures for International Communication and Cooperation from the University of Milan (Italy) with a fieldwork research on tensions between policy and practice in bilingual multicultural education for indigenous students in Higher Education in Peru; and a BA in Languages and Intercultural Mediation from the University of Arezzo (Italy).

Alice’s research interests are interdisciplinary and relate to the critical linkages between intersecting inequalities, education, individual/societal development, and social justice at local and global levels, motivated by the question what education for what/whose development?

Areas, theoretical approaches and methodologies of interests:
• Sociology of education including aspirations in post-school transitions
• Cultural political economy of education and life chances/human flourishing/social justice
• Tensions between global educational frameworks and local knowledge and practices
• Critical Realism
• Capability Approach
• Qualitative and participatory methodologies
• Digital storytelling for social change

Besides her work in academia, Alice has gained experience as researcher, development practitioner and educator working in projects including early childhood education programmes, refugees’ education, girls’ education, SEN and inclusive education, TVET, global citizenship education, arts-based pedagogies. She lived and worked in different countries including in Nepal (a country she has developed a strong bond with), Tanzania, El Salvador, Italy and the UK. These experiences have reinforced her critical approach to international education and global development and to education as a catalyst for both inequalities, injustices, violence and more equitable social change and peace-building processes.

She served as Student Representative of the British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) from 2017 to 2019 and she is currently part of the college of reviewers of the editorial board of Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education.

Publications:

Aldinucci, A. (2022). Understanding aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to postschool trajectories in Chile. PhD thesis, University of Glasgow.
Aldinucci, A., Valiente, O., Hurrell S., and Zancajo, A. (2021). Understanding aspirations: Why do secondary TVET students aim so high in Chile? Journal of Vocational Education & Training.

Rawle, G., Riddle, N., Pettersson, G., Wallin, J., Bici, M., Jasper, P., Harb, J., Hebbar, M., Davis, J., Aldinucci, A., (2017), EQUIP-Tanzania Impact Evaluation. Midline Technical Report, Volume I and II. Oxford Policy Management.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.
Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Steph is a primary-trained teacher, maths specialist teacher (MaST) and Specialist Leader of Education (SLE) for mathematics in Oxfordshire. She trained as an NCETM mastery specialist and has NCETM PD Lead accreditation. Steph is currently undertaking a part-time PhD, exploring the experiences of teachers working in multi-academy trusts – how expertise is utilised and whether agency is possible.

Publications

Mastery and optional standardised tests: some tensions, Mathematics Teaching (2019), 268, p.18-20

Georgia is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre. She is currently working on the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, primarily involved in qualitative data analysis. Georgia is also working on a British Academy funded project about care-experienced academics working in higher education.

Georgia came to research from a legal background. She initially worked as a researcher in the Centre for Child and Family Research at Loughborough University, where she was involved in multiple research and evaluation projects including, a prospective longitudinal study of children identified in infancy as likely to suffer significant harm; evaluations for the Department for Education Children’s Social Care Innovation Programme; and research on return home from care. More recently, Georgia worked as a Development Researcher at the NSPCC, involved in the development of local services for children and families from concept through to scale up.

Her primary research interests are transitions from care (e.g. transitions from care into adulthood, returning home from care) and the role of education in supporting and providing opportunities for vulnerable children. Georgia’s PhD focused on care leavers’ experiences of higher education in England.

Publications

Journal articles

Harrington, L., McElearney, A. and Hyde-Dryden, G. (2021) Adapting the Pregnancy in Mind (PiM) support service to virtual delivery. Journal of Birth and Parent Education, 8 (3).

Margolis, R., Jackson-Hollis, V., Hyde-Dryden, G., Robson-Brown, E., Smith, E. and McConnell, N (2020) Families facing multiple adversities: impact and interventions. Paediatrics and Child Health 30(11), 390-394.

Ward, H., Brown, R., Blackmore, J., Hyde-Dryden, G. and Thomas, C. (2019) Identifying parents who show capacity to make and sustain positive changes when infants are at risk of significant harm. Developing Practice: The Child, Youth and Family Work Journal, 54, 45-61.

McDermid, S., Hyde-Dryden, G. and Ward, H. (2015) Looking for long-term outcomes: What early interventions are needed for children and young people at risk of maltreatment in England? Irish Journal of Applied Social Studies, 15 (2), 36-49.

Hyde-Dryden, G. (2015) Overcoming self-reliance and lack of expectation among care leavers in higher education in England: the role of inter-agency working. Swiss Journal of Social Work, 16, 75-93, (Special issue).

Munro, E., Pinkerton, J., Mendes, P., Hyde Dryden, G., Herczog, M. and Benbenishty, R. (2011) The contribution of the UNC for the rights of the child to understanding and promoting the interests of young people making the transition from care to adulthood. Children and Youth Services Review 33 (12), 2417-2423.

 

Reports

McElearney, A., Murphy, C., Fullerton, D., Hyde-Dryden, G., Cosette, A. and Morris, S. (2021) School staff, parents and carers’ views and experience of the Keeping Safe whole-school education programme: Lessons from the process evaluation for teaching children to recognise abusive behaviours and tell. London: NSPCC.

McElearney, A., Hyde-Dryden, G., Walters, H., Palmer, L., Coulter, K. and Adamson, G. (2021) Process evaluation of Virtual Pregnancy in Mind during the Covid-19 pandemic. London: NSPCC.

McElearney, A., Hyde-Dryden, G., Palmer, L. and Walters, H. (2021) Reflections and learning from our local service response to families during Covid-19. London: NSPCC.

McElearney, A., Palmer, L., Walters, H., and Hyde-Dryden, G. (2020) Learning from adapting the Baby Steps programme in response to COVID-19. London: NSPCC.

Hyde-Dryden, G. and Ward, H. (2017) Towards a Family Justice Observatory – A Scoping Study: Main Findings Report of the International Scoping Exercise. Available at: http://wp.lancs.ac.uk/observatory-scoping-study/

Lushey, C., Hyde-Dryden, G., Holmes, L. and Blackmore, J. (2017) No Wrong Door evaluation report. London: Department for Education.

Holmes, L, Thomas, C, Hyde-Dryden, G, Williams, A (2017) Firstline evaluation report. London: Department for Education

Brown, R., Ward, H., Blackmore, J., Thomas, C. and Hyde-Dryden, G. (2016) Children identified in infancy as likely to suffer, significant harm: a prospective longitudinal study: age eight follow-up, London: Department for Education.

Hyde-Dryden, G., Gibb, J., Lea, J., Buckley, E., Holmes, L., Wallace, E., Lushey, C. and Lawson, D. (2015) Improving practice in respect of children who return home from care: Research report. London: Department for Education.

Hyde-Dryden G., Holmes L., Lawson D. and Blackmore J. (2015) Taking Care Practice Framework for Reunification evaluation report. Loughborough: Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University.

Ward, H., Brown, R. and Hyde Dryden, G. (2014) Assessing Parental Capacity to Change when Children are on the Edge of Care: An Overview of Research Evidence, Childhood Wellbeing Research Centre Report, London: Department for Education.

Dr Selena Nemorin is a UKRI Future Leaders Fellow and researcher/lecturer in sociology of digital technology at the University of Oxford.

Selena’s research focuses on critical theories of technology, surveillance studies, tech ethics, and youth and future media/technologies. She is currently working on the Fair-AIEd project which examines the role that public-private partnerships play in access and use of AI in emerging market economies.

Her past work includes research projects that have examined AI, IoT and ethics, the uses of new technologies in digital schools, educational equity and inclusion, as well as human rights policies and procedures in K-12 and post-secondary institutions.

Publications

Books

Nemorin, S. (2018). Biosurveillance in New Media Marketing: World, Discourse, Representation. New York, NY: Palgrave Macmillan.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Johnson, N., & Bulfin, S. (2017). Everyday Schooling in the Digital Age: High School, High Tech? Oxford, UK: Routledge.

Journal articles

Bonami, B. & Nemorin, S. (2021). Through three levels of abstraction. Towards an ecological framework for making sense of new technologies in education. Education and Information Technologies. doi: 10.1007/s10639-020-10305-1

Gandy, Jr. O. H. & Nemorin, S. (2020). Transportation and smart city imaginaries: A critical analysis of proposals for the USDOT Smart City Challenge. International Journal of Communication, 14, 1232-1252.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Bulfin, S., & Johnson, N. F. (2020). The ‘obvious’ stuff: exploring the mundane realities of students’ digital technology use in school. Digital Education Review, 37, https://revistes.ub.edu/index.php/der/article/view/30670

Ustek-Spilda, F., Powell, A. & Nemorin, S. (2019). Engaging with ethics in Internet of Things: Imaginaries in the social milieu of technology developers. Big Data and Society. July-Dec 1-12. doi: 10.1177/2053951719879468

Selwyn, N., Pangrazio, L., Nemorin, S., & Perrotta, C. (2019). What might the school of 2030 be like? An exercise in social science fiction. Learning, Media and Technology, 1-17. doi:10.1080/17439884.2020.1694944

Gandy, Jr. O. H. & Nemorin, S. (2018). Toward the political economy of ‘nudge’: Smart city variations. Information, Communication & Society. doi.org/10.1080/1369118X.2018.1477969

Williamson, B., Pykett, J. & Nemorin, S. (2018). Biosocial spaces and neurocomputational governance: brain-based and brain-targeted technologies in education. Discourse, 39(2), 258-275. doi:10.1080/01596306.2018.1394421

Nemorin, S. (2017). Affective capture in digital school spaces and the modulation of student subjectivities. Emotion, Space & Society, 24, 11-18. doi:10.1016/j.emospa.2017.05.007

Nemorin, S. (2017). Post-panoptic pedagogies: The changing nature of school surveillance in the digital age. Surveillance & Society. 15 (2): 239-253.

Nemorin, S. (2017). Neuromarketing and the ‘poor in world’ consumer: How the animalization of thinking underpins contemporary market research discourses. Consumption, Markets & Culture, 20 (1), 59-80 22. doi: 10.1080/10253866.2016.1160897

Nemorin, S. & Gandy, Jr. O.H. (2017). Exploring neuromarketing and its reliance on remote sensing: Social and ethical implications. International Journal of Communication, 11, 4824-4844.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Bulfin, S., & Johnson. N. (2017). Left to their own devices: The everyday realities of ‘one-to-one’ classrooms. Oxford Review of Education. doi: 10.1080/03054985.2017.1305047

Nemorin, S. (2016). The frustrations of digital fabrication: An auto/ethnographic exploration of 3D ‘Making’ in school. International Journal of Technology and Design Education. doi: 10.1007/s10798-016-9366-z

Nemorin, S. & Selwyn, N. (2016). Making the best of it? Exploring the realities of 3D printing in school. Research Papers in Education. doi: 10.1080/02671522.2016.1225802

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., & Johnson, N. (2016). High-tech, hard work: An investigation of teachers’ work in the digital age. Learning Media and Technology. doi:10.1080/17439884.2016.1252770

Bulfin, S., Johnson, N., Nemorin, S., & Selwyn, N. (2016). Nagging, noobs and new tricks – student perceptions of school as a context for digital technology use. Educational Studies 42(3), 239-251. doi: 10.1080/03055698.2016.1160824

Pinto, L. E. & Nemorin, S. (2015). Normalizing panoptic surveillance among children. Our Schools Our Selves, 24(2), 53-62.

Book sections

 Nemorin, S. (2017). Online safety. In SAGE Encyclopedia of Out-of-School Learning, K. Peppler (Ed). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Bulfin, S., & Johnson, N. (2016). Toward a digital sociology of school. In Digital Sociologies, J. Daniels, K. Gregory, & T. McMillan Cottom (Eds). Bristol, UK: Policy Press.

Boler, M. & Nemorin, S. (2013). Dissent, truthiness, and war: New media landscapes of 21st century propaganda. In The Oxford Handbook of Propaganda Studies, R. Castronovo and J. Auerbach (Eds.). New York, NY: Oxford University Press.

Monographs and reports

Powell, A., Nemorin, S., Berner, A., Douglas-Jones, R., Fritsch, E., Hanteer, O., … Vega-Aurelio, D. (2017). Values and ethics in innovation for responsible technology in Europe. Report for the EU Commission: Enabling responsible ICT-related research and innovation.

Selwyn, N., Johnson, N., Nemorin, S., & Knight, E. (2016). Going online on behalf of others: An investigation of ‘proxy’ Internet consumers. Report for the Australian Communications Consumer Action Network, Sydney.

Alice Aldinucci is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford, Department of Education. She is part of the team working on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani, and she is a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group.

She holds a PhD in Education from the University of Glasgow (UK) where she was awarded the LKAS Interdisciplinary Scholarship. Her thesis applies a longitudinal qualitative research design and draws on the combination of Critical Realism and Capability Approach to explore aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to adulthood in Chile. Prior to her PhD, she completed a MA in International Education and Development from the University of Sussex (UK) where she was awarded the Centre for International Education Prize for the best overall MA performance. For her MA at Sussex, she conducted an empirical dissertation on the meaning making of Inclusive Education in Nepal. She holds a MA in Languages and Cultures for International Communication and Cooperation from the University of Milan (Italy) with a fieldwork research on tensions between policy and practice in bilingual multicultural education for indigenous students in Higher Education in Peru; and a BA in Languages and Intercultural Mediation from the University of Arezzo (Italy).

Alice’s research interests are interdisciplinary and relate to the critical linkages between intersecting inequalities, education, individual/societal development, and social justice at local and global levels, motivated by the question what education for what/whose development?

Areas, theoretical approaches and methodologies of interests:
• Sociology of education including aspirations in post-school transitions
• Cultural political economy of education and life chances/human flourishing/social justice
• Tensions between global educational frameworks and local knowledge and practices
• Critical Realism
• Capability Approach
• Qualitative and participatory methodologies
• Digital storytelling for social change

Besides her work in academia, Alice has gained experience as researcher, development practitioner and educator working in projects including early childhood education programmes, refugees’ education, girls’ education, SEN and inclusive education, TVET, global citizenship education, arts-based pedagogies. She lived and worked in different countries including in Nepal (a country she has developed a strong bond with), Tanzania, El Salvador, Italy and the UK. These experiences have reinforced her critical approach to international education and global development and to education as a catalyst for both inequalities, injustices, violence and more equitable social change and peace-building processes.

She served as Student Representative of the British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) from 2017 to 2019 and she is currently part of the college of reviewers of the editorial board of Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education.

Publications:

Aldinucci, A. (2022). Understanding aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to postschool trajectories in Chile. PhD thesis, University of Glasgow.
Aldinucci, A., Valiente, O., Hurrell S., and Zancajo, A. (2021). Understanding aspirations: Why do secondary TVET students aim so high in Chile? Journal of Vocational Education & Training.

Rawle, G., Riddle, N., Pettersson, G., Wallin, J., Bici, M., Jasper, P., Harb, J., Hebbar, M., Davis, J., Aldinucci, A., (2017), EQUIP-Tanzania Impact Evaluation. Midline Technical Report, Volume I and II. Oxford Policy Management.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.
Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Steph is a primary-trained teacher, maths specialist teacher (MaST) and Specialist Leader of Education (SLE) for mathematics in Oxfordshire. She trained as an NCETM mastery specialist and has NCETM PD Lead accreditation. Steph is currently undertaking a part-time PhD, exploring the experiences of teachers working in multi-academy trusts – how expertise is utilised and whether agency is possible.

Publications

Mastery and optional standardised tests: some tensions, Mathematics Teaching (2019), 268, p.18-20

Georgia is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre. She is currently working on the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, primarily involved in qualitative data analysis. Georgia is also working on a British Academy funded project about care-experienced academics working in higher education.

Georgia came to research from a legal background. She initially worked as a researcher in the Centre for Child and Family Research at Loughborough University, where she was involved in multiple research and evaluation projects including, a prospective longitudinal study of children identified in infancy as likely to suffer significant harm; evaluations for the Department for Education Children’s Social Care Innovation Programme; and research on return home from care. More recently, Georgia worked as a Development Researcher at the NSPCC, involved in the development of local services for children and families from concept through to scale up.

Her primary research interests are transitions from care (e.g. transitions from care into adulthood, returning home from care) and the role of education in supporting and providing opportunities for vulnerable children. Georgia’s PhD focused on care leavers’ experiences of higher education in England.

Publications

Journal articles

Harrington, L., McElearney, A. and Hyde-Dryden, G. (2021) Adapting the Pregnancy in Mind (PiM) support service to virtual delivery. Journal of Birth and Parent Education, 8 (3).

Margolis, R., Jackson-Hollis, V., Hyde-Dryden, G., Robson-Brown, E., Smith, E. and McConnell, N (2020) Families facing multiple adversities: impact and interventions. Paediatrics and Child Health 30(11), 390-394.

Ward, H., Brown, R., Blackmore, J., Hyde-Dryden, G. and Thomas, C. (2019) Identifying parents who show capacity to make and sustain positive changes when infants are at risk of significant harm. Developing Practice: The Child, Youth and Family Work Journal, 54, 45-61.

McDermid, S., Hyde-Dryden, G. and Ward, H. (2015) Looking for long-term outcomes: What early interventions are needed for children and young people at risk of maltreatment in England? Irish Journal of Applied Social Studies, 15 (2), 36-49.

Hyde-Dryden, G. (2015) Overcoming self-reliance and lack of expectation among care leavers in higher education in England: the role of inter-agency working. Swiss Journal of Social Work, 16, 75-93, (Special issue).

Munro, E., Pinkerton, J., Mendes, P., Hyde Dryden, G., Herczog, M. and Benbenishty, R. (2011) The contribution of the UNC for the rights of the child to understanding and promoting the interests of young people making the transition from care to adulthood. Children and Youth Services Review 33 (12), 2417-2423.

 

Reports

McElearney, A., Murphy, C., Fullerton, D., Hyde-Dryden, G., Cosette, A. and Morris, S. (2021) School staff, parents and carers’ views and experience of the Keeping Safe whole-school education programme: Lessons from the process evaluation for teaching children to recognise abusive behaviours and tell. London: NSPCC.

McElearney, A., Hyde-Dryden, G., Walters, H., Palmer, L., Coulter, K. and Adamson, G. (2021) Process evaluation of Virtual Pregnancy in Mind during the Covid-19 pandemic. London: NSPCC.

McElearney, A., Hyde-Dryden, G., Palmer, L. and Walters, H. (2021) Reflections and learning from our local service response to families during Covid-19. London: NSPCC.

McElearney, A., Palmer, L., Walters, H., and Hyde-Dryden, G. (2020) Learning from adapting the Baby Steps programme in response to COVID-19. London: NSPCC.

Hyde-Dryden, G. and Ward, H. (2017) Towards a Family Justice Observatory – A Scoping Study: Main Findings Report of the International Scoping Exercise. Available at: http://wp.lancs.ac.uk/observatory-scoping-study/

Lushey, C., Hyde-Dryden, G., Holmes, L. and Blackmore, J. (2017) No Wrong Door evaluation report. London: Department for Education.

Holmes, L, Thomas, C, Hyde-Dryden, G, Williams, A (2017) Firstline evaluation report. London: Department for Education

Brown, R., Ward, H., Blackmore, J., Thomas, C. and Hyde-Dryden, G. (2016) Children identified in infancy as likely to suffer, significant harm: a prospective longitudinal study: age eight follow-up, London: Department for Education.

Hyde-Dryden, G., Gibb, J., Lea, J., Buckley, E., Holmes, L., Wallace, E., Lushey, C. and Lawson, D. (2015) Improving practice in respect of children who return home from care: Research report. London: Department for Education.

Hyde-Dryden G., Holmes L., Lawson D. and Blackmore J. (2015) Taking Care Practice Framework for Reunification evaluation report. Loughborough: Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University.

Ward, H., Brown, R. and Hyde Dryden, G. (2014) Assessing Parental Capacity to Change when Children are on the Edge of Care: An Overview of Research Evidence, Childhood Wellbeing Research Centre Report, London: Department for Education.

Dr Selena Nemorin is a UKRI Future Leaders Fellow and researcher/lecturer in sociology of digital technology at the University of Oxford.

Selena’s research focuses on critical theories of technology, surveillance studies, tech ethics, and youth and future media/technologies. She is currently working on the Fair-AIEd project which examines the role that public-private partnerships play in access and use of AI in emerging market economies.

Her past work includes research projects that have examined AI, IoT and ethics, the uses of new technologies in digital schools, educational equity and inclusion, as well as human rights policies and procedures in K-12 and post-secondary institutions.

Publications

Books

Nemorin, S. (2018). Biosurveillance in New Media Marketing: World, Discourse, Representation. New York, NY: Palgrave Macmillan.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Johnson, N., & Bulfin, S. (2017). Everyday Schooling in the Digital Age: High School, High Tech? Oxford, UK: Routledge.

Journal articles

Bonami, B. & Nemorin, S. (2021). Through three levels of abstraction. Towards an ecological framework for making sense of new technologies in education. Education and Information Technologies. doi: 10.1007/s10639-020-10305-1

Gandy, Jr. O. H. & Nemorin, S. (2020). Transportation and smart city imaginaries: A critical analysis of proposals for the USDOT Smart City Challenge. International Journal of Communication, 14, 1232-1252.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Bulfin, S., & Johnson, N. F. (2020). The ‘obvious’ stuff: exploring the mundane realities of students’ digital technology use in school. Digital Education Review, 37, https://revistes.ub.edu/index.php/der/article/view/30670

Ustek-Spilda, F., Powell, A. & Nemorin, S. (2019). Engaging with ethics in Internet of Things: Imaginaries in the social milieu of technology developers. Big Data and Society. July-Dec 1-12. doi: 10.1177/2053951719879468

Selwyn, N., Pangrazio, L., Nemorin, S., & Perrotta, C. (2019). What might the school of 2030 be like? An exercise in social science fiction. Learning, Media and Technology, 1-17. doi:10.1080/17439884.2020.1694944

Gandy, Jr. O. H. & Nemorin, S. (2018). Toward the political economy of ‘nudge’: Smart city variations. Information, Communication & Society. doi.org/10.1080/1369118X.2018.1477969

Williamson, B., Pykett, J. & Nemorin, S. (2018). Biosocial spaces and neurocomputational governance: brain-based and brain-targeted technologies in education. Discourse, 39(2), 258-275. doi:10.1080/01596306.2018.1394421

Nemorin, S. (2017). Affective capture in digital school spaces and the modulation of student subjectivities. Emotion, Space & Society, 24, 11-18. doi:10.1016/j.emospa.2017.05.007

Nemorin, S. (2017). Post-panoptic pedagogies: The changing nature of school surveillance in the digital age. Surveillance & Society. 15 (2): 239-253.

Nemorin, S. (2017). Neuromarketing and the ‘poor in world’ consumer: How the animalization of thinking underpins contemporary market research discourses. Consumption, Markets & Culture, 20 (1), 59-80 22. doi: 10.1080/10253866.2016.1160897

Nemorin, S. & Gandy, Jr. O.H. (2017). Exploring neuromarketing and its reliance on remote sensing: Social and ethical implications. International Journal of Communication, 11, 4824-4844.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Bulfin, S., & Johnson. N. (2017). Left to their own devices: The everyday realities of ‘one-to-one’ classrooms. Oxford Review of Education. doi: 10.1080/03054985.2017.1305047

Nemorin, S. (2016). The frustrations of digital fabrication: An auto/ethnographic exploration of 3D ‘Making’ in school. International Journal of Technology and Design Education. doi: 10.1007/s10798-016-9366-z

Nemorin, S. & Selwyn, N. (2016). Making the best of it? Exploring the realities of 3D printing in school. Research Papers in Education. doi: 10.1080/02671522.2016.1225802

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., & Johnson, N. (2016). High-tech, hard work: An investigation of teachers’ work in the digital age. Learning Media and Technology. doi:10.1080/17439884.2016.1252770

Bulfin, S., Johnson, N., Nemorin, S., & Selwyn, N. (2016). Nagging, noobs and new tricks – student perceptions of school as a context for digital technology use. Educational Studies 42(3), 239-251. doi: 10.1080/03055698.2016.1160824

Pinto, L. E. & Nemorin, S. (2015). Normalizing panoptic surveillance among children. Our Schools Our Selves, 24(2), 53-62.

Book sections

 Nemorin, S. (2017). Online safety. In SAGE Encyclopedia of Out-of-School Learning, K. Peppler (Ed). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Bulfin, S., & Johnson, N. (2016). Toward a digital sociology of school. In Digital Sociologies, J. Daniels, K. Gregory, & T. McMillan Cottom (Eds). Bristol, UK: Policy Press.

Boler, M. & Nemorin, S. (2013). Dissent, truthiness, and war: New media landscapes of 21st century propaganda. In The Oxford Handbook of Propaganda Studies, R. Castronovo and J. Auerbach (Eds.). New York, NY: Oxford University Press.

Monographs and reports

Powell, A., Nemorin, S., Berner, A., Douglas-Jones, R., Fritsch, E., Hanteer, O., … Vega-Aurelio, D. (2017). Values and ethics in innovation for responsible technology in Europe. Report for the EU Commission: Enabling responsible ICT-related research and innovation.

Selwyn, N., Johnson, N., Nemorin, S., & Knight, E. (2016). Going online on behalf of others: An investigation of ‘proxy’ Internet consumers. Report for the Australian Communications Consumer Action Network, Sydney.

Alice Aldinucci is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford, Department of Education. She is part of the team working on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani, and she is a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group.

She holds a PhD in Education from the University of Glasgow (UK) where she was awarded the LKAS Interdisciplinary Scholarship. Her thesis applies a longitudinal qualitative research design and draws on the combination of Critical Realism and Capability Approach to explore aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to adulthood in Chile. Prior to her PhD, she completed a MA in International Education and Development from the University of Sussex (UK) where she was awarded the Centre for International Education Prize for the best overall MA performance. For her MA at Sussex, she conducted an empirical dissertation on the meaning making of Inclusive Education in Nepal. She holds a MA in Languages and Cultures for International Communication and Cooperation from the University of Milan (Italy) with a fieldwork research on tensions between policy and practice in bilingual multicultural education for indigenous students in Higher Education in Peru; and a BA in Languages and Intercultural Mediation from the University of Arezzo (Italy).

Alice’s research interests are interdisciplinary and relate to the critical linkages between intersecting inequalities, education, individual/societal development, and social justice at local and global levels, motivated by the question what education for what/whose development?

Areas, theoretical approaches and methodologies of interests:
• Sociology of education including aspirations in post-school transitions
• Cultural political economy of education and life chances/human flourishing/social justice
• Tensions between global educational frameworks and local knowledge and practices
• Critical Realism
• Capability Approach
• Qualitative and participatory methodologies
• Digital storytelling for social change

Besides her work in academia, Alice has gained experience as researcher, development practitioner and educator working in projects including early childhood education programmes, refugees’ education, girls’ education, SEN and inclusive education, TVET, global citizenship education, arts-based pedagogies. She lived and worked in different countries including in Nepal (a country she has developed a strong bond with), Tanzania, El Salvador, Italy and the UK. These experiences have reinforced her critical approach to international education and global development and to education as a catalyst for both inequalities, injustices, violence and more equitable social change and peace-building processes.

She served as Student Representative of the British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) from 2017 to 2019 and she is currently part of the college of reviewers of the editorial board of Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education.

Publications:

Aldinucci, A. (2022). Understanding aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to postschool trajectories in Chile. PhD thesis, University of Glasgow.
Aldinucci, A., Valiente, O., Hurrell S., and Zancajo, A. (2021). Understanding aspirations: Why do secondary TVET students aim so high in Chile? Journal of Vocational Education & Training.

Rawle, G., Riddle, N., Pettersson, G., Wallin, J., Bici, M., Jasper, P., Harb, J., Hebbar, M., Davis, J., Aldinucci, A., (2017), EQUIP-Tanzania Impact Evaluation. Midline Technical Report, Volume I and II. Oxford Policy Management.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.
Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Steph is a primary-trained teacher, maths specialist teacher (MaST) and Specialist Leader of Education (SLE) for mathematics in Oxfordshire. She trained as an NCETM mastery specialist and has NCETM PD Lead accreditation. Steph is currently undertaking a part-time PhD, exploring the experiences of teachers working in multi-academy trusts – how expertise is utilised and whether agency is possible.

Publications

Mastery and optional standardised tests: some tensions, Mathematics Teaching (2019), 268, p.18-20

Georgia is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre. She is currently working on the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, primarily involved in qualitative data analysis. Georgia is also working on a British Academy funded project about care-experienced academics working in higher education.

Georgia came to research from a legal background. She initially worked as a researcher in the Centre for Child and Family Research at Loughborough University, where she was involved in multiple research and evaluation projects including, a prospective longitudinal study of children identified in infancy as likely to suffer significant harm; evaluations for the Department for Education Children’s Social Care Innovation Programme; and research on return home from care. More recently, Georgia worked as a Development Researcher at the NSPCC, involved in the development of local services for children and families from concept through to scale up.

Her primary research interests are transitions from care (e.g. transitions from care into adulthood, returning home from care) and the role of education in supporting and providing opportunities for vulnerable children. Georgia’s PhD focused on care leavers’ experiences of higher education in England.

Publications

Journal articles

Harrington, L., McElearney, A. and Hyde-Dryden, G. (2021) Adapting the Pregnancy in Mind (PiM) support service to virtual delivery. Journal of Birth and Parent Education, 8 (3).

Margolis, R., Jackson-Hollis, V., Hyde-Dryden, G., Robson-Brown, E., Smith, E. and McConnell, N (2020) Families facing multiple adversities: impact and interventions. Paediatrics and Child Health 30(11), 390-394.

Ward, H., Brown, R., Blackmore, J., Hyde-Dryden, G. and Thomas, C. (2019) Identifying parents who show capacity to make and sustain positive changes when infants are at risk of significant harm. Developing Practice: The Child, Youth and Family Work Journal, 54, 45-61.

McDermid, S., Hyde-Dryden, G. and Ward, H. (2015) Looking for long-term outcomes: What early interventions are needed for children and young people at risk of maltreatment in England? Irish Journal of Applied Social Studies, 15 (2), 36-49.

Hyde-Dryden, G. (2015) Overcoming self-reliance and lack of expectation among care leavers in higher education in England: the role of inter-agency working. Swiss Journal of Social Work, 16, 75-93, (Special issue).

Munro, E., Pinkerton, J., Mendes, P., Hyde Dryden, G., Herczog, M. and Benbenishty, R. (2011) The contribution of the UNC for the rights of the child to understanding and promoting the interests of young people making the transition from care to adulthood. Children and Youth Services Review 33 (12), 2417-2423.

 

Reports

McElearney, A., Murphy, C., Fullerton, D., Hyde-Dryden, G., Cosette, A. and Morris, S. (2021) School staff, parents and carers’ views and experience of the Keeping Safe whole-school education programme: Lessons from the process evaluation for teaching children to recognise abusive behaviours and tell. London: NSPCC.

McElearney, A., Hyde-Dryden, G., Walters, H., Palmer, L., Coulter, K. and Adamson, G. (2021) Process evaluation of Virtual Pregnancy in Mind during the Covid-19 pandemic. London: NSPCC.

McElearney, A., Hyde-Dryden, G., Palmer, L. and Walters, H. (2021) Reflections and learning from our local service response to families during Covid-19. London: NSPCC.

McElearney, A., Palmer, L., Walters, H., and Hyde-Dryden, G. (2020) Learning from adapting the Baby Steps programme in response to COVID-19. London: NSPCC.

Hyde-Dryden, G. and Ward, H. (2017) Towards a Family Justice Observatory – A Scoping Study: Main Findings Report of the International Scoping Exercise. Available at: http://wp.lancs.ac.uk/observatory-scoping-study/

Lushey, C., Hyde-Dryden, G., Holmes, L. and Blackmore, J. (2017) No Wrong Door evaluation report. London: Department for Education.

Holmes, L, Thomas, C, Hyde-Dryden, G, Williams, A (2017) Firstline evaluation report. London: Department for Education

Brown, R., Ward, H., Blackmore, J., Thomas, C. and Hyde-Dryden, G. (2016) Children identified in infancy as likely to suffer, significant harm: a prospective longitudinal study: age eight follow-up, London: Department for Education.

Hyde-Dryden, G., Gibb, J., Lea, J., Buckley, E., Holmes, L., Wallace, E., Lushey, C. and Lawson, D. (2015) Improving practice in respect of children who return home from care: Research report. London: Department for Education.

Hyde-Dryden G., Holmes L., Lawson D. and Blackmore J. (2015) Taking Care Practice Framework for Reunification evaluation report. Loughborough: Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University.

Ward, H., Brown, R. and Hyde Dryden, G. (2014) Assessing Parental Capacity to Change when Children are on the Edge of Care: An Overview of Research Evidence, Childhood Wellbeing Research Centre Report, London: Department for Education.

Dr Selena Nemorin is a UKRI Future Leaders Fellow and researcher/lecturer in sociology of digital technology at the University of Oxford.

Selena’s research focuses on critical theories of technology, surveillance studies, tech ethics, and youth and future media/technologies. She is currently working on the Fair-AIEd project which examines the role that public-private partnerships play in access and use of AI in emerging market economies.

Her past work includes research projects that have examined AI, IoT and ethics, the uses of new technologies in digital schools, educational equity and inclusion, as well as human rights policies and procedures in K-12 and post-secondary institutions.

Publications

Books

Nemorin, S. (2018). Biosurveillance in New Media Marketing: World, Discourse, Representation. New York, NY: Palgrave Macmillan.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Johnson, N., & Bulfin, S. (2017). Everyday Schooling in the Digital Age: High School, High Tech? Oxford, UK: Routledge.

