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Mariela is Postdoctoral Researcher at SKOPE carrying out research for the Nuffield Project, ‘Comparing UK policies, outcomes and inequalities in post-16 education & training.’ Her research interests encompass identity and wellbeing theories, in particular the recognition theory and the Capability Approach, children’s rights and the ethics of care. She takes a multi-disciplinary approach in research, drawing on theories in sociology, psychology, human rights and political science to explore what makes a good life, particularly for young people, in contemporary society.

She holds a doctorate in Social Sciences and a Master’s in International Human Rights Law from New College, University of Oxford. Prior to joining SKOPE, she conducted evaluation research for the Rees Centre, research in social care for  the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, and provided policy advice and conducted research with young people in refugee camps for the AMAR Foundation.

She is a former Head of the National Authority for Children’s Rights in Romania (2007-2009) and former Policy Officer for the office of the European Commission in Romania where she was responsible for the EU intervention to reform the child protection system in Romania (1999 – 2006). Mariela is founding member of the Oxford Children’s Rights Network.

She is the author of ‘Voices from the Silent Cradles’ (Policy Press, 2021), a book which sheds light on children’s homes, foster care, domestic and international adoption from the perspective of the young people who experienced these types of care and which has been reviewed as complementing Sir Michael Rutter’s longitudinal study of Romanian born adoptees. Her work has been published in The International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, the British Journal of Social Work and Children and Youth Services Review. Her article ‘Children by Request: Romania’s children between rights and international politics’ has been cited in John Tobin’s ‘The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: A Commentary’ (OUP, 2019) and in the 2017 report of the UN Rapporteur on the Sale and Exploitation of Children.

Visit Mariela’s website: https://marielaneagu.com

Kelsey is a Research Associate at the Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance, and a Supernumerary Fellow at Jesus College. Her research areas include doctoral education, scholarly writing and publishing, and PhD career trajectories.

Kelsey works on the OFS and Research England ‘Close the Gap’ project, which aims to transform the PhD selection and admissions processes at Oxford and Cambridge towards the goal of a more inclusive research culture.

Kelsey received a DPhil in Education in 2020 and worked as a Senior Researcher at the University of Applied Sciences and Arts Western Switzerland from 2021-2022. She currently serves as the Junior Coordinator for the EARLI SIG 24 on Researcher Education and Careers.

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Mariela is Postdoctoral Researcher at SKOPE carrying out research for the Nuffield Project, ‘Comparing UK policies, outcomes and inequalities in post-16 education & training.’ Her research interests encompass identity and wellbeing theories, in particular the recognition theory and the Capability Approach, children’s rights and the ethics of care. She takes a multi-disciplinary approach in research, drawing on theories in sociology, psychology, human rights and political science to explore what makes a good life, particularly for young people, in contemporary society.

She holds a doctorate in Social Sciences and a Master’s in International Human Rights Law from New College, University of Oxford. Prior to joining SKOPE, she conducted evaluation research for the Rees Centre, research in social care for  the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, and provided policy advice and conducted research with young people in refugee camps for the AMAR Foundation.

She is a former Head of the National Authority for Children’s Rights in Romania (2007-2009) and former Policy Officer for the office of the European Commission in Romania where she was responsible for the EU intervention to reform the child protection system in Romania (1999 – 2006). Mariela is founding member of the Oxford Children’s Rights Network.

She is the author of ‘Voices from the Silent Cradles’ (Policy Press, 2021), a book which sheds light on children’s homes, foster care, domestic and international adoption from the perspective of the young people who experienced these types of care and which has been reviewed as complementing Sir Michael Rutter’s longitudinal study of Romanian born adoptees. Her work has been published in The International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, the British Journal of Social Work and Children and Youth Services Review. Her article ‘Children by Request: Romania’s children between rights and international politics’ has been cited in John Tobin’s ‘The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: A Commentary’ (OUP, 2019) and in the 2017 report of the UN Rapporteur on the Sale and Exploitation of Children.

Visit Mariela’s website: https://marielaneagu.com

Kelsey is a Research Associate at the Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance, and a Supernumerary Fellow at Jesus College. Her research areas include doctoral education, scholarly writing and publishing, and PhD career trajectories.

Kelsey works on the OFS and Research England ‘Close the Gap’ project, which aims to transform the PhD selection and admissions processes at Oxford and Cambridge towards the goal of a more inclusive research culture.

Kelsey received a DPhil in Education in 2020 and worked as a Senior Researcher at the University of Applied Sciences and Arts Western Switzerland from 2021-2022. She currently serves as the Junior Coordinator for the EARLI SIG 24 on Researcher Education and Careers.

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Mariela is Postdoctoral Researcher at SKOPE carrying out research for the Nuffield Project, ‘Comparing UK policies, outcomes and inequalities in post-16 education & training.’ Her research interests encompass identity and wellbeing theories, in particular the recognition theory and the Capability Approach, children’s rights and the ethics of care. She takes a multi-disciplinary approach in research, drawing on theories in sociology, psychology, human rights and political science to explore what makes a good life, particularly for young people, in contemporary society.

She holds a doctorate in Social Sciences and a Master’s in International Human Rights Law from New College, University of Oxford. Prior to joining SKOPE, she conducted evaluation research for the Rees Centre, research in social care for  the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, and provided policy advice and conducted research with young people in refugee camps for the AMAR Foundation.

She is a former Head of the National Authority for Children’s Rights in Romania (2007-2009) and former Policy Officer for the office of the European Commission in Romania where she was responsible for the EU intervention to reform the child protection system in Romania (1999 – 2006). Mariela is founding member of the Oxford Children’s Rights Network.