Journal articles

Bonami, B. & Nemorin, S. (2021). Through three levels of abstraction. Towards an ecological framework for making sense of new technologies in education. Education and Information Technologies. doi: 10.1007/s10639-020-10305-1

Gandy, Jr. O. H. & Nemorin, S. (2020). Transportation and smart city imaginaries: A critical analysis of proposals for the USDOT Smart City Challenge. International Journal of Communication, 14, 1232-1252.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Bulfin, S., & Johnson, N. F. (2020). The ‘obvious’ stuff: exploring the mundane realities of students’ digital technology use in school. Digital Education Review, 37, https://revistes.ub.edu/index.php/der/article/view/30670

Ustek-Spilda, F., Powell, A. & Nemorin, S. (2019). Engaging with ethics in Internet of Things: Imaginaries in the social milieu of technology developers. Big Data and Society. July-Dec 1-12. doi: 10.1177/2053951719879468

Selwyn, N., Pangrazio, L., Nemorin, S., & Perrotta, C. (2019). What might the school of 2030 be like? An exercise in social science fiction. Learning, Media and Technology, 1-17. doi:10.1080/17439884.2020.1694944

Gandy, Jr. O. H. & Nemorin, S. (2018). Toward the political economy of ‘nudge’: Smart city variations. Information, Communication & Society. doi.org/10.1080/1369118X.2018.1477969

Williamson, B., Pykett, J. & Nemorin, S. (2018). Biosocial spaces and neurocomputational governance: brain-based and brain-targeted technologies in education. Discourse, 39(2), 258-275. doi:10.1080/01596306.2018.1394421

Nemorin, S. (2017). Affective capture in digital school spaces and the modulation of student subjectivities. Emotion, Space & Society, 24, 11-18. doi:10.1016/j.emospa.2017.05.007

Nemorin, S. (2017). Post-panoptic pedagogies: The changing nature of school surveillance in the digital age. Surveillance & Society. 15 (2): 239-253.

Nemorin, S. (2017). Neuromarketing and the ‘poor in world’ consumer: How the animalization of thinking underpins contemporary market research discourses. Consumption, Markets & Culture, 20 (1), 59-80 22. doi: 10.1080/10253866.2016.1160897

Nemorin, S. & Gandy, Jr. O.H. (2017). Exploring neuromarketing and its reliance on remote sensing: Social and ethical implications. International Journal of Communication, 11, 4824-4844.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Bulfin, S., & Johnson. N. (2017). Left to their own devices: The everyday realities of ‘one-to-one’ classrooms. Oxford Review of Education. doi: 10.1080/03054985.2017.1305047

Nemorin, S. (2016). The frustrations of digital fabrication: An auto/ethnographic exploration of 3D ‘Making’ in school. International Journal of Technology and Design Education. doi: 10.1007/s10798-016-9366-z

Nemorin, S. & Selwyn, N. (2016). Making the best of it? Exploring the realities of 3D printing in school. Research Papers in Education. doi: 10.1080/02671522.2016.1225802

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., & Johnson, N. (2016). High-tech, hard work: An investigation of teachers’ work in the digital age. Learning Media and Technology. doi:10.1080/17439884.2016.1252770

Bulfin, S., Johnson, N., Nemorin, S., & Selwyn, N. (2016). Nagging, noobs and new tricks – student perceptions of school as a context for digital technology use. Educational Studies 42(3), 239-251. doi: 10.1080/03055698.2016.1160824

Pinto, L. E. & Nemorin, S. (2015). Normalizing panoptic surveillance among children. Our Schools Our Selves, 24(2), 53-62.

Book sections

 Nemorin, S. (2017). Online safety. In SAGE Encyclopedia of Out-of-School Learning, K. Peppler (Ed). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Bulfin, S., & Johnson, N. (2016). Toward a digital sociology of school. In Digital Sociologies, J. Daniels, K. Gregory, & T. McMillan Cottom (Eds). Bristol, UK: Policy Press.

Boler, M. & Nemorin, S. (2013). Dissent, truthiness, and war: New media landscapes of 21st century propaganda. In The Oxford Handbook of Propaganda Studies, R. Castronovo and J. Auerbach (Eds.). New York, NY: Oxford University Press.

Monographs and reports

Powell, A., Nemorin, S., Berner, A., Douglas-Jones, R., Fritsch, E., Hanteer, O., … Vega-Aurelio, D. (2017). Values and ethics in innovation for responsible technology in Europe. Report for the EU Commission: Enabling responsible ICT-related research and innovation.

Selwyn, N., Johnson, N., Nemorin, S., & Knight, E. (2016). Going online on behalf of others: An investigation of ‘proxy’ Internet consumers. Report for the Australian Communications Consumer Action Network, Sydney.

Alice Aldinucci is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford, Department of Education. She is part of the team working on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani, and she is a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group.

She holds a PhD in Education from the University of Glasgow (UK) where she was awarded the LKAS Interdisciplinary Scholarship. Her thesis applies a longitudinal qualitative research design and draws on the combination of Critical Realism and Capability Approach to explore aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to adulthood in Chile. Prior to her PhD, she completed a MA in International Education and Development from the University of Sussex (UK) where she was awarded the Centre for International Education Prize for the best overall MA performance. For her MA at Sussex, she conducted an empirical dissertation on the meaning making of Inclusive Education in Nepal. She holds a MA in Languages and Cultures for International Communication and Cooperation from the University of Milan (Italy) with a fieldwork research on tensions between policy and practice in bilingual multicultural education for indigenous students in Higher Education in Peru; and a BA in Languages and Intercultural Mediation from the University of Arezzo (Italy).

Alice’s research interests are interdisciplinary and relate to the critical linkages between intersecting inequalities, education, individual/societal development, and social justice at local and global levels, motivated by the question what education for what/whose development?

Areas, theoretical approaches and methodologies of interests:
• Sociology of education including aspirations in post-school transitions
• Cultural political economy of education and life chances/human flourishing/social justice
• Tensions between global educational frameworks and local knowledge and practices
• Critical Realism
• Capability Approach
• Qualitative and participatory methodologies
• Digital storytelling for social change

Besides her work in academia, Alice has gained experience as researcher, development practitioner and educator working in projects including early childhood education programmes, refugees’ education, girls’ education, SEN and inclusive education, TVET, global citizenship education, arts-based pedagogies. She lived and worked in different countries including in Nepal (a country she has developed a strong bond with), Tanzania, El Salvador, Italy and the UK. These experiences have reinforced her critical approach to international education and global development and to education as a catalyst for both inequalities, injustices, violence and more equitable social change and peace-building processes.

She served as Student Representative of the British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) from 2017 to 2019 and she is currently part of the college of reviewers of the editorial board of Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education.

Publications:

Aldinucci, A. (2022). Understanding aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to postschool trajectories in Chile. PhD thesis, University of Glasgow.
Aldinucci, A., Valiente, O., Hurrell S., and Zancajo, A. (2021). Understanding aspirations: Why do secondary TVET students aim so high in Chile? Journal of Vocational Education & Training.

Rawle, G., Riddle, N., Pettersson, G., Wallin, J., Bici, M., Jasper, P., Harb, J., Hebbar, M., Davis, J., Aldinucci, A., (2017), EQUIP-Tanzania Impact Evaluation. Midline Technical Report, Volume I and II. Oxford Policy Management.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.
Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Steph is a primary-trained teacher, maths specialist teacher (MaST) and Specialist Leader of Education (SLE) for mathematics in Oxfordshire. She trained as an NCETM mastery specialist and has NCETM PD Lead accreditation. Steph is currently undertaking a part-time PhD, exploring the experiences of teachers working in multi-academy trusts – how expertise is utilised and whether agency is possible.

Publications

Mastery and optional standardised tests: some tensions, Mathematics Teaching (2019), 268, p.18-20

Georgia is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre. She is currently working on the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, primarily involved in qualitative data analysis. Georgia is also working on a British Academy funded project about care-experienced academics working in higher education.

Georgia came to research from a legal background. She initially worked as a researcher in the Centre for Child and Family Research at Loughborough University, where she was involved in multiple research and evaluation projects including, a prospective longitudinal study of children identified in infancy as likely to suffer significant harm; evaluations for the Department for Education Children’s Social Care Innovation Programme; and research on return home from care. More recently, Georgia worked as a Development Researcher at the NSPCC, involved in the development of local services for children and families from concept through to scale up.

Her primary research interests are transitions from care (e.g. transitions from care into adulthood, returning home from care) and the role of education in supporting and providing opportunities for vulnerable children. Georgia’s PhD focused on care leavers’ experiences of higher education in England.

Publications

Journal articles

Harrington, L., McElearney, A. and Hyde-Dryden, G. (2021) Adapting the Pregnancy in Mind (PiM) support service to virtual delivery. Journal of Birth and Parent Education, 8 (3).

Margolis, R., Jackson-Hollis, V., Hyde-Dryden, G., Robson-Brown, E., Smith, E. and McConnell, N (2020) Families facing multiple adversities: impact and interventions. Paediatrics and Child Health 30(11), 390-394.

Ward, H., Brown, R., Blackmore, J., Hyde-Dryden, G. and Thomas, C. (2019) Identifying parents who show capacity to make and sustain positive changes when infants are at risk of significant harm. Developing Practice: The Child, Youth and Family Work Journal, 54, 45-61.

McDermid, S., Hyde-Dryden, G. and Ward, H. (2015) Looking for long-term outcomes: What early interventions are needed for children and young people at risk of maltreatment in England? Irish Journal of Applied Social Studies, 15 (2), 36-49.

Hyde-Dryden, G. (2015) Overcoming self-reliance and lack of expectation among care leavers in higher education in England: the role of inter-agency working. Swiss Journal of Social Work, 16, 75-93, (Special issue).

Munro, E., Pinkerton, J., Mendes, P., Hyde Dryden, G., Herczog, M. and Benbenishty, R. (2011) The contribution of the UNC for the rights of the child to understanding and promoting the interests of young people making the transition from care to adulthood. Children and Youth Services Review 33 (12), 2417-2423.

 

Reports

McElearney, A., Murphy, C., Fullerton, D., Hyde-Dryden, G., Cosette, A. and Morris, S. (2021) School staff, parents and carers’ views and experience of the Keeping Safe whole-school education programme: Lessons from the process evaluation for teaching children to recognise abusive behaviours and tell. London: NSPCC.

McElearney, A., Hyde-Dryden, G., Walters, H., Palmer, L., Coulter, K. and Adamson, G. (2021) Process evaluation of Virtual Pregnancy in Mind during the Covid-19 pandemic. London: NSPCC.

McElearney, A., Hyde-Dryden, G., Palmer, L. and Walters, H. (2021) Reflections and learning from our local service response to families during Covid-19. London: NSPCC.

McElearney, A., Palmer, L., Walters, H., and Hyde-Dryden, G. (2020) Learning from adapting the Baby Steps programme in response to COVID-19. London: NSPCC.

Hyde-Dryden, G. and Ward, H. (2017) Towards a Family Justice Observatory – A Scoping Study: Main Findings Report of the International Scoping Exercise. Available at: http://wp.lancs.ac.uk/observatory-scoping-study/

Lushey, C., Hyde-Dryden, G., Holmes, L. and Blackmore, J. (2017) No Wrong Door evaluation report. London: Department for Education.

Holmes, L, Thomas, C, Hyde-Dryden, G, Williams, A (2017) Firstline evaluation report. London: Department for Education

Brown, R., Ward, H., Blackmore, J., Thomas, C. and Hyde-Dryden, G. (2016) Children identified in infancy as likely to suffer, significant harm: a prospective longitudinal study: age eight follow-up, London: Department for Education.

Hyde-Dryden, G., Gibb, J., Lea, J., Buckley, E., Holmes, L., Wallace, E., Lushey, C. and Lawson, D. (2015) Improving practice in respect of children who return home from care: Research report. London: Department for Education.

Hyde-Dryden G., Holmes L., Lawson D. and Blackmore J. (2015) Taking Care Practice Framework for Reunification evaluation report. Loughborough: Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University.

Ward, H., Brown, R. and Hyde Dryden, G. (2014) Assessing Parental Capacity to Change when Children are on the Edge of Care: An Overview of Research Evidence, Childhood Wellbeing Research Centre Report, London: Department for Education.

Dr Selena Nemorin is a UKRI Future Leaders Fellow and researcher/lecturer in sociology of digital technology at the University of Oxford.

Selena’s research focuses on critical theories of technology, surveillance studies, tech ethics, and youth and future media/technologies. She is currently working on the Fair-AIEd project which examines the role that public-private partnerships play in access and use of AI in emerging market economies.

Her past work includes research projects that have examined AI, IoT and ethics, the uses of new technologies in digital schools, educational equity and inclusion, as well as human rights policies and procedures in K-12 and post-secondary institutions.

Publications

Books

Nemorin, S. (2018). Biosurveillance in New Media Marketing: World, Discourse, Representation. New York, NY: Palgrave Macmillan.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Johnson, N., & Bulfin, S. (2017). Everyday Schooling in the Digital Age: High School, High Tech? Oxford, UK: Routledge.

Journal articles

Bonami, B. & Nemorin, S. (2021). Through three levels of abstraction. Towards an ecological framework for making sense of new technologies in education. Education and Information Technologies. doi: 10.1007/s10639-020-10305-1

Gandy, Jr. O. H. & Nemorin, S. (2020). Transportation and smart city imaginaries: A critical analysis of proposals for the USDOT Smart City Challenge. International Journal of Communication, 14, 1232-1252.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Bulfin, S., & Johnson, N. F. (2020). The ‘obvious’ stuff: exploring the mundane realities of students’ digital technology use in school. Digital Education Review, 37, https://revistes.ub.edu/index.php/der/article/view/30670

Ustek-Spilda, F., Powell, A. & Nemorin, S. (2019). Engaging with ethics in Internet of Things: Imaginaries in the social milieu of technology developers. Big Data and Society. July-Dec 1-12. doi: 10.1177/2053951719879468

Selwyn, N., Pangrazio, L., Nemorin, S., & Perrotta, C. (2019). What might the school of 2030 be like? An exercise in social science fiction. Learning, Media and Technology, 1-17. doi:10.1080/17439884.2020.1694944

Gandy, Jr. O. H. & Nemorin, S. (2018). Toward the political economy of ‘nudge’: Smart city variations. Information, Communication & Society. doi.org/10.1080/1369118X.2018.1477969

Williamson, B., Pykett, J. & Nemorin, S. (2018). Biosocial spaces and neurocomputational governance: brain-based and brain-targeted technologies in education. Discourse, 39(2), 258-275. doi:10.1080/01596306.2018.1394421

Nemorin, S. (2017). Affective capture in digital school spaces and the modulation of student subjectivities. Emotion, Space & Society, 24, 11-18. doi:10.1016/j.emospa.2017.05.007

Nemorin, S. (2017). Post-panoptic pedagogies: The changing nature of school surveillance in the digital age. Surveillance & Society. 15 (2): 239-253.

Nemorin, S. (2017). Neuromarketing and the ‘poor in world’ consumer: How the animalization of thinking underpins contemporary market research discourses. Consumption, Markets & Culture, 20 (1), 59-80 22. doi: 10.1080/10253866.2016.1160897

Nemorin, S. & Gandy, Jr. O.H. (2017). Exploring neuromarketing and its reliance on remote sensing: Social and ethical implications. International Journal of Communication, 11, 4824-4844.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Bulfin, S., & Johnson. N. (2017). Left to their own devices: The everyday realities of ‘one-to-one’ classrooms. Oxford Review of Education. doi: 10.1080/03054985.2017.1305047

Nemorin, S. (2016). The frustrations of digital fabrication: An auto/ethnographic exploration of 3D ‘Making’ in school. International Journal of Technology and Design Education. doi: 10.1007/s10798-016-9366-z

Nemorin, S. & Selwyn, N. (2016). Making the best of it? Exploring the realities of 3D printing in school. Research Papers in Education. doi: 10.1080/02671522.2016.1225802

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., & Johnson, N. (2016). High-tech, hard work: An investigation of teachers’ work in the digital age. Learning Media and Technology. doi:10.1080/17439884.2016.1252770

Bulfin, S., Johnson, N., Nemorin, S., & Selwyn, N. (2016). Nagging, noobs and new tricks – student perceptions of school as a context for digital technology use. Educational Studies 42(3), 239-251. doi: 10.1080/03055698.2016.1160824

Pinto, L. E. & Nemorin, S. (2015). Normalizing panoptic surveillance among children. Our Schools Our Selves, 24(2), 53-62.

Book sections

 Nemorin, S. (2017). Online safety. In SAGE Encyclopedia of Out-of-School Learning, K. Peppler (Ed). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Bulfin, S., & Johnson, N. (2016). Toward a digital sociology of school. In Digital Sociologies, J. Daniels, K. Gregory, & T. McMillan Cottom (Eds). Bristol, UK: Policy Press.

Boler, M. & Nemorin, S. (2013). Dissent, truthiness, and war: New media landscapes of 21st century propaganda. In The Oxford Handbook of Propaganda Studies, R. Castronovo and J. Auerbach (Eds.). New York, NY: Oxford University Press.

Monographs and reports

Powell, A., Nemorin, S., Berner, A., Douglas-Jones, R., Fritsch, E., Hanteer, O., … Vega-Aurelio, D. (2017). Values and ethics in innovation for responsible technology in Europe. Report for the EU Commission: Enabling responsible ICT-related research and innovation.

Selwyn, N., Johnson, N., Nemorin, S., & Knight, E. (2016). Going online on behalf of others: An investigation of ‘proxy’ Internet consumers. Report for the Australian Communications Consumer Action Network, Sydney.

Alice Aldinucci is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford, Department of Education. She is part of the team working on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani, and she is a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group.

She holds a PhD in Education from the University of Glasgow (UK) where she was awarded the LKAS Interdisciplinary Scholarship. Her thesis applies a longitudinal qualitative research design and draws on the combination of Critical Realism and Capability Approach to explore aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to adulthood in Chile. Prior to her PhD, she completed a MA in International Education and Development from the University of Sussex (UK) where she was awarded the Centre for International Education Prize for the best overall MA performance. For her MA at Sussex, she conducted an empirical dissertation on the meaning making of Inclusive Education in Nepal. She holds a MA in Languages and Cultures for International Communication and Cooperation from the University of Milan (Italy) with a fieldwork research on tensions between policy and practice in bilingual multicultural education for indigenous students in Higher Education in Peru; and a BA in Languages and Intercultural Mediation from the University of Arezzo (Italy).

Alice’s research interests are interdisciplinary and relate to the critical linkages between intersecting inequalities, education, individual/societal development, and social justice at local and global levels, motivated by the question what education for what/whose development?

Areas, theoretical approaches and methodologies of interests:
• Sociology of education including aspirations in post-school transitions
• Cultural political economy of education and life chances/human flourishing/social justice
• Tensions between global educational frameworks and local knowledge and practices
• Critical Realism
• Capability Approach
• Qualitative and participatory methodologies
• Digital storytelling for social change

Besides her work in academia, Alice has gained experience as researcher, development practitioner and educator working in projects including early childhood education programmes, refugees’ education, girls’ education, SEN and inclusive education, TVET, global citizenship education, arts-based pedagogies. She lived and worked in different countries including in Nepal (a country she has developed a strong bond with), Tanzania, El Salvador, Italy and the UK. These experiences have reinforced her critical approach to international education and global development and to education as a catalyst for both inequalities, injustices, violence and more equitable social change and peace-building processes.

She served as Student Representative of the British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) from 2017 to 2019 and she is currently part of the college of reviewers of the editorial board of Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education.

Publications:

Aldinucci, A. (2022). Understanding aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to postschool trajectories in Chile. PhD thesis, University of Glasgow.
Aldinucci, A., Valiente, O., Hurrell S., and Zancajo, A. (2021). Understanding aspirations: Why do secondary TVET students aim so high in Chile? Journal of Vocational Education & Training.

Rawle, G., Riddle, N., Pettersson, G., Wallin, J., Bici, M., Jasper, P., Harb, J., Hebbar, M., Davis, J., Aldinucci, A., (2017), EQUIP-Tanzania Impact Evaluation. Midline Technical Report, Volume I and II. Oxford Policy Management.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.
Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Steph is a primary-trained teacher, maths specialist teacher (MaST) and Specialist Leader of Education (SLE) for mathematics in Oxfordshire. She trained as an NCETM mastery specialist and has NCETM PD Lead accreditation. Steph is currently undertaking a part-time PhD, exploring the experiences of teachers working in multi-academy trusts – how expertise is utilised and whether agency is possible.

Publications

Mastery and optional standardised tests: some tensions, Mathematics Teaching (2019), 268, p.18-20

Georgia is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre. She is currently working on the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, primarily involved in qualitative data analysis. Georgia is also working on a British Academy funded project about care-experienced academics working in higher education.

Georgia came to research from a legal background. She initially worked as a researcher in the Centre for Child and Family Research at Loughborough University, where she was involved in multiple research and evaluation projects including, a prospective longitudinal study of children identified in infancy as likely to suffer significant harm; evaluations for the Department for Education Children’s Social Care Innovation Programme; and research on return home from care. More recently, Georgia worked as a Development Researcher at the NSPCC, involved in the development of local services for children and families from concept through to scale up.

Her primary research interests are transitions from care (e.g. transitions from care into adulthood, returning home from care) and the role of education in supporting and providing opportunities for vulnerable children. Georgia’s PhD focused on care leavers’ experiences of higher education in England.

Publications

Journal articles

Harrington, L., McElearney, A. and Hyde-Dryden, G. (2021) Adapting the Pregnancy in Mind (PiM) support service to virtual delivery. Journal of Birth and Parent Education, 8 (3).

Margolis, R., Jackson-Hollis, V., Hyde-Dryden, G., Robson-Brown, E., Smith, E. and McConnell, N (2020) Families facing multiple adversities: impact and interventions. Paediatrics and Child Health 30(11), 390-394.

Ward, H., Brown, R., Blackmore, J., Hyde-Dryden, G. and Thomas, C. (2019) Identifying parents who show capacity to make and sustain positive changes when infants are at risk of significant harm. Developing Practice: The Child, Youth and Family Work Journal, 54, 45-61.

McDermid, S., Hyde-Dryden, G. and Ward, H. (2015) Looking for long-term outcomes: What early interventions are needed for children and young people at risk of maltreatment in England? Irish Journal of Applied Social Studies, 15 (2), 36-49.

Hyde-Dryden, G. (2015) Overcoming self-reliance and lack of expectation among care leavers in higher education in England: the role of inter-agency working. Swiss Journal of Social Work, 16, 75-93, (Special issue).

Munro, E., Pinkerton, J., Mendes, P., Hyde Dryden, G., Herczog, M. and Benbenishty, R. (2011) The contribution of the UNC for the rights of the child to understanding and promoting the interests of young people making the transition from care to adulthood. Children and Youth Services Review 33 (12), 2417-2423.

 

Reports

McElearney, A., Murphy, C., Fullerton, D., Hyde-Dryden, G., Cosette, A. and Morris, S. (2021) School staff, parents and carers’ views and experience of the Keeping Safe whole-school education programme: Lessons from the process evaluation for teaching children to recognise abusive behaviours and tell. London: NSPCC.

McElearney, A., Hyde-Dryden, G., Walters, H., Palmer, L., Coulter, K. and Adamson, G. (2021) Process evaluation of Virtual Pregnancy in Mind during the Covid-19 pandemic. London: NSPCC.

McElearney, A., Hyde-Dryden, G., Palmer, L. and Walters, H. (2021) Reflections and learning from our local service response to families during Covid-19. London: NSPCC.

McElearney, A., Palmer, L., Walters, H., and Hyde-Dryden, G. (2020) Learning from adapting the Baby Steps programme in response to COVID-19. London: NSPCC.

Hyde-Dryden, G. and Ward, H. (2017) Towards a Family Justice Observatory – A Scoping Study: Main Findings Report of the International Scoping Exercise. Available at: http://wp.lancs.ac.uk/observatory-scoping-study/

Lushey, C., Hyde-Dryden, G., Holmes, L. and Blackmore, J. (2017) No Wrong Door evaluation report. London: Department for Education.

Holmes, L, Thomas, C, Hyde-Dryden, G, Williams, A (2017) Firstline evaluation report. London: Department for Education

Brown, R., Ward, H., Blackmore, J., Thomas, C. and Hyde-Dryden, G. (2016) Children identified in infancy as likely to suffer, significant harm: a prospective longitudinal study: age eight follow-up, London: Department for Education.

Hyde-Dryden, G., Gibb, J., Lea, J., Buckley, E., Holmes, L., Wallace, E., Lushey, C. and Lawson, D. (2015) Improving practice in respect of children who return home from care: Research report. London: Department for Education.

Hyde-Dryden G., Holmes L., Lawson D. and Blackmore J. (2015) Taking Care Practice Framework for Reunification evaluation report. Loughborough: Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University.

Ward, H., Brown, R. and Hyde Dryden, G. (2014) Assessing Parental Capacity to Change when Children are on the Edge of Care: An Overview of Research Evidence, Childhood Wellbeing Research Centre Report, London: Department for Education.

Dr Selena Nemorin is a UKRI Future Leaders Fellow and researcher/lecturer in sociology of digital technology at the University of Oxford.

Selena’s research focuses on critical theories of technology, surveillance studies, tech ethics, and youth and future media/technologies. She is currently working on the Fair-AIEd project which examines the role that public-private partnerships play in access and use of AI in emerging market economies.

Her past work includes research projects that have examined AI, IoT and ethics, the uses of new technologies in digital schools, educational equity and inclusion, as well as human rights policies and procedures in K-12 and post-secondary institutions.

Publications

Books

Nemorin, S. (2018). Biosurveillance in New Media Marketing: World, Discourse, Representation. New York, NY: Palgrave Macmillan.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Johnson, N., & Bulfin, S. (2017). Everyday Schooling in the Digital Age: High School, High Tech? Oxford, UK: Routledge.

Journal articles

Bonami, B. & Nemorin, S. (2021). Through three levels of abstraction. Towards an ecological framework for making sense of new technologies in education. Education and Information Technologies. doi: 10.1007/s10639-020-10305-1

Gandy, Jr. O. H. & Nemorin, S. (2020). Transportation and smart city imaginaries: A critical analysis of proposals for the USDOT Smart City Challenge. International Journal of Communication, 14, 1232-1252.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Bulfin, S., & Johnson, N. F. (2020). The ‘obvious’ stuff: exploring the mundane realities of students’ digital technology use in school. Digital Education Review, 37, https://revistes.ub.edu/index.php/der/article/view/30670

Ustek-Spilda, F., Powell, A. & Nemorin, S. (2019). Engaging with ethics in Internet of Things: Imaginaries in the social milieu of technology developers. Big Data and Society. July-Dec 1-12. doi: 10.1177/2053951719879468

Selwyn, N., Pangrazio, L., Nemorin, S., & Perrotta, C. (2019). What might the school of 2030 be like? An exercise in social science fiction. Learning, Media and Technology, 1-17. doi:10.1080/17439884.2020.1694944

Gandy, Jr. O. H. & Nemorin, S. (2018). Toward the political economy of ‘nudge’: Smart city variations. Information, Communication & Society. doi.org/10.1080/1369118X.2018.1477969

Williamson, B., Pykett, J. & Nemorin, S. (2018). Biosocial spaces and neurocomputational governance: brain-based and brain-targeted technologies in education. Discourse, 39(2), 258-275. doi:10.1080/01596306.2018.1394421

Nemorin, S. (2017). Affective capture in digital school spaces and the modulation of student subjectivities. Emotion, Space & Society, 24, 11-18. doi:10.1016/j.emospa.2017.05.007

Nemorin, S. (2017). Post-panoptic pedagogies: The changing nature of school surveillance in the digital age. Surveillance & Society. 15 (2): 239-253.

Nemorin, S. (2017). Neuromarketing and the ‘poor in world’ consumer: How the animalization of thinking underpins contemporary market research discourses. Consumption, Markets & Culture, 20 (1), 59-80 22. doi: 10.1080/10253866.2016.1160897

Nemorin, S. & Gandy, Jr. O.H. (2017). Exploring neuromarketing and its reliance on remote sensing: Social and ethical implications. International Journal of Communication, 11, 4824-4844.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Bulfin, S., & Johnson. N. (2017). Left to their own devices: The everyday realities of ‘one-to-one’ classrooms. Oxford Review of Education. doi: 10.1080/03054985.2017.1305047

Nemorin, S. (2016). The frustrations of digital fabrication: An auto/ethnographic exploration of 3D ‘Making’ in school. International Journal of Technology and Design Education. doi: 10.1007/s10798-016-9366-z

Nemorin, S. & Selwyn, N. (2016). Making the best of it? Exploring the realities of 3D printing in school. Research Papers in Education. doi: 10.1080/02671522.2016.1225802

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., & Johnson, N. (2016). High-tech, hard work: An investigation of teachers’ work in the digital age. Learning Media and Technology. doi:10.1080/17439884.2016.1252770

Bulfin, S., Johnson, N., Nemorin, S., & Selwyn, N. (2016). Nagging, noobs and new tricks – student perceptions of school as a context for digital technology use. Educational Studies 42(3), 239-251. doi: 10.1080/03055698.2016.1160824

Pinto, L. E. & Nemorin, S. (2015). Normalizing panoptic surveillance among children. Our Schools Our Selves, 24(2), 53-62.

Book sections

 Nemorin, S. (2017). Online safety. In SAGE Encyclopedia of Out-of-School Learning, K. Peppler (Ed). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Bulfin, S., & Johnson, N. (2016). Toward a digital sociology of school. In Digital Sociologies, J. Daniels, K. Gregory, & T. McMillan Cottom (Eds). Bristol, UK: Policy Press.

Boler, M. & Nemorin, S. (2013). Dissent, truthiness, and war: New media landscapes of 21st century propaganda. In The Oxford Handbook of Propaganda Studies, R. Castronovo and J. Auerbach (Eds.). New York, NY: Oxford University Press.

Monographs and reports

Powell, A., Nemorin, S., Berner, A., Douglas-Jones, R., Fritsch, E., Hanteer, O., … Vega-Aurelio, D. (2017). Values and ethics in innovation for responsible technology in Europe. Report for the EU Commission: Enabling responsible ICT-related research and innovation.

Selwyn, N., Johnson, N., Nemorin, S., & Knight, E. (2016). Going online on behalf of others: An investigation of ‘proxy’ Internet consumers. Report for the Australian Communications Consumer Action Network, Sydney.

Alice Aldinucci is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford, Department of Education. She is part of the team working on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani, and she is a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group.

She holds a PhD in Education from the University of Glasgow (UK) where she was awarded the LKAS Interdisciplinary Scholarship. Her thesis applies a longitudinal qualitative research design and draws on the combination of Critical Realism and Capability Approach to explore aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to adulthood in Chile. Prior to her PhD, she completed a MA in International Education and Development from the University of Sussex (UK) where she was awarded the Centre for International Education Prize for the best overall MA performance. For her MA at Sussex, she conducted an empirical dissertation on the meaning making of Inclusive Education in Nepal. She holds a MA in Languages and Cultures for International Communication and Cooperation from the University of Milan (Italy) with a fieldwork research on tensions between policy and practice in bilingual multicultural education for indigenous students in Higher Education in Peru; and a BA in Languages and Intercultural Mediation from the University of Arezzo (Italy).

Alice’s research interests are interdisciplinary and relate to the critical linkages between intersecting inequalities, education, individual/societal development, and social justice at local and global levels, motivated by the question what education for what/whose development?

Areas, theoretical approaches and methodologies of interests:
• Sociology of education including aspirations in post-school transitions
• Cultural political economy of education and life chances/human flourishing/social justice
• Tensions between global educational frameworks and local knowledge and practices
• Critical Realism
• Capability Approach
• Qualitative and participatory methodologies
• Digital storytelling for social change

Besides her work in academia, Alice has gained experience as researcher, development practitioner and educator working in projects including early childhood education programmes, refugees’ education, girls’ education, SEN and inclusive education, TVET, global citizenship education, arts-based pedagogies. She lived and worked in different countries including in Nepal (a country she has developed a strong bond with), Tanzania, El Salvador, Italy and the UK. These experiences have reinforced her critical approach to international education and global development and to education as a catalyst for both inequalities, injustices, violence and more equitable social change and peace-building processes.

She served as Student Representative of the British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) from 2017 to 2019 and she is currently part of the college of reviewers of the editorial board of Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education.

Publications:

Aldinucci, A. (2022). Understanding aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to postschool trajectories in Chile. PhD thesis, University of Glasgow.
Aldinucci, A., Valiente, O., Hurrell S., and Zancajo, A. (2021). Understanding aspirations: Why do secondary TVET students aim so high in Chile? Journal of Vocational Education & Training.

Rawle, G., Riddle, N., Pettersson, G., Wallin, J., Bici, M., Jasper, P., Harb, J., Hebbar, M., Davis, J., Aldinucci, A., (2017), EQUIP-Tanzania Impact Evaluation. Midline Technical Report, Volume I and II. Oxford Policy Management.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.
Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Steph is a primary-trained teacher, maths specialist teacher (MaST) and Specialist Leader of Education (SLE) for mathematics in Oxfordshire. She trained as an NCETM mastery specialist and has NCETM PD Lead accreditation. Steph is currently undertaking a part-time PhD, exploring the experiences of teachers working in multi-academy trusts – how expertise is utilised and whether agency is possible.

Publications

Mastery and optional standardised tests: some tensions, Mathematics Teaching (2019), 268, p.18-20

Georgia is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre. She is currently working on the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, primarily involved in qualitative data analysis. Georgia is also working on a British Academy funded project about care-experienced academics working in higher education.

Georgia came to research from a legal background. She initially worked as a researcher in the Centre for Child and Family Research at Loughborough University, where she was involved in multiple research and evaluation projects including, a prospective longitudinal study of children identified in infancy as likely to suffer significant harm; evaluations for the Department for Education Children’s Social Care Innovation Programme; and research on return home from care. More recently, Georgia worked as a Development Researcher at the NSPCC, involved in the development of local services for children and families from concept through to scale up.

Her primary research interests are transitions from care (e.g. transitions from care into adulthood, returning home from care) and the role of education in supporting and providing opportunities for vulnerable children. Georgia’s PhD focused on care leavers’ experiences of higher education in England.

Publications

Journal articles

Harrington, L., McElearney, A. and Hyde-Dryden, G. (2021) Adapting the Pregnancy in Mind (PiM) support service to virtual delivery. Journal of Birth and Parent Education, 8 (3).

Margolis, R., Jackson-Hollis, V., Hyde-Dryden, G., Robson-Brown, E., Smith, E. and McConnell, N (2020) Families facing multiple adversities: impact and interventions. Paediatrics and Child Health 30(11), 390-394.

Ward, H., Brown, R., Blackmore, J., Hyde-Dryden, G. and Thomas, C. (2019) Identifying parents who show capacity to make and sustain positive changes when infants are at risk of significant harm. Developing Practice: The Child, Youth and Family Work Journal, 54, 45-61.

McDermid, S., Hyde-Dryden, G. and Ward, H. (2015) Looking for long-term outcomes: What early interventions are needed for children and young people at risk of maltreatment in England? Irish Journal of Applied Social Studies, 15 (2), 36-49.

Hyde-Dryden, G. (2015) Overcoming self-reliance and lack of expectation among care leavers in higher education in England: the role of inter-agency working. Swiss Journal of Social Work, 16, 75-93, (Special issue).

Munro, E., Pinkerton, J., Mendes, P., Hyde Dryden, G., Herczog, M. and Benbenishty, R. (2011) The contribution of the UNC for the rights of the child to understanding and promoting the interests of young people making the transition from care to adulthood. Children and Youth Services Review 33 (12), 2417-2423.

 

Reports

McElearney, A., Murphy, C., Fullerton, D., Hyde-Dryden, G., Cosette, A. and Morris, S. (2021) School staff, parents and carers’ views and experience of the Keeping Safe whole-school education programme: Lessons from the process evaluation for teaching children to recognise abusive behaviours and tell. London: NSPCC.

McElearney, A., Hyde-Dryden, G., Walters, H., Palmer, L., Coulter, K. and Adamson, G. (2021) Process evaluation of Virtual Pregnancy in Mind during the Covid-19 pandemic. London: NSPCC.

McElearney, A., Hyde-Dryden, G., Palmer, L. and Walters, H. (2021) Reflections and learning from our local service response to families during Covid-19. London: NSPCC.

McElearney, A., Palmer, L., Walters, H., and Hyde-Dryden, G. (2020) Learning from adapting the Baby Steps programme in response to COVID-19. London: NSPCC.

Hyde-Dryden, G. and Ward, H. (2017) Towards a Family Justice Observatory – A Scoping Study: Main Findings Report of the International Scoping Exercise. Available at: http://wp.lancs.ac.uk/observatory-scoping-study/

Lushey, C., Hyde-Dryden, G., Holmes, L. and Blackmore, J. (2017) No Wrong Door evaluation report. London: Department for Education.

Holmes, L, Thomas, C, Hyde-Dryden, G, Williams, A (2017) Firstline evaluation report. London: Department for Education

Brown, R., Ward, H., Blackmore, J., Thomas, C. and Hyde-Dryden, G. (2016) Children identified in infancy as likely to suffer, significant harm: a prospective longitudinal study: age eight follow-up, London: Department for Education.

Hyde-Dryden, G., Gibb, J., Lea, J., Buckley, E., Holmes, L., Wallace, E., Lushey, C. and Lawson, D. (2015) Improving practice in respect of children who return home from care: Research report. London: Department for Education.

Hyde-Dryden G., Holmes L., Lawson D. and Blackmore J. (2015) Taking Care Practice Framework for Reunification evaluation report. Loughborough: Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University.

Ward, H., Brown, R. and Hyde Dryden, G. (2014) Assessing Parental Capacity to Change when Children are on the Edge of Care: An Overview of Research Evidence, Childhood Wellbeing Research Centre Report, London: Department for Education.

Dr Selena Nemorin is a UKRI Future Leaders Fellow and researcher/lecturer in sociology of digital technology at the University of Oxford.

Selena’s research focuses on critical theories of technology, surveillance studies, tech ethics, and youth and future media/technologies. She is currently working on the Fair-AIEd project which examines the role that public-private partnerships play in access and use of AI in emerging market economies.

Her past work includes research projects that have examined AI, IoT and ethics, the uses of new technologies in digital schools, educational equity and inclusion, as well as human rights policies and procedures in K-12 and post-secondary institutions.

Publications

Books

Nemorin, S. (2018). Biosurveillance in New Media Marketing: World, Discourse, Representation. New York, NY: Palgrave Macmillan.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Johnson, N., & Bulfin, S. (2017). Everyday Schooling in the Digital Age: High School, High Tech? Oxford, UK: Routledge.

Journal articles

Bonami, B. & Nemorin, S. (2021). Through three levels of abstraction. Towards an ecological framework for making sense of new technologies in education. Education and Information Technologies. doi: 10.1007/s10639-020-10305-1

Gandy, Jr. O. H. & Nemorin, S. (2020). Transportation and smart city imaginaries: A critical analysis of proposals for the USDOT Smart City Challenge. International Journal of Communication, 14, 1232-1252.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Bulfin, S., & Johnson, N. F. (2020). The ‘obvious’ stuff: exploring the mundane realities of students’ digital technology use in school. Digital Education Review, 37, https://revistes.ub.edu/index.php/der/article/view/30670

Ustek-Spilda, F., Powell, A. & Nemorin, S. (2019). Engaging with ethics in Internet of Things: Imaginaries in the social milieu of technology developers. Big Data and Society. July-Dec 1-12. doi: 10.1177/2053951719879468

Selwyn, N., Pangrazio, L., Nemorin, S., & Perrotta, C. (2019). What might the school of 2030 be like? An exercise in social science fiction. Learning, Media and Technology, 1-17. doi:10.1080/17439884.2020.1694944

Gandy, Jr. O. H. & Nemorin, S. (2018). Toward the political economy of ‘nudge’: Smart city variations. Information, Communication & Society. doi.org/10.1080/1369118X.2018.1477969

Williamson, B., Pykett, J. & Nemorin, S. (2018). Biosocial spaces and neurocomputational governance: brain-based and brain-targeted technologies in education. Discourse, 39(2), 258-275. doi:10.1080/01596306.2018.1394421

Nemorin, S. (2017). Affective capture in digital school spaces and the modulation of student subjectivities. Emotion, Space & Society, 24, 11-18. doi:10.1016/j.emospa.2017.05.007

Nemorin, S. (2017). Post-panoptic pedagogies: The changing nature of school surveillance in the digital age. Surveillance & Society. 15 (2): 239-253.

Nemorin, S. (2017). Neuromarketing and the ‘poor in world’ consumer: How the animalization of thinking underpins contemporary market research discourses. Consumption, Markets & Culture, 20 (1), 59-80 22. doi: 10.1080/10253866.2016.1160897

Nemorin, S. & Gandy, Jr. O.H. (2017). Exploring neuromarketing and its reliance on remote sensing: Social and ethical implications. International Journal of Communication, 11, 4824-4844.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Bulfin, S., & Johnson. N. (2017). Left to their own devices: The everyday realities of ‘one-to-one’ classrooms. Oxford Review of Education. doi: 10.1080/03054985.2017.1305047

Nemorin, S. (2016). The frustrations of digital fabrication: An auto/ethnographic exploration of 3D ‘Making’ in school. International Journal of Technology and Design Education. doi: 10.1007/s10798-016-9366-z

Nemorin, S. & Selwyn, N. (2016). Making the best of it? Exploring the realities of 3D printing in school. Research Papers in Education. doi: 10.1080/02671522.2016.1225802

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., & Johnson, N. (2016). High-tech, hard work: An investigation of teachers’ work in the digital age. Learning Media and Technology. doi:10.1080/17439884.2016.1252770

Bulfin, S., Johnson, N., Nemorin, S., & Selwyn, N. (2016). Nagging, noobs and new tricks – student perceptions of school as a context for digital technology use. Educational Studies 42(3), 239-251. doi: 10.1080/03055698.2016.1160824

Pinto, L. E. & Nemorin, S. (2015). Normalizing panoptic surveillance among children. Our Schools Our Selves, 24(2), 53-62.

Book sections

 Nemorin, S. (2017). Online safety. In SAGE Encyclopedia of Out-of-School Learning, K. Peppler (Ed). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Bulfin, S., & Johnson, N. (2016). Toward a digital sociology of school. In Digital Sociologies, J. Daniels, K. Gregory, & T. McMillan Cottom (Eds). Bristol, UK: Policy Press.

Boler, M. & Nemorin, S. (2013). Dissent, truthiness, and war: New media landscapes of 21st century propaganda. In The Oxford Handbook of Propaganda Studies, R. Castronovo and J. Auerbach (Eds.). New York, NY: Oxford University Press.

Monographs and reports

Powell, A., Nemorin, S., Berner, A., Douglas-Jones, R., Fritsch, E., Hanteer, O., … Vega-Aurelio, D. (2017). Values and ethics in innovation for responsible technology in Europe. Report for the EU Commission: Enabling responsible ICT-related research and innovation.

Selwyn, N., Johnson, N., Nemorin, S., & Knight, E. (2016). Going online on behalf of others: An investigation of ‘proxy’ Internet consumers. Report for the Australian Communications Consumer Action Network, Sydney.

Alice Aldinucci is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford, Department of Education. She is part of the team working on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani, and she is a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group.

She holds a PhD in Education from the University of Glasgow (UK) where she was awarded the LKAS Interdisciplinary Scholarship. Her thesis applies a longitudinal qualitative research design and draws on the combination of Critical Realism and Capability Approach to explore aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to adulthood in Chile. Prior to her PhD, she completed a MA in International Education and Development from the University of Sussex (UK) where she was awarded the Centre for International Education Prize for the best overall MA performance. For her MA at Sussex, she conducted an empirical dissertation on the meaning making of Inclusive Education in Nepal. She holds a MA in Languages and Cultures for International Communication and Cooperation from the University of Milan (Italy) with a fieldwork research on tensions between policy and practice in bilingual multicultural education for indigenous students in Higher Education in Peru; and a BA in Languages and Intercultural Mediation from the University of Arezzo (Italy).

Alice’s research interests are interdisciplinary and relate to the critical linkages between intersecting inequalities, education, individual/societal development, and social justice at local and global levels, motivated by the question what education for what/whose development?

Areas, theoretical approaches and methodologies of interests:
• Sociology of education including aspirations in post-school transitions
• Cultural political economy of education and life chances/human flourishing/social justice
• Tensions between global educational frameworks and local knowledge and practices
• Critical Realism
• Capability Approach
• Qualitative and participatory methodologies
• Digital storytelling for social change

Besides her work in academia, Alice has gained experience as researcher, development practitioner and educator working in projects including early childhood education programmes, refugees’ education, girls’ education, SEN and inclusive education, TVET, global citizenship education, arts-based pedagogies. She lived and worked in different countries including in Nepal (a country she has developed a strong bond with), Tanzania, El Salvador, Italy and the UK. These experiences have reinforced her critical approach to international education and global development and to education as a catalyst for both inequalities, injustices, violence and more equitable social change and peace-building processes.

She served as Student Representative of the British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) from 2017 to 2019 and she is currently part of the college of reviewers of the editorial board of Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education.

Publications:

Aldinucci, A. (2022). Understanding aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to postschool trajectories in Chile. PhD thesis, University of Glasgow.
Aldinucci, A., Valiente, O., Hurrell S., and Zancajo, A. (2021). Understanding aspirations: Why do secondary TVET students aim so high in Chile? Journal of Vocational Education & Training.

Rawle, G., Riddle, N., Pettersson, G., Wallin, J., Bici, M., Jasper, P., Harb, J., Hebbar, M., Davis, J., Aldinucci, A., (2017), EQUIP-Tanzania Impact Evaluation. Midline Technical Report, Volume I and II. Oxford Policy Management.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.
Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Steph is a primary-trained teacher, maths specialist teacher (MaST) and Specialist Leader of Education (SLE) for mathematics in Oxfordshire. She trained as an NCETM mastery specialist and has NCETM PD Lead accreditation. Steph is currently undertaking a part-time PhD, exploring the experiences of teachers working in multi-academy trusts – how expertise is utilised and whether agency is possible.

Publications

Mastery and optional standardised tests: some tensions, Mathematics Teaching (2019), 268, p.18-20

Georgia is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre. She is currently working on the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, primarily involved in qualitative data analysis. Georgia is also working on a British Academy funded project about care-experienced academics working in higher education.

Georgia came to research from a legal background. She initially worked as a researcher in the Centre for Child and Family Research at Loughborough University, where she was involved in multiple research and evaluation projects including, a prospective longitudinal study of children identified in infancy as likely to suffer significant harm; evaluations for the Department for Education Children’s Social Care Innovation Programme; and research on return home from care. More recently, Georgia worked as a Development Researcher at the NSPCC, involved in the development of local services for children and families from concept through to scale up.

Her primary research interests are transitions from care (e.g. transitions from care into adulthood, returning home from care) and the role of education in supporting and providing opportunities for vulnerable children. Georgia’s PhD focused on care leavers’ experiences of higher education in England.

Publications

Journal articles

Harrington, L., McElearney, A. and Hyde-Dryden, G. (2021) Adapting the Pregnancy in Mind (PiM) support service to virtual delivery. Journal of Birth and Parent Education, 8 (3).

Margolis, R., Jackson-Hollis, V., Hyde-Dryden, G., Robson-Brown, E., Smith, E. and McConnell, N (2020) Families facing multiple adversities: impact and interventions. Paediatrics and Child Health 30(11), 390-394.

Ward, H., Brown, R., Blackmore, J., Hyde-Dryden, G. and Thomas, C. (2019) Identifying parents who show capacity to make and sustain positive changes when infants are at risk of significant harm. Developing Practice: The Child, Youth and Family Work Journal, 54, 45-61.

McDermid, S., Hyde-Dryden, G. and Ward, H. (2015) Looking for long-term outcomes: What early interventions are needed for children and young people at risk of maltreatment in England? Irish Journal of Applied Social Studies, 15 (2), 36-49.

Hyde-Dryden, G. (2015) Overcoming self-reliance and lack of expectation among care leavers in higher education in England: the role of inter-agency working. Swiss Journal of Social Work, 16, 75-93, (Special issue).

Munro, E., Pinkerton, J., Mendes, P., Hyde Dryden, G., Herczog, M. and Benbenishty, R. (2011) The contribution of the UNC for the rights of the child to understanding and promoting the interests of young people making the transition from care to adulthood. Children and Youth Services Review 33 (12), 2417-2423.

 

Reports

McElearney, A., Murphy, C., Fullerton, D., Hyde-Dryden, G., Cosette, A. and Morris, S. (2021) School staff, parents and carers’ views and experience of the Keeping Safe whole-school education programme: Lessons from the process evaluation for teaching children to recognise abusive behaviours and tell. London: NSPCC.

McElearney, A., Hyde-Dryden, G., Walters, H., Palmer, L., Coulter, K. and Adamson, G. (2021) Process evaluation of Virtual Pregnancy in Mind during the Covid-19 pandemic. London: NSPCC.

McElearney, A., Hyde-Dryden, G., Palmer, L. and Walters, H. (2021) Reflections and learning from our local service response to families during Covid-19. London: NSPCC.

McElearney, A., Palmer, L., Walters, H., and Hyde-Dryden, G. (2020) Learning from adapting the Baby Steps programme in response to COVID-19. London: NSPCC.

Hyde-Dryden, G. and Ward, H. (2017) Towards a Family Justice Observatory – A Scoping Study: Main Findings Report of the International Scoping Exercise. Available at: http://wp.lancs.ac.uk/observatory-scoping-study/

Lushey, C., Hyde-Dryden, G., Holmes, L. and Blackmore, J. (2017) No Wrong Door evaluation report. London: Department for Education.

Holmes, L, Thomas, C, Hyde-Dryden, G, Williams, A (2017) Firstline evaluation report. London: Department for Education

Brown, R., Ward, H., Blackmore, J., Thomas, C. and Hyde-Dryden, G. (2016) Children identified in infancy as likely to suffer, significant harm: a prospective longitudinal study: age eight follow-up, London: Department for Education.

Hyde-Dryden, G., Gibb, J., Lea, J., Buckley, E., Holmes, L., Wallace, E., Lushey, C. and Lawson, D. (2015) Improving practice in respect of children who return home from care: Research report. London: Department for Education.

Hyde-Dryden G., Holmes L., Lawson D. and Blackmore J. (2015) Taking Care Practice Framework for Reunification evaluation report. Loughborough: Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University.

Ward, H., Brown, R. and Hyde Dryden, G. (2014) Assessing Parental Capacity to Change when Children are on the Edge of Care: An Overview of Research Evidence, Childhood Wellbeing Research Centre Report, London: Department for Education.

Dr Selena Nemorin is a UKRI Future Leaders Fellow and researcher/lecturer in sociology of digital technology at the University of Oxford.

Selena’s research focuses on critical theories of technology, surveillance studies, tech ethics, and youth and future media/technologies. She is currently working on the Fair-AIEd project which examines the role that public-private partnerships play in access and use of AI in emerging market economies.

Her past work includes research projects that have examined AI, IoT and ethics, the uses of new technologies in digital schools, educational equity and inclusion, as well as human rights policies and procedures in K-12 and post-secondary institutions.

Publications

Books

Nemorin, S. (2018). Biosurveillance in New Media Marketing: World, Discourse, Representation. New York, NY: Palgrave Macmillan.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Johnson, N., & Bulfin, S. (2017). Everyday Schooling in the Digital Age: High School, High Tech? Oxford, UK: Routledge.

Journal articles

Bonami, B. & Nemorin, S. (2021). Through three levels of abstraction. Towards an ecological framework for making sense of new technologies in education. Education and Information Technologies. doi: 10.1007/s10639-020-10305-1

Gandy, Jr. O. H. & Nemorin, S. (2020). Transportation and smart city imaginaries: A critical analysis of proposals for the USDOT Smart City Challenge. International Journal of Communication, 14, 1232-1252.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Bulfin, S., & Johnson, N. F. (2020). The ‘obvious’ stuff: exploring the mundane realities of students’ digital technology use in school. Digital Education Review, 37, https://revistes.ub.edu/index.php/der/article/view/30670

Ustek-Spilda, F., Powell, A. & Nemorin, S. (2019). Engaging with ethics in Internet of Things: Imaginaries in the social milieu of technology developers. Big Data and Society. July-Dec 1-12. doi: 10.1177/2053951719879468

Selwyn, N., Pangrazio, L., Nemorin, S., & Perrotta, C. (2019). What might the school of 2030 be like? An exercise in social science fiction. Learning, Media and Technology, 1-17. doi:10.1080/17439884.2020.1694944

Gandy, Jr. O. H. & Nemorin, S. (2018). Toward the political economy of ‘nudge’: Smart city variations. Information, Communication & Society. doi.org/10.1080/1369118X.2018.1477969

Williamson, B., Pykett, J. & Nemorin, S. (2018). Biosocial spaces and neurocomputational governance: brain-based and brain-targeted technologies in education. Discourse, 39(2), 258-275. doi:10.1080/01596306.2018.1394421

Nemorin, S. (2017). Affective capture in digital school spaces and the modulation of student subjectivities. Emotion, Space & Society, 24, 11-18. doi:10.1016/j.emospa.2017.05.007

Nemorin, S. (2017). Post-panoptic pedagogies: The changing nature of school surveillance in the digital age. Surveillance & Society. 15 (2): 239-253.

Nemorin, S. (2017). Neuromarketing and the ‘poor in world’ consumer: How the animalization of thinking underpins contemporary market research discourses. Consumption, Markets & Culture, 20 (1), 59-80 22. doi: 10.1080/10253866.2016.1160897

Nemorin, S. & Gandy, Jr. O.H. (2017). Exploring neuromarketing and its reliance on remote sensing: Social and ethical implications. International Journal of Communication, 11, 4824-4844.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Bulfin, S., & Johnson. N. (2017). Left to their own devices: The everyday realities of ‘one-to-one’ classrooms. Oxford Review of Education. doi: 10.1080/03054985.2017.1305047

Nemorin, S. (2016). The frustrations of digital fabrication: An auto/ethnographic exploration of 3D ‘Making’ in school. International Journal of Technology and Design Education. doi: 10.1007/s10798-016-9366-z

Nemorin, S. & Selwyn, N. (2016). Making the best of it? Exploring the realities of 3D printing in school. Research Papers in Education. doi: 10.1080/02671522.2016.1225802

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., & Johnson, N. (2016). High-tech, hard work: An investigation of teachers’ work in the digital age. Learning Media and Technology. doi:10.1080/17439884.2016.1252770

Bulfin, S., Johnson, N., Nemorin, S., & Selwyn, N. (2016). Nagging, noobs and new tricks – student perceptions of school as a context for digital technology use. Educational Studies 42(3), 239-251. doi: 10.1080/03055698.2016.1160824

Pinto, L. E. & Nemorin, S. (2015). Normalizing panoptic surveillance among children. Our Schools Our Selves, 24(2), 53-62.

Book sections

 Nemorin, S. (2017). Online safety. In SAGE Encyclopedia of Out-of-School Learning, K. Peppler (Ed). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Bulfin, S., & Johnson, N. (2016). Toward a digital sociology of school. In Digital Sociologies, J. Daniels, K. Gregory, & T. McMillan Cottom (Eds). Bristol, UK: Policy Press.

Boler, M. & Nemorin, S. (2013). Dissent, truthiness, and war: New media landscapes of 21st century propaganda. In The Oxford Handbook of Propaganda Studies, R. Castronovo and J. Auerbach (Eds.). New York, NY: Oxford University Press.

Monographs and reports

Powell, A., Nemorin, S., Berner, A., Douglas-Jones, R., Fritsch, E., Hanteer, O., … Vega-Aurelio, D. (2017). Values and ethics in innovation for responsible technology in Europe. Report for the EU Commission: Enabling responsible ICT-related research and innovation.

Selwyn, N., Johnson, N., Nemorin, S., & Knight, E. (2016). Going online on behalf of others: An investigation of ‘proxy’ Internet consumers. Report for the Australian Communications Consumer Action Network, Sydney.

Alice Aldinucci is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford, Department of Education. She is part of the team working on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani, and she is a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group.

She holds a PhD in Education from the University of Glasgow (UK) where she was awarded the LKAS Interdisciplinary Scholarship. Her thesis applies a longitudinal qualitative research design and draws on the combination of Critical Realism and Capability Approach to explore aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to adulthood in Chile. Prior to her PhD, she completed a MA in International Education and Development from the University of Sussex (UK) where she was awarded the Centre for International Education Prize for the best overall MA performance. For her MA at Sussex, she conducted an empirical dissertation on the meaning making of Inclusive Education in Nepal. She holds a MA in Languages and Cultures for International Communication and Cooperation from the University of Milan (Italy) with a fieldwork research on tensions between policy and practice in bilingual multicultural education for indigenous students in Higher Education in Peru; and a BA in Languages and Intercultural Mediation from the University of Arezzo (Italy).

Alice’s research interests are interdisciplinary and relate to the critical linkages between intersecting inequalities, education, individual/societal development, and social justice at local and global levels, motivated by the question what education for what/whose development?

Areas, theoretical approaches and methodologies of interests:
• Sociology of education including aspirations in post-school transitions
• Cultural political economy of education and life chances/human flourishing/social justice
• Tensions between global educational frameworks and local knowledge and practices
• Critical Realism
• Capability Approach
• Qualitative and participatory methodologies
• Digital storytelling for social change

Besides her work in academia, Alice has gained experience as researcher, development practitioner and educator working in projects including early childhood education programmes, refugees’ education, girls’ education, SEN and inclusive education, TVET, global citizenship education, arts-based pedagogies. She lived and worked in different countries including in Nepal (a country she has developed a strong bond with), Tanzania, El Salvador, Italy and the UK. These experiences have reinforced her critical approach to international education and global development and to education as a catalyst for both inequalities, injustices, violence and more equitable social change and peace-building processes.

She served as Student Representative of the British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) from 2017 to 2019 and she is currently part of the college of reviewers of the editorial board of Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education.

Publications:

Aldinucci, A. (2022). Understanding aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to postschool trajectories in Chile. PhD thesis, University of Glasgow.
Aldinucci, A., Valiente, O., Hurrell S., and Zancajo, A. (2021). Understanding aspirations: Why do secondary TVET students aim so high in Chile? Journal of Vocational Education & Training.

Rawle, G., Riddle, N., Pettersson, G., Wallin, J., Bici, M., Jasper, P., Harb, J., Hebbar, M., Davis, J., Aldinucci, A., (2017), EQUIP-Tanzania Impact Evaluation. Midline Technical Report, Volume I and II. Oxford Policy Management.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.
Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Steph is a primary-trained teacher, maths specialist teacher (MaST) and Specialist Leader of Education (SLE) for mathematics in Oxfordshire. She trained as an NCETM mastery specialist and has NCETM PD Lead accreditation. Steph is currently undertaking a part-time PhD, exploring the experiences of teachers working in multi-academy trusts – how expertise is utilised and whether agency is possible.

Publications

Mastery and optional standardised tests: some tensions, Mathematics Teaching (2019), 268, p.18-20

Georgia is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre. She is currently working on the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, primarily involved in qualitative data analysis. Georgia is also working on a British Academy funded project about care-experienced academics working in higher education.

Georgia came to research from a legal background. She initially worked as a researcher in the Centre for Child and Family Research at Loughborough University, where she was involved in multiple research and evaluation projects including, a prospective longitudinal study of children identified in infancy as likely to suffer significant harm; evaluations for the Department for Education Children’s Social Care Innovation Programme; and research on return home from care. More recently, Georgia worked as a Development Researcher at the NSPCC, involved in the development of local services for children and families from concept through to scale up.

Her primary research interests are transitions from care (e.g. transitions from care into adulthood, returning home from care) and the role of education in supporting and providing opportunities for vulnerable children. Georgia’s PhD focused on care leavers’ experiences of higher education in England.

Publications

Journal articles

Harrington, L., McElearney, A. and Hyde-Dryden, G. (2021) Adapting the Pregnancy in Mind (PiM) support service to virtual delivery. Journal of Birth and Parent Education, 8 (3).

Margolis, R., Jackson-Hollis, V., Hyde-Dryden, G., Robson-Brown, E., Smith, E. and McConnell, N (2020) Families facing multiple adversities: impact and interventions. Paediatrics and Child Health 30(11), 390-394.

Ward, H., Brown, R., Blackmore, J., Hyde-Dryden, G. and Thomas, C. (2019) Identifying parents who show capacity to make and sustain positive changes when infants are at risk of significant harm. Developing Practice: The Child, Youth and Family Work Journal, 54, 45-61.

McDermid, S., Hyde-Dryden, G. and Ward, H. (2015) Looking for long-term outcomes: What early interventions are needed for children and young people at risk of maltreatment in England? Irish Journal of Applied Social Studies, 15 (2), 36-49.

Hyde-Dryden, G. (2015) Overcoming self-reliance and lack of expectation among care leavers in higher education in England: the role of inter-agency working. Swiss Journal of Social Work, 16, 75-93, (Special issue).

Munro, E., Pinkerton, J., Mendes, P., Hyde Dryden, G., Herczog, M. and Benbenishty, R. (2011) The contribution of the UNC for the rights of the child to understanding and promoting the interests of young people making the transition from care to adulthood. Children and Youth Services Review 33 (12), 2417-2423.

 

Reports

McElearney, A., Murphy, C., Fullerton, D., Hyde-Dryden, G., Cosette, A. and Morris, S. (2021) School staff, parents and carers’ views and experience of the Keeping Safe whole-school education programme: Lessons from the process evaluation for teaching children to recognise abusive behaviours and tell. London: NSPCC.

McElearney, A., Hyde-Dryden, G., Walters, H., Palmer, L., Coulter, K. and Adamson, G. (2021) Process evaluation of Virtual Pregnancy in Mind during the Covid-19 pandemic. London: NSPCC.

McElearney, A., Hyde-Dryden, G., Palmer, L. and Walters, H. (2021) Reflections and learning from our local service response to families during Covid-19. London: NSPCC.

McElearney, A., Palmer, L., Walters, H., and Hyde-Dryden, G. (2020) Learning from adapting the Baby Steps programme in response to COVID-19. London: NSPCC.

Hyde-Dryden, G. and Ward, H. (2017) Towards a Family Justice Observatory – A Scoping Study: Main Findings Report of the International Scoping Exercise. Available at: http://wp.lancs.ac.uk/observatory-scoping-study/

Lushey, C., Hyde-Dryden, G., Holmes, L. and Blackmore, J. (2017) No Wrong Door evaluation report. London: Department for Education.

Holmes, L, Thomas, C, Hyde-Dryden, G, Williams, A (2017) Firstline evaluation report. London: Department for Education

Brown, R., Ward, H., Blackmore, J., Thomas, C. and Hyde-Dryden, G. (2016) Children identified in infancy as likely to suffer, significant harm: a prospective longitudinal study: age eight follow-up, London: Department for Education.

Hyde-Dryden, G., Gibb, J., Lea, J., Buckley, E., Holmes, L., Wallace, E., Lushey, C. and Lawson, D. (2015) Improving practice in respect of children who return home from care: Research report. London: Department for Education.

Hyde-Dryden G., Holmes L., Lawson D. and Blackmore J. (2015) Taking Care Practice Framework for Reunification evaluation report. Loughborough: Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University.

Ward, H., Brown, R. and Hyde Dryden, G. (2014) Assessing Parental Capacity to Change when Children are on the Edge of Care: An Overview of Research Evidence, Childhood Wellbeing Research Centre Report, London: Department for Education.

Dr Selena Nemorin is a UKRI Future Leaders Fellow and researcher/lecturer in sociology of digital technology at the University of Oxford.

Selena’s research focuses on critical theories of technology, surveillance studies, tech ethics, and youth and future media/technologies. She is currently working on the Fair-AIEd project which examines the role that public-private partnerships play in access and use of AI in emerging market economies.

Her past work includes research projects that have examined AI, IoT and ethics, the uses of new technologies in digital schools, educational equity and inclusion, as well as human rights policies and procedures in K-12 and post-secondary institutions.

Publications

Books

Nemorin, S. (2018). Biosurveillance in New Media Marketing: World, Discourse, Representation. New York, NY: Palgrave Macmillan.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Johnson, N., & Bulfin, S. (2017). Everyday Schooling in the Digital Age: High School, High Tech? Oxford, UK: Routledge.

Journal articles

Bonami, B. & Nemorin, S. (2021). Through three levels of abstraction. Towards an ecological framework for making sense of new technologies in education. Education and Information Technologies. doi: 10.1007/s10639-020-10305-1

Gandy, Jr. O. H. & Nemorin, S. (2020). Transportation and smart city imaginaries: A critical analysis of proposals for the USDOT Smart City Challenge. International Journal of Communication, 14, 1232-1252.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Bulfin, S., & Johnson, N. F. (2020). The ‘obvious’ stuff: exploring the mundane realities of students’ digital technology use in school. Digital Education Review, 37, https://revistes.ub.edu/index.php/der/article/view/30670

Ustek-Spilda, F., Powell, A. & Nemorin, S. (2019). Engaging with ethics in Internet of Things: Imaginaries in the social milieu of technology developers. Big Data and Society. July-Dec 1-12. doi: 10.1177/2053951719879468

Selwyn, N., Pangrazio, L., Nemorin, S., & Perrotta, C. (2019). What might the school of 2030 be like? An exercise in social science fiction. Learning, Media and Technology, 1-17. doi:10.1080/17439884.2020.1694944

Gandy, Jr. O. H. & Nemorin, S. (2018). Toward the political economy of ‘nudge’: Smart city variations. Information, Communication & Society. doi.org/10.1080/1369118X.2018.1477969

Williamson, B., Pykett, J. & Nemorin, S. (2018). Biosocial spaces and neurocomputational governance: brain-based and brain-targeted technologies in education. Discourse, 39(2), 258-275. doi:10.1080/01596306.2018.1394421

Nemorin, S. (2017). Affective capture in digital school spaces and the modulation of student subjectivities. Emotion, Space & Society, 24, 11-18. doi:10.1016/j.emospa.2017.05.007

Nemorin, S. (2017). Post-panoptic pedagogies: The changing nature of school surveillance in the digital age. Surveillance & Society. 15 (2): 239-253.

Nemorin, S. (2017). Neuromarketing and the ‘poor in world’ consumer: How the animalization of thinking underpins contemporary market research discourses. Consumption, Markets & Culture, 20 (1), 59-80 22. doi: 10.1080/10253866.2016.1160897

Nemorin, S. & Gandy, Jr. O.H. (2017). Exploring neuromarketing and its reliance on remote sensing: Social and ethical implications. International Journal of Communication, 11, 4824-4844.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Bulfin, S., & Johnson. N. (2017). Left to their own devices: The everyday realities of ‘one-to-one’ classrooms. Oxford Review of Education. doi: 10.1080/03054985.2017.1305047

Nemorin, S. (2016). The frustrations of digital fabrication: An auto/ethnographic exploration of 3D ‘Making’ in school. International Journal of Technology and Design Education. doi: 10.1007/s10798-016-9366-z

Nemorin, S. & Selwyn, N. (2016). Making the best of it? Exploring the realities of 3D printing in school. Research Papers in Education. doi: 10.1080/02671522.2016.1225802

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., & Johnson, N. (2016). High-tech, hard work: An investigation of teachers’ work in the digital age. Learning Media and Technology. doi:10.1080/17439884.2016.1252770

Bulfin, S., Johnson, N., Nemorin, S., & Selwyn, N. (2016). Nagging, noobs and new tricks – student perceptions of school as a context for digital technology use. Educational Studies 42(3), 239-251. doi: 10.1080/03055698.2016.1160824

Pinto, L. E. & Nemorin, S. (2015). Normalizing panoptic surveillance among children. Our Schools Our Selves, 24(2), 53-62.

Book sections

 Nemorin, S. (2017). Online safety. In SAGE Encyclopedia of Out-of-School Learning, K. Peppler (Ed). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Bulfin, S., & Johnson, N. (2016). Toward a digital sociology of school. In Digital Sociologies, J. Daniels, K. Gregory, & T. McMillan Cottom (Eds). Bristol, UK: Policy Press.

Boler, M. & Nemorin, S. (2013). Dissent, truthiness, and war: New media landscapes of 21st century propaganda. In The Oxford Handbook of Propaganda Studies, R. Castronovo and J. Auerbach (Eds.). New York, NY: Oxford University Press.

Monographs and reports

Powell, A., Nemorin, S., Berner, A., Douglas-Jones, R., Fritsch, E., Hanteer, O., … Vega-Aurelio, D. (2017). Values and ethics in innovation for responsible technology in Europe. Report for the EU Commission: Enabling responsible ICT-related research and innovation.