She is the author of ‘Voices from the Silent Cradles’ (Policy Press, 2021), a book which sheds light on children’s homes, foster care, domestic and international adoption from the perspective of the young people who experienced these types of care and which has been reviewed as complementing Sir Michael Rutter’s longitudinal study of Romanian born adoptees. Her work has been published in The International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, the British Journal of Social Work and Children and Youth Services Review. Her article ‘Children by Request: Romania’s children between rights and international politics’ has been cited in John Tobin’s ‘The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: A Commentary’ (OUP, 2019) and in the 2017 report of the UN Rapporteur on the Sale and Exploitation of Children.

Visit Mariela’s website: https://marielaneagu.com

Kelsey is a Research Associate at the Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance, and a Supernumerary Fellow at Jesus College. Her research areas include doctoral education, scholarly writing and publishing, and PhD career trajectories.

Kelsey works on the OFS and Research England ‘Close the Gap’ project, which aims to transform the PhD selection and admissions processes at Oxford and Cambridge towards the goal of a more inclusive research culture.

Kelsey received a DPhil in Education in 2020 and worked as a Senior Researcher at the University of Applied Sciences and Arts Western Switzerland from 2021-2022. She currently serves as the Junior Coordinator for the EARLI SIG 24 on Researcher Education and Careers.

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Mariela is Postdoctoral Researcher at SKOPE carrying out research for the Nuffield Project, ‘Comparing UK policies, outcomes and inequalities in post-16 education & training.’ Her research interests encompass identity and wellbeing theories, in particular the recognition theory and the Capability Approach, children’s rights and the ethics of care. She takes a multi-disciplinary approach in research, drawing on theories in sociology, psychology, human rights and political science to explore what makes a good life, particularly for young people, in contemporary society.

She holds a doctorate in Social Sciences and a Master’s in International Human Rights Law from New College, University of Oxford. Prior to joining SKOPE, she conducted evaluation research for the Rees Centre, research in social care for  the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, and provided policy advice and conducted research with young people in refugee camps for the AMAR Foundation.

She is a former Head of the National Authority for Children’s Rights in Romania (2007-2009) and former Policy Officer for the office of the European Commission in Romania where she was responsible for the EU intervention to reform the child protection system in Romania (1999 – 2006). Mariela is founding member of the Oxford Children’s Rights Network.

She is the author of ‘Voices from the Silent Cradles’ (Policy Press, 2021), a book which sheds light on children’s homes, foster care, domestic and international adoption from the perspective of the young people who experienced these types of care and which has been reviewed as complementing Sir Michael Rutter’s longitudinal study of Romanian born adoptees. Her work has been published in The International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, the British Journal of Social Work and Children and Youth Services Review. Her article ‘Children by Request: Romania’s children between rights and international politics’ has been cited in John Tobin’s ‘The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: A Commentary’ (OUP, 2019) and in the 2017 report of the UN Rapporteur on the Sale and Exploitation of Children.

Visit Mariela’s website: https://marielaneagu.com

Kelsey is a Research Associate at the Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance, and a Supernumerary Fellow at Jesus College. Her research areas include doctoral education, scholarly writing and publishing, and PhD career trajectories.

Kelsey works on the OFS and Research England ‘Close the Gap’ project, which aims to transform the PhD selection and admissions processes at Oxford and Cambridge towards the goal of a more inclusive research culture.

Kelsey received a DPhil in Education in 2020 and worked as a Senior Researcher at the University of Applied Sciences and Arts Western Switzerland from 2021-2022. She currently serves as the Junior Coordinator for the EARLI SIG 24 on Researcher Education and Careers.

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Mariela is Postdoctoral Researcher at SKOPE carrying out research for the Nuffield Project, ‘Comparing UK policies, outcomes and inequalities in post-16 education & training.’ Her research interests encompass identity and wellbeing theories, in particular the recognition theory and the Capability Approach, children’s rights and the ethics of care. She takes a multi-disciplinary approach in research, drawing on theories in sociology, psychology, human rights and political science to explore what makes a good life, particularly for young people, in contemporary society.

She holds a doctorate in Social Sciences and a Master’s in International Human Rights Law from New College, University of Oxford. Prior to joining SKOPE, she conducted evaluation research for the Rees Centre, research in social care for  the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, and provided policy advice and conducted research with young people in refugee camps for the AMAR Foundation.

She is a former Head of the National Authority for Children’s Rights in Romania (2007-2009) and former Policy Officer for the office of the European Commission in Romania where she was responsible for the EU intervention to reform the child protection system in Romania (1999 – 2006). Mariela is founding member of the Oxford Children’s Rights Network.

She is the author of ‘Voices from the Silent Cradles’ (Policy Press, 2021), a book which sheds light on children’s homes, foster care, domestic and international adoption from the perspective of the young people who experienced these types of care and which has been reviewed as complementing Sir Michael Rutter’s longitudinal study of Romanian born adoptees. Her work has been published in The International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, the British Journal of Social Work and Children and Youth Services Review. Her article ‘Children by Request: Romania’s children between rights and international politics’ has been cited in John Tobin’s ‘The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: A Commentary’ (OUP, 2019) and in the 2017 report of the UN Rapporteur on the Sale and Exploitation of Children.

Visit Mariela’s website: https://marielaneagu.com

Kelsey is a Research Associate at the Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance, and a Supernumerary Fellow at Jesus College. Her research areas include doctoral education, scholarly writing and publishing, and PhD career trajectories.

Kelsey works on the OFS and Research England ‘Close the Gap’ project, which aims to transform the PhD selection and admissions processes at Oxford and Cambridge towards the goal of a more inclusive research culture.

Kelsey received a DPhil in Education in 2020 and worked as a Senior Researcher at the University of Applied Sciences and Arts Western Switzerland from 2021-2022. She currently serves as the Junior Coordinator for the EARLI SIG 24 on Researcher Education and Careers.