Selwyn, N., Johnson, N., Nemorin, S., & Knight, E. (2016). Going online on behalf of others: An investigation of ‘proxy’ Internet consumers. Report for the Australian Communications Consumer Action Network, Sydney.

Alice Aldinucci is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford, Department of Education. She is part of the team working on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani, and she is a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group.

She holds a PhD in Education from the University of Glasgow (UK) where she was awarded the LKAS Interdisciplinary Scholarship. Her thesis applies a longitudinal qualitative research design and draws on the combination of Critical Realism and Capability Approach to explore aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to adulthood in Chile. Prior to her PhD, she completed a MA in International Education and Development from the University of Sussex (UK) where she was awarded the Centre for International Education Prize for the best overall MA performance. For her MA at Sussex, she conducted an empirical dissertation on the meaning making of Inclusive Education in Nepal. She holds a MA in Languages and Cultures for International Communication and Cooperation from the University of Milan (Italy) with a fieldwork research on tensions between policy and practice in bilingual multicultural education for indigenous students in Higher Education in Peru; and a BA in Languages and Intercultural Mediation from the University of Arezzo (Italy).

Alice’s research interests are interdisciplinary and relate to the critical linkages between intersecting inequalities, education, individual/societal development, and social justice at local and global levels, motivated by the question what education for what/whose development?

Areas, theoretical approaches and methodologies of interests:
• Sociology of education including aspirations in post-school transitions
• Cultural political economy of education and life chances/human flourishing/social justice
• Tensions between global educational frameworks and local knowledge and practices
• Critical Realism
• Capability Approach
• Qualitative and participatory methodologies
• Digital storytelling for social change

Besides her work in academia, Alice has gained experience as researcher, development practitioner and educator working in projects including early childhood education programmes, refugees’ education, girls’ education, SEN and inclusive education, TVET, global citizenship education, arts-based pedagogies. She lived and worked in different countries including in Nepal (a country she has developed a strong bond with), Tanzania, El Salvador, Italy and the UK. These experiences have reinforced her critical approach to international education and global development and to education as a catalyst for both inequalities, injustices, violence and more equitable social change and peace-building processes.

She served as Student Representative of the British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) from 2017 to 2019 and she is currently part of the college of reviewers of the editorial board of Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education.

Publications:

Aldinucci, A. (2022). Understanding aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to postschool trajectories in Chile. PhD thesis, University of Glasgow.
Aldinucci, A., Valiente, O., Hurrell S., and Zancajo, A. (2021). Understanding aspirations: Why do secondary TVET students aim so high in Chile? Journal of Vocational Education & Training.

Rawle, G., Riddle, N., Pettersson, G., Wallin, J., Bici, M., Jasper, P., Harb, J., Hebbar, M., Davis, J., Aldinucci, A., (2017), EQUIP-Tanzania Impact Evaluation. Midline Technical Report, Volume I and II. Oxford Policy Management.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.
Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Steph is a primary-trained teacher, maths specialist teacher (MaST) and Specialist Leader of Education (SLE) for mathematics in Oxfordshire. She trained as an NCETM mastery specialist and has NCETM PD Lead accreditation. Steph is currently undertaking a part-time PhD, exploring the experiences of teachers working in multi-academy trusts – how expertise is utilised and whether agency is possible.

Publications

Mastery and optional standardised tests: some tensions, Mathematics Teaching (2019), 268, p.18-20

Georgia is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre. She is currently working on the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, primarily involved in qualitative data analysis. Georgia is also working on a British Academy funded project about care-experienced academics working in higher education.

Georgia came to research from a legal background. She initially worked as a researcher in the Centre for Child and Family Research at Loughborough University, where she was involved in multiple research and evaluation projects including, a prospective longitudinal study of children identified in infancy as likely to suffer significant harm; evaluations for the Department for Education Children’s Social Care Innovation Programme; and research on return home from care. More recently, Georgia worked as a Development Researcher at the NSPCC, involved in the development of local services for children and families from concept through to scale up.

Her primary research interests are transitions from care (e.g. transitions from care into adulthood, returning home from care) and the role of education in supporting and providing opportunities for vulnerable children. Georgia’s PhD focused on care leavers’ experiences of higher education in England.

Publications

Journal articles

Harrington, L., McElearney, A. and Hyde-Dryden, G. (2021) Adapting the Pregnancy in Mind (PiM) support service to virtual delivery. Journal of Birth and Parent Education, 8 (3).

Margolis, R., Jackson-Hollis, V., Hyde-Dryden, G., Robson-Brown, E., Smith, E. and McConnell, N (2020) Families facing multiple adversities: impact and interventions. Paediatrics and Child Health 30(11), 390-394.

Ward, H., Brown, R., Blackmore, J., Hyde-Dryden, G. and Thomas, C. (2019) Identifying parents who show capacity to make and sustain positive changes when infants are at risk of significant harm. Developing Practice: The Child, Youth and Family Work Journal, 54, 45-61.

McDermid, S., Hyde-Dryden, G. and Ward, H. (2015) Looking for long-term outcomes: What early interventions are needed for children and young people at risk of maltreatment in England? Irish Journal of Applied Social Studies, 15 (2), 36-49.

Hyde-Dryden, G. (2015) Overcoming self-reliance and lack of expectation among care leavers in higher education in England: the role of inter-agency working. Swiss Journal of Social Work, 16, 75-93, (Special issue).

Munro, E., Pinkerton, J., Mendes, P., Hyde Dryden, G., Herczog, M. and Benbenishty, R. (2011) The contribution of the UNC for the rights of the child to understanding and promoting the interests of young people making the transition from care to adulthood. Children and Youth Services Review 33 (12), 2417-2423.

 

Reports

McElearney, A., Murphy, C., Fullerton, D., Hyde-Dryden, G., Cosette, A. and Morris, S. (2021) School staff, parents and carers’ views and experience of the Keeping Safe whole-school education programme: Lessons from the process evaluation for teaching children to recognise abusive behaviours and tell. London: NSPCC.

McElearney, A., Hyde-Dryden, G., Walters, H., Palmer, L., Coulter, K. and Adamson, G. (2021) Process evaluation of Virtual Pregnancy in Mind during the Covid-19 pandemic. London: NSPCC.

McElearney, A., Hyde-Dryden, G., Palmer, L. and Walters, H. (2021) Reflections and learning from our local service response to families during Covid-19. London: NSPCC.

McElearney, A., Palmer, L., Walters, H., and Hyde-Dryden, G. (2020) Learning from adapting the Baby Steps programme in response to COVID-19. London: NSPCC.

Hyde-Dryden, G. and Ward, H. (2017) Towards a Family Justice Observatory – A Scoping Study: Main Findings Report of the International Scoping Exercise. Available at: http://wp.lancs.ac.uk/observatory-scoping-study/

Lushey, C., Hyde-Dryden, G., Holmes, L. and Blackmore, J. (2017) No Wrong Door evaluation report. London: Department for Education.

Holmes, L, Thomas, C, Hyde-Dryden, G, Williams, A (2017) Firstline evaluation report. London: Department for Education

Brown, R., Ward, H., Blackmore, J., Thomas, C. and Hyde-Dryden, G. (2016) Children identified in infancy as likely to suffer, significant harm: a prospective longitudinal study: age eight follow-up, London: Department for Education.

Hyde-Dryden, G., Gibb, J., Lea, J., Buckley, E., Holmes, L., Wallace, E., Lushey, C. and Lawson, D. (2015) Improving practice in respect of children who return home from care: Research report. London: Department for Education.

Hyde-Dryden G., Holmes L., Lawson D. and Blackmore J. (2015) Taking Care Practice Framework for Reunification evaluation report. Loughborough: Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University.

Ward, H., Brown, R. and Hyde Dryden, G. (2014) Assessing Parental Capacity to Change when Children are on the Edge of Care: An Overview of Research Evidence, Childhood Wellbeing Research Centre Report, London: Department for Education.

Dr Selena Nemorin is a UKRI Future Leaders Fellow and researcher/lecturer in sociology of digital technology at the University of Oxford.

Selena’s research focuses on critical theories of technology, surveillance studies, tech ethics, and youth and future media/technologies. She is currently working on the Fair-AIEd project which examines the role that public-private partnerships play in access and use of AI in emerging market economies.

Her past work includes research projects that have examined AI, IoT and ethics, the uses of new technologies in digital schools, educational equity and inclusion, as well as human rights policies and procedures in K-12 and post-secondary institutions.

Publications

Books

Nemorin, S. (2018). Biosurveillance in New Media Marketing: World, Discourse, Representation. New York, NY: Palgrave Macmillan.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Johnson, N., & Bulfin, S. (2017). Everyday Schooling in the Digital Age: High School, High Tech? Oxford, UK: Routledge.

Journal articles

Bonami, B. & Nemorin, S. (2021). Through three levels of abstraction. Towards an ecological framework for making sense of new technologies in education. Education and Information Technologies. doi: 10.1007/s10639-020-10305-1

Gandy, Jr. O. H. & Nemorin, S. (2020). Transportation and smart city imaginaries: A critical analysis of proposals for the USDOT Smart City Challenge. International Journal of Communication, 14, 1232-1252.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Bulfin, S., & Johnson, N. F. (2020). The ‘obvious’ stuff: exploring the mundane realities of students’ digital technology use in school. Digital Education Review, 37, https://revistes.ub.edu/index.php/der/article/view/30670

Ustek-Spilda, F., Powell, A. & Nemorin, S. (2019). Engaging with ethics in Internet of Things: Imaginaries in the social milieu of technology developers. Big Data and Society. July-Dec 1-12. doi: 10.1177/2053951719879468

Selwyn, N., Pangrazio, L., Nemorin, S., & Perrotta, C. (2019). What might the school of 2030 be like? An exercise in social science fiction. Learning, Media and Technology, 1-17. doi:10.1080/17439884.2020.1694944

Gandy, Jr. O. H. & Nemorin, S. (2018). Toward the political economy of ‘nudge’: Smart city variations. Information, Communication & Society. doi.org/10.1080/1369118X.2018.1477969

Williamson, B., Pykett, J. & Nemorin, S. (2018). Biosocial spaces and neurocomputational governance: brain-based and brain-targeted technologies in education. Discourse, 39(2), 258-275. doi:10.1080/01596306.2018.1394421

Nemorin, S. (2017). Affective capture in digital school spaces and the modulation of student subjectivities. Emotion, Space & Society, 24, 11-18. doi:10.1016/j.emospa.2017.05.007

Nemorin, S. (2017). Post-panoptic pedagogies: The changing nature of school surveillance in the digital age. Surveillance & Society. 15 (2): 239-253.

Nemorin, S. (2017). Neuromarketing and the ‘poor in world’ consumer: How the animalization of thinking underpins contemporary market research discourses. Consumption, Markets & Culture, 20 (1), 59-80 22. doi: 10.1080/10253866.2016.1160897

Nemorin, S. & Gandy, Jr. O.H. (2017). Exploring neuromarketing and its reliance on remote sensing: Social and ethical implications. International Journal of Communication, 11, 4824-4844.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Bulfin, S., & Johnson. N. (2017). Left to their own devices: The everyday realities of ‘one-to-one’ classrooms. Oxford Review of Education. doi: 10.1080/03054985.2017.1305047

Nemorin, S. (2016). The frustrations of digital fabrication: An auto/ethnographic exploration of 3D ‘Making’ in school. International Journal of Technology and Design Education. doi: 10.1007/s10798-016-9366-z

Nemorin, S. & Selwyn, N. (2016). Making the best of it? Exploring the realities of 3D printing in school. Research Papers in Education. doi: 10.1080/02671522.2016.1225802

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., & Johnson, N. (2016). High-tech, hard work: An investigation of teachers’ work in the digital age. Learning Media and Technology. doi:10.1080/17439884.2016.1252770

Bulfin, S., Johnson, N., Nemorin, S., & Selwyn, N. (2016). Nagging, noobs and new tricks – student perceptions of school as a context for digital technology use. Educational Studies 42(3), 239-251. doi: 10.1080/03055698.2016.1160824

Pinto, L. E. & Nemorin, S. (2015). Normalizing panoptic surveillance among children. Our Schools Our Selves, 24(2), 53-62.

Book sections

 Nemorin, S. (2017). Online safety. In SAGE Encyclopedia of Out-of-School Learning, K. Peppler (Ed). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Bulfin, S., & Johnson, N. (2016). Toward a digital sociology of school. In Digital Sociologies, J. Daniels, K. Gregory, & T. McMillan Cottom (Eds). Bristol, UK: Policy Press.

Boler, M. & Nemorin, S. (2013). Dissent, truthiness, and war: New media landscapes of 21st century propaganda. In The Oxford Handbook of Propaganda Studies, R. Castronovo and J. Auerbach (Eds.). New York, NY: Oxford University Press.

Monographs and reports

Powell, A., Nemorin, S., Berner, A., Douglas-Jones, R., Fritsch, E., Hanteer, O., … Vega-Aurelio, D. (2017). Values and ethics in innovation for responsible technology in Europe. Report for the EU Commission: Enabling responsible ICT-related research and innovation.

Selwyn, N., Johnson, N., Nemorin, S., & Knight, E. (2016). Going online on behalf of others: An investigation of ‘proxy’ Internet consumers. Report for the Australian Communications Consumer Action Network, Sydney.

Alice Aldinucci is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford, Department of Education. She is part of the team working on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani, and she is a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group.

She holds a PhD in Education from the University of Glasgow (UK) where she was awarded the LKAS Interdisciplinary Scholarship. Her thesis applies a longitudinal qualitative research design and draws on the combination of Critical Realism and Capability Approach to explore aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to adulthood in Chile. Prior to her PhD, she completed a MA in International Education and Development from the University of Sussex (UK) where she was awarded the Centre for International Education Prize for the best overall MA performance. For her MA at Sussex, she conducted an empirical dissertation on the meaning making of Inclusive Education in Nepal. She holds a MA in Languages and Cultures for International Communication and Cooperation from the University of Milan (Italy) with a fieldwork research on tensions between policy and practice in bilingual multicultural education for indigenous students in Higher Education in Peru; and a BA in Languages and Intercultural Mediation from the University of Arezzo (Italy).

Alice’s research interests are interdisciplinary and relate to the critical linkages between intersecting inequalities, education, individual/societal development, and social justice at local and global levels, motivated by the question what education for what/whose development?

Areas, theoretical approaches and methodologies of interests:
• Sociology of education including aspirations in post-school transitions
• Cultural political economy of education and life chances/human flourishing/social justice
• Tensions between global educational frameworks and local knowledge and practices
• Critical Realism
• Capability Approach
• Qualitative and participatory methodologies
• Digital storytelling for social change

Besides her work in academia, Alice has gained experience as researcher, development practitioner and educator working in projects including early childhood education programmes, refugees’ education, girls’ education, SEN and inclusive education, TVET, global citizenship education, arts-based pedagogies. She lived and worked in different countries including in Nepal (a country she has developed a strong bond with), Tanzania, El Salvador, Italy and the UK. These experiences have reinforced her critical approach to international education and global development and to education as a catalyst for both inequalities, injustices, violence and more equitable social change and peace-building processes.

She served as Student Representative of the British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) from 2017 to 2019 and she is currently part of the college of reviewers of the editorial board of Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education.

Publications:

Aldinucci, A. (2022). Understanding aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to postschool trajectories in Chile. PhD thesis, University of Glasgow.
Aldinucci, A., Valiente, O., Hurrell S., and Zancajo, A. (2021). Understanding aspirations: Why do secondary TVET students aim so high in Chile? Journal of Vocational Education & Training.

Rawle, G., Riddle, N., Pettersson, G., Wallin, J., Bici, M., Jasper, P., Harb, J., Hebbar, M., Davis, J., Aldinucci, A., (2017), EQUIP-Tanzania Impact Evaluation. Midline Technical Report, Volume I and II. Oxford Policy Management.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.
Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Steph is a primary-trained teacher, maths specialist teacher (MaST) and Specialist Leader of Education (SLE) for mathematics in Oxfordshire. She trained as an NCETM mastery specialist and has NCETM PD Lead accreditation. Steph is currently undertaking a part-time PhD, exploring the experiences of teachers working in multi-academy trusts – how expertise is utilised and whether agency is possible.

Publications

Mastery and optional standardised tests: some tensions, Mathematics Teaching (2019), 268, p.18-20

Georgia is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre. She is currently working on the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, primarily involved in qualitative data analysis. Georgia is also working on a British Academy funded project about care-experienced academics working in higher education.

Georgia came to research from a legal background. She initially worked as a researcher in the Centre for Child and Family Research at Loughborough University, where she was involved in multiple research and evaluation projects including, a prospective longitudinal study of children identified in infancy as likely to suffer significant harm; evaluations for the Department for Education Children’s Social Care Innovation Programme; and research on return home from care. More recently, Georgia worked as a Development Researcher at the NSPCC, involved in the development of local services for children and families from concept through to scale up.

Her primary research interests are transitions from care (e.g. transitions from care into adulthood, returning home from care) and the role of education in supporting and providing opportunities for vulnerable children. Georgia’s PhD focused on care leavers’ experiences of higher education in England.

Publications

Journal articles

Harrington, L., McElearney, A. and Hyde-Dryden, G. (2021) Adapting the Pregnancy in Mind (PiM) support service to virtual delivery. Journal of Birth and Parent Education, 8 (3).

Margolis, R., Jackson-Hollis, V., Hyde-Dryden, G., Robson-Brown, E., Smith, E. and McConnell, N (2020) Families facing multiple adversities: impact and interventions. Paediatrics and Child Health 30(11), 390-394.

Ward, H., Brown, R., Blackmore, J., Hyde-Dryden, G. and Thomas, C. (2019) Identifying parents who show capacity to make and sustain positive changes when infants are at risk of significant harm. Developing Practice: The Child, Youth and Family Work Journal, 54, 45-61.

McDermid, S., Hyde-Dryden, G. and Ward, H. (2015) Looking for long-term outcomes: What early interventions are needed for children and young people at risk of maltreatment in England? Irish Journal of Applied Social Studies, 15 (2), 36-49.

Hyde-Dryden, G. (2015) Overcoming self-reliance and lack of expectation among care leavers in higher education in England: the role of inter-agency working. Swiss Journal of Social Work, 16, 75-93, (Special issue).

Munro, E., Pinkerton, J., Mendes, P., Hyde Dryden, G., Herczog, M. and Benbenishty, R. (2011) The contribution of the UNC for the rights of the child to understanding and promoting the interests of young people making the transition from care to adulthood. Children and Youth Services Review 33 (12), 2417-2423.

 

Reports

McElearney, A., Murphy, C., Fullerton, D., Hyde-Dryden, G., Cosette, A. and Morris, S. (2021) School staff, parents and carers’ views and experience of the Keeping Safe whole-school education programme: Lessons from the process evaluation for teaching children to recognise abusive behaviours and tell. London: NSPCC.

McElearney, A., Hyde-Dryden, G., Walters, H., Palmer, L., Coulter, K. and Adamson, G. (2021) Process evaluation of Virtual Pregnancy in Mind during the Covid-19 pandemic. London: NSPCC.

McElearney, A., Hyde-Dryden, G., Palmer, L. and Walters, H. (2021) Reflections and learning from our local service response to families during Covid-19. London: NSPCC.

McElearney, A., Palmer, L., Walters, H., and Hyde-Dryden, G. (2020) Learning from adapting the Baby Steps programme in response to COVID-19. London: NSPCC.

Hyde-Dryden, G. and Ward, H. (2017) Towards a Family Justice Observatory – A Scoping Study: Main Findings Report of the International Scoping Exercise. Available at: http://wp.lancs.ac.uk/observatory-scoping-study/

Lushey, C., Hyde-Dryden, G., Holmes, L. and Blackmore, J. (2017) No Wrong Door evaluation report. London: Department for Education.

Holmes, L, Thomas, C, Hyde-Dryden, G, Williams, A (2017) Firstline evaluation report. London: Department for Education

Brown, R., Ward, H., Blackmore, J., Thomas, C. and Hyde-Dryden, G. (2016) Children identified in infancy as likely to suffer, significant harm: a prospective longitudinal study: age eight follow-up, London: Department for Education.

Hyde-Dryden, G., Gibb, J., Lea, J., Buckley, E., Holmes, L., Wallace, E., Lushey, C. and Lawson, D. (2015) Improving practice in respect of children who return home from care: Research report. London: Department for Education.

Hyde-Dryden G., Holmes L., Lawson D. and Blackmore J. (2015) Taking Care Practice Framework for Reunification evaluation report. Loughborough: Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University.

Ward, H., Brown, R. and Hyde Dryden, G. (2014) Assessing Parental Capacity to Change when Children are on the Edge of Care: An Overview of Research Evidence, Childhood Wellbeing Research Centre Report, London: Department for Education.

Dr Selena Nemorin is a UKRI Future Leaders Fellow and researcher/lecturer in sociology of digital technology at the University of Oxford.

Selena’s research focuses on critical theories of technology, surveillance studies, tech ethics, and youth and future media/technologies. She is currently working on the Fair-AIEd project which examines the role that public-private partnerships play in access and use of AI in emerging market economies.

Her past work includes research projects that have examined AI, IoT and ethics, the uses of new technologies in digital schools, educational equity and inclusion, as well as human rights policies and procedures in K-12 and post-secondary institutions.

Publications

Books

Nemorin, S. (2018). Biosurveillance in New Media Marketing: World, Discourse, Representation. New York, NY: Palgrave Macmillan.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Johnson, N., & Bulfin, S. (2017). Everyday Schooling in the Digital Age: High School, High Tech? Oxford, UK: Routledge.

Journal articles

Bonami, B. & Nemorin, S. (2021). Through three levels of abstraction. Towards an ecological framework for making sense of new technologies in education. Education and Information Technologies. doi: 10.1007/s10639-020-10305-1

Gandy, Jr. O. H. & Nemorin, S. (2020). Transportation and smart city imaginaries: A critical analysis of proposals for the USDOT Smart City Challenge. International Journal of Communication, 14, 1232-1252.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Bulfin, S., & Johnson, N. F. (2020). The ‘obvious’ stuff: exploring the mundane realities of students’ digital technology use in school. Digital Education Review, 37, https://revistes.ub.edu/index.php/der/article/view/30670

Ustek-Spilda, F., Powell, A. & Nemorin, S. (2019). Engaging with ethics in Internet of Things: Imaginaries in the social milieu of technology developers. Big Data and Society. July-Dec 1-12. doi: 10.1177/2053951719879468

Selwyn, N., Pangrazio, L., Nemorin, S., & Perrotta, C. (2019). What might the school of 2030 be like? An exercise in social science fiction. Learning, Media and Technology, 1-17. doi:10.1080/17439884.2020.1694944

Gandy, Jr. O. H. & Nemorin, S. (2018). Toward the political economy of ‘nudge’: Smart city variations. Information, Communication & Society. doi.org/10.1080/1369118X.2018.1477969

Williamson, B., Pykett, J. & Nemorin, S. (2018). Biosocial spaces and neurocomputational governance: brain-based and brain-targeted technologies in education. Discourse, 39(2), 258-275. doi:10.1080/01596306.2018.1394421

Nemorin, S. (2017). Affective capture in digital school spaces and the modulation of student subjectivities. Emotion, Space & Society, 24, 11-18. doi:10.1016/j.emospa.2017.05.007

Nemorin, S. (2017). Post-panoptic pedagogies: The changing nature of school surveillance in the digital age. Surveillance & Society. 15 (2): 239-253.

Nemorin, S. (2017). Neuromarketing and the ‘poor in world’ consumer: How the animalization of thinking underpins contemporary market research discourses. Consumption, Markets & Culture, 20 (1), 59-80 22. doi: 10.1080/10253866.2016.1160897

Nemorin, S. & Gandy, Jr. O.H. (2017). Exploring neuromarketing and its reliance on remote sensing: Social and ethical implications. International Journal of Communication, 11, 4824-4844.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Bulfin, S., & Johnson. N. (2017). Left to their own devices: The everyday realities of ‘one-to-one’ classrooms. Oxford Review of Education. doi: 10.1080/03054985.2017.1305047

Nemorin, S. (2016). The frustrations of digital fabrication: An auto/ethnographic exploration of 3D ‘Making’ in school. International Journal of Technology and Design Education. doi: 10.1007/s10798-016-9366-z

Nemorin, S. & Selwyn, N. (2016). Making the best of it? Exploring the realities of 3D printing in school. Research Papers in Education. doi: 10.1080/02671522.2016.1225802

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., & Johnson, N. (2016). High-tech, hard work: An investigation of teachers’ work in the digital age. Learning Media and Technology. doi:10.1080/17439884.2016.1252770

Bulfin, S., Johnson, N., Nemorin, S., & Selwyn, N. (2016). Nagging, noobs and new tricks – student perceptions of school as a context for digital technology use. Educational Studies 42(3), 239-251. doi: 10.1080/03055698.2016.1160824

Pinto, L. E. & Nemorin, S. (2015). Normalizing panoptic surveillance among children. Our Schools Our Selves, 24(2), 53-62.

Book sections

 Nemorin, S. (2017). Online safety. In SAGE Encyclopedia of Out-of-School Learning, K. Peppler (Ed). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Bulfin, S., & Johnson, N. (2016). Toward a digital sociology of school. In Digital Sociologies, J. Daniels, K. Gregory, & T. McMillan Cottom (Eds). Bristol, UK: Policy Press.

Boler, M. & Nemorin, S. (2013). Dissent, truthiness, and war: New media landscapes of 21st century propaganda. In The Oxford Handbook of Propaganda Studies, R. Castronovo and J. Auerbach (Eds.). New York, NY: Oxford University Press.

Monographs and reports

Powell, A., Nemorin, S., Berner, A., Douglas-Jones, R., Fritsch, E., Hanteer, O., … Vega-Aurelio, D. (2017). Values and ethics in innovation for responsible technology in Europe. Report for the EU Commission: Enabling responsible ICT-related research and innovation.

Selwyn, N., Johnson, N., Nemorin, S., & Knight, E. (2016). Going online on behalf of others: An investigation of ‘proxy’ Internet consumers. Report for the Australian Communications Consumer Action Network, Sydney.

Alice Aldinucci is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford, Department of Education. She is part of the team working on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani, and she is a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group.

She holds a PhD in Education from the University of Glasgow (UK) where she was awarded the LKAS Interdisciplinary Scholarship. Her thesis applies a longitudinal qualitative research design and draws on the combination of Critical Realism and Capability Approach to explore aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to adulthood in Chile. Prior to her PhD, she completed a MA in International Education and Development from the University of Sussex (UK) where she was awarded the Centre for International Education Prize for the best overall MA performance. For her MA at Sussex, she conducted an empirical dissertation on the meaning making of Inclusive Education in Nepal. She holds a MA in Languages and Cultures for International Communication and Cooperation from the University of Milan (Italy) with a fieldwork research on tensions between policy and practice in bilingual multicultural education for indigenous students in Higher Education in Peru; and a BA in Languages and Intercultural Mediation from the University of Arezzo (Italy).

Alice’s research interests are interdisciplinary and relate to the critical linkages between intersecting inequalities, education, individual/societal development, and social justice at local and global levels, motivated by the question what education for what/whose development?

Areas, theoretical approaches and methodologies of interests:
• Sociology of education including aspirations in post-school transitions
• Cultural political economy of education and life chances/human flourishing/social justice
• Tensions between global educational frameworks and local knowledge and practices
• Critical Realism
• Capability Approach
• Qualitative and participatory methodologies
• Digital storytelling for social change

Besides her work in academia, Alice has gained experience as researcher, development practitioner and educator working in projects including early childhood education programmes, refugees’ education, girls’ education, SEN and inclusive education, TVET, global citizenship education, arts-based pedagogies. She lived and worked in different countries including in Nepal (a country she has developed a strong bond with), Tanzania, El Salvador, Italy and the UK. These experiences have reinforced her critical approach to international education and global development and to education as a catalyst for both inequalities, injustices, violence and more equitable social change and peace-building processes.

She served as Student Representative of the British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) from 2017 to 2019 and she is currently part of the college of reviewers of the editorial board of Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education.

Publications:

Aldinucci, A. (2022). Understanding aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to postschool trajectories in Chile. PhD thesis, University of Glasgow.
Aldinucci, A., Valiente, O., Hurrell S., and Zancajo, A. (2021). Understanding aspirations: Why do secondary TVET students aim so high in Chile? Journal of Vocational Education & Training.

Rawle, G., Riddle, N., Pettersson, G., Wallin, J., Bici, M., Jasper, P., Harb, J., Hebbar, M., Davis, J., Aldinucci, A., (2017), EQUIP-Tanzania Impact Evaluation. Midline Technical Report, Volume I and II. Oxford Policy Management.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.
Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Steph is a primary-trained teacher, maths specialist teacher (MaST) and Specialist Leader of Education (SLE) for mathematics in Oxfordshire. She trained as an NCETM mastery specialist and has NCETM PD Lead accreditation. Steph is currently undertaking a part-time PhD, exploring the experiences of teachers working in multi-academy trusts – how expertise is utilised and whether agency is possible.

Publications

Mastery and optional standardised tests: some tensions, Mathematics Teaching (2019), 268, p.18-20

Georgia is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre. She is currently working on the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, primarily involved in qualitative data analysis. Georgia is also working on a British Academy funded project about care-experienced academics working in higher education.

Georgia came to research from a legal background. She initially worked as a researcher in the Centre for Child and Family Research at Loughborough University, where she was involved in multiple research and evaluation projects including, a prospective longitudinal study of children identified in infancy as likely to suffer significant harm; evaluations for the Department for Education Children’s Social Care Innovation Programme; and research on return home from care. More recently, Georgia worked as a Development Researcher at the NSPCC, involved in the development of local services for children and families from concept through to scale up.

Her primary research interests are transitions from care (e.g. transitions from care into adulthood, returning home from care) and the role of education in supporting and providing opportunities for vulnerable children. Georgia’s PhD focused on care leavers’ experiences of higher education in England.

Publications

Journal articles

Harrington, L., McElearney, A. and Hyde-Dryden, G. (2021) Adapting the Pregnancy in Mind (PiM) support service to virtual delivery. Journal of Birth and Parent Education, 8 (3).

Margolis, R., Jackson-Hollis, V., Hyde-Dryden, G., Robson-Brown, E., Smith, E. and McConnell, N (2020) Families facing multiple adversities: impact and interventions. Paediatrics and Child Health 30(11), 390-394.

Ward, H., Brown, R., Blackmore, J., Hyde-Dryden, G. and Thomas, C. (2019) Identifying parents who show capacity to make and sustain positive changes when infants are at risk of significant harm. Developing Practice: The Child, Youth and Family Work Journal, 54, 45-61.

McDermid, S., Hyde-Dryden, G. and Ward, H. (2015) Looking for long-term outcomes: What early interventions are needed for children and young people at risk of maltreatment in England? Irish Journal of Applied Social Studies, 15 (2), 36-49.

Hyde-Dryden, G. (2015) Overcoming self-reliance and lack of expectation among care leavers in higher education in England: the role of inter-agency working. Swiss Journal of Social Work, 16, 75-93, (Special issue).

Munro, E., Pinkerton, J., Mendes, P., Hyde Dryden, G., Herczog, M. and Benbenishty, R. (2011) The contribution of the UNC for the rights of the child to understanding and promoting the interests of young people making the transition from care to adulthood. Children and Youth Services Review 33 (12), 2417-2423.

 

Reports

McElearney, A., Murphy, C., Fullerton, D., Hyde-Dryden, G., Cosette, A. and Morris, S. (2021) School staff, parents and carers’ views and experience of the Keeping Safe whole-school education programme: Lessons from the process evaluation for teaching children to recognise abusive behaviours and tell. London: NSPCC.

McElearney, A., Hyde-Dryden, G., Walters, H., Palmer, L., Coulter, K. and Adamson, G. (2021) Process evaluation of Virtual Pregnancy in Mind during the Covid-19 pandemic. London: NSPCC.

McElearney, A., Hyde-Dryden, G., Palmer, L. and Walters, H. (2021) Reflections and learning from our local service response to families during Covid-19. London: NSPCC.

McElearney, A., Palmer, L., Walters, H., and Hyde-Dryden, G. (2020) Learning from adapting the Baby Steps programme in response to COVID-19. London: NSPCC.

Hyde-Dryden, G. and Ward, H. (2017) Towards a Family Justice Observatory – A Scoping Study: Main Findings Report of the International Scoping Exercise. Available at: http://wp.lancs.ac.uk/observatory-scoping-study/

Lushey, C., Hyde-Dryden, G., Holmes, L. and Blackmore, J. (2017) No Wrong Door evaluation report. London: Department for Education.

Holmes, L, Thomas, C, Hyde-Dryden, G, Williams, A (2017) Firstline evaluation report. London: Department for Education

Brown, R., Ward, H., Blackmore, J., Thomas, C. and Hyde-Dryden, G. (2016) Children identified in infancy as likely to suffer, significant harm: a prospective longitudinal study: age eight follow-up, London: Department for Education.

Hyde-Dryden, G., Gibb, J., Lea, J., Buckley, E., Holmes, L., Wallace, E., Lushey, C. and Lawson, D. (2015) Improving practice in respect of children who return home from care: Research report. London: Department for Education.

Hyde-Dryden G., Holmes L., Lawson D. and Blackmore J. (2015) Taking Care Practice Framework for Reunification evaluation report. Loughborough: Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University.

Ward, H., Brown, R. and Hyde Dryden, G. (2014) Assessing Parental Capacity to Change when Children are on the Edge of Care: An Overview of Research Evidence, Childhood Wellbeing Research Centre Report, London: Department for Education.

Dr Selena Nemorin is a UKRI Future Leaders Fellow and researcher/lecturer in sociology of digital technology at the University of Oxford.

Selena’s research focuses on critical theories of technology, surveillance studies, tech ethics, and youth and future media/technologies. She is currently working on the Fair-AIEd project which examines the role that public-private partnerships play in access and use of AI in emerging market economies.

Her past work includes research projects that have examined AI, IoT and ethics, the uses of new technologies in digital schools, educational equity and inclusion, as well as human rights policies and procedures in K-12 and post-secondary institutions.