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Mariela is Postdoctoral Researcher at SKOPE carrying out research for the Nuffield Project, ‘Comparing UK policies, outcomes and inequalities in post-16 education & training.’ Her research interests encompass identity and wellbeing theories, in particular the recognition theory and the Capability Approach, children’s rights and the ethics of care. She takes a multi-disciplinary approach in research, drawing on theories in sociology, psychology, human rights and political science to explore what makes a good life, particularly for young people, in contemporary society.

She holds a doctorate in Social Sciences and a Master’s in International Human Rights Law from New College, University of Oxford. Prior to joining SKOPE, she conducted evaluation research for the Rees Centre, research in social care for  the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, and provided policy advice and conducted research with young people in refugee camps for the AMAR Foundation.

She is a former Head of the National Authority for Children’s Rights in Romania (2007-2009) and former Policy Officer for the office of the European Commission in Romania where she was responsible for the EU intervention to reform the child protection system in Romania (1999 – 2006). Mariela is founding member of the Oxford Children’s Rights Network.

She is the author of ‘Voices from the Silent Cradles’ (Policy Press, 2021), a book which sheds light on children’s homes, foster care, domestic and international adoption from the perspective of the young people who experienced these types of care and which has been reviewed as complementing Sir Michael Rutter’s longitudinal study of Romanian born adoptees. Her work has been published in The International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, the British Journal of Social Work and Children and Youth Services Review. Her article ‘Children by Request: Romania’s children between rights and international politics’ has been cited in John Tobin’s ‘The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: A Commentary’ (OUP, 2019) and in the 2017 report of the UN Rapporteur on the Sale and Exploitation of Children.

Visit Mariela’s website: https://marielaneagu.com

Kelsey is a Research Associate at the Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance, and a Supernumerary Fellow at Jesus College. Her research areas include doctoral education, scholarly writing and publishing, and PhD career trajectories.

Kelsey works on the OFS and Research England ‘Close the Gap’ project, which aims to transform the PhD selection and admissions processes at Oxford and Cambridge towards the goal of a more inclusive research culture.

Kelsey received a DPhil in Education in 2020 and worked as a Senior Researcher at the University of Applied Sciences and Arts Western Switzerland from 2021-2022. She currently serves as the Junior Coordinator for the EARLI SIG 24 on Researcher Education and Careers.

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Mariela is Postdoctoral Researcher at SKOPE carrying out research for the Nuffield Project, ‘Comparing UK policies, outcomes and inequalities in post-16 education & training.’ Her research interests encompass identity and wellbeing theories, in particular the recognition theory and the Capability Approach, children’s rights and the ethics of care. She takes a multi-disciplinary approach in research, drawing on theories in sociology, psychology, human rights and political science to explore what makes a good life, particularly for young people, in contemporary society.

She holds a doctorate in Social Sciences and a Master’s in International Human Rights Law from New College, University of Oxford. Prior to joining SKOPE, she conducted evaluation research for the Rees Centre, research in social care for  the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, and provided policy advice and conducted research with young people in refugee camps for the AMAR Foundation.

She is a former Head of the National Authority for Children’s Rights in Romania (2007-2009) and former Policy Officer for the office of the European Commission in Romania where she was responsible for the EU intervention to reform the child protection system in Romania (1999 – 2006). Mariela is founding member of the Oxford Children’s Rights Network.

She is the author of ‘Voices from the Silent Cradles’ (Policy Press, 2021), a book which sheds light on children’s homes, foster care, domestic and international adoption from the perspective of the young people who experienced these types of care and which has been reviewed as complementing Sir Michael Rutter’s longitudinal study of Romanian born adoptees. Her work has been published in The International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, the British Journal of Social Work and Children and Youth Services Review. Her article ‘Children by Request: Romania’s children between rights and international politics’ has been cited in John Tobin’s ‘The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: A Commentary’ (OUP, 2019) and in the 2017 report of the UN Rapporteur on the Sale and Exploitation of Children.

Visit Mariela’s website: https://marielaneagu.com

Kelsey is a Research Associate at the Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance, and a Supernumerary Fellow at Jesus College. Her research areas include doctoral education, scholarly writing and publishing, and PhD career trajectories.

Kelsey works on the OFS and Research England ‘Close the Gap’ project, which aims to transform the PhD selection and admissions processes at Oxford and Cambridge towards the goal of a more inclusive research culture.

Kelsey received a DPhil in Education in 2020 and worked as a Senior Researcher at the University of Applied Sciences and Arts Western Switzerland from 2021-2022. She currently serves as the Junior Coordinator for the EARLI SIG 24 on Researcher Education and Careers.

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Mariela is Postdoctoral Researcher at SKOPE carrying out research for the Nuffield Project, ‘Comparing UK policies, outcomes and inequalities in post-16 education & training.’ Her research interests encompass identity and wellbeing theories, in particular the recognition theory and the Capability Approach, children’s rights and the ethics of care. She takes a multi-disciplinary approach in research, drawing on theories in sociology, psychology, human rights and political science to explore what makes a good life, particularly for young people, in contemporary society.

She holds a doctorate in Social Sciences and a Master’s in International Human Rights Law from New College, University of Oxford. Prior to joining SKOPE, she conducted evaluation research for the Rees Centre, research in social care for  the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, and provided policy advice and conducted research with young people in refugee camps for the AMAR Foundation.

She is a former Head of the National Authority for Children’s Rights in Romania (2007-2009) and former Policy Officer for the office of the European Commission in Romania where she was responsible for the EU intervention to reform the child protection system in Romania (1999 – 2006). Mariela is founding member of the Oxford Children’s Rights Network.

She is the author of ‘Voices from the Silent Cradles’ (Policy Press, 2021), a book which sheds light on children’s homes, foster care, domestic and international adoption from the perspective of the young people who experienced these types of care and which has been reviewed as complementing Sir Michael Rutter’s longitudinal study of Romanian born adoptees. Her work has been published in The International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, the British Journal of Social Work and Children and Youth Services Review. Her article ‘Children by Request: Romania’s children between rights and international politics’ has been cited in John Tobin’s ‘The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: A Commentary’ (OUP, 2019) and in the 2017 report of the UN Rapporteur on the Sale and Exploitation of Children.

Visit Mariela’s website: https://marielaneagu.com

Kelsey is a Research Associate at the Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance, and a Supernumerary Fellow at Jesus College. Her research areas include doctoral education, scholarly writing and publishing, and PhD career trajectories.

Kelsey works on the OFS and Research England ‘Close the Gap’ project, which aims to transform the PhD selection and admissions processes at Oxford and Cambridge towards the goal of a more inclusive research culture.

Kelsey received a DPhil in Education in 2020 and worked as a Senior Researcher at the University of Applied Sciences and Arts Western Switzerland from 2021-2022. She currently serves as the Junior Coordinator for the EARLI SIG 24 on Researcher Education and Careers.

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Mariela is Postdoctoral Researcher at SKOPE carrying out research for the Nuffield Project, ‘Comparing UK policies, outcomes and inequalities in post-16 education & training.’ Her research interests encompass identity and wellbeing theories, in particular the recognition theory and the Capability Approach, children’s rights and the ethics of care. She takes a multi-disciplinary approach in research, drawing on theories in sociology, psychology, human rights and political science to explore what makes a good life, particularly for young people, in contemporary society.

She holds a doctorate in Social Sciences and a Master’s in International Human Rights Law from New College, University of Oxford. Prior to joining SKOPE, she conducted evaluation research for the Rees Centre, research in social care for  the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, and provided policy advice and conducted research with young people in refugee camps for the AMAR Foundation.

She is a former Head of the National Authority for Children’s Rights in Romania (2007-2009) and former Policy Officer for the office of the European Commission in Romania where she was responsible for the EU intervention to reform the child protection system in Romania (1999 – 2006). Mariela is founding member of the Oxford Children’s Rights Network.

She is the author of ‘Voices from the Silent Cradles’ (Policy Press, 2021), a book which sheds light on children’s homes, foster care, domestic and international adoption from the perspective of the young people who experienced these types of care and which has been reviewed as complementing Sir Michael Rutter’s longitudinal study of Romanian born adoptees. Her work has been published in The International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, the British Journal of Social Work and Children and Youth Services Review. Her article ‘Children by Request: Romania’s children between rights and international politics’ has been cited in John Tobin’s ‘The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: A Commentary’ (OUP, 2019) and in the 2017 report of the UN Rapporteur on the Sale and Exploitation of Children.

Visit Mariela’s website: https://marielaneagu.com

Kelsey is a Research Associate at the Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance, and a Supernumerary Fellow at Jesus College. Her research areas include doctoral education, scholarly writing and publishing, and PhD career trajectories.

Kelsey works on the OFS and Research England ‘Close the Gap’ project, which aims to transform the PhD selection and admissions processes at Oxford and Cambridge towards the goal of a more inclusive research culture.

Kelsey received a DPhil in Education in 2020 and worked as a Senior Researcher at the University of Applied Sciences and Arts Western Switzerland from 2021-2022. She currently serves as the Junior Coordinator for the EARLI SIG 24 on Researcher Education and Careers.

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Mariela is Postdoctoral Researcher at SKOPE carrying out research for the Nuffield Project, ‘Comparing UK policies, outcomes and inequalities in post-16 education & training.’ Her research interests encompass identity and wellbeing theories, in particular the recognition theory and the Capability Approach, children’s rights and the ethics of care. She takes a multi-disciplinary approach in research, drawing on theories in sociology, psychology, human rights and political science to explore what makes a good life, particularly for young people, in contemporary society.

She holds a doctorate in Social Sciences and a Master’s in International Human Rights Law from New College, University of Oxford. Prior to joining SKOPE, she conducted evaluation research for the Rees Centre, research in social care for  the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, and provided policy advice and conducted research with young people in refugee camps for the AMAR Foundation.

She is a former Head of the National Authority for Children’s Rights in Romania (2007-2009) and former Policy Officer for the office of the European Commission in Romania where she was responsible for the EU intervention to reform the child protection system in Romania (1999 – 2006). Mariela is founding member of the Oxford Children’s Rights Network.

She is the author of ‘Voices from the Silent Cradles’ (Policy Press, 2021), a book which sheds light on children’s homes, foster care, domestic and international adoption from the perspective of the young people who experienced these types of care and which has been reviewed as complementing Sir Michael Rutter’s longitudinal study of Romanian born adoptees. Her work has been published in The International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, the British Journal of Social Work and Children and Youth Services Review. Her article ‘Children by Request: Romania’s children between rights and international politics’ has been cited in John Tobin’s ‘The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: A Commentary’ (OUP, 2019) and in the 2017 report of the UN Rapporteur on the Sale and Exploitation of Children.

Visit Mariela’s website: https://marielaneagu.com

Kelsey is a Research Associate at the Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance, and a Supernumerary Fellow at Jesus College. Her research areas include doctoral education, scholarly writing and publishing, and PhD career trajectories.

Kelsey works on the OFS and Research England ‘Close the Gap’ project, which aims to transform the PhD selection and admissions processes at Oxford and Cambridge towards the goal of a more inclusive research culture.

Kelsey received a DPhil in Education in 2020 and worked as a Senior Researcher at the University of Applied Sciences and Arts Western Switzerland from 2021-2022. She currently serves as the Junior Coordinator for the EARLI SIG 24 on Researcher Education and Careers.