Publications

Books

Nemorin, S. (2018). Biosurveillance in New Media Marketing: World, Discourse, Representation. New York, NY: Palgrave Macmillan.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Johnson, N., & Bulfin, S. (2017). Everyday Schooling in the Digital Age: High School, High Tech? Oxford, UK: Routledge.

Journal articles

Bonami, B. & Nemorin, S. (2021). Through three levels of abstraction. Towards an ecological framework for making sense of new technologies in education. Education and Information Technologies. doi: 10.1007/s10639-020-10305-1

Gandy, Jr. O. H. & Nemorin, S. (2020). Transportation and smart city imaginaries: A critical analysis of proposals for the USDOT Smart City Challenge. International Journal of Communication, 14, 1232-1252.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Bulfin, S., & Johnson, N. F. (2020). The ‘obvious’ stuff: exploring the mundane realities of students’ digital technology use in school. Digital Education Review, 37, https://revistes.ub.edu/index.php/der/article/view/30670

Ustek-Spilda, F., Powell, A. & Nemorin, S. (2019). Engaging with ethics in Internet of Things: Imaginaries in the social milieu of technology developers. Big Data and Society. July-Dec 1-12. doi: 10.1177/2053951719879468

Selwyn, N., Pangrazio, L., Nemorin, S., & Perrotta, C. (2019). What might the school of 2030 be like? An exercise in social science fiction. Learning, Media and Technology, 1-17. doi:10.1080/17439884.2020.1694944

Gandy, Jr. O. H. & Nemorin, S. (2018). Toward the political economy of ‘nudge’: Smart city variations. Information, Communication & Society. doi.org/10.1080/1369118X.2018.1477969

Williamson, B., Pykett, J. & Nemorin, S. (2018). Biosocial spaces and neurocomputational governance: brain-based and brain-targeted technologies in education. Discourse, 39(2), 258-275. doi:10.1080/01596306.2018.1394421

Nemorin, S. (2017). Affective capture in digital school spaces and the modulation of student subjectivities. Emotion, Space & Society, 24, 11-18. doi:10.1016/j.emospa.2017.05.007

Nemorin, S. (2017). Post-panoptic pedagogies: The changing nature of school surveillance in the digital age. Surveillance & Society. 15 (2): 239-253.

Nemorin, S. (2017). Neuromarketing and the ‘poor in world’ consumer: How the animalization of thinking underpins contemporary market research discourses. Consumption, Markets & Culture, 20 (1), 59-80 22. doi: 10.1080/10253866.2016.1160897

Nemorin, S. & Gandy, Jr. O.H. (2017). Exploring neuromarketing and its reliance on remote sensing: Social and ethical implications. International Journal of Communication, 11, 4824-4844.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Bulfin, S., & Johnson. N. (2017). Left to their own devices: The everyday realities of ‘one-to-one’ classrooms. Oxford Review of Education. doi: 10.1080/03054985.2017.1305047

Nemorin, S. (2016). The frustrations of digital fabrication: An auto/ethnographic exploration of 3D ‘Making’ in school. International Journal of Technology and Design Education. doi: 10.1007/s10798-016-9366-z

Nemorin, S. & Selwyn, N. (2016). Making the best of it? Exploring the realities of 3D printing in school. Research Papers in Education. doi: 10.1080/02671522.2016.1225802

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., & Johnson, N. (2016). High-tech, hard work: An investigation of teachers’ work in the digital age. Learning Media and Technology. doi:10.1080/17439884.2016.1252770

Bulfin, S., Johnson, N., Nemorin, S., & Selwyn, N. (2016). Nagging, noobs and new tricks – student perceptions of school as a context for digital technology use. Educational Studies 42(3), 239-251. doi: 10.1080/03055698.2016.1160824

Pinto, L. E. & Nemorin, S. (2015). Normalizing panoptic surveillance among children. Our Schools Our Selves, 24(2), 53-62.

Book sections

 Nemorin, S. (2017). Online safety. In SAGE Encyclopedia of Out-of-School Learning, K. Peppler (Ed). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Bulfin, S., & Johnson, N. (2016). Toward a digital sociology of school. In Digital Sociologies, J. Daniels, K. Gregory, & T. McMillan Cottom (Eds). Bristol, UK: Policy Press.

Boler, M. & Nemorin, S. (2013). Dissent, truthiness, and war: New media landscapes of 21st century propaganda. In The Oxford Handbook of Propaganda Studies, R. Castronovo and J. Auerbach (Eds.). New York, NY: Oxford University Press.

Monographs and reports

Powell, A., Nemorin, S., Berner, A., Douglas-Jones, R., Fritsch, E., Hanteer, O., … Vega-Aurelio, D. (2017). Values and ethics in innovation for responsible technology in Europe. Report for the EU Commission: Enabling responsible ICT-related research and innovation.

Selwyn, N., Johnson, N., Nemorin, S., & Knight, E. (2016). Going online on behalf of others: An investigation of ‘proxy’ Internet consumers. Report for the Australian Communications Consumer Action Network, Sydney.

Alice Aldinucci is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford, Department of Education. She is part of the team working on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani, and she is a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group.

She holds a PhD in Education from the University of Glasgow (UK) where she was awarded the LKAS Interdisciplinary Scholarship. Her thesis applies a longitudinal qualitative research design and draws on the combination of Critical Realism and Capability Approach to explore aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to adulthood in Chile. Prior to her PhD, she completed a MA in International Education and Development from the University of Sussex (UK) where she was awarded the Centre for International Education Prize for the best overall MA performance. For her MA at Sussex, she conducted an empirical dissertation on the meaning making of Inclusive Education in Nepal. She holds a MA in Languages and Cultures for International Communication and Cooperation from the University of Milan (Italy) with a fieldwork research on tensions between policy and practice in bilingual multicultural education for indigenous students in Higher Education in Peru; and a BA in Languages and Intercultural Mediation from the University of Arezzo (Italy).

Alice’s research interests are interdisciplinary and relate to the critical linkages between intersecting inequalities, education, individual/societal development, and social justice at local and global levels, motivated by the question what education for what/whose development?

Areas, theoretical approaches and methodologies of interests:
• Sociology of education including aspirations in post-school transitions
• Cultural political economy of education and life chances/human flourishing/social justice
• Tensions between global educational frameworks and local knowledge and practices
• Critical Realism
• Capability Approach
• Qualitative and participatory methodologies
• Digital storytelling for social change

Besides her work in academia, Alice has gained experience as researcher, development practitioner and educator working in projects including early childhood education programmes, refugees’ education, girls’ education, SEN and inclusive education, TVET, global citizenship education, arts-based pedagogies. She lived and worked in different countries including in Nepal (a country she has developed a strong bond with), Tanzania, El Salvador, Italy and the UK. These experiences have reinforced her critical approach to international education and global development and to education as a catalyst for both inequalities, injustices, violence and more equitable social change and peace-building processes.

She served as Student Representative of the British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) from 2017 to 2019 and she is currently part of the college of reviewers of the editorial board of Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education.

Publications:

Aldinucci, A. (2022). Understanding aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to postschool trajectories in Chile. PhD thesis, University of Glasgow.
Aldinucci, A., Valiente, O., Hurrell S., and Zancajo, A. (2021). Understanding aspirations: Why do secondary TVET students aim so high in Chile? Journal of Vocational Education & Training.

Rawle, G., Riddle, N., Pettersson, G., Wallin, J., Bici, M., Jasper, P., Harb, J., Hebbar, M., Davis, J., Aldinucci, A., (2017), EQUIP-Tanzania Impact Evaluation. Midline Technical Report, Volume I and II. Oxford Policy Management.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.
Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Steph is a primary-trained teacher, maths specialist teacher (MaST) and Specialist Leader of Education (SLE) for mathematics in Oxfordshire. She trained as an NCETM mastery specialist and has NCETM PD Lead accreditation. Steph is currently undertaking a part-time PhD, exploring the experiences of teachers working in multi-academy trusts – how expertise is utilised and whether agency is possible.

Publications

Mastery and optional standardised tests: some tensions, Mathematics Teaching (2019), 268, p.18-20

Georgia is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre. She is currently working on the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, primarily involved in qualitative data analysis. Georgia is also working on a British Academy funded project about care-experienced academics working in higher education.

Georgia came to research from a legal background. She initially worked as a researcher in the Centre for Child and Family Research at Loughborough University, where she was involved in multiple research and evaluation projects including, a prospective longitudinal study of children identified in infancy as likely to suffer significant harm; evaluations for the Department for Education Children’s Social Care Innovation Programme; and research on return home from care. More recently, Georgia worked as a Development Researcher at the NSPCC, involved in the development of local services for children and families from concept through to scale up.

Her primary research interests are transitions from care (e.g. transitions from care into adulthood, returning home from care) and the role of education in supporting and providing opportunities for vulnerable children. Georgia’s PhD focused on care leavers’ experiences of higher education in England.

Publications

Journal articles

Harrington, L., McElearney, A. and Hyde-Dryden, G. (2021) Adapting the Pregnancy in Mind (PiM) support service to virtual delivery. Journal of Birth and Parent Education, 8 (3).

Margolis, R., Jackson-Hollis, V., Hyde-Dryden, G., Robson-Brown, E., Smith, E. and McConnell, N (2020) Families facing multiple adversities: impact and interventions. Paediatrics and Child Health 30(11), 390-394.

Ward, H., Brown, R., Blackmore, J., Hyde-Dryden, G. and Thomas, C. (2019) Identifying parents who show capacity to make and sustain positive changes when infants are at risk of significant harm. Developing Practice: The Child, Youth and Family Work Journal, 54, 45-61.

McDermid, S., Hyde-Dryden, G. and Ward, H. (2015) Looking for long-term outcomes: What early interventions are needed for children and young people at risk of maltreatment in England? Irish Journal of Applied Social Studies, 15 (2), 36-49.

Hyde-Dryden, G. (2015) Overcoming self-reliance and lack of expectation among care leavers in higher education in England: the role of inter-agency working. Swiss Journal of Social Work, 16, 75-93, (Special issue).

Munro, E., Pinkerton, J., Mendes, P., Hyde Dryden, G., Herczog, M. and Benbenishty, R. (2011) The contribution of the UNC for the rights of the child to understanding and promoting the interests of young people making the transition from care to adulthood. Children and Youth Services Review 33 (12), 2417-2423.

 

Reports

McElearney, A., Murphy, C., Fullerton, D., Hyde-Dryden, G., Cosette, A. and Morris, S. (2021) School staff, parents and carers’ views and experience of the Keeping Safe whole-school education programme: Lessons from the process evaluation for teaching children to recognise abusive behaviours and tell. London: NSPCC.

McElearney, A., Hyde-Dryden, G., Walters, H., Palmer, L., Coulter, K. and Adamson, G. (2021) Process evaluation of Virtual Pregnancy in Mind during the Covid-19 pandemic. London: NSPCC.

McElearney, A., Hyde-Dryden, G., Palmer, L. and Walters, H. (2021) Reflections and learning from our local service response to families during Covid-19. London: NSPCC.

McElearney, A., Palmer, L., Walters, H., and Hyde-Dryden, G. (2020) Learning from adapting the Baby Steps programme in response to COVID-19. London: NSPCC.

Hyde-Dryden, G. and Ward, H. (2017) Towards a Family Justice Observatory – A Scoping Study: Main Findings Report of the International Scoping Exercise. Available at: http://wp.lancs.ac.uk/observatory-scoping-study/

Lushey, C., Hyde-Dryden, G., Holmes, L. and Blackmore, J. (2017) No Wrong Door evaluation report. London: Department for Education.

Holmes, L, Thomas, C, Hyde-Dryden, G, Williams, A (2017) Firstline evaluation report. London: Department for Education

Brown, R., Ward, H., Blackmore, J., Thomas, C. and Hyde-Dryden, G. (2016) Children identified in infancy as likely to suffer, significant harm: a prospective longitudinal study: age eight follow-up, London: Department for Education.

Hyde-Dryden, G., Gibb, J., Lea, J., Buckley, E., Holmes, L., Wallace, E., Lushey, C. and Lawson, D. (2015) Improving practice in respect of children who return home from care: Research report. London: Department for Education.

Hyde-Dryden G., Holmes L., Lawson D. and Blackmore J. (2015) Taking Care Practice Framework for Reunification evaluation report. Loughborough: Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University.

Ward, H., Brown, R. and Hyde Dryden, G. (2014) Assessing Parental Capacity to Change when Children are on the Edge of Care: An Overview of Research Evidence, Childhood Wellbeing Research Centre Report, London: Department for Education.

Dr Selena Nemorin is a UKRI Future Leaders Fellow and researcher/lecturer in sociology of digital technology at the University of Oxford.

Selena’s research focuses on critical theories of technology, surveillance studies, tech ethics, and youth and future media/technologies. She is currently working on the Fair-AIEd project which examines the role that public-private partnerships play in access and use of AI in emerging market economies.

Her past work includes research projects that have examined AI, IoT and ethics, the uses of new technologies in digital schools, educational equity and inclusion, as well as human rights policies and procedures in K-12 and post-secondary institutions.

Publications

Books

Nemorin, S. (2018). Biosurveillance in New Media Marketing: World, Discourse, Representation. New York, NY: Palgrave Macmillan.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Johnson, N., & Bulfin, S. (2017). Everyday Schooling in the Digital Age: High School, High Tech? Oxford, UK: Routledge.

Journal articles

Bonami, B. & Nemorin, S. (2021). Through three levels of abstraction. Towards an ecological framework for making sense of new technologies in education. Education and Information Technologies. doi: 10.1007/s10639-020-10305-1

Gandy, Jr. O. H. & Nemorin, S. (2020). Transportation and smart city imaginaries: A critical analysis of proposals for the USDOT Smart City Challenge. International Journal of Communication, 14, 1232-1252.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Bulfin, S., & Johnson, N. F. (2020). The ‘obvious’ stuff: exploring the mundane realities of students’ digital technology use in school. Digital Education Review, 37, https://revistes.ub.edu/index.php/der/article/view/30670

Ustek-Spilda, F., Powell, A. & Nemorin, S. (2019). Engaging with ethics in Internet of Things: Imaginaries in the social milieu of technology developers. Big Data and Society. July-Dec 1-12. doi: 10.1177/2053951719879468

Selwyn, N., Pangrazio, L., Nemorin, S., & Perrotta, C. (2019). What might the school of 2030 be like? An exercise in social science fiction. Learning, Media and Technology, 1-17. doi:10.1080/17439884.2020.1694944

Gandy, Jr. O. H. & Nemorin, S. (2018). Toward the political economy of ‘nudge’: Smart city variations. Information, Communication & Society. doi.org/10.1080/1369118X.2018.1477969

Williamson, B., Pykett, J. & Nemorin, S. (2018). Biosocial spaces and neurocomputational governance: brain-based and brain-targeted technologies in education. Discourse, 39(2), 258-275. doi:10.1080/01596306.2018.1394421

Nemorin, S. (2017). Affective capture in digital school spaces and the modulation of student subjectivities. Emotion, Space & Society, 24, 11-18. doi:10.1016/j.emospa.2017.05.007

Nemorin, S. (2017). Post-panoptic pedagogies: The changing nature of school surveillance in the digital age. Surveillance & Society. 15 (2): 239-253.

Nemorin, S. (2017). Neuromarketing and the ‘poor in world’ consumer: How the animalization of thinking underpins contemporary market research discourses. Consumption, Markets & Culture, 20 (1), 59-80 22. doi: 10.1080/10253866.2016.1160897

Nemorin, S. & Gandy, Jr. O.H. (2017). Exploring neuromarketing and its reliance on remote sensing: Social and ethical implications. International Journal of Communication, 11, 4824-4844.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Bulfin, S., & Johnson. N. (2017). Left to their own devices: The everyday realities of ‘one-to-one’ classrooms. Oxford Review of Education. doi: 10.1080/03054985.2017.1305047

Nemorin, S. (2016). The frustrations of digital fabrication: An auto/ethnographic exploration of 3D ‘Making’ in school. International Journal of Technology and Design Education. doi: 10.1007/s10798-016-9366-z

Nemorin, S. & Selwyn, N. (2016). Making the best of it? Exploring the realities of 3D printing in school. Research Papers in Education. doi: 10.1080/02671522.2016.1225802

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., & Johnson, N. (2016). High-tech, hard work: An investigation of teachers’ work in the digital age. Learning Media and Technology. doi:10.1080/17439884.2016.1252770

Bulfin, S., Johnson, N., Nemorin, S., & Selwyn, N. (2016). Nagging, noobs and new tricks – student perceptions of school as a context for digital technology use. Educational Studies 42(3), 239-251. doi: 10.1080/03055698.2016.1160824

Pinto, L. E. & Nemorin, S. (2015). Normalizing panoptic surveillance among children. Our Schools Our Selves, 24(2), 53-62.

Book sections

 Nemorin, S. (2017). Online safety. In SAGE Encyclopedia of Out-of-School Learning, K. Peppler (Ed). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Bulfin, S., & Johnson, N. (2016). Toward a digital sociology of school. In Digital Sociologies, J. Daniels, K. Gregory, & T. McMillan Cottom (Eds). Bristol, UK: Policy Press.

Boler, M. & Nemorin, S. (2013). Dissent, truthiness, and war: New media landscapes of 21st century propaganda. In The Oxford Handbook of Propaganda Studies, R. Castronovo and J. Auerbach (Eds.). New York, NY: Oxford University Press.

Monographs and reports

Powell, A., Nemorin, S., Berner, A., Douglas-Jones, R., Fritsch, E., Hanteer, O., … Vega-Aurelio, D. (2017). Values and ethics in innovation for responsible technology in Europe. Report for the EU Commission: Enabling responsible ICT-related research and innovation.

Selwyn, N., Johnson, N., Nemorin, S., & Knight, E. (2016). Going online on behalf of others: An investigation of ‘proxy’ Internet consumers. Report for the Australian Communications Consumer Action Network, Sydney.

Alice Aldinucci is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford, Department of Education. She is part of the team working on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani, and she is a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group.

She holds a PhD in Education from the University of Glasgow (UK) where she was awarded the LKAS Interdisciplinary Scholarship. Her thesis applies a longitudinal qualitative research design and draws on the combination of Critical Realism and Capability Approach to explore aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to adulthood in Chile. Prior to her PhD, she completed a MA in International Education and Development from the University of Sussex (UK) where she was awarded the Centre for International Education Prize for the best overall MA performance. For her MA at Sussex, she conducted an empirical dissertation on the meaning making of Inclusive Education in Nepal. She holds a MA in Languages and Cultures for International Communication and Cooperation from the University of Milan (Italy) with a fieldwork research on tensions between policy and practice in bilingual multicultural education for indigenous students in Higher Education in Peru; and a BA in Languages and Intercultural Mediation from the University of Arezzo (Italy).

Alice’s research interests are interdisciplinary and relate to the critical linkages between intersecting inequalities, education, individual/societal development, and social justice at local and global levels, motivated by the question what education for what/whose development?

Areas, theoretical approaches and methodologies of interests:
• Sociology of education including aspirations in post-school transitions
• Cultural political economy of education and life chances/human flourishing/social justice
• Tensions between global educational frameworks and local knowledge and practices
• Critical Realism
• Capability Approach
• Qualitative and participatory methodologies
• Digital storytelling for social change

Besides her work in academia, Alice has gained experience as researcher, development practitioner and educator working in projects including early childhood education programmes, refugees’ education, girls’ education, SEN and inclusive education, TVET, global citizenship education, arts-based pedagogies. She lived and worked in different countries including in Nepal (a country she has developed a strong bond with), Tanzania, El Salvador, Italy and the UK. These experiences have reinforced her critical approach to international education and global development and to education as a catalyst for both inequalities, injustices, violence and more equitable social change and peace-building processes.

She served as Student Representative of the British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) from 2017 to 2019 and she is currently part of the college of reviewers of the editorial board of Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education.

Publications:

Aldinucci, A. (2022). Understanding aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to postschool trajectories in Chile. PhD thesis, University of Glasgow.
Aldinucci, A., Valiente, O., Hurrell S., and Zancajo, A. (2021). Understanding aspirations: Why do secondary TVET students aim so high in Chile? Journal of Vocational Education & Training.

Rawle, G., Riddle, N., Pettersson, G., Wallin, J., Bici, M., Jasper, P., Harb, J., Hebbar, M., Davis, J., Aldinucci, A., (2017), EQUIP-Tanzania Impact Evaluation. Midline Technical Report, Volume I and II. Oxford Policy Management.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.
Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Steph is a primary-trained teacher, maths specialist teacher (MaST) and Specialist Leader of Education (SLE) for mathematics in Oxfordshire. She trained as an NCETM mastery specialist and has NCETM PD Lead accreditation. Steph is currently undertaking a part-time PhD, exploring the experiences of teachers working in multi-academy trusts – how expertise is utilised and whether agency is possible.

Publications

Mastery and optional standardised tests: some tensions, Mathematics Teaching (2019), 268, p.18-20

Georgia is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre. She is currently working on the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, primarily involved in qualitative data analysis. Georgia is also working on a British Academy funded project about care-experienced academics working in higher education.

Georgia came to research from a legal background. She initially worked as a researcher in the Centre for Child and Family Research at Loughborough University, where she was involved in multiple research and evaluation projects including, a prospective longitudinal study of children identified in infancy as likely to suffer significant harm; evaluations for the Department for Education Children’s Social Care Innovation Programme; and research on return home from care. More recently, Georgia worked as a Development Researcher at the NSPCC, involved in the development of local services for children and families from concept through to scale up.

Her primary research interests are transitions from care (e.g. transitions from care into adulthood, returning home from care) and the role of education in supporting and providing opportunities for vulnerable children. Georgia’s PhD focused on care leavers’ experiences of higher education in England.

Publications

Journal articles

Harrington, L., McElearney, A. and Hyde-Dryden, G. (2021) Adapting the Pregnancy in Mind (PiM) support service to virtual delivery. Journal of Birth and Parent Education, 8 (3).

Margolis, R., Jackson-Hollis, V., Hyde-Dryden, G., Robson-Brown, E., Smith, E. and McConnell, N (2020) Families facing multiple adversities: impact and interventions. Paediatrics and Child Health 30(11), 390-394.

Ward, H., Brown, R., Blackmore, J., Hyde-Dryden, G. and Thomas, C. (2019) Identifying parents who show capacity to make and sustain positive changes when infants are at risk of significant harm. Developing Practice: The Child, Youth and Family Work Journal, 54, 45-61.

McDermid, S., Hyde-Dryden, G. and Ward, H. (2015) Looking for long-term outcomes: What early interventions are needed for children and young people at risk of maltreatment in England? Irish Journal of Applied Social Studies, 15 (2), 36-49.

Hyde-Dryden, G. (2015) Overcoming self-reliance and lack of expectation among care leavers in higher education in England: the role of inter-agency working. Swiss Journal of Social Work, 16, 75-93, (Special issue).

Munro, E., Pinkerton, J., Mendes, P., Hyde Dryden, G., Herczog, M. and Benbenishty, R. (2011) The contribution of the UNC for the rights of the child to understanding and promoting the interests of young people making the transition from care to adulthood. Children and Youth Services Review 33 (12), 2417-2423.

 

Reports

McElearney, A., Murphy, C., Fullerton, D., Hyde-Dryden, G., Cosette, A. and Morris, S. (2021) School staff, parents and carers’ views and experience of the Keeping Safe whole-school education programme: Lessons from the process evaluation for teaching children to recognise abusive behaviours and tell. London: NSPCC.

McElearney, A., Hyde-Dryden, G., Walters, H., Palmer, L., Coulter, K. and Adamson, G. (2021) Process evaluation of Virtual Pregnancy in Mind during the Covid-19 pandemic. London: NSPCC.

McElearney, A., Hyde-Dryden, G., Palmer, L. and Walters, H. (2021) Reflections and learning from our local service response to families during Covid-19. London: NSPCC.

McElearney, A., Palmer, L., Walters, H., and Hyde-Dryden, G. (2020) Learning from adapting the Baby Steps programme in response to COVID-19. London: NSPCC.

Hyde-Dryden, G. and Ward, H. (2017) Towards a Family Justice Observatory – A Scoping Study: Main Findings Report of the International Scoping Exercise. Available at: http://wp.lancs.ac.uk/observatory-scoping-study/

Lushey, C., Hyde-Dryden, G., Holmes, L. and Blackmore, J. (2017) No Wrong Door evaluation report. London: Department for Education.

Holmes, L, Thomas, C, Hyde-Dryden, G, Williams, A (2017) Firstline evaluation report. London: Department for Education

Brown, R., Ward, H., Blackmore, J., Thomas, C. and Hyde-Dryden, G. (2016) Children identified in infancy as likely to suffer, significant harm: a prospective longitudinal study: age eight follow-up, London: Department for Education.

Hyde-Dryden, G., Gibb, J., Lea, J., Buckley, E., Holmes, L., Wallace, E., Lushey, C. and Lawson, D. (2015) Improving practice in respect of children who return home from care: Research report. London: Department for Education.

Hyde-Dryden G., Holmes L., Lawson D. and Blackmore J. (2015) Taking Care Practice Framework for Reunification evaluation report. Loughborough: Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University.

Ward, H., Brown, R. and Hyde Dryden, G. (2014) Assessing Parental Capacity to Change when Children are on the Edge of Care: An Overview of Research Evidence, Childhood Wellbeing Research Centre Report, London: Department for Education.

Dr Selena Nemorin is a UKRI Future Leaders Fellow and researcher/lecturer in sociology of digital technology at the University of Oxford.

Selena’s research focuses on critical theories of technology, surveillance studies, tech ethics, and youth and future media/technologies. She is currently working on the Fair-AIEd project which examines the role that public-private partnerships play in access and use of AI in emerging market economies.

Her past work includes research projects that have examined AI, IoT and ethics, the uses of new technologies in digital schools, educational equity and inclusion, as well as human rights policies and procedures in K-12 and post-secondary institutions.

Publications

Books

Nemorin, S. (2018). Biosurveillance in New Media Marketing: World, Discourse, Representation. New York, NY: Palgrave Macmillan.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Johnson, N., & Bulfin, S. (2017). Everyday Schooling in the Digital Age: High School, High Tech? Oxford, UK: Routledge.

Journal articles

Bonami, B. & Nemorin, S. (2021). Through three levels of abstraction. Towards an ecological framework for making sense of new technologies in education. Education and Information Technologies. doi: 10.1007/s10639-020-10305-1

Gandy, Jr. O. H. & Nemorin, S. (2020). Transportation and smart city imaginaries: A critical analysis of proposals for the USDOT Smart City Challenge. International Journal of Communication, 14, 1232-1252.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Bulfin, S., & Johnson, N. F. (2020). The ‘obvious’ stuff: exploring the mundane realities of students’ digital technology use in school. Digital Education Review, 37, https://revistes.ub.edu/index.php/der/article/view/30670

Ustek-Spilda, F., Powell, A. & Nemorin, S. (2019). Engaging with ethics in Internet of Things: Imaginaries in the social milieu of technology developers. Big Data and Society. July-Dec 1-12. doi: 10.1177/2053951719879468

Selwyn, N., Pangrazio, L., Nemorin, S., & Perrotta, C. (2019). What might the school of 2030 be like? An exercise in social science fiction. Learning, Media and Technology, 1-17. doi:10.1080/17439884.2020.1694944

Gandy, Jr. O. H. & Nemorin, S. (2018). Toward the political economy of ‘nudge’: Smart city variations. Information, Communication & Society. doi.org/10.1080/1369118X.2018.1477969

Williamson, B., Pykett, J. & Nemorin, S. (2018). Biosocial spaces and neurocomputational governance: brain-based and brain-targeted technologies in education. Discourse, 39(2), 258-275. doi:10.1080/01596306.2018.1394421

Nemorin, S. (2017). Affective capture in digital school spaces and the modulation of student subjectivities. Emotion, Space & Society, 24, 11-18. doi:10.1016/j.emospa.2017.05.007

Nemorin, S. (2017). Post-panoptic pedagogies: The changing nature of school surveillance in the digital age. Surveillance & Society. 15 (2): 239-253.

Nemorin, S. (2017). Neuromarketing and the ‘poor in world’ consumer: How the animalization of thinking underpins contemporary market research discourses. Consumption, Markets & Culture, 20 (1), 59-80 22. doi: 10.1080/10253866.2016.1160897

Nemorin, S. & Gandy, Jr. O.H. (2017). Exploring neuromarketing and its reliance on remote sensing: Social and ethical implications. International Journal of Communication, 11, 4824-4844.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Bulfin, S., & Johnson. N. (2017). Left to their own devices: The everyday realities of ‘one-to-one’ classrooms. Oxford Review of Education. doi: 10.1080/03054985.2017.1305047

Nemorin, S. (2016). The frustrations of digital fabrication: An auto/ethnographic exploration of 3D ‘Making’ in school. International Journal of Technology and Design Education. doi: 10.1007/s10798-016-9366-z

Nemorin, S. & Selwyn, N. (2016). Making the best of it? Exploring the realities of 3D printing in school. Research Papers in Education. doi: 10.1080/02671522.2016.1225802

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., & Johnson, N. (2016). High-tech, hard work: An investigation of teachers’ work in the digital age. Learning Media and Technology. doi:10.1080/17439884.2016.1252770

Bulfin, S., Johnson, N., Nemorin, S., & Selwyn, N. (2016). Nagging, noobs and new tricks – student perceptions of school as a context for digital technology use. Educational Studies 42(3), 239-251. doi: 10.1080/03055698.2016.1160824

Pinto, L. E. & Nemorin, S. (2015). Normalizing panoptic surveillance among children. Our Schools Our Selves, 24(2), 53-62.

Book sections

 Nemorin, S. (2017). Online safety. In SAGE Encyclopedia of Out-of-School Learning, K. Peppler (Ed). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Bulfin, S., & Johnson, N. (2016). Toward a digital sociology of school. In Digital Sociologies, J. Daniels, K. Gregory, & T. McMillan Cottom (Eds). Bristol, UK: Policy Press.

Boler, M. & Nemorin, S. (2013). Dissent, truthiness, and war: New media landscapes of 21st century propaganda. In The Oxford Handbook of Propaganda Studies, R. Castronovo and J. Auerbach (Eds.). New York, NY: Oxford University Press.

Monographs and reports

Powell, A., Nemorin, S., Berner, A., Douglas-Jones, R., Fritsch, E., Hanteer, O., … Vega-Aurelio, D. (2017). Values and ethics in innovation for responsible technology in Europe. Report for the EU Commission: Enabling responsible ICT-related research and innovation.

Selwyn, N., Johnson, N., Nemorin, S., & Knight, E. (2016). Going online on behalf of others: An investigation of ‘proxy’ Internet consumers. Report for the Australian Communications Consumer Action Network, Sydney.

Alice Aldinucci is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford, Department of Education. She is part of the team working on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani, and she is a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group.

She holds a PhD in Education from the University of Glasgow (UK) where she was awarded the LKAS Interdisciplinary Scholarship. Her thesis applies a longitudinal qualitative research design and draws on the combination of Critical Realism and Capability Approach to explore aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to adulthood in Chile. Prior to her PhD, she completed a MA in International Education and Development from the University of Sussex (UK) where she was awarded the Centre for International Education Prize for the best overall MA performance. For her MA at Sussex, she conducted an empirical dissertation on the meaning making of Inclusive Education in Nepal. She holds a MA in Languages and Cultures for International Communication and Cooperation from the University of Milan (Italy) with a fieldwork research on tensions between policy and practice in bilingual multicultural education for indigenous students in Higher Education in Peru; and a BA in Languages and Intercultural Mediation from the University of Arezzo (Italy).

Alice’s research interests are interdisciplinary and relate to the critical linkages between intersecting inequalities, education, individual/societal development, and social justice at local and global levels, motivated by the question what education for what/whose development?

Areas, theoretical approaches and methodologies of interests:
• Sociology of education including aspirations in post-school transitions
• Cultural political economy of education and life chances/human flourishing/social justice
• Tensions between global educational frameworks and local knowledge and practices
• Critical Realism
• Capability Approach
• Qualitative and participatory methodologies
• Digital storytelling for social change

Besides her work in academia, Alice has gained experience as researcher, development practitioner and educator working in projects including early childhood education programmes, refugees’ education, girls’ education, SEN and inclusive education, TVET, global citizenship education, arts-based pedagogies. She lived and worked in different countries including in Nepal (a country she has developed a strong bond with), Tanzania, El Salvador, Italy and the UK. These experiences have reinforced her critical approach to international education and global development and to education as a catalyst for both inequalities, injustices, violence and more equitable social change and peace-building processes.

She served as Student Representative of the British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) from 2017 to 2019 and she is currently part of the college of reviewers of the editorial board of Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education.

Publications:

Aldinucci, A. (2022). Understanding aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to postschool trajectories in Chile. PhD thesis, University of Glasgow.
Aldinucci, A., Valiente, O., Hurrell S., and Zancajo, A. (2021). Understanding aspirations: Why do secondary TVET students aim so high in Chile? Journal of Vocational Education & Training.

Rawle, G., Riddle, N., Pettersson, G., Wallin, J., Bici, M., Jasper, P., Harb, J., Hebbar, M., Davis, J., Aldinucci, A., (2017), EQUIP-Tanzania Impact Evaluation. Midline Technical Report, Volume I and II. Oxford Policy Management.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.
Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Steph is a primary-trained teacher, maths specialist teacher (MaST) and Specialist Leader of Education (SLE) for mathematics in Oxfordshire. She trained as an NCETM mastery specialist and has NCETM PD Lead accreditation. Steph is currently undertaking a part-time PhD, exploring the experiences of teachers working in multi-academy trusts – how expertise is utilised and whether agency is possible.

Publications

Mastery and optional standardised tests: some tensions, Mathematics Teaching (2019), 268, p.18-20

Georgia is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre. She is currently working on the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, primarily involved in qualitative data analysis. Georgia is also working on a British Academy funded project about care-experienced academics working in higher education.

Georgia came to research from a legal background. She initially worked as a researcher in the Centre for Child and Family Research at Loughborough University, where she was involved in multiple research and evaluation projects including, a prospective longitudinal study of children identified in infancy as likely to suffer significant harm; evaluations for the Department for Education Children’s Social Care Innovation Programme; and research on return home from care. More recently, Georgia worked as a Development Researcher at the NSPCC, involved in the development of local services for children and families from concept through to scale up.