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Mariela is Postdoctoral Researcher at SKOPE carrying out research for the Nuffield Project, ‘Comparing UK policies, outcomes and inequalities in post-16 education & training.’ Her research interests encompass identity and wellbeing theories, in particular the recognition theory and the Capability Approach, children’s rights and the ethics of care. She takes a multi-disciplinary approach in research, drawing on theories in sociology, psychology, human rights and political science to explore what makes a good life, particularly for young people, in contemporary society.

She holds a doctorate in Social Sciences and a Master’s in International Human Rights Law from New College, University of Oxford. Prior to joining SKOPE, she conducted evaluation research for the Rees Centre, research in social care for  the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, and provided policy advice and conducted research with young people in refugee camps for the AMAR Foundation.

She is a former Head of the National Authority for Children’s Rights in Romania (2007-2009) and former Policy Officer for the office of the European Commission in Romania where she was responsible for the EU intervention to reform the child protection system in Romania (1999 – 2006). Mariela is founding member of the Oxford Children’s Rights Network.

She is the author of ‘Voices from the Silent Cradles’ (Policy Press, 2021), a book which sheds light on children’s homes, foster care, domestic and international adoption from the perspective of the young people who experienced these types of care and which has been reviewed as complementing Sir Michael Rutter’s longitudinal study of Romanian born adoptees. Her work has been published in The International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, the British Journal of Social Work and Children and Youth Services Review. Her article ‘Children by Request: Romania’s children between rights and international politics’ has been cited in John Tobin’s ‘The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: A Commentary’ (OUP, 2019) and in the 2017 report of the UN Rapporteur on the Sale and Exploitation of Children.

Visit Mariela’s website: https://marielaneagu.com

Kelsey is a Research Associate at the Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance, and a Supernumerary Fellow at Jesus College. Her research areas include doctoral education, scholarly writing and publishing, and PhD career trajectories.

Kelsey works on the OFS and Research England ‘Close the Gap’ project, which aims to transform the PhD selection and admissions processes at Oxford and Cambridge towards the goal of a more inclusive research culture.

Kelsey received a DPhil in Education in 2020 and worked as a Senior Researcher at the University of Applied Sciences and Arts Western Switzerland from 2021-2022. She currently serves as the Junior Coordinator for the EARLI SIG 24 on Researcher Education and Careers.

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Mariela is Postdoctoral Researcher at SKOPE carrying out research for the Nuffield Project, ‘Comparing UK policies, outcomes and inequalities in post-16 education & training.’ Her research interests encompass identity and wellbeing theories, in particular the recognition theory and the Capability Approach, children’s rights and the ethics of care. She takes a multi-disciplinary approach in research, drawing on theories in sociology, psychology, human rights and political science to explore what makes a good life, particularly for young people, in contemporary society.

She holds a doctorate in Social Sciences and a Master’s in International Human Rights Law from New College, University of Oxford. Prior to joining SKOPE, she conducted evaluation research for the Rees Centre, research in social care for  the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, and provided policy advice and conducted research with young people in refugee camps for the AMAR Foundation.

She is a former Head of the National Authority for Children’s Rights in Romania (2007-2009) and former Policy Officer for the office of the European Commission in Romania where she was responsible for the EU intervention to reform the child protection system in Romania (1999 – 2006). Mariela is founding member of the Oxford Children’s Rights Network.

She is the author of ‘Voices from the Silent Cradles’ (Policy Press, 2021), a book which sheds light on children’s homes, foster care, domestic and international adoption from the perspective of the young people who experienced these types of care and which has been reviewed as complementing Sir Michael Rutter’s longitudinal study of Romanian born adoptees. Her work has been published in The International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, the British Journal of Social Work and Children and Youth Services Review. Her article ‘Children by Request: Romania’s children between rights and international politics’ has been cited in John Tobin’s ‘The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: A Commentary’ (OUP, 2019) and in the 2017 report of the UN Rapporteur on the Sale and Exploitation of Children.

Visit Mariela’s website: https://marielaneagu.com

Kelsey is a Research Associate at the Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance, and a Supernumerary Fellow at Jesus College. Her research areas include doctoral education, scholarly writing and publishing, and PhD career trajectories.

Kelsey works on the OFS and Research England ‘Close the Gap’ project, which aims to transform the PhD selection and admissions processes at Oxford and Cambridge towards the goal of a more inclusive research culture.

Kelsey received a DPhil in Education in 2020 and worked as a Senior Researcher at the University of Applied Sciences and Arts Western Switzerland from 2021-2022. She currently serves as the Junior Coordinator for the EARLI SIG 24 on Researcher Education and Careers.

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Mariela is Postdoctoral Researcher at SKOPE carrying out research for the Nuffield Project, ‘Comparing UK policies, outcomes and inequalities in post-16 education & training.’ Her research interests encompass identity and wellbeing theories, in particular the recognition theory and the Capability Approach, children’s rights and the ethics of care. She takes a multi-disciplinary approach in research, drawing on theories in sociology, psychology, human rights and political science to explore what makes a good life, particularly for young people, in contemporary society.

She holds a doctorate in Social Sciences and a Master’s in International Human Rights Law from New College, University of Oxford. Prior to joining SKOPE, she conducted evaluation research for the Rees Centre, research in social care for  the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, and provided policy advice and conducted research with young people in refugee camps for the AMAR Foundation.

She is a former Head of the National Authority for Children’s Rights in Romania (2007-2009) and former Policy Officer for the office of the European Commission in Romania where she was responsible for the EU intervention to reform the child protection system in Romania (1999 – 2006). Mariela is founding member of the Oxford Children’s Rights Network.

She is the author of ‘Voices from the Silent Cradles’ (Policy Press, 2021), a book which sheds light on children’s homes, foster care, domestic and international adoption from the perspective of the young people who experienced these types of care and which has been reviewed as complementing Sir Michael Rutter’s longitudinal study of Romanian born adoptees. Her work has been published in The International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, the British Journal of Social Work and Children and Youth Services Review. Her article ‘Children by Request: Romania’s children between rights and international politics’ has been cited in John Tobin’s ‘The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: A Commentary’ (OUP, 2019) and in the 2017 report of the UN Rapporteur on the Sale and Exploitation of Children.

Visit Mariela’s website: https://marielaneagu.com

Kelsey is a Research Associate at the Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance, and a Supernumerary Fellow at Jesus College. Her research areas include doctoral education, scholarly writing and publishing, and PhD career trajectories.

Kelsey works on the OFS and Research England ‘Close the Gap’ project, which aims to transform the PhD selection and admissions processes at Oxford and Cambridge towards the goal of a more inclusive research culture.

Kelsey received a DPhil in Education in 2020 and worked as a Senior Researcher at the University of Applied Sciences and Arts Western Switzerland from 2021-2022. She currently serves as the Junior Coordinator for the EARLI SIG 24 on Researcher Education and Careers.

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Mariela is Postdoctoral Researcher at SKOPE carrying out research for the Nuffield Project, ‘Comparing UK policies, outcomes and inequalities in post-16 education & training.’ Her research interests encompass identity and wellbeing theories, in particular the recognition theory and the Capability Approach, children’s rights and the ethics of care. She takes a multi-disciplinary approach in research, drawing on theories in sociology, psychology, human rights and political science to explore what makes a good life, particularly for young people, in contemporary society.

She holds a doctorate in Social Sciences and a Master’s in International Human Rights Law from New College, University of Oxford. Prior to joining SKOPE, she conducted evaluation research for the Rees Centre, research in social care for  the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, and provided policy advice and conducted research with young people in refugee camps for the AMAR Foundation.

She is a former Head of the National Authority for Children’s Rights in Romania (2007-2009) and former Policy Officer for the office of the European Commission in Romania where she was responsible for the EU intervention to reform the child protection system in Romania (1999 – 2006). Mariela is founding member of the Oxford Children’s Rights Network.

She is the author of ‘Voices from the Silent Cradles’ (Policy Press, 2021), a book which sheds light on children’s homes, foster care, domestic and international adoption from the perspective of the young people who experienced these types of care and which has been reviewed as complementing Sir Michael Rutter’s longitudinal study of Romanian born adoptees. Her work has been published in The International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, the British Journal of Social Work and Children and Youth Services Review. Her article ‘Children by Request: Romania’s children between rights and international politics’ has been cited in John Tobin’s ‘The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: A Commentary’ (OUP, 2019) and in the 2017 report of the UN Rapporteur on the Sale and Exploitation of Children.

Visit Mariela’s website: https://marielaneagu.com

Kelsey is a Research Associate at the Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance, and a Supernumerary Fellow at Jesus College. Her research areas include doctoral education, scholarly writing and publishing, and PhD career trajectories.

Kelsey works on the OFS and Research England ‘Close the Gap’ project, which aims to transform the PhD selection and admissions processes at Oxford and Cambridge towards the goal of a more inclusive research culture.

Kelsey received a DPhil in Education in 2020 and worked as a Senior Researcher at the University of Applied Sciences and Arts Western Switzerland from 2021-2022. She currently serves as the Junior Coordinator for the EARLI SIG 24 on Researcher Education and Careers.

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Mariela is Postdoctoral Researcher at SKOPE carrying out research for the Nuffield Project, ‘Comparing UK policies, outcomes and inequalities in post-16 education & training.’ Her research interests encompass identity and wellbeing theories, in particular the recognition theory and the Capability Approach, children’s rights and the ethics of care. She takes a multi-disciplinary approach in research, drawing on theories in sociology, psychology, human rights and political science to explore what makes a good life, particularly for young people, in contemporary society.

She holds a doctorate in Social Sciences and a Master’s in International Human Rights Law from New College, University of Oxford. Prior to joining SKOPE, she conducted evaluation research for the Rees Centre, research in social care for  the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, and provided policy advice and conducted research with young people in refugee camps for the AMAR Foundation.

She is a former Head of the National Authority for Children’s Rights in Romania (2007-2009) and former Policy Officer for the office of the European Commission in Romania where she was responsible for the EU intervention to reform the child protection system in Romania (1999 – 2006). Mariela is founding member of the Oxford Children’s Rights Network.

She is the author of ‘Voices from the Silent Cradles’ (Policy Press, 2021), a book which sheds light on children’s homes, foster care, domestic and international adoption from the perspective of the young people who experienced these types of care and which has been reviewed as complementing Sir Michael Rutter’s longitudinal study of Romanian born adoptees. Her work has been published in The International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, the British Journal of Social Work and Children and Youth Services Review. Her article ‘Children by Request: Romania’s children between rights and international politics’ has been cited in John Tobin’s ‘The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: A Commentary’ (OUP, 2019) and in the 2017 report of the UN Rapporteur on the Sale and Exploitation of Children.

Visit Mariela’s website: https://marielaneagu.com

Kelsey is a Research Associate at the Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance, and a Supernumerary Fellow at Jesus College. Her research areas include doctoral education, scholarly writing and publishing, and PhD career trajectories.

Kelsey works on the OFS and Research England ‘Close the Gap’ project, which aims to transform the PhD selection and admissions processes at Oxford and Cambridge towards the goal of a more inclusive research culture.

Kelsey received a DPhil in Education in 2020 and worked as a Senior Researcher at the University of Applied Sciences and Arts Western Switzerland from 2021-2022. She currently serves as the Junior Coordinator for the EARLI SIG 24 on Researcher Education and Careers.