Her primary research interests are transitions from care (e.g. transitions from care into adulthood, returning home from care) and the role of education in supporting and providing opportunities for vulnerable children. Georgia’s PhD focused on care leavers’ experiences of higher education in England.

Publications

Journal articles

Harrington, L., McElearney, A. and Hyde-Dryden, G. (2021) Adapting the Pregnancy in Mind (PiM) support service to virtual delivery. Journal of Birth and Parent Education, 8 (3).

Margolis, R., Jackson-Hollis, V., Hyde-Dryden, G., Robson-Brown, E., Smith, E. and McConnell, N (2020) Families facing multiple adversities: impact and interventions. Paediatrics and Child Health 30(11), 390-394.

Ward, H., Brown, R., Blackmore, J., Hyde-Dryden, G. and Thomas, C. (2019) Identifying parents who show capacity to make and sustain positive changes when infants are at risk of significant harm. Developing Practice: The Child, Youth and Family Work Journal, 54, 45-61.

McDermid, S., Hyde-Dryden, G. and Ward, H. (2015) Looking for long-term outcomes: What early interventions are needed for children and young people at risk of maltreatment in England? Irish Journal of Applied Social Studies, 15 (2), 36-49.

Hyde-Dryden, G. (2015) Overcoming self-reliance and lack of expectation among care leavers in higher education in England: the role of inter-agency working. Swiss Journal of Social Work, 16, 75-93, (Special issue).

Munro, E., Pinkerton, J., Mendes, P., Hyde Dryden, G., Herczog, M. and Benbenishty, R. (2011) The contribution of the UNC for the rights of the child to understanding and promoting the interests of young people making the transition from care to adulthood. Children and Youth Services Review 33 (12), 2417-2423.

 

Reports

McElearney, A., Murphy, C., Fullerton, D., Hyde-Dryden, G., Cosette, A. and Morris, S. (2021) School staff, parents and carers’ views and experience of the Keeping Safe whole-school education programme: Lessons from the process evaluation for teaching children to recognise abusive behaviours and tell. London: NSPCC.

McElearney, A., Hyde-Dryden, G., Walters, H., Palmer, L., Coulter, K. and Adamson, G. (2021) Process evaluation of Virtual Pregnancy in Mind during the Covid-19 pandemic. London: NSPCC.

McElearney, A., Hyde-Dryden, G., Palmer, L. and Walters, H. (2021) Reflections and learning from our local service response to families during Covid-19. London: NSPCC.

McElearney, A., Palmer, L., Walters, H., and Hyde-Dryden, G. (2020) Learning from adapting the Baby Steps programme in response to COVID-19. London: NSPCC.

Hyde-Dryden, G. and Ward, H. (2017) Towards a Family Justice Observatory – A Scoping Study: Main Findings Report of the International Scoping Exercise. Available at: http://wp.lancs.ac.uk/observatory-scoping-study/

Lushey, C., Hyde-Dryden, G., Holmes, L. and Blackmore, J. (2017) No Wrong Door evaluation report. London: Department for Education.

Holmes, L, Thomas, C, Hyde-Dryden, G, Williams, A (2017) Firstline evaluation report. London: Department for Education

Brown, R., Ward, H., Blackmore, J., Thomas, C. and Hyde-Dryden, G. (2016) Children identified in infancy as likely to suffer, significant harm: a prospective longitudinal study: age eight follow-up, London: Department for Education.

Hyde-Dryden, G., Gibb, J., Lea, J., Buckley, E., Holmes, L., Wallace, E., Lushey, C. and Lawson, D. (2015) Improving practice in respect of children who return home from care: Research report. London: Department for Education.

Hyde-Dryden G., Holmes L., Lawson D. and Blackmore J. (2015) Taking Care Practice Framework for Reunification evaluation report. Loughborough: Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University.

Ward, H., Brown, R. and Hyde Dryden, G. (2014) Assessing Parental Capacity to Change when Children are on the Edge of Care: An Overview of Research Evidence, Childhood Wellbeing Research Centre Report, London: Department for Education.

Dr Selena Nemorin is a UKRI Future Leaders Fellow and researcher/lecturer in sociology of digital technology at the University of Oxford.

Selena’s research focuses on critical theories of technology, surveillance studies, tech ethics, and youth and future media/technologies. She is currently working on the Fair-AIEd project which examines the role that public-private partnerships play in access and use of AI in emerging market economies.

Her past work includes research projects that have examined AI, IoT and ethics, the uses of new technologies in digital schools, educational equity and inclusion, as well as human rights policies and procedures in K-12 and post-secondary institutions.

Publications

Books

Nemorin, S. (2018). Biosurveillance in New Media Marketing: World, Discourse, Representation. New York, NY: Palgrave Macmillan.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Johnson, N., & Bulfin, S. (2017). Everyday Schooling in the Digital Age: High School, High Tech? Oxford, UK: Routledge.

Journal articles

Bonami, B. & Nemorin, S. (2021). Through three levels of abstraction. Towards an ecological framework for making sense of new technologies in education. Education and Information Technologies. doi: 10.1007/s10639-020-10305-1

Gandy, Jr. O. H. & Nemorin, S. (2020). Transportation and smart city imaginaries: A critical analysis of proposals for the USDOT Smart City Challenge. International Journal of Communication, 14, 1232-1252.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Bulfin, S., & Johnson, N. F. (2020). The ‘obvious’ stuff: exploring the mundane realities of students’ digital technology use in school. Digital Education Review, 37, https://revistes.ub.edu/index.php/der/article/view/30670

Ustek-Spilda, F., Powell, A. & Nemorin, S. (2019). Engaging with ethics in Internet of Things: Imaginaries in the social milieu of technology developers. Big Data and Society. July-Dec 1-12. doi: 10.1177/2053951719879468

Selwyn, N., Pangrazio, L., Nemorin, S., & Perrotta, C. (2019). What might the school of 2030 be like? An exercise in social science fiction. Learning, Media and Technology, 1-17. doi:10.1080/17439884.2020.1694944

Gandy, Jr. O. H. & Nemorin, S. (2018). Toward the political economy of ‘nudge’: Smart city variations. Information, Communication & Society. doi.org/10.1080/1369118X.2018.1477969

Williamson, B., Pykett, J. & Nemorin, S. (2018). Biosocial spaces and neurocomputational governance: brain-based and brain-targeted technologies in education. Discourse, 39(2), 258-275. doi:10.1080/01596306.2018.1394421

Nemorin, S. (2017). Affective capture in digital school spaces and the modulation of student subjectivities. Emotion, Space & Society, 24, 11-18. doi:10.1016/j.emospa.2017.05.007

Nemorin, S. (2017). Post-panoptic pedagogies: The changing nature of school surveillance in the digital age. Surveillance & Society. 15 (2): 239-253.

Nemorin, S. (2017). Neuromarketing and the ‘poor in world’ consumer: How the animalization of thinking underpins contemporary market research discourses. Consumption, Markets & Culture, 20 (1), 59-80 22. doi: 10.1080/10253866.2016.1160897

Nemorin, S. & Gandy, Jr. O.H. (2017). Exploring neuromarketing and its reliance on remote sensing: Social and ethical implications. International Journal of Communication, 11, 4824-4844.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Bulfin, S., & Johnson. N. (2017). Left to their own devices: The everyday realities of ‘one-to-one’ classrooms. Oxford Review of Education. doi: 10.1080/03054985.2017.1305047

Nemorin, S. (2016). The frustrations of digital fabrication: An auto/ethnographic exploration of 3D ‘Making’ in school. International Journal of Technology and Design Education. doi: 10.1007/s10798-016-9366-z

Nemorin, S. & Selwyn, N. (2016). Making the best of it? Exploring the realities of 3D printing in school. Research Papers in Education. doi: 10.1080/02671522.2016.1225802

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., & Johnson, N. (2016). High-tech, hard work: An investigation of teachers’ work in the digital age. Learning Media and Technology. doi:10.1080/17439884.2016.1252770

Bulfin, S., Johnson, N., Nemorin, S., & Selwyn, N. (2016). Nagging, noobs and new tricks – student perceptions of school as a context for digital technology use. Educational Studies 42(3), 239-251. doi: 10.1080/03055698.2016.1160824

Pinto, L. E. & Nemorin, S. (2015). Normalizing panoptic surveillance among children. Our Schools Our Selves, 24(2), 53-62.

Book sections

 Nemorin, S. (2017). Online safety. In SAGE Encyclopedia of Out-of-School Learning, K. Peppler (Ed). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Bulfin, S., & Johnson, N. (2016). Toward a digital sociology of school. In Digital Sociologies, J. Daniels, K. Gregory, & T. McMillan Cottom (Eds). Bristol, UK: Policy Press.

Boler, M. & Nemorin, S. (2013). Dissent, truthiness, and war: New media landscapes of 21st century propaganda. In The Oxford Handbook of Propaganda Studies, R. Castronovo and J. Auerbach (Eds.). New York, NY: Oxford University Press.

Monographs and reports

Powell, A., Nemorin, S., Berner, A., Douglas-Jones, R., Fritsch, E., Hanteer, O., … Vega-Aurelio, D. (2017). Values and ethics in innovation for responsible technology in Europe. Report for the EU Commission: Enabling responsible ICT-related research and innovation.

Selwyn, N., Johnson, N., Nemorin, S., & Knight, E. (2016). Going online on behalf of others: An investigation of ‘proxy’ Internet consumers. Report for the Australian Communications Consumer Action Network, Sydney.

Alice Aldinucci is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford, Department of Education. She is part of the team working on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani, and she is a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group.

She holds a PhD in Education from the University of Glasgow (UK) where she was awarded the LKAS Interdisciplinary Scholarship. Her thesis applies a longitudinal qualitative research design and draws on the combination of Critical Realism and Capability Approach to explore aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to adulthood in Chile. Prior to her PhD, she completed a MA in International Education and Development from the University of Sussex (UK) where she was awarded the Centre for International Education Prize for the best overall MA performance. For her MA at Sussex, she conducted an empirical dissertation on the meaning making of Inclusive Education in Nepal. She holds a MA in Languages and Cultures for International Communication and Cooperation from the University of Milan (Italy) with a fieldwork research on tensions between policy and practice in bilingual multicultural education for indigenous students in Higher Education in Peru; and a BA in Languages and Intercultural Mediation from the University of Arezzo (Italy).

Alice’s research interests are interdisciplinary and relate to the critical linkages between intersecting inequalities, education, individual/societal development, and social justice at local and global levels, motivated by the question what education for what/whose development?

Areas, theoretical approaches and methodologies of interests:
• Sociology of education including aspirations in post-school transitions
• Cultural political economy of education and life chances/human flourishing/social justice
• Tensions between global educational frameworks and local knowledge and practices
• Critical Realism
• Capability Approach
• Qualitative and participatory methodologies
• Digital storytelling for social change

Besides her work in academia, Alice has gained experience as researcher, development practitioner and educator working in projects including early childhood education programmes, refugees’ education, girls’ education, SEN and inclusive education, TVET, global citizenship education, arts-based pedagogies. She lived and worked in different countries including in Nepal (a country she has developed a strong bond with), Tanzania, El Salvador, Italy and the UK. These experiences have reinforced her critical approach to international education and global development and to education as a catalyst for both inequalities, injustices, violence and more equitable social change and peace-building processes.

She served as Student Representative of the British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) from 2017 to 2019 and she is currently part of the college of reviewers of the editorial board of Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education.

Publications:

Aldinucci, A. (2022). Understanding aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to postschool trajectories in Chile. PhD thesis, University of Glasgow.
Aldinucci, A., Valiente, O., Hurrell S., and Zancajo, A. (2021). Understanding aspirations: Why do secondary TVET students aim so high in Chile? Journal of Vocational Education & Training.

Rawle, G., Riddle, N., Pettersson, G., Wallin, J., Bici, M., Jasper, P., Harb, J., Hebbar, M., Davis, J., Aldinucci, A., (2017), EQUIP-Tanzania Impact Evaluation. Midline Technical Report, Volume I and II. Oxford Policy Management.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.
Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Steph is a primary-trained teacher, maths specialist teacher (MaST) and Specialist Leader of Education (SLE) for mathematics in Oxfordshire. She trained as an NCETM mastery specialist and has NCETM PD Lead accreditation. Steph is currently undertaking a part-time PhD, exploring the experiences of teachers working in multi-academy trusts – how expertise is utilised and whether agency is possible.

Publications

Mastery and optional standardised tests: some tensions, Mathematics Teaching (2019), 268, p.18-20

Georgia is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre. She is currently working on the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, primarily involved in qualitative data analysis. Georgia is also working on a British Academy funded project about care-experienced academics working in higher education.

Georgia came to research from a legal background. She initially worked as a researcher in the Centre for Child and Family Research at Loughborough University, where she was involved in multiple research and evaluation projects including, a prospective longitudinal study of children identified in infancy as likely to suffer significant harm; evaluations for the Department for Education Children’s Social Care Innovation Programme; and research on return home from care. More recently, Georgia worked as a Development Researcher at the NSPCC, involved in the development of local services for children and families from concept through to scale up.

Her primary research interests are transitions from care (e.g. transitions from care into adulthood, returning home from care) and the role of education in supporting and providing opportunities for vulnerable children. Georgia’s PhD focused on care leavers’ experiences of higher education in England.

Publications

Journal articles

Harrington, L., McElearney, A. and Hyde-Dryden, G. (2021) Adapting the Pregnancy in Mind (PiM) support service to virtual delivery. Journal of Birth and Parent Education, 8 (3).

Margolis, R., Jackson-Hollis, V., Hyde-Dryden, G., Robson-Brown, E., Smith, E. and McConnell, N (2020) Families facing multiple adversities: impact and interventions. Paediatrics and Child Health 30(11), 390-394.

Ward, H., Brown, R., Blackmore, J., Hyde-Dryden, G. and Thomas, C. (2019) Identifying parents who show capacity to make and sustain positive changes when infants are at risk of significant harm. Developing Practice: The Child, Youth and Family Work Journal, 54, 45-61.

McDermid, S., Hyde-Dryden, G. and Ward, H. (2015) Looking for long-term outcomes: What early interventions are needed for children and young people at risk of maltreatment in England? Irish Journal of Applied Social Studies, 15 (2), 36-49.

Hyde-Dryden, G. (2015) Overcoming self-reliance and lack of expectation among care leavers in higher education in England: the role of inter-agency working. Swiss Journal of Social Work, 16, 75-93, (Special issue).

Munro, E., Pinkerton, J., Mendes, P., Hyde Dryden, G., Herczog, M. and Benbenishty, R. (2011) The contribution of the UNC for the rights of the child to understanding and promoting the interests of young people making the transition from care to adulthood. Children and Youth Services Review 33 (12), 2417-2423.

 

Reports

McElearney, A., Murphy, C., Fullerton, D., Hyde-Dryden, G., Cosette, A. and Morris, S. (2021) School staff, parents and carers’ views and experience of the Keeping Safe whole-school education programme: Lessons from the process evaluation for teaching children to recognise abusive behaviours and tell. London: NSPCC.

McElearney, A., Hyde-Dryden, G., Walters, H., Palmer, L., Coulter, K. and Adamson, G. (2021) Process evaluation of Virtual Pregnancy in Mind during the Covid-19 pandemic. London: NSPCC.

McElearney, A., Hyde-Dryden, G., Palmer, L. and Walters, H. (2021) Reflections and learning from our local service response to families during Covid-19. London: NSPCC.

McElearney, A., Palmer, L., Walters, H., and Hyde-Dryden, G. (2020) Learning from adapting the Baby Steps programme in response to COVID-19. London: NSPCC.

Hyde-Dryden, G. and Ward, H. (2017) Towards a Family Justice Observatory – A Scoping Study: Main Findings Report of the International Scoping Exercise. Available at: http://wp.lancs.ac.uk/observatory-scoping-study/

Lushey, C., Hyde-Dryden, G., Holmes, L. and Blackmore, J. (2017) No Wrong Door evaluation report. London: Department for Education.

Holmes, L, Thomas, C, Hyde-Dryden, G, Williams, A (2017) Firstline evaluation report. London: Department for Education

Brown, R., Ward, H., Blackmore, J., Thomas, C. and Hyde-Dryden, G. (2016) Children identified in infancy as likely to suffer, significant harm: a prospective longitudinal study: age eight follow-up, London: Department for Education.

Hyde-Dryden, G., Gibb, J., Lea, J., Buckley, E., Holmes, L., Wallace, E., Lushey, C. and Lawson, D. (2015) Improving practice in respect of children who return home from care: Research report. London: Department for Education.

Hyde-Dryden G., Holmes L., Lawson D. and Blackmore J. (2015) Taking Care Practice Framework for Reunification evaluation report. Loughborough: Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University.

Ward, H., Brown, R. and Hyde Dryden, G. (2014) Assessing Parental Capacity to Change when Children are on the Edge of Care: An Overview of Research Evidence, Childhood Wellbeing Research Centre Report, London: Department for Education.

Dr Selena Nemorin is a UKRI Future Leaders Fellow and researcher/lecturer in sociology of digital technology at the University of Oxford.

Selena’s research focuses on critical theories of technology, surveillance studies, tech ethics, and youth and future media/technologies. She is currently working on the Fair-AIEd project which examines the role that public-private partnerships play in access and use of AI in emerging market economies.

Her past work includes research projects that have examined AI, IoT and ethics, the uses of new technologies in digital schools, educational equity and inclusion, as well as human rights policies and procedures in K-12 and post-secondary institutions.

Publications

Books

Nemorin, S. (2018). Biosurveillance in New Media Marketing: World, Discourse, Representation. New York, NY: Palgrave Macmillan.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Johnson, N., & Bulfin, S. (2017). Everyday Schooling in the Digital Age: High School, High Tech? Oxford, UK: Routledge.

Journal articles

Bonami, B. & Nemorin, S. (2021). Through three levels of abstraction. Towards an ecological framework for making sense of new technologies in education. Education and Information Technologies. doi: 10.1007/s10639-020-10305-1

Gandy, Jr. O. H. & Nemorin, S. (2020). Transportation and smart city imaginaries: A critical analysis of proposals for the USDOT Smart City Challenge. International Journal of Communication, 14, 1232-1252.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Bulfin, S., & Johnson, N. F. (2020). The ‘obvious’ stuff: exploring the mundane realities of students’ digital technology use in school. Digital Education Review, 37, https://revistes.ub.edu/index.php/der/article/view/30670

Ustek-Spilda, F., Powell, A. & Nemorin, S. (2019). Engaging with ethics in Internet of Things: Imaginaries in the social milieu of technology developers. Big Data and Society. July-Dec 1-12. doi: 10.1177/2053951719879468

Selwyn, N., Pangrazio, L., Nemorin, S., & Perrotta, C. (2019). What might the school of 2030 be like? An exercise in social science fiction. Learning, Media and Technology, 1-17. doi:10.1080/17439884.2020.1694944

Gandy, Jr. O. H. & Nemorin, S. (2018). Toward the political economy of ‘nudge’: Smart city variations. Information, Communication & Society. doi.org/10.1080/1369118X.2018.1477969

Williamson, B., Pykett, J. & Nemorin, S. (2018). Biosocial spaces and neurocomputational governance: brain-based and brain-targeted technologies in education. Discourse, 39(2), 258-275. doi:10.1080/01596306.2018.1394421

Nemorin, S. (2017). Affective capture in digital school spaces and the modulation of student subjectivities. Emotion, Space & Society, 24, 11-18. doi:10.1016/j.emospa.2017.05.007

Nemorin, S. (2017). Post-panoptic pedagogies: The changing nature of school surveillance in the digital age. Surveillance & Society. 15 (2): 239-253.

Nemorin, S. (2017). Neuromarketing and the ‘poor in world’ consumer: How the animalization of thinking underpins contemporary market research discourses. Consumption, Markets & Culture, 20 (1), 59-80 22. doi: 10.1080/10253866.2016.1160897

Nemorin, S. & Gandy, Jr. O.H. (2017). Exploring neuromarketing and its reliance on remote sensing: Social and ethical implications. International Journal of Communication, 11, 4824-4844.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Bulfin, S., & Johnson. N. (2017). Left to their own devices: The everyday realities of ‘one-to-one’ classrooms. Oxford Review of Education. doi: 10.1080/03054985.2017.1305047

Nemorin, S. (2016). The frustrations of digital fabrication: An auto/ethnographic exploration of 3D ‘Making’ in school. International Journal of Technology and Design Education. doi: 10.1007/s10798-016-9366-z

Nemorin, S. & Selwyn, N. (2016). Making the best of it? Exploring the realities of 3D printing in school. Research Papers in Education. doi: 10.1080/02671522.2016.1225802

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., & Johnson, N. (2016). High-tech, hard work: An investigation of teachers’ work in the digital age. Learning Media and Technology. doi:10.1080/17439884.2016.1252770

Bulfin, S., Johnson, N., Nemorin, S., & Selwyn, N. (2016). Nagging, noobs and new tricks – student perceptions of school as a context for digital technology use. Educational Studies 42(3), 239-251. doi: 10.1080/03055698.2016.1160824

Pinto, L. E. & Nemorin, S. (2015). Normalizing panoptic surveillance among children. Our Schools Our Selves, 24(2), 53-62.

Book sections

 Nemorin, S. (2017). Online safety. In SAGE Encyclopedia of Out-of-School Learning, K. Peppler (Ed). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Bulfin, S., & Johnson, N. (2016). Toward a digital sociology of school. In Digital Sociologies, J. Daniels, K. Gregory, & T. McMillan Cottom (Eds). Bristol, UK: Policy Press.

Boler, M. & Nemorin, S. (2013). Dissent, truthiness, and war: New media landscapes of 21st century propaganda. In The Oxford Handbook of Propaganda Studies, R. Castronovo and J. Auerbach (Eds.). New York, NY: Oxford University Press.

Monographs and reports

Powell, A., Nemorin, S., Berner, A., Douglas-Jones, R., Fritsch, E., Hanteer, O., … Vega-Aurelio, D. (2017). Values and ethics in innovation for responsible technology in Europe. Report for the EU Commission: Enabling responsible ICT-related research and innovation.

Selwyn, N., Johnson, N., Nemorin, S., & Knight, E. (2016). Going online on behalf of others: An investigation of ‘proxy’ Internet consumers. Report for the Australian Communications Consumer Action Network, Sydney.

Alice Aldinucci is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford, Department of Education. She is part of the team working on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani, and she is a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group.

She holds a PhD in Education from the University of Glasgow (UK) where she was awarded the LKAS Interdisciplinary Scholarship. Her thesis applies a longitudinal qualitative research design and draws on the combination of Critical Realism and Capability Approach to explore aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to adulthood in Chile. Prior to her PhD, she completed a MA in International Education and Development from the University of Sussex (UK) where she was awarded the Centre for International Education Prize for the best overall MA performance. For her MA at Sussex, she conducted an empirical dissertation on the meaning making of Inclusive Education in Nepal. She holds a MA in Languages and Cultures for International Communication and Cooperation from the University of Milan (Italy) with a fieldwork research on tensions between policy and practice in bilingual multicultural education for indigenous students in Higher Education in Peru; and a BA in Languages and Intercultural Mediation from the University of Arezzo (Italy).

Alice’s research interests are interdisciplinary and relate to the critical linkages between intersecting inequalities, education, individual/societal development, and social justice at local and global levels, motivated by the question what education for what/whose development?

Areas, theoretical approaches and methodologies of interests:
• Sociology of education including aspirations in post-school transitions
• Cultural political economy of education and life chances/human flourishing/social justice
• Tensions between global educational frameworks and local knowledge and practices
• Critical Realism
• Capability Approach
• Qualitative and participatory methodologies
• Digital storytelling for social change

Besides her work in academia, Alice has gained experience as researcher, development practitioner and educator working in projects including early childhood education programmes, refugees’ education, girls’ education, SEN and inclusive education, TVET, global citizenship education, arts-based pedagogies. She lived and worked in different countries including in Nepal (a country she has developed a strong bond with), Tanzania, El Salvador, Italy and the UK. These experiences have reinforced her critical approach to international education and global development and to education as a catalyst for both inequalities, injustices, violence and more equitable social change and peace-building processes.

She served as Student Representative of the British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) from 2017 to 2019 and she is currently part of the college of reviewers of the editorial board of Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education.

Publications:

Aldinucci, A. (2022). Understanding aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to postschool trajectories in Chile. PhD thesis, University of Glasgow.
Aldinucci, A., Valiente, O., Hurrell S., and Zancajo, A. (2021). Understanding aspirations: Why do secondary TVET students aim so high in Chile? Journal of Vocational Education & Training.

Rawle, G., Riddle, N., Pettersson, G., Wallin, J., Bici, M., Jasper, P., Harb, J., Hebbar, M., Davis, J., Aldinucci, A., (2017), EQUIP-Tanzania Impact Evaluation. Midline Technical Report, Volume I and II. Oxford Policy Management.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.
Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Steph is a primary-trained teacher, maths specialist teacher (MaST) and Specialist Leader of Education (SLE) for mathematics in Oxfordshire. She trained as an NCETM mastery specialist and has NCETM PD Lead accreditation. Steph is currently undertaking a part-time PhD, exploring the experiences of teachers working in multi-academy trusts – how expertise is utilised and whether agency is possible.

Publications

Mastery and optional standardised tests: some tensions, Mathematics Teaching (2019), 268, p.18-20

Georgia is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre. She is currently working on the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, primarily involved in qualitative data analysis. Georgia is also working on a British Academy funded project about care-experienced academics working in higher education.

Georgia came to research from a legal background. She initially worked as a researcher in the Centre for Child and Family Research at Loughborough University, where she was involved in multiple research and evaluation projects including, a prospective longitudinal study of children identified in infancy as likely to suffer significant harm; evaluations for the Department for Education Children’s Social Care Innovation Programme; and research on return home from care. More recently, Georgia worked as a Development Researcher at the NSPCC, involved in the development of local services for children and families from concept through to scale up.

Her primary research interests are transitions from care (e.g. transitions from care into adulthood, returning home from care) and the role of education in supporting and providing opportunities for vulnerable children. Georgia’s PhD focused on care leavers’ experiences of higher education in England.

Publications

Journal articles

Harrington, L., McElearney, A. and Hyde-Dryden, G. (2021) Adapting the Pregnancy in Mind (PiM) support service to virtual delivery. Journal of Birth and Parent Education, 8 (3).

Margolis, R., Jackson-Hollis, V., Hyde-Dryden, G., Robson-Brown, E., Smith, E. and McConnell, N (2020) Families facing multiple adversities: impact and interventions. Paediatrics and Child Health 30(11), 390-394.

Ward, H., Brown, R., Blackmore, J., Hyde-Dryden, G. and Thomas, C. (2019) Identifying parents who show capacity to make and sustain positive changes when infants are at risk of significant harm. Developing Practice: The Child, Youth and Family Work Journal, 54, 45-61.

McDermid, S., Hyde-Dryden, G. and Ward, H. (2015) Looking for long-term outcomes: What early interventions are needed for children and young people at risk of maltreatment in England? Irish Journal of Applied Social Studies, 15 (2), 36-49.

Hyde-Dryden, G. (2015) Overcoming self-reliance and lack of expectation among care leavers in higher education in England: the role of inter-agency working. Swiss Journal of Social Work, 16, 75-93, (Special issue).

Munro, E., Pinkerton, J., Mendes, P., Hyde Dryden, G., Herczog, M. and Benbenishty, R. (2011) The contribution of the UNC for the rights of the child to understanding and promoting the interests of young people making the transition from care to adulthood. Children and Youth Services Review 33 (12), 2417-2423.

 

Reports

McElearney, A., Murphy, C., Fullerton, D., Hyde-Dryden, G., Cosette, A. and Morris, S. (2021) School staff, parents and carers’ views and experience of the Keeping Safe whole-school education programme: Lessons from the process evaluation for teaching children to recognise abusive behaviours and tell. London: NSPCC.

McElearney, A., Hyde-Dryden, G., Walters, H., Palmer, L., Coulter, K. and Adamson, G. (2021) Process evaluation of Virtual Pregnancy in Mind during the Covid-19 pandemic. London: NSPCC.

McElearney, A., Hyde-Dryden, G., Palmer, L. and Walters, H. (2021) Reflections and learning from our local service response to families during Covid-19. London: NSPCC.

McElearney, A., Palmer, L., Walters, H., and Hyde-Dryden, G. (2020) Learning from adapting the Baby Steps programme in response to COVID-19. London: NSPCC.

Hyde-Dryden, G. and Ward, H. (2017) Towards a Family Justice Observatory – A Scoping Study: Main Findings Report of the International Scoping Exercise. Available at: http://wp.lancs.ac.uk/observatory-scoping-study/

Lushey, C., Hyde-Dryden, G., Holmes, L. and Blackmore, J. (2017) No Wrong Door evaluation report. London: Department for Education.

Holmes, L, Thomas, C, Hyde-Dryden, G, Williams, A (2017) Firstline evaluation report. London: Department for Education

Brown, R., Ward, H., Blackmore, J., Thomas, C. and Hyde-Dryden, G. (2016) Children identified in infancy as likely to suffer, significant harm: a prospective longitudinal study: age eight follow-up, London: Department for Education.

Hyde-Dryden, G., Gibb, J., Lea, J., Buckley, E., Holmes, L., Wallace, E., Lushey, C. and Lawson, D. (2015) Improving practice in respect of children who return home from care: Research report. London: Department for Education.

Hyde-Dryden G., Holmes L., Lawson D. and Blackmore J. (2015) Taking Care Practice Framework for Reunification evaluation report. Loughborough: Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University.

Ward, H., Brown, R. and Hyde Dryden, G. (2014) Assessing Parental Capacity to Change when Children are on the Edge of Care: An Overview of Research Evidence, Childhood Wellbeing Research Centre Report, London: Department for Education.

Dr Selena Nemorin is a UKRI Future Leaders Fellow and researcher/lecturer in sociology of digital technology at the University of Oxford.

Selena’s research focuses on critical theories of technology, surveillance studies, tech ethics, and youth and future media/technologies. She is currently working on the Fair-AIEd project which examines the role that public-private partnerships play in access and use of AI in emerging market economies.

Her past work includes research projects that have examined AI, IoT and ethics, the uses of new technologies in digital schools, educational equity and inclusion, as well as human rights policies and procedures in K-12 and post-secondary institutions.

Publications

Books

Nemorin, S. (2018). Biosurveillance in New Media Marketing: World, Discourse, Representation. New York, NY: Palgrave Macmillan.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Johnson, N., & Bulfin, S. (2017). Everyday Schooling in the Digital Age: High School, High Tech? Oxford, UK: Routledge.

Journal articles

Bonami, B. & Nemorin, S. (2021). Through three levels of abstraction. Towards an ecological framework for making sense of new technologies in education. Education and Information Technologies. doi: 10.1007/s10639-020-10305-1

Gandy, Jr. O. H. & Nemorin, S. (2020). Transportation and smart city imaginaries: A critical analysis of proposals for the USDOT Smart City Challenge. International Journal of Communication, 14, 1232-1252.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Bulfin, S., & Johnson, N. F. (2020). The ‘obvious’ stuff: exploring the mundane realities of students’ digital technology use in school. Digital Education Review, 37, https://revistes.ub.edu/index.php/der/article/view/30670

Ustek-Spilda, F., Powell, A. & Nemorin, S. (2019). Engaging with ethics in Internet of Things: Imaginaries in the social milieu of technology developers. Big Data and Society. July-Dec 1-12. doi: 10.1177/2053951719879468

Selwyn, N., Pangrazio, L., Nemorin, S., & Perrotta, C. (2019). What might the school of 2030 be like? An exercise in social science fiction. Learning, Media and Technology, 1-17. doi:10.1080/17439884.2020.1694944

Gandy, Jr. O. H. & Nemorin, S. (2018). Toward the political economy of ‘nudge’: Smart city variations. Information, Communication & Society. doi.org/10.1080/1369118X.2018.1477969

Williamson, B., Pykett, J. & Nemorin, S. (2018). Biosocial spaces and neurocomputational governance: brain-based and brain-targeted technologies in education. Discourse, 39(2), 258-275. doi:10.1080/01596306.2018.1394421

Nemorin, S. (2017). Affective capture in digital school spaces and the modulation of student subjectivities. Emotion, Space & Society, 24, 11-18. doi:10.1016/j.emospa.2017.05.007

Nemorin, S. (2017). Post-panoptic pedagogies: The changing nature of school surveillance in the digital age. Surveillance & Society. 15 (2): 239-253.

Nemorin, S. (2017). Neuromarketing and the ‘poor in world’ consumer: How the animalization of thinking underpins contemporary market research discourses. Consumption, Markets & Culture, 20 (1), 59-80 22. doi: 10.1080/10253866.2016.1160897

Nemorin, S. & Gandy, Jr. O.H. (2017). Exploring neuromarketing and its reliance on remote sensing: Social and ethical implications. International Journal of Communication, 11, 4824-4844.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Bulfin, S., & Johnson. N. (2017). Left to their own devices: The everyday realities of ‘one-to-one’ classrooms. Oxford Review of Education. doi: 10.1080/03054985.2017.1305047

Nemorin, S. (2016). The frustrations of digital fabrication: An auto/ethnographic exploration of 3D ‘Making’ in school. International Journal of Technology and Design Education. doi: 10.1007/s10798-016-9366-z

Nemorin, S. & Selwyn, N. (2016). Making the best of it? Exploring the realities of 3D printing in school. Research Papers in Education. doi: 10.1080/02671522.2016.1225802

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., & Johnson, N. (2016). High-tech, hard work: An investigation of teachers’ work in the digital age. Learning Media and Technology. doi:10.1080/17439884.2016.1252770

Bulfin, S., Johnson, N., Nemorin, S., & Selwyn, N. (2016). Nagging, noobs and new tricks – student perceptions of school as a context for digital technology use. Educational Studies 42(3), 239-251. doi: 10.1080/03055698.2016.1160824

Pinto, L. E. & Nemorin, S. (2015). Normalizing panoptic surveillance among children. Our Schools Our Selves, 24(2), 53-62.