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Mariela is Postdoctoral Researcher at SKOPE carrying out research for the Nuffield Project, ‘Comparing UK policies, outcomes and inequalities in post-16 education & training.’ Her research interests encompass identity and wellbeing theories, in particular the recognition theory and the Capability Approach, children’s rights and the ethics of care. She takes a multi-disciplinary approach in research, drawing on theories in sociology, psychology, human rights and political science to explore what makes a good life, particularly for young people, in contemporary society.

She holds a doctorate in Social Sciences and a Master’s in International Human Rights Law from New College, University of Oxford. Prior to joining SKOPE, she conducted evaluation research for the Rees Centre, research in social care for  the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, and provided policy advice and conducted research with young people in refugee camps for the AMAR Foundation.

She is a former Head of the National Authority for Children’s Rights in Romania (2007-2009) and former Policy Officer for the office of the European Commission in Romania where she was responsible for the EU intervention to reform the child protection system in Romania (1999 – 2006). Mariela is founding member of the Oxford Children’s Rights Network.

She is the author of ‘Voices from the Silent Cradles’ (Policy Press, 2021), a book which sheds light on children’s homes, foster care, domestic and international adoption from the perspective of the young people who experienced these types of care and which has been reviewed as complementing Sir Michael Rutter’s longitudinal study of Romanian born adoptees. Her work has been published in The International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, the British Journal of Social Work and Children and Youth Services Review. Her article ‘Children by Request: Romania’s children between rights and international politics’ has been cited in John Tobin’s ‘The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: A Commentary’ (OUP, 2019) and in the 2017 report of the UN Rapporteur on the Sale and Exploitation of Children.

Visit Mariela’s website: https://marielaneagu.com

Kelsey is a Research Associate at the Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance, and a Supernumerary Fellow at Jesus College. Her research areas include doctoral education, scholarly writing and publishing, and PhD career trajectories.

Kelsey works on the OFS and Research England ‘Close the Gap’ project, which aims to transform the PhD selection and admissions processes at Oxford and Cambridge towards the goal of a more inclusive research culture.

Kelsey received a DPhil in Education in 2020 and worked as a Senior Researcher at the University of Applied Sciences and Arts Western Switzerland from 2021-2022. She currently serves as the Junior Coordinator for the EARLI SIG 24 on Researcher Education and Careers.

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Mariela is Postdoctoral Researcher at SKOPE carrying out research for the Nuffield Project, ‘Comparing UK policies, outcomes and inequalities in post-16 education & training.’ Her research interests encompass identity and wellbeing theories, in particular the recognition theory and the Capability Approach, children’s rights and the ethics of care. She takes a multi-disciplinary approach in research, drawing on theories in sociology, psychology, human rights and political science to explore what makes a good life, particularly for young people, in contemporary society.

She holds a doctorate in Social Sciences and a Master’s in International Human Rights Law from New College, University of Oxford. Prior to joining SKOPE, she conducted evaluation research for the Rees Centre, research in social care for  the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, and provided policy advice and conducted research with young people in refugee camps for the AMAR Foundation.

She is a former Head of the National Authority for Children’s Rights in Romania (2007-2009) and former Policy Officer for the office of the European Commission in Romania where she was responsible for the EU intervention to reform the child protection system in Romania (1999 – 2006). Mariela is founding member of the Oxford Children’s Rights Network.

She is the author of ‘Voices from the Silent Cradles’ (Policy Press, 2021), a book which sheds light on children’s homes, foster care, domestic and international adoption from the perspective of the young people who experienced these types of care and which has been reviewed as complementing Sir Michael Rutter’s longitudinal study of Romanian born adoptees. Her work has been published in The International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, the British Journal of Social Work and Children and Youth Services Review. Her article ‘Children by Request: Romania’s children between rights and international politics’ has been cited in John Tobin’s ‘The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: A Commentary’ (OUP, 2019) and in the 2017 report of the UN Rapporteur on the Sale and Exploitation of Children.

Visit Mariela’s website: https://marielaneagu.com

Kelsey is a Research Associate at the Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance, and a Supernumerary Fellow at Jesus College. Her research areas include doctoral education, scholarly writing and publishing, and PhD career trajectories.

Kelsey works on the OFS and Research England ‘Close the Gap’ project, which aims to transform the PhD selection and admissions processes at Oxford and Cambridge towards the goal of a more inclusive research culture.

Kelsey received a DPhil in Education in 2020 and worked as a Senior Researcher at the University of Applied Sciences and Arts Western Switzerland from 2021-2022. She currently serves as the Junior Coordinator for the EARLI SIG 24 on Researcher Education and Careers.

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Mariela is Postdoctoral Researcher at SKOPE carrying out research for the Nuffield Project, ‘Comparing UK policies, outcomes and inequalities in post-16 education & training.’ Her research interests encompass identity and wellbeing theories, in particular the recognition theory and the Capability Approach, children’s rights and the ethics of care. She takes a multi-disciplinary approach in research, drawing on theories in sociology, psychology, human rights and political science to explore what makes a good life, particularly for young people, in contemporary society.

She holds a doctorate in Social Sciences and a Master’s in International Human Rights Law from New College, University of Oxford. Prior to joining SKOPE, she conducted evaluation research for the Rees Centre, research in social care for  the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, and provided policy advice and conducted research with young people in refugee camps for the AMAR Foundation.

She is a former Head of the National Authority for Children’s Rights in Romania (2007-2009) and former Policy Officer for the office of the European Commission in Romania where she was responsible for the EU intervention to reform the child protection system in Romania (1999 – 2006). Mariela is founding member of the Oxford Children’s Rights Network.