Book sections

 Nemorin, S. (2017). Online safety. In SAGE Encyclopedia of Out-of-School Learning, K. Peppler (Ed). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Bulfin, S., & Johnson, N. (2016). Toward a digital sociology of school. In Digital Sociologies, J. Daniels, K. Gregory, & T. McMillan Cottom (Eds). Bristol, UK: Policy Press.

Boler, M. & Nemorin, S. (2013). Dissent, truthiness, and war: New media landscapes of 21st century propaganda. In The Oxford Handbook of Propaganda Studies, R. Castronovo and J. Auerbach (Eds.). New York, NY: Oxford University Press.

Monographs and reports

Powell, A., Nemorin, S., Berner, A., Douglas-Jones, R., Fritsch, E., Hanteer, O., … Vega-Aurelio, D. (2017). Values and ethics in innovation for responsible technology in Europe. Report for the EU Commission: Enabling responsible ICT-related research and innovation.

Selwyn, N., Johnson, N., Nemorin, S., & Knight, E. (2016). Going online on behalf of others: An investigation of ‘proxy’ Internet consumers. Report for the Australian Communications Consumer Action Network, Sydney.

Alice Aldinucci is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford, Department of Education. She is part of the team working on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani, and she is a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group.

She holds a PhD in Education from the University of Glasgow (UK) where she was awarded the LKAS Interdisciplinary Scholarship. Her thesis applies a longitudinal qualitative research design and draws on the combination of Critical Realism and Capability Approach to explore aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to adulthood in Chile. Prior to her PhD, she completed a MA in International Education and Development from the University of Sussex (UK) where she was awarded the Centre for International Education Prize for the best overall MA performance. For her MA at Sussex, she conducted an empirical dissertation on the meaning making of Inclusive Education in Nepal. She holds a MA in Languages and Cultures for International Communication and Cooperation from the University of Milan (Italy) with a fieldwork research on tensions between policy and practice in bilingual multicultural education for indigenous students in Higher Education in Peru; and a BA in Languages and Intercultural Mediation from the University of Arezzo (Italy).

Alice’s research interests are interdisciplinary and relate to the critical linkages between intersecting inequalities, education, individual/societal development, and social justice at local and global levels, motivated by the question what education for what/whose development?

Areas, theoretical approaches and methodologies of interests:
• Sociology of education including aspirations in post-school transitions
• Cultural political economy of education and life chances/human flourishing/social justice
• Tensions between global educational frameworks and local knowledge and practices
• Critical Realism
• Capability Approach
• Qualitative and participatory methodologies
• Digital storytelling for social change

Besides her work in academia, Alice has gained experience as researcher, development practitioner and educator working in projects including early childhood education programmes, refugees’ education, girls’ education, SEN and inclusive education, TVET, global citizenship education, arts-based pedagogies. She lived and worked in different countries including in Nepal (a country she has developed a strong bond with), Tanzania, El Salvador, Italy and the UK. These experiences have reinforced her critical approach to international education and global development and to education as a catalyst for both inequalities, injustices, violence and more equitable social change and peace-building processes.

She served as Student Representative of the British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) from 2017 to 2019 and she is currently part of the college of reviewers of the editorial board of Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education.

Publications:

Aldinucci, A. (2022). Understanding aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to postschool trajectories in Chile. PhD thesis, University of Glasgow.
Aldinucci, A., Valiente, O., Hurrell S., and Zancajo, A. (2021). Understanding aspirations: Why do secondary TVET students aim so high in Chile? Journal of Vocational Education & Training.

Rawle, G., Riddle, N., Pettersson, G., Wallin, J., Bici, M., Jasper, P., Harb, J., Hebbar, M., Davis, J., Aldinucci, A., (2017), EQUIP-Tanzania Impact Evaluation. Midline Technical Report, Volume I and II. Oxford Policy Management.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.
Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Steph is a primary-trained teacher, maths specialist teacher (MaST) and Specialist Leader of Education (SLE) for mathematics in Oxfordshire. She trained as an NCETM mastery specialist and has NCETM PD Lead accreditation. Steph is currently undertaking a part-time PhD, exploring the experiences of teachers working in multi-academy trusts – how expertise is utilised and whether agency is possible.

Publications

Mastery and optional standardised tests: some tensions, Mathematics Teaching (2019), 268, p.18-20

Georgia is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre. She is currently working on the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, primarily involved in qualitative data analysis. Georgia is also working on a British Academy funded project about care-experienced academics working in higher education.

Georgia came to research from a legal background. She initially worked as a researcher in the Centre for Child and Family Research at Loughborough University, where she was involved in multiple research and evaluation projects including, a prospective longitudinal study of children identified in infancy as likely to suffer significant harm; evaluations for the Department for Education Children’s Social Care Innovation Programme; and research on return home from care. More recently, Georgia worked as a Development Researcher at the NSPCC, involved in the development of local services for children and families from concept through to scale up.

Her primary research interests are transitions from care (e.g. transitions from care into adulthood, returning home from care) and the role of education in supporting and providing opportunities for vulnerable children. Georgia’s PhD focused on care leavers’ experiences of higher education in England.

Publications

Journal articles

Harrington, L., McElearney, A. and Hyde-Dryden, G. (2021) Adapting the Pregnancy in Mind (PiM) support service to virtual delivery. Journal of Birth and Parent Education, 8 (3).

Margolis, R., Jackson-Hollis, V., Hyde-Dryden, G., Robson-Brown, E., Smith, E. and McConnell, N (2020) Families facing multiple adversities: impact and interventions. Paediatrics and Child Health 30(11), 390-394.

Ward, H., Brown, R., Blackmore, J., Hyde-Dryden, G. and Thomas, C. (2019) Identifying parents who show capacity to make and sustain positive changes when infants are at risk of significant harm. Developing Practice: The Child, Youth and Family Work Journal, 54, 45-61.

McDermid, S., Hyde-Dryden, G. and Ward, H. (2015) Looking for long-term outcomes: What early interventions are needed for children and young people at risk of maltreatment in England? Irish Journal of Applied Social Studies, 15 (2), 36-49.

Hyde-Dryden, G. (2015) Overcoming self-reliance and lack of expectation among care leavers in higher education in England: the role of inter-agency working. Swiss Journal of Social Work, 16, 75-93, (Special issue).

Munro, E., Pinkerton, J., Mendes, P., Hyde Dryden, G., Herczog, M. and Benbenishty, R. (2011) The contribution of the UNC for the rights of the child to understanding and promoting the interests of young people making the transition from care to adulthood. Children and Youth Services Review 33 (12), 2417-2423.

 

Reports

McElearney, A., Murphy, C., Fullerton, D., Hyde-Dryden, G., Cosette, A. and Morris, S. (2021) School staff, parents and carers’ views and experience of the Keeping Safe whole-school education programme: Lessons from the process evaluation for teaching children to recognise abusive behaviours and tell. London: NSPCC.

McElearney, A., Hyde-Dryden, G., Walters, H., Palmer, L., Coulter, K. and Adamson, G. (2021) Process evaluation of Virtual Pregnancy in Mind during the Covid-19 pandemic. London: NSPCC.

McElearney, A., Hyde-Dryden, G., Palmer, L. and Walters, H. (2021) Reflections and learning from our local service response to families during Covid-19. London: NSPCC.

McElearney, A., Palmer, L., Walters, H., and Hyde-Dryden, G. (2020) Learning from adapting the Baby Steps programme in response to COVID-19. London: NSPCC.

Hyde-Dryden, G. and Ward, H. (2017) Towards a Family Justice Observatory – A Scoping Study: Main Findings Report of the International Scoping Exercise. Available at: http://wp.lancs.ac.uk/observatory-scoping-study/

Lushey, C., Hyde-Dryden, G., Holmes, L. and Blackmore, J. (2017) No Wrong Door evaluation report. London: Department for Education.

Holmes, L, Thomas, C, Hyde-Dryden, G, Williams, A (2017) Firstline evaluation report. London: Department for Education

Brown, R., Ward, H., Blackmore, J., Thomas, C. and Hyde-Dryden, G. (2016) Children identified in infancy as likely to suffer, significant harm: a prospective longitudinal study: age eight follow-up, London: Department for Education.

Hyde-Dryden, G., Gibb, J., Lea, J., Buckley, E., Holmes, L., Wallace, E., Lushey, C. and Lawson, D. (2015) Improving practice in respect of children who return home from care: Research report. London: Department for Education.

Hyde-Dryden G., Holmes L., Lawson D. and Blackmore J. (2015) Taking Care Practice Framework for Reunification evaluation report. Loughborough: Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University.

Ward, H., Brown, R. and Hyde Dryden, G. (2014) Assessing Parental Capacity to Change when Children are on the Edge of Care: An Overview of Research Evidence, Childhood Wellbeing Research Centre Report, London: Department for Education.

Dr Selena Nemorin is a UKRI Future Leaders Fellow and researcher/lecturer in sociology of digital technology at the University of Oxford.

Selena’s research focuses on critical theories of technology, surveillance studies, tech ethics, and youth and future media/technologies. She is currently working on the Fair-AIEd project which examines the role that public-private partnerships play in access and use of AI in emerging market economies.

Her past work includes research projects that have examined AI, IoT and ethics, the uses of new technologies in digital schools, educational equity and inclusion, as well as human rights policies and procedures in K-12 and post-secondary institutions.

Publications

Books

Nemorin, S. (2018). Biosurveillance in New Media Marketing: World, Discourse, Representation. New York, NY: Palgrave Macmillan.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Johnson, N., & Bulfin, S. (2017). Everyday Schooling in the Digital Age: High School, High Tech? Oxford, UK: Routledge.

Journal articles

Bonami, B. & Nemorin, S. (2021). Through three levels of abstraction. Towards an ecological framework for making sense of new technologies in education. Education and Information Technologies. doi: 10.1007/s10639-020-10305-1

Gandy, Jr. O. H. & Nemorin, S. (2020). Transportation and smart city imaginaries: A critical analysis of proposals for the USDOT Smart City Challenge. International Journal of Communication, 14, 1232-1252.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Bulfin, S., & Johnson, N. F. (2020). The ‘obvious’ stuff: exploring the mundane realities of students’ digital technology use in school. Digital Education Review, 37, https://revistes.ub.edu/index.php/der/article/view/30670

Ustek-Spilda, F., Powell, A. & Nemorin, S. (2019). Engaging with ethics in Internet of Things: Imaginaries in the social milieu of technology developers. Big Data and Society. July-Dec 1-12. doi: 10.1177/2053951719879468

Selwyn, N., Pangrazio, L., Nemorin, S., & Perrotta, C. (2019). What might the school of 2030 be like? An exercise in social science fiction. Learning, Media and Technology, 1-17. doi:10.1080/17439884.2020.1694944

Gandy, Jr. O. H. & Nemorin, S. (2018). Toward the political economy of ‘nudge’: Smart city variations. Information, Communication & Society. doi.org/10.1080/1369118X.2018.1477969

Williamson, B., Pykett, J. & Nemorin, S. (2018). Biosocial spaces and neurocomputational governance: brain-based and brain-targeted technologies in education. Discourse, 39(2), 258-275. doi:10.1080/01596306.2018.1394421

Nemorin, S. (2017). Affective capture in digital school spaces and the modulation of student subjectivities. Emotion, Space & Society, 24, 11-18. doi:10.1016/j.emospa.2017.05.007

Nemorin, S. (2017). Post-panoptic pedagogies: The changing nature of school surveillance in the digital age. Surveillance & Society. 15 (2): 239-253.

Nemorin, S. (2017). Neuromarketing and the ‘poor in world’ consumer: How the animalization of thinking underpins contemporary market research discourses. Consumption, Markets & Culture, 20 (1), 59-80 22. doi: 10.1080/10253866.2016.1160897

Nemorin, S. & Gandy, Jr. O.H. (2017). Exploring neuromarketing and its reliance on remote sensing: Social and ethical implications. International Journal of Communication, 11, 4824-4844.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Bulfin, S., & Johnson. N. (2017). Left to their own devices: The everyday realities of ‘one-to-one’ classrooms. Oxford Review of Education. doi: 10.1080/03054985.2017.1305047

Nemorin, S. (2016). The frustrations of digital fabrication: An auto/ethnographic exploration of 3D ‘Making’ in school. International Journal of Technology and Design Education. doi: 10.1007/s10798-016-9366-z

Nemorin, S. & Selwyn, N. (2016). Making the best of it? Exploring the realities of 3D printing in school. Research Papers in Education. doi: 10.1080/02671522.2016.1225802

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., & Johnson, N. (2016). High-tech, hard work: An investigation of teachers’ work in the digital age. Learning Media and Technology. doi:10.1080/17439884.2016.1252770

Bulfin, S., Johnson, N., Nemorin, S., & Selwyn, N. (2016). Nagging, noobs and new tricks – student perceptions of school as a context for digital technology use. Educational Studies 42(3), 239-251. doi: 10.1080/03055698.2016.1160824

Pinto, L. E. & Nemorin, S. (2015). Normalizing panoptic surveillance among children. Our Schools Our Selves, 24(2), 53-62.

Book sections

 Nemorin, S. (2017). Online safety. In SAGE Encyclopedia of Out-of-School Learning, K. Peppler (Ed). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Bulfin, S., & Johnson, N. (2016). Toward a digital sociology of school. In Digital Sociologies, J. Daniels, K. Gregory, & T. McMillan Cottom (Eds). Bristol, UK: Policy Press.

Boler, M. & Nemorin, S. (2013). Dissent, truthiness, and war: New media landscapes of 21st century propaganda. In The Oxford Handbook of Propaganda Studies, R. Castronovo and J. Auerbach (Eds.). New York, NY: Oxford University Press.

Monographs and reports

Powell, A., Nemorin, S., Berner, A., Douglas-Jones, R., Fritsch, E., Hanteer, O., … Vega-Aurelio, D. (2017). Values and ethics in innovation for responsible technology in Europe. Report for the EU Commission: Enabling responsible ICT-related research and innovation.

Selwyn, N., Johnson, N., Nemorin, S., & Knight, E. (2016). Going online on behalf of others: An investigation of ‘proxy’ Internet consumers. Report for the Australian Communications Consumer Action Network, Sydney.

Alice Aldinucci is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford, Department of Education. She is part of the team working on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani, and she is a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group.

She holds a PhD in Education from the University of Glasgow (UK) where she was awarded the LKAS Interdisciplinary Scholarship. Her thesis applies a longitudinal qualitative research design and draws on the combination of Critical Realism and Capability Approach to explore aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to adulthood in Chile. Prior to her PhD, she completed a MA in International Education and Development from the University of Sussex (UK) where she was awarded the Centre for International Education Prize for the best overall MA performance. For her MA at Sussex, she conducted an empirical dissertation on the meaning making of Inclusive Education in Nepal. She holds a MA in Languages and Cultures for International Communication and Cooperation from the University of Milan (Italy) with a fieldwork research on tensions between policy and practice in bilingual multicultural education for indigenous students in Higher Education in Peru; and a BA in Languages and Intercultural Mediation from the University of Arezzo (Italy).

Alice’s research interests are interdisciplinary and relate to the critical linkages between intersecting inequalities, education, individual/societal development, and social justice at local and global levels, motivated by the question what education for what/whose development?

Areas, theoretical approaches and methodologies of interests:
• Sociology of education including aspirations in post-school transitions
• Cultural political economy of education and life chances/human flourishing/social justice
• Tensions between global educational frameworks and local knowledge and practices
• Critical Realism
• Capability Approach
• Qualitative and participatory methodologies
• Digital storytelling for social change

Besides her work in academia, Alice has gained experience as researcher, development practitioner and educator working in projects including early childhood education programmes, refugees’ education, girls’ education, SEN and inclusive education, TVET, global citizenship education, arts-based pedagogies. She lived and worked in different countries including in Nepal (a country she has developed a strong bond with), Tanzania, El Salvador, Italy and the UK. These experiences have reinforced her critical approach to international education and global development and to education as a catalyst for both inequalities, injustices, violence and more equitable social change and peace-building processes.

She served as Student Representative of the British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) from 2017 to 2019 and she is currently part of the college of reviewers of the editorial board of Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education.

Publications:

Aldinucci, A. (2022). Understanding aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to postschool trajectories in Chile. PhD thesis, University of Glasgow.
Aldinucci, A., Valiente, O., Hurrell S., and Zancajo, A. (2021). Understanding aspirations: Why do secondary TVET students aim so high in Chile? Journal of Vocational Education & Training.

Rawle, G., Riddle, N., Pettersson, G., Wallin, J., Bici, M., Jasper, P., Harb, J., Hebbar, M., Davis, J., Aldinucci, A., (2017), EQUIP-Tanzania Impact Evaluation. Midline Technical Report, Volume I and II. Oxford Policy Management.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.
Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Steph is a primary-trained teacher, maths specialist teacher (MaST) and Specialist Leader of Education (SLE) for mathematics in Oxfordshire. She trained as an NCETM mastery specialist and has NCETM PD Lead accreditation. Steph is currently undertaking a part-time PhD, exploring the experiences of teachers working in multi-academy trusts – how expertise is utilised and whether agency is possible.

Publications

Mastery and optional standardised tests: some tensions, Mathematics Teaching (2019), 268, p.18-20

Georgia is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre. She is currently working on the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, primarily involved in qualitative data analysis. Georgia is also working on a British Academy funded project about care-experienced academics working in higher education.

Georgia came to research from a legal background. She initially worked as a researcher in the Centre for Child and Family Research at Loughborough University, where she was involved in multiple research and evaluation projects including, a prospective longitudinal study of children identified in infancy as likely to suffer significant harm; evaluations for the Department for Education Children’s Social Care Innovation Programme; and research on return home from care. More recently, Georgia worked as a Development Researcher at the NSPCC, involved in the development of local services for children and families from concept through to scale up.

Her primary research interests are transitions from care (e.g. transitions from care into adulthood, returning home from care) and the role of education in supporting and providing opportunities for vulnerable children. Georgia’s PhD focused on care leavers’ experiences of higher education in England.

Publications

Journal articles

Harrington, L., McElearney, A. and Hyde-Dryden, G. (2021) Adapting the Pregnancy in Mind (PiM) support service to virtual delivery. Journal of Birth and Parent Education, 8 (3).

Margolis, R., Jackson-Hollis, V., Hyde-Dryden, G., Robson-Brown, E., Smith, E. and McConnell, N (2020) Families facing multiple adversities: impact and interventions. Paediatrics and Child Health 30(11), 390-394.

Ward, H., Brown, R., Blackmore, J., Hyde-Dryden, G. and Thomas, C. (2019) Identifying parents who show capacity to make and sustain positive changes when infants are at risk of significant harm. Developing Practice: The Child, Youth and Family Work Journal, 54, 45-61.

McDermid, S., Hyde-Dryden, G. and Ward, H. (2015) Looking for long-term outcomes: What early interventions are needed for children and young people at risk of maltreatment in England? Irish Journal of Applied Social Studies, 15 (2), 36-49.

Hyde-Dryden, G. (2015) Overcoming self-reliance and lack of expectation among care leavers in higher education in England: the role of inter-agency working. Swiss Journal of Social Work, 16, 75-93, (Special issue).

Munro, E., Pinkerton, J., Mendes, P., Hyde Dryden, G., Herczog, M. and Benbenishty, R. (2011) The contribution of the UNC for the rights of the child to understanding and promoting the interests of young people making the transition from care to adulthood. Children and Youth Services Review 33 (12), 2417-2423.

 

Reports

McElearney, A., Murphy, C., Fullerton, D., Hyde-Dryden, G., Cosette, A. and Morris, S. (2021) School staff, parents and carers’ views and experience of the Keeping Safe whole-school education programme: Lessons from the process evaluation for teaching children to recognise abusive behaviours and tell. London: NSPCC.

McElearney, A., Hyde-Dryden, G., Walters, H., Palmer, L., Coulter, K. and Adamson, G. (2021) Process evaluation of Virtual Pregnancy in Mind during the Covid-19 pandemic. London: NSPCC.

McElearney, A., Hyde-Dryden, G., Palmer, L. and Walters, H. (2021) Reflections and learning from our local service response to families during Covid-19. London: NSPCC.

McElearney, A., Palmer, L., Walters, H., and Hyde-Dryden, G. (2020) Learning from adapting the Baby Steps programme in response to COVID-19. London: NSPCC.

Hyde-Dryden, G. and Ward, H. (2017) Towards a Family Justice Observatory – A Scoping Study: Main Findings Report of the International Scoping Exercise. Available at: http://wp.lancs.ac.uk/observatory-scoping-study/

Lushey, C., Hyde-Dryden, G., Holmes, L. and Blackmore, J. (2017) No Wrong Door evaluation report. London: Department for Education.

Holmes, L, Thomas, C, Hyde-Dryden, G, Williams, A (2017) Firstline evaluation report. London: Department for Education

Brown, R., Ward, H., Blackmore, J., Thomas, C. and Hyde-Dryden, G. (2016) Children identified in infancy as likely to suffer, significant harm: a prospective longitudinal study: age eight follow-up, London: Department for Education.

Hyde-Dryden, G., Gibb, J., Lea, J., Buckley, E., Holmes, L., Wallace, E., Lushey, C. and Lawson, D. (2015) Improving practice in respect of children who return home from care: Research report. London: Department for Education.

Hyde-Dryden G., Holmes L., Lawson D. and Blackmore J. (2015) Taking Care Practice Framework for Reunification evaluation report. Loughborough: Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University.

Ward, H., Brown, R. and Hyde Dryden, G. (2014) Assessing Parental Capacity to Change when Children are on the Edge of Care: An Overview of Research Evidence, Childhood Wellbeing Research Centre Report, London: Department for Education.

Dr Selena Nemorin is a UKRI Future Leaders Fellow and researcher/lecturer in sociology of digital technology at the University of Oxford.

Selena’s research focuses on critical theories of technology, surveillance studies, tech ethics, and youth and future media/technologies. She is currently working on the Fair-AIEd project which examines the role that public-private partnerships play in access and use of AI in emerging market economies.

Her past work includes research projects that have examined AI, IoT and ethics, the uses of new technologies in digital schools, educational equity and inclusion, as well as human rights policies and procedures in K-12 and post-secondary institutions.

Publications

Books

Nemorin, S. (2018). Biosurveillance in New Media Marketing: World, Discourse, Representation. New York, NY: Palgrave Macmillan.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Johnson, N., & Bulfin, S. (2017). Everyday Schooling in the Digital Age: High School, High Tech? Oxford, UK: Routledge.

Journal articles

Bonami, B. & Nemorin, S. (2021). Through three levels of abstraction. Towards an ecological framework for making sense of new technologies in education. Education and Information Technologies. doi: 10.1007/s10639-020-10305-1

Gandy, Jr. O. H. & Nemorin, S. (2020). Transportation and smart city imaginaries: A critical analysis of proposals for the USDOT Smart City Challenge. International Journal of Communication, 14, 1232-1252.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Bulfin, S., & Johnson, N. F. (2020). The ‘obvious’ stuff: exploring the mundane realities of students’ digital technology use in school. Digital Education Review, 37, https://revistes.ub.edu/index.php/der/article/view/30670

Ustek-Spilda, F., Powell, A. & Nemorin, S. (2019). Engaging with ethics in Internet of Things: Imaginaries in the social milieu of technology developers. Big Data and Society. July-Dec 1-12. doi: 10.1177/2053951719879468

Selwyn, N., Pangrazio, L., Nemorin, S., & Perrotta, C. (2019). What might the school of 2030 be like? An exercise in social science fiction. Learning, Media and Technology, 1-17. doi:10.1080/17439884.2020.1694944

Gandy, Jr. O. H. & Nemorin, S. (2018). Toward the political economy of ‘nudge’: Smart city variations. Information, Communication & Society. doi.org/10.1080/1369118X.2018.1477969

Williamson, B., Pykett, J. & Nemorin, S. (2018). Biosocial spaces and neurocomputational governance: brain-based and brain-targeted technologies in education. Discourse, 39(2), 258-275. doi:10.1080/01596306.2018.1394421

Nemorin, S. (2017). Affective capture in digital school spaces and the modulation of student subjectivities. Emotion, Space & Society, 24, 11-18. doi:10.1016/j.emospa.2017.05.007

Nemorin, S. (2017). Post-panoptic pedagogies: The changing nature of school surveillance in the digital age. Surveillance & Society. 15 (2): 239-253.

Nemorin, S. (2017). Neuromarketing and the ‘poor in world’ consumer: How the animalization of thinking underpins contemporary market research discourses. Consumption, Markets & Culture, 20 (1), 59-80 22. doi: 10.1080/10253866.2016.1160897

Nemorin, S. & Gandy, Jr. O.H. (2017). Exploring neuromarketing and its reliance on remote sensing: Social and ethical implications. International Journal of Communication, 11, 4824-4844.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Bulfin, S., & Johnson. N. (2017). Left to their own devices: The everyday realities of ‘one-to-one’ classrooms. Oxford Review of Education. doi: 10.1080/03054985.2017.1305047

Nemorin, S. (2016). The frustrations of digital fabrication: An auto/ethnographic exploration of 3D ‘Making’ in school. International Journal of Technology and Design Education. doi: 10.1007/s10798-016-9366-z

Nemorin, S. & Selwyn, N. (2016). Making the best of it? Exploring the realities of 3D printing in school. Research Papers in Education. doi: 10.1080/02671522.2016.1225802

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., & Johnson, N. (2016). High-tech, hard work: An investigation of teachers’ work in the digital age. Learning Media and Technology. doi:10.1080/17439884.2016.1252770

Bulfin, S., Johnson, N., Nemorin, S., & Selwyn, N. (2016). Nagging, noobs and new tricks – student perceptions of school as a context for digital technology use. Educational Studies 42(3), 239-251. doi: 10.1080/03055698.2016.1160824

Pinto, L. E. & Nemorin, S. (2015). Normalizing panoptic surveillance among children. Our Schools Our Selves, 24(2), 53-62.

Book sections

 Nemorin, S. (2017). Online safety. In SAGE Encyclopedia of Out-of-School Learning, K. Peppler (Ed). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Bulfin, S., & Johnson, N. (2016). Toward a digital sociology of school. In Digital Sociologies, J. Daniels, K. Gregory, & T. McMillan Cottom (Eds). Bristol, UK: Policy Press.

Boler, M. & Nemorin, S. (2013). Dissent, truthiness, and war: New media landscapes of 21st century propaganda. In The Oxford Handbook of Propaganda Studies, R. Castronovo and J. Auerbach (Eds.). New York, NY: Oxford University Press.

Monographs and reports

Powell, A., Nemorin, S., Berner, A., Douglas-Jones, R., Fritsch, E., Hanteer, O., … Vega-Aurelio, D. (2017). Values and ethics in innovation for responsible technology in Europe. Report for the EU Commission: Enabling responsible ICT-related research and innovation.

Selwyn, N., Johnson, N., Nemorin, S., & Knight, E. (2016). Going online on behalf of others: An investigation of ‘proxy’ Internet consumers. Report for the Australian Communications Consumer Action Network, Sydney.

Alice Aldinucci is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford, Department of Education. She is part of the team working on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani, and she is a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group.

She holds a PhD in Education from the University of Glasgow (UK) where she was awarded the LKAS Interdisciplinary Scholarship. Her thesis applies a longitudinal qualitative research design and draws on the combination of Critical Realism and Capability Approach to explore aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to adulthood in Chile. Prior to her PhD, she completed a MA in International Education and Development from the University of Sussex (UK) where she was awarded the Centre for International Education Prize for the best overall MA performance. For her MA at Sussex, she conducted an empirical dissertation on the meaning making of Inclusive Education in Nepal. She holds a MA in Languages and Cultures for International Communication and Cooperation from the University of Milan (Italy) with a fieldwork research on tensions between policy and practice in bilingual multicultural education for indigenous students in Higher Education in Peru; and a BA in Languages and Intercultural Mediation from the University of Arezzo (Italy).

Alice’s research interests are interdisciplinary and relate to the critical linkages between intersecting inequalities, education, individual/societal development, and social justice at local and global levels, motivated by the question what education for what/whose development?

Areas, theoretical approaches and methodologies of interests:
• Sociology of education including aspirations in post-school transitions
• Cultural political economy of education and life chances/human flourishing/social justice
• Tensions between global educational frameworks and local knowledge and practices
• Critical Realism
• Capability Approach
• Qualitative and participatory methodologies
• Digital storytelling for social change

Besides her work in academia, Alice has gained experience as researcher, development practitioner and educator working in projects including early childhood education programmes, refugees’ education, girls’ education, SEN and inclusive education, TVET, global citizenship education, arts-based pedagogies. She lived and worked in different countries including in Nepal (a country she has developed a strong bond with), Tanzania, El Salvador, Italy and the UK. These experiences have reinforced her critical approach to international education and global development and to education as a catalyst for both inequalities, injustices, violence and more equitable social change and peace-building processes.

She served as Student Representative of the British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) from 2017 to 2019 and she is currently part of the college of reviewers of the editorial board of Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education.

Publications:

Aldinucci, A. (2022). Understanding aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to postschool trajectories in Chile. PhD thesis, University of Glasgow.
Aldinucci, A., Valiente, O., Hurrell S., and Zancajo, A. (2021). Understanding aspirations: Why do secondary TVET students aim so high in Chile? Journal of Vocational Education & Training.

Rawle, G., Riddle, N., Pettersson, G., Wallin, J., Bici, M., Jasper, P., Harb, J., Hebbar, M., Davis, J., Aldinucci, A., (2017), EQUIP-Tanzania Impact Evaluation. Midline Technical Report, Volume I and II. Oxford Policy Management.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.
Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Steph is a primary-trained teacher, maths specialist teacher (MaST) and Specialist Leader of Education (SLE) for mathematics in Oxfordshire. She trained as an NCETM mastery specialist and has NCETM PD Lead accreditation. Steph is currently undertaking a part-time PhD, exploring the experiences of teachers working in multi-academy trusts – how expertise is utilised and whether agency is possible.

Publications

Mastery and optional standardised tests: some tensions, Mathematics Teaching (2019), 268, p.18-20

Georgia is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre. She is currently working on the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, primarily involved in qualitative data analysis. Georgia is also working on a British Academy funded project about care-experienced academics working in higher education.

Georgia came to research from a legal background. She initially worked as a researcher in the Centre for Child and Family Research at Loughborough University, where she was involved in multiple research and evaluation projects including, a prospective longitudinal study of children identified in infancy as likely to suffer significant harm; evaluations for the Department for Education Children’s Social Care Innovation Programme; and research on return home from care. More recently, Georgia worked as a Development Researcher at the NSPCC, involved in the development of local services for children and families from concept through to scale up.

Her primary research interests are transitions from care (e.g. transitions from care into adulthood, returning home from care) and the role of education in supporting and providing opportunities for vulnerable children. Georgia’s PhD focused on care leavers’ experiences of higher education in England.

Publications

Journal articles

Harrington, L., McElearney, A. and Hyde-Dryden, G. (2021) Adapting the Pregnancy in Mind (PiM) support service to virtual delivery. Journal of Birth and Parent Education, 8 (3).

Margolis, R., Jackson-Hollis, V., Hyde-Dryden, G., Robson-Brown, E., Smith, E. and McConnell, N (2020) Families facing multiple adversities: impact and interventions. Paediatrics and Child Health 30(11), 390-394.

Ward, H., Brown, R., Blackmore, J., Hyde-Dryden, G. and Thomas, C. (2019) Identifying parents who show capacity to make and sustain positive changes when infants are at risk of significant harm. Developing Practice: The Child, Youth and Family Work Journal, 54, 45-61.

McDermid, S., Hyde-Dryden, G. and Ward, H. (2015) Looking for long-term outcomes: What early interventions are needed for children and young people at risk of maltreatment in England? Irish Journal of Applied Social Studies, 15 (2), 36-49.

Hyde-Dryden, G. (2015) Overcoming self-reliance and lack of expectation among care leavers in higher education in England: the role of inter-agency working. Swiss Journal of Social Work, 16, 75-93, (Special issue).

Munro, E., Pinkerton, J., Mendes, P., Hyde Dryden, G., Herczog, M. and Benbenishty, R. (2011) The contribution of the UNC for the rights of the child to understanding and promoting the interests of young people making the transition from care to adulthood. Children and Youth Services Review 33 (12), 2417-2423.

 

Reports

McElearney, A., Murphy, C., Fullerton, D., Hyde-Dryden, G., Cosette, A. and Morris, S. (2021) School staff, parents and carers’ views and experience of the Keeping Safe whole-school education programme: Lessons from the process evaluation for teaching children to recognise abusive behaviours and tell. London: NSPCC.

McElearney, A., Hyde-Dryden, G., Walters, H., Palmer, L., Coulter, K. and Adamson, G. (2021) Process evaluation of Virtual Pregnancy in Mind during the Covid-19 pandemic. London: NSPCC.

McElearney, A., Hyde-Dryden, G., Palmer, L. and Walters, H. (2021) Reflections and learning from our local service response to families during Covid-19. London: NSPCC.

McElearney, A., Palmer, L., Walters, H., and Hyde-Dryden, G. (2020) Learning from adapting the Baby Steps programme in response to COVID-19. London: NSPCC.

Hyde-Dryden, G. and Ward, H. (2017) Towards a Family Justice Observatory – A Scoping Study: Main Findings Report of the International Scoping Exercise. Available at: http://wp.lancs.ac.uk/observatory-scoping-study/

Lushey, C., Hyde-Dryden, G., Holmes, L. and Blackmore, J. (2017) No Wrong Door evaluation report. London: Department for Education.

Holmes, L, Thomas, C, Hyde-Dryden, G, Williams, A (2017) Firstline evaluation report. London: Department for Education

Brown, R., Ward, H., Blackmore, J., Thomas, C. and Hyde-Dryden, G. (2016) Children identified in infancy as likely to suffer, significant harm: a prospective longitudinal study: age eight follow-up, London: Department for Education.

Hyde-Dryden, G., Gibb, J., Lea, J., Buckley, E., Holmes, L., Wallace, E., Lushey, C. and Lawson, D. (2015) Improving practice in respect of children who return home from care: Research report. London: Department for Education.

Hyde-Dryden G., Holmes L., Lawson D. and Blackmore J. (2015) Taking Care Practice Framework for Reunification evaluation report. Loughborough: Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University.

Ward, H., Brown, R. and Hyde Dryden, G. (2014) Assessing Parental Capacity to Change when Children are on the Edge of Care: An Overview of Research Evidence, Childhood Wellbeing Research Centre Report, London: Department for Education.

Dr Selena Nemorin is a UKRI Future Leaders Fellow and researcher/lecturer in sociology of digital technology at the University of Oxford.

Selena’s research focuses on critical theories of technology, surveillance studies, tech ethics, and youth and future media/technologies. She is currently working on the Fair-AIEd project which examines the role that public-private partnerships play in access and use of AI in emerging market economies.

Her past work includes research projects that have examined AI, IoT and ethics, the uses of new technologies in digital schools, educational equity and inclusion, as well as human rights policies and procedures in K-12 and post-secondary institutions.

Publications

Books

Nemorin, S. (2018). Biosurveillance in New Media Marketing: World, Discourse, Representation. New York, NY: Palgrave Macmillan.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Johnson, N., & Bulfin, S. (2017). Everyday Schooling in the Digital Age: High School, High Tech? Oxford, UK: Routledge.

Journal articles

Bonami, B. & Nemorin, S. (2021). Through three levels of abstraction. Towards an ecological framework for making sense of new technologies in education. Education and Information Technologies. doi: 10.1007/s10639-020-10305-1

Gandy, Jr. O. H. & Nemorin, S. (2020). Transportation and smart city imaginaries: A critical analysis of proposals for the USDOT Smart City Challenge. International Journal of Communication, 14, 1232-1252.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Bulfin, S., & Johnson, N. F. (2020). The ‘obvious’ stuff: exploring the mundane realities of students’ digital technology use in school. Digital Education Review, 37, https://revistes.ub.edu/index.php/der/article/view/30670

Ustek-Spilda, F., Powell, A. & Nemorin, S. (2019). Engaging with ethics in Internet of Things: Imaginaries in the social milieu of technology developers. Big Data and Society. July-Dec 1-12. doi: 10.1177/2053951719879468

Selwyn, N., Pangrazio, L., Nemorin, S., & Perrotta, C. (2019). What might the school of 2030 be like? An exercise in social science fiction. Learning, Media and Technology, 1-17. doi:10.1080/17439884.2020.1694944

Gandy, Jr. O. H. & Nemorin, S. (2018). Toward the political economy of ‘nudge’: Smart city variations. Information, Communication & Society. doi.org/10.1080/1369118X.2018.1477969

Williamson, B., Pykett, J. & Nemorin, S. (2018). Biosocial spaces and neurocomputational governance: brain-based and brain-targeted technologies in education. Discourse, 39(2), 258-275. doi:10.1080/01596306.2018.1394421

Nemorin, S. (2017). Affective capture in digital school spaces and the modulation of student subjectivities. Emotion, Space & Society, 24, 11-18. doi:10.1016/j.emospa.2017.05.007

Nemorin, S. (2017). Post-panoptic pedagogies: The changing nature of school surveillance in the digital age. Surveillance & Society. 15 (2): 239-253.

Nemorin, S. (2017). Neuromarketing and the ‘poor in world’ consumer: How the animalization of thinking underpins contemporary market research discourses. Consumption, Markets & Culture, 20 (1), 59-80 22. doi: 10.1080/10253866.2016.1160897

Nemorin, S. & Gandy, Jr. O.H. (2017). Exploring neuromarketing and its reliance on remote sensing: Social and ethical implications. International Journal of Communication, 11, 4824-4844.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Bulfin, S., & Johnson. N. (2017). Left to their own devices: The everyday realities of ‘one-to-one’ classrooms. Oxford Review of Education. doi: 10.1080/03054985.2017.1305047

Nemorin, S. (2016). The frustrations of digital fabrication: An auto/ethnographic exploration of 3D ‘Making’ in school. International Journal of Technology and Design Education. doi: 10.1007/s10798-016-9366-z

Nemorin, S. & Selwyn, N. (2016). Making the best of it? Exploring the realities of 3D printing in school. Research Papers in Education. doi: 10.1080/02671522.2016.1225802

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., & Johnson, N. (2016). High-tech, hard work: An investigation of teachers’ work in the digital age. Learning Media and Technology. doi:10.1080/17439884.2016.1252770

Bulfin, S., Johnson, N., Nemorin, S., & Selwyn, N. (2016). Nagging, noobs and new tricks – student perceptions of school as a context for digital technology use. Educational Studies 42(3), 239-251. doi: 10.1080/03055698.2016.1160824

Pinto, L. E. & Nemorin, S. (2015). Normalizing panoptic surveillance among children. Our Schools Our Selves, 24(2), 53-62.

Book sections

 Nemorin, S. (2017). Online safety. In SAGE Encyclopedia of Out-of-School Learning, K. Peppler (Ed). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Bulfin, S., & Johnson, N. (2016). Toward a digital sociology of school. In Digital Sociologies, J. Daniels, K. Gregory, & T. McMillan Cottom (Eds). Bristol, UK: Policy Press.

Boler, M. & Nemorin, S. (2013). Dissent, truthiness, and war: New media landscapes of 21st century propaganda. In The Oxford Handbook of Propaganda Studies, R. Castronovo and J. Auerbach (Eds.). New York, NY: Oxford University Press.

Monographs and reports

Powell, A., Nemorin, S., Berner, A., Douglas-Jones, R., Fritsch, E., Hanteer, O., … Vega-Aurelio, D. (2017). Values and ethics in innovation for responsible technology in Europe. Report for the EU Commission: Enabling responsible ICT-related research and innovation.

Selwyn, N., Johnson, N., Nemorin, S., & Knight, E. (2016). Going online on behalf of others: An investigation of ‘proxy’ Internet consumers. Report for the Australian Communications Consumer Action Network, Sydney.

Alice Aldinucci is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford, Department of Education. She is part of the team working on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani, and she is a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group.

She holds a PhD in Education from the University of Glasgow (UK) where she was awarded the LKAS Interdisciplinary Scholarship. Her thesis applies a longitudinal qualitative research design and draws on the combination of Critical Realism and Capability Approach to explore aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to adulthood in Chile. Prior to her PhD, she completed a MA in International Education and Development from the University of Sussex (UK) where she was awarded the Centre for International Education Prize for the best overall MA performance. For her MA at Sussex, she conducted an empirical dissertation on the meaning making of Inclusive Education in Nepal. She holds a MA in Languages and Cultures for International Communication and Cooperation from the University of Milan (Italy) with a fieldwork research on tensions between policy and practice in bilingual multicultural education for indigenous students in Higher Education in Peru; and a BA in Languages and Intercultural Mediation from the University of Arezzo (Italy).

Alice’s research interests are interdisciplinary and relate to the critical linkages between intersecting inequalities, education, individual/societal development, and social justice at local and global levels, motivated by the question what education for what/whose development?

Areas, theoretical approaches and methodologies of interests:
• Sociology of education including aspirations in post-school transitions
• Cultural political economy of education and life chances/human flourishing/social justice
• Tensions between global educational frameworks and local knowledge and practices
• Critical Realism
• Capability Approach
• Qualitative and participatory methodologies
• Digital storytelling for social change

Besides her work in academia, Alice has gained experience as researcher, development practitioner and educator working in projects including early childhood education programmes, refugees’ education, girls’ education, SEN and inclusive education, TVET, global citizenship education, arts-based pedagogies. She lived and worked in different countries including in Nepal (a country she has developed a strong bond with), Tanzania, El Salvador, Italy and the UK. These experiences have reinforced her critical approach to international education and global development and to education as a catalyst for both inequalities, injustices, violence and more equitable social change and peace-building processes.

She served as Student Representative of the British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) from 2017 to 2019 and she is currently part of the college of reviewers of the editorial board of Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education.

Publications:

Aldinucci, A. (2022). Understanding aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to postschool trajectories in Chile. PhD thesis, University of Glasgow.
Aldinucci, A., Valiente, O., Hurrell S., and Zancajo, A. (2021). Understanding aspirations: Why do secondary TVET students aim so high in Chile? Journal of Vocational Education & Training.

Rawle, G., Riddle, N., Pettersson, G., Wallin, J., Bici, M., Jasper, P., Harb, J., Hebbar, M., Davis, J., Aldinucci, A., (2017), EQUIP-Tanzania Impact Evaluation. Midline Technical Report, Volume I and II. Oxford Policy Management.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.
Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Steph is a primary-trained teacher, maths specialist teacher (MaST) and Specialist Leader of Education (SLE) for mathematics in Oxfordshire. She trained as an NCETM mastery specialist and has NCETM PD Lead accreditation. Steph is currently undertaking a part-time PhD, exploring the experiences of teachers working in multi-academy trusts – how expertise is utilised and whether agency is possible.

Publications

Mastery and optional standardised tests: some tensions, Mathematics Teaching (2019), 268, p.18-20

Georgia is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre. She is currently working on the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, primarily involved in qualitative data analysis. Georgia is also working on a British Academy funded project about care-experienced academics working in higher education.

Georgia came to research from a legal background. She initially worked as a researcher in the Centre for Child and Family Research at Loughborough University, where she was involved in multiple research and evaluation projects including, a prospective longitudinal study of children identified in infancy as likely to suffer significant harm; evaluations for the Department for Education Children’s Social Care Innovation Programme; and research on return home from care. More recently, Georgia worked as a Development Researcher at the NSPCC, involved in the development of local services for children and families from concept through to scale up.

Her primary research interests are transitions from care (e.g. transitions from care into adulthood, returning home from care) and the role of education in supporting and providing opportunities for vulnerable children. Georgia’s PhD focused on care leavers’ experiences of higher education in England.

Publications

Journal articles

Harrington, L., McElearney, A. and Hyde-Dryden, G. (2021) Adapting the Pregnancy in Mind (PiM) support service to virtual delivery. Journal of Birth and Parent Education, 8 (3).

Margolis, R., Jackson-Hollis, V., Hyde-Dryden, G., Robson-Brown, E., Smith, E. and McConnell, N (2020) Families facing multiple adversities: impact and interventions. Paediatrics and Child Health 30(11), 390-394.

Ward, H., Brown, R., Blackmore, J., Hyde-Dryden, G. and Thomas, C. (2019) Identifying parents who show capacity to make and sustain positive changes when infants are at risk of significant harm. Developing Practice: The Child, Youth and Family Work Journal, 54, 45-61.

McDermid, S., Hyde-Dryden, G. and Ward, H. (2015) Looking for long-term outcomes: What early interventions are needed for children and young people at risk of maltreatment in England? Irish Journal of Applied Social Studies, 15 (2), 36-49.

Hyde-Dryden, G. (2015) Overcoming self-reliance and lack of expectation among care leavers in higher education in England: the role of inter-agency working. Swiss Journal of Social Work, 16, 75-93, (Special issue).

Munro, E., Pinkerton, J., Mendes, P., Hyde Dryden, G., Herczog, M. and Benbenishty, R. (2011) The contribution of the UNC for the rights of the child to understanding and promoting the interests of young people making the transition from care to adulthood. Children and Youth Services Review 33 (12), 2417-2423.

 

Reports

McElearney, A., Murphy, C., Fullerton, D., Hyde-Dryden, G., Cosette, A. and Morris, S. (2021) School staff, parents and carers’ views and experience of the Keeping Safe whole-school education programme: Lessons from the process evaluation for teaching children to recognise abusive behaviours and tell. London: NSPCC.

McElearney, A., Hyde-Dryden, G., Walters, H., Palmer, L., Coulter, K. and Adamson, G. (2021) Process evaluation of Virtual Pregnancy in Mind during the Covid-19 pandemic. London: NSPCC.

McElearney, A., Hyde-Dryden, G., Palmer, L. and Walters, H. (2021) Reflections and learning from our local service response to families during Covid-19. London: NSPCC.

McElearney, A., Palmer, L., Walters, H., and Hyde-Dryden, G. (2020) Learning from adapting the Baby Steps programme in response to COVID-19. London: NSPCC.

Hyde-Dryden, G. and Ward, H. (2017) Towards a Family Justice Observatory – A Scoping Study: Main Findings Report of the International Scoping Exercise. Available at: http://wp.lancs.ac.uk/observatory-scoping-study/

Lushey, C., Hyde-Dryden, G., Holmes, L. and Blackmore, J. (2017) No Wrong Door evaluation report. London: Department for Education.

Holmes, L, Thomas, C, Hyde-Dryden, G, Williams, A (2017) Firstline evaluation report. London: Department for Education

Brown, R., Ward, H., Blackmore, J., Thomas, C. and Hyde-Dryden, G. (2016) Children identified in infancy as likely to suffer, significant harm: a prospective longitudinal study: age eight follow-up, London: Department for Education.

Hyde-Dryden, G., Gibb, J., Lea, J., Buckley, E., Holmes, L., Wallace, E., Lushey, C. and Lawson, D. (2015) Improving practice in respect of children who return home from care: Research report. London: Department for Education.

Hyde-Dryden G., Holmes L., Lawson D. and Blackmore J. (2015) Taking Care Practice Framework for Reunification evaluation report. Loughborough: Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University.

Ward, H., Brown, R. and Hyde Dryden, G. (2014) Assessing Parental Capacity to Change when Children are on the Edge of Care: An Overview of Research Evidence, Childhood Wellbeing Research Centre Report, London: Department for Education.

Dr Selena Nemorin is a UKRI Future Leaders Fellow and researcher/lecturer in sociology of digital technology at the University of Oxford.

Selena’s research focuses on critical theories of technology, surveillance studies, tech ethics, and youth and future media/technologies. She is currently working on the Fair-AIEd project which examines the role that public-private partnerships play in access and use of AI in emerging market economies.

Her past work includes research projects that have examined AI, IoT and ethics, the uses of new technologies in digital schools, educational equity and inclusion, as well as human rights policies and procedures in K-12 and post-secondary institutions.

Publications

Books

Nemorin, S. (2018). Biosurveillance in New Media Marketing: World, Discourse, Representation. New York, NY: Palgrave Macmillan.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Johnson, N., & Bulfin, S. (2017). Everyday Schooling in the Digital Age: High School, High Tech? Oxford, UK: Routledge.

Journal articles

Bonami, B. & Nemorin, S. (2021). Through three levels of abstraction. Towards an ecological framework for making sense of new technologies in education. Education and Information Technologies. doi: 10.1007/s10639-020-10305-1

Gandy, Jr. O. H. & Nemorin, S. (2020). Transportation and smart city imaginaries: A critical analysis of proposals for the USDOT Smart City Challenge. International Journal of Communication, 14, 1232-1252.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Bulfin, S., & Johnson, N. F. (2020). The ‘obvious’ stuff: exploring the mundane realities of students’ digital technology use in school. Digital Education Review, 37, https://revistes.ub.edu/index.php/der/article/view/30670

Ustek-Spilda, F., Powell, A. & Nemorin, S. (2019). Engaging with ethics in Internet of Things: Imaginaries in the social milieu of technology developers. Big Data and Society. July-Dec 1-12. doi: 10.1177/2053951719879468

Selwyn, N., Pangrazio, L., Nemorin, S., & Perrotta, C. (2019). What might the school of 2030 be like? An exercise in social science fiction. Learning, Media and Technology, 1-17. doi:10.1080/17439884.2020.1694944

Gandy, Jr. O. H. & Nemorin, S. (2018). Toward the political economy of ‘nudge’: Smart city variations. Information, Communication & Society. doi.org/10.1080/1369118X.2018.1477969

Williamson, B., Pykett, J. & Nemorin, S. (2018). Biosocial spaces and neurocomputational governance: brain-based and brain-targeted technologies in education. Discourse, 39(2), 258-275. doi:10.1080/01596306.2018.1394421

Nemorin, S. (2017). Affective capture in digital school spaces and the modulation of student subjectivities. Emotion, Space & Society, 24, 11-18. doi:10.1016/j.emospa.2017.05.007

Nemorin, S. (2017). Post-panoptic pedagogies: The changing nature of school surveillance in the digital age. Surveillance & Society. 15 (2): 239-253.

Nemorin, S. (2017). Neuromarketing and the ‘poor in world’ consumer: How the animalization of thinking underpins contemporary market research discourses. Consumption, Markets & Culture, 20 (1), 59-80 22. doi: 10.1080/10253866.2016.1160897

Nemorin, S. & Gandy, Jr. O.H. (2017). Exploring neuromarketing and its reliance on remote sensing: Social and ethical implications. International Journal of Communication, 11, 4824-4844.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Bulfin, S., & Johnson. N. (2017). Left to their own devices: The everyday realities of ‘one-to-one’ classrooms. Oxford Review of Education. doi: 10.1080/03054985.2017.1305047

Nemorin, S. (2016). The frustrations of digital fabrication: An auto/ethnographic exploration of 3D ‘Making’ in school. International Journal of Technology and Design Education. doi: 10.1007/s10798-016-9366-z

Nemorin, S. & Selwyn, N. (2016). Making the best of it? Exploring the realities of 3D printing in school. Research Papers in Education. doi: 10.1080/02671522.2016.1225802

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., & Johnson, N. (2016). High-tech, hard work: An investigation of teachers’ work in the digital age. Learning Media and Technology. doi:10.1080/17439884.2016.1252770

Bulfin, S., Johnson, N., Nemorin, S., & Selwyn, N. (2016). Nagging, noobs and new tricks – student perceptions of school as a context for digital technology use. Educational Studies 42(3), 239-251. doi: 10.1080/03055698.2016.1160824

Pinto, L. E. & Nemorin, S. (2015). Normalizing panoptic surveillance among children. Our Schools Our Selves, 24(2), 53-62.

Book sections

 Nemorin, S. (2017). Online safety. In SAGE Encyclopedia of Out-of-School Learning, K. Peppler (Ed). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Bulfin, S., & Johnson, N. (2016). Toward a digital sociology of school. In Digital Sociologies, J. Daniels, K. Gregory, & T. McMillan Cottom (Eds). Bristol, UK: Policy Press.

Boler, M. & Nemorin, S. (2013). Dissent, truthiness, and war: New media landscapes of 21st century propaganda. In The Oxford Handbook of Propaganda Studies, R. Castronovo and J. Auerbach (Eds.). New York, NY: Oxford University Press.

Monographs and reports

Powell, A., Nemorin, S., Berner, A., Douglas-Jones, R., Fritsch, E., Hanteer, O., … Vega-Aurelio, D. (2017). Values and ethics in innovation for responsible technology in Europe. Report for the EU Commission: Enabling responsible ICT-related research and innovation.

Selwyn, N., Johnson, N., Nemorin, S., & Knight, E. (2016). Going online on behalf of others: An investigation of ‘proxy’ Internet consumers. Report for the Australian Communications Consumer Action Network, Sydney.

Alice Aldinucci is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford, Department of Education. She is part of the team working on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani, and she is a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group.

She holds a PhD in Education from the University of Glasgow (UK) where she was awarded the LKAS Interdisciplinary Scholarship. Her thesis applies a longitudinal qualitative research design and draws on the combination of Critical Realism and Capability Approach to explore aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to adulthood in Chile. Prior to her PhD, she completed a MA in International Education and Development from the University of Sussex (UK) where she was awarded the Centre for International Education Prize for the best overall MA performance. For her MA at Sussex, she conducted an empirical dissertation on the meaning making of Inclusive Education in Nepal. She holds a MA in Languages and Cultures for International Communication and Cooperation from the University of Milan (Italy) with a fieldwork research on tensions between policy and practice in bilingual multicultural education for indigenous students in Higher Education in Peru; and a BA in Languages and Intercultural Mediation from the University of Arezzo (Italy).

Alice’s research interests are interdisciplinary and relate to the critical linkages between intersecting inequalities, education, individual/societal development, and social justice at local and global levels, motivated by the question what education for what/whose development?

Areas, theoretical approaches and methodologies of interests:
• Sociology of education including aspirations in post-school transitions
• Cultural political economy of education and life chances/human flourishing/social justice
• Tensions between global educational frameworks and local knowledge and practices
• Critical Realism
• Capability Approach
• Qualitative and participatory methodologies
• Digital storytelling for social change

Besides her work in academia, Alice has gained experience as researcher, development practitioner and educator working in projects including early childhood education programmes, refugees’ education, girls’ education, SEN and inclusive education, TVET, global citizenship education, arts-based pedagogies. She lived and worked in different countries including in Nepal (a country she has developed a strong bond with), Tanzania, El Salvador, Italy and the UK. These experiences have reinforced her critical approach to international education and global development and to education as a catalyst for both inequalities, injustices, violence and more equitable social change and peace-building processes.

She served as Student Representative of the British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) from 2017 to 2019 and she is currently part of the college of reviewers of the editorial board of Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education.

Publications:

Aldinucci, A. (2022). Understanding aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to postschool trajectories in Chile. PhD thesis, University of Glasgow.
Aldinucci, A., Valiente, O., Hurrell S., and Zancajo, A. (2021). Understanding aspirations: Why do secondary TVET students aim so high in Chile? Journal of Vocational Education & Training.

Rawle, G., Riddle, N., Pettersson, G., Wallin, J., Bici, M., Jasper, P., Harb, J., Hebbar, M., Davis, J., Aldinucci, A., (2017), EQUIP-Tanzania Impact Evaluation. Midline Technical Report, Volume I and II. Oxford Policy Management.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.
Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Steph is a primary-trained teacher, maths specialist teacher (MaST) and Specialist Leader of Education (SLE) for mathematics in Oxfordshire. She trained as an NCETM mastery specialist and has NCETM PD Lead accreditation. Steph is currently undertaking a part-time PhD, exploring the experiences of teachers working in multi-academy trusts – how expertise is utilised and whether agency is possible.

Publications

Mastery and optional standardised tests: some tensions, Mathematics Teaching (2019), 268, p.18-20

Georgia is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre. She is currently working on the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, primarily involved in qualitative data analysis. Georgia is also working on a British Academy funded project about care-experienced academics working in higher education.

Georgia came to research from a legal background. She initially worked as a researcher in the Centre for Child and Family Research at Loughborough University, where she was involved in multiple research and evaluation projects including, a prospective longitudinal study of children identified in infancy as likely to suffer significant harm; evaluations for the Department for Education Children’s Social Care Innovation Programme; and research on return home from care. More recently, Georgia worked as a Development Researcher at the NSPCC, involved in the development of local services for children and families from concept through to scale up.

Her primary research interests are transitions from care (e.g. transitions from care into adulthood, returning home from care) and the role of education in supporting and providing opportunities for vulnerable children. Georgia’s PhD focused on care leavers’ experiences of higher education in England.

Publications

Journal articles

Harrington, L., McElearney, A. and Hyde-Dryden, G. (2021) Adapting the Pregnancy in Mind (PiM) support service to virtual delivery. Journal of Birth and Parent Education, 8 (3).

Margolis, R., Jackson-Hollis, V., Hyde-Dryden, G., Robson-Brown, E., Smith, E. and McConnell, N (2020) Families facing multiple adversities: impact and interventions. Paediatrics and Child Health 30(11), 390-394.

Ward, H., Brown, R., Blackmore, J., Hyde-Dryden, G. and Thomas, C. (2019) Identifying parents who show capacity to make and sustain positive changes when infants are at risk of significant harm. Developing Practice: The Child, Youth and Family Work Journal, 54, 45-61.

McDermid, S., Hyde-Dryden, G. and Ward, H. (2015) Looking for long-term outcomes: What early interventions are needed for children and young people at risk of maltreatment in England? Irish Journal of Applied Social Studies, 15 (2), 36-49.

Hyde-Dryden, G. (2015) Overcoming self-reliance and lack of expectation among care leavers in higher education in England: the role of inter-agency working. Swiss Journal of Social Work, 16, 75-93, (Special issue).

Munro, E., Pinkerton, J., Mendes, P., Hyde Dryden, G., Herczog, M. and Benbenishty, R. (2011) The contribution of the UNC for the rights of the child to understanding and promoting the interests of young people making the transition from care to adulthood. Children and Youth Services Review 33 (12), 2417-2423.

 

Reports

McElearney, A., Murphy, C., Fullerton, D., Hyde-Dryden, G., Cosette, A. and Morris, S. (2021) School staff, parents and carers’ views and experience of the Keeping Safe whole-school education programme: Lessons from the process evaluation for teaching children to recognise abusive behaviours and tell. London: NSPCC.

McElearney, A., Hyde-Dryden, G., Walters, H., Palmer, L., Coulter, K. and Adamson, G. (2021) Process evaluation of Virtual Pregnancy in Mind during the Covid-19 pandemic. London: NSPCC.

McElearney, A., Hyde-Dryden, G., Palmer, L. and Walters, H. (2021) Reflections and learning from our local service response to families during Covid-19. London: NSPCC.

McElearney, A., Palmer, L., Walters, H., and Hyde-Dryden, G. (2020) Learning from adapting the Baby Steps programme in response to COVID-19. London: NSPCC.

Hyde-Dryden, G. and Ward, H. (2017) Towards a Family Justice Observatory – A Scoping Study: Main Findings Report of the International Scoping Exercise. Available at: http://wp.lancs.ac.uk/observatory-scoping-study/

Lushey, C., Hyde-Dryden, G., Holmes, L. and Blackmore, J. (2017) No Wrong Door evaluation report. London: Department for Education.

Holmes, L, Thomas, C, Hyde-Dryden, G, Williams, A (2017) Firstline evaluation report. London: Department for Education

Brown, R., Ward, H., Blackmore, J., Thomas, C. and Hyde-Dryden, G. (2016) Children identified in infancy as likely to suffer, significant harm: a prospective longitudinal study: age eight follow-up, London: Department for Education.

Hyde-Dryden, G., Gibb, J., Lea, J., Buckley, E., Holmes, L., Wallace, E., Lushey, C. and Lawson, D. (2015) Improving practice in respect of children who return home from care: Research report. London: Department for Education.

Hyde-Dryden G., Holmes L., Lawson D. and Blackmore J. (2015) Taking Care Practice Framework for Reunification evaluation report. Loughborough: Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University.

Ward, H., Brown, R. and Hyde Dryden, G. (2014) Assessing Parental Capacity to Change when Children are on the Edge of Care: An Overview of Research Evidence, Childhood Wellbeing Research Centre Report, London: Department for Education.

Dr Selena Nemorin is a UKRI Future Leaders Fellow and researcher/lecturer in sociology of digital technology at the University of Oxford.

Selena’s research focuses on critical theories of technology, surveillance studies, tech ethics, and youth and future media/technologies. She is currently working on the Fair-AIEd project which examines the role that public-private partnerships play in access and use of AI in emerging market economies.

Her past work includes research projects that have examined AI, IoT and ethics, the uses of new technologies in digital schools, educational equity and inclusion, as well as human rights policies and procedures in K-12 and post-secondary institutions.

Publications

Books

Nemorin, S. (2018). Biosurveillance in New Media Marketing: World, Discourse, Representation. New York, NY: Palgrave Macmillan.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Johnson, N., & Bulfin, S. (2017). Everyday Schooling in the Digital Age: High School, High Tech? Oxford, UK: Routledge.

Journal articles

Bonami, B. & Nemorin, S. (2021). Through three levels of abstraction. Towards an ecological framework for making sense of new technologies in education. Education and Information Technologies. doi: 10.1007/s10639-020-10305-1

Gandy, Jr. O. H. & Nemorin, S. (2020). Transportation and smart city imaginaries: A critical analysis of proposals for the USDOT Smart City Challenge. International Journal of Communication, 14, 1232-1252.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Bulfin, S., & Johnson, N. F. (2020). The ‘obvious’ stuff: exploring the mundane realities of students’ digital technology use in school. Digital Education Review, 37, https://revistes.ub.edu/index.php/der/article/view/30670

Ustek-Spilda, F., Powell, A. & Nemorin, S. (2019). Engaging with ethics in Internet of Things: Imaginaries in the social milieu of technology developers. Big Data and Society. July-Dec 1-12. doi: 10.1177/2053951719879468

Selwyn, N., Pangrazio, L., Nemorin, S., & Perrotta, C. (2019). What might the school of 2030 be like? An exercise in social science fiction. Learning, Media and Technology, 1-17. doi:10.1080/17439884.2020.1694944

Gandy, Jr. O. H. & Nemorin, S. (2018). Toward the political economy of ‘nudge’: Smart city variations. Information, Communication & Society. doi.org/10.1080/1369118X.2018.1477969

Williamson, B., Pykett, J. & Nemorin, S. (2018). Biosocial spaces and neurocomputational governance: brain-based and brain-targeted technologies in education. Discourse, 39(2), 258-275. doi:10.1080/01596306.2018.1394421

Nemorin, S. (2017). Affective capture in digital school spaces and the modulation of student subjectivities. Emotion, Space & Society, 24, 11-18. doi:10.1016/j.emospa.2017.05.007

Nemorin, S. (2017). Post-panoptic pedagogies: The changing nature of school surveillance in the digital age. Surveillance & Society. 15 (2): 239-253.

Nemorin, S. (2017). Neuromarketing and the ‘poor in world’ consumer: How the animalization of thinking underpins contemporary market research discourses. Consumption, Markets & Culture, 20 (1), 59-80 22. doi: 10.1080/10253866.2016.1160897

Nemorin, S. & Gandy, Jr. O.H. (2017). Exploring neuromarketing and its reliance on remote sensing: Social and ethical implications. International Journal of Communication, 11, 4824-4844.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Bulfin, S., & Johnson. N. (2017). Left to their own devices: The everyday realities of ‘one-to-one’ classrooms. Oxford Review of Education. doi: 10.1080/03054985.2017.1305047

Nemorin, S. (2016). The frustrations of digital fabrication: An auto/ethnographic exploration of 3D ‘Making’ in school. International Journal of Technology and Design Education. doi: 10.1007/s10798-016-9366-z

Nemorin, S. & Selwyn, N. (2016). Making the best of it? Exploring the realities of 3D printing in school. Research Papers in Education. doi: 10.1080/02671522.2016.1225802

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., & Johnson, N. (2016). High-tech, hard work: An investigation of teachers’ work in the digital age. Learning Media and Technology. doi:10.1080/17439884.2016.1252770

Bulfin, S., Johnson, N., Nemorin, S., & Selwyn, N. (2016). Nagging, noobs and new tricks – student perceptions of school as a context for digital technology use. Educational Studies 42(3), 239-251. doi: 10.1080/03055698.2016.1160824

Pinto, L. E. & Nemorin, S. (2015). Normalizing panoptic surveillance among children. Our Schools Our Selves, 24(2), 53-62.

Book sections

 Nemorin, S. (2017). Online safety. In SAGE Encyclopedia of Out-of-School Learning, K. Peppler (Ed). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S., Bulfin, S., & Johnson, N. (2016). Toward a digital sociology of school. In Digital Sociologies, J. Daniels, K. Gregory, & T. McMillan Cottom (Eds). Bristol, UK: Policy Press.

Boler, M. & Nemorin, S. (2013). Dissent, truthiness, and war: New media landscapes of 21st century propaganda. In The Oxford Handbook of Propaganda Studies, R. Castronovo and J. Auerbach (Eds.). New York, NY: Oxford University Press.

Monographs and reports

Powell, A., Nemorin, S., Berner, A., Douglas-Jones, R., Fritsch, E., Hanteer, O., … Vega-Aurelio, D. (2017). Values and ethics in innovation for responsible technology in Europe. Report for the EU Commission: Enabling responsible ICT-related research and innovation.

Selwyn, N., Johnson, N., Nemorin, S., & Knight, E. (2016). Going online on behalf of others: An investigation of ‘proxy’ Internet consumers. Report for the Australian Communications Consumer Action Network, Sydney.

Alice Aldinucci is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford, Department of Education. She is part of the team working on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani, and she is a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group.

She holds a PhD in Education from the University of Glasgow (UK) where she was awarded the LKAS Interdisciplinary Scholarship. Her thesis applies a longitudinal qualitative research design and draws on the combination of Critical Realism and Capability Approach to explore aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to adulthood in Chile. Prior to her PhD, she completed a MA in International Education and Development from the University of Sussex (UK) where she was awarded the Centre for International Education Prize for the best overall MA performance. For her MA at Sussex, she conducted an empirical dissertation on the meaning making of Inclusive Education in Nepal. She holds a MA in Languages and Cultures for International Communication and Cooperation from the University of Milan (Italy) with a fieldwork research on tensions between policy and practice in bilingual multicultural education for indigenous students in Higher Education in Peru; and a BA in Languages and Intercultural Mediation from the University of Arezzo (Italy).

Alice’s research interests are interdisciplinary and relate to the critical linkages between intersecting inequalities, education, individual/societal development, and social justice at local and global levels, motivated by the question what education for what/whose development?

Areas, theoretical approaches and methodologies of interests:
• Sociology of education including aspirations in post-school transitions
• Cultural political economy of education and life chances/human flourishing/social justice
• Tensions between global educational frameworks and local knowledge and practices
• Critical Realism
• Capability Approach
• Qualitative and participatory methodologies
• Digital storytelling for social change

Besides her work in academia, Alice has gained experience as researcher, development practitioner and educator working in projects including early childhood education programmes, refugees’ education, girls’ education, SEN and inclusive education, TVET, global citizenship education, arts-based pedagogies. She lived and worked in different countries including in Nepal (a country she has developed a strong bond with), Tanzania, El Salvador, Italy and the UK. These experiences have reinforced her critical approach to international education and global development and to education as a catalyst for both inequalities, injustices, violence and more equitable social change and peace-building processes.

She served as Student Representative of the British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) from 2017 to 2019 and she is currently part of the college of reviewers of the editorial board of Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education.

Publications:

Aldinucci, A. (2022). Understanding aspirations and choices of upper-secondary TVET students in transition to postschool trajectories in Chile. PhD thesis, University of Glasgow.
Aldinucci, A., Valiente, O., Hurrell S., and Zancajo, A. (2021). Understanding aspirations: Why do secondary TVET students aim so high in Chile? Journal of Vocational Education & Training.

Rawle, G., Riddle, N., Pettersson, G., Wallin, J., Bici, M., Jasper, P., Harb, J., Hebbar, M., Davis, J., Aldinucci, A., (2017), EQUIP-Tanzania Impact Evaluation. Midline Technical Report, Volume I and II. Oxford Policy Management.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psycholog