She is the author of ‘Voices from the Silent Cradles’ (Policy Press, 2021), a book which sheds light on children’s homes, foster care, domestic and international adoption from the perspective of the young people who experienced these types of care and which has been reviewed as complementing Sir Michael Rutter’s longitudinal study of Romanian born adoptees. Her work has been published in The International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, the British Journal of Social Work and Children and Youth Services Review. Her article ‘Children by Request: Romania’s children between rights and international politics’ has been cited in John Tobin’s ‘The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: A Commentary’ (OUP, 2019) and in the 2017 report of the UN Rapporteur on the Sale and Exploitation of Children.

Visit Mariela’s website: https://marielaneagu.com

Kelsey is a Research Associate at the Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance, and a Supernumerary Fellow at Jesus College. Her research areas include doctoral education, scholarly writing and publishing, and PhD career trajectories.

Kelsey works on the OFS and Research England ‘Close the Gap’ project, which aims to transform the PhD selection and admissions processes at Oxford and Cambridge towards the goal of a more inclusive research culture.

Kelsey received a DPhil in Education in 2020 and worked as a Senior Researcher at the University of Applied Sciences and Arts Western Switzerland from 2021-2022. She currently serves as the Junior Coordinator for the EARLI SIG 24 on Researcher Education and Careers.

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Mariela is Postdoctoral Researcher at SKOPE carrying out research for the Nuffield Project, ‘Comparing UK policies, outcomes and inequalities in post-16 education & training.’ Her research interests encompass identity and wellbeing theories, in particular the recognition theory and the Capability Approach, children’s rights and the ethics of care. She takes a multi-disciplinary approach in research, drawing on theories in sociology, psychology, human rights and political science to explore what makes a good life, particularly for young people, in contemporary society.

She holds a doctorate in Social Sciences and a Master’s in International Human Rights Law from New College, University of Oxford. Prior to joining SKOPE, she conducted evaluation research for the Rees Centre, research in social care for  the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, and provided policy advice and conducted research with young people in refugee camps for the AMAR Foundation.

She is a former Head of the National Authority for Children’s Rights in Romania (2007-2009) and former Policy Officer for the office of the European Commission in Romania where she was responsible for the EU intervention to reform the child protection system in Romania (1999 – 2006). Mariela is founding member of the Oxford Children’s Rights Network.

She is the author of ‘Voices from the Silent Cradles’ (Policy Press, 2021), a book which sheds light on children’s homes, foster care, domestic and international adoption from the perspective of the young people who experienced these types of care and which has been reviewed as complementing Sir Michael Rutter’s longitudinal study of Romanian born adoptees. Her work has been published in The International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, the British Journal of Social Work and Children and Youth Services Review. Her article ‘Children by Request: Romania’s children between rights and international politics’ has been cited in John Tobin’s ‘The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: A Commentary’ (OUP, 2019) and in the 2017 report of the UN Rapporteur on the Sale and Exploitation of Children.

Visit Mariela’s website: https://marielaneagu.com

Kelsey is a Research Associate at the Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance, and a Supernumerary Fellow at Jesus College. Her research areas include doctoral education, scholarly writing and publishing, and PhD career trajectories.

Kelsey works on the OFS and Research England ‘Close the Gap’ project, which aims to transform the PhD selection and admissions processes at Oxford and Cambridge towards the goal of a more inclusive research culture.

Kelsey received a DPhil in Education in 2020 and worked as a Senior Researcher at the University of Applied Sciences and Arts Western Switzerland from 2021-2022. She currently serves as the Junior Coordinator for the EARLI SIG 24 on Researcher Education and Careers.

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Mariela is Postdoctoral Researcher at SKOPE carrying out research for the Nuffield Project, ‘Comparing UK policies, outcomes and inequalities in post-16 education & training.’ Her research interests encompass identity and wellbeing theories, in particular the recognition theory and the Capability Approach, children’s rights and the ethics of care. She takes a multi-disciplinary approach in research, drawing on theories in sociology, psychology, human rights and political science to explore what makes a good life, particularly for young people, in contemporary society.

She holds a doctorate in Social Sciences and a Master’s in International Human Rights Law from New College, University of Oxford. Prior to joining SKOPE, she conducted evaluation research for the Rees Centre, research in social care for  the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, and provided policy advice and conducted research with young people in refugee camps for the AMAR Foundation.

She is a former Head of the National Authority for Children’s Rights in Romania (2007-2009) and former Policy Officer for the office of the European Commission in Romania where she was responsible for the EU intervention to reform the child protection system in Romania (1999 – 2006). Mariela is founding member of the Oxford Children’s Rights Network.

She is the author of ‘Voices from the Silent Cradles’ (Policy Press, 2021), a book which sheds light on children’s homes, foster care, domestic and international adoption from the perspective of the young people who experienced these types of care and which has been reviewed as complementing Sir Michael Rutter’s longitudinal study of Romanian born adoptees. Her work has been published in The International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, the British Journal of Social Work and Children and Youth Services Review. Her article ‘Children by Request: Romania’s children between rights and international politics’ has been cited in John Tobin’s ‘The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: A Commentary’ (OUP, 2019) and in the 2017 report of the UN Rapporteur on the Sale and Exploitation of Children.

Visit Mariela’s website: https://marielaneagu.com

Kelsey is a Research Associate at the Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance, and a Supernumerary Fellow at Jesus College. Her research areas include doctoral education, scholarly writing and publishing, and PhD career trajectories.

Kelsey works on the OFS and Research England ‘Close the Gap’ project, which aims to transform the PhD selection and admissions processes at Oxford and Cambridge towards the goal of a more inclusive research culture.

Kelsey received a DPhil in Education in 2020 and worked as a Senior Researcher at the University of Applied Sciences and Arts Western Switzerland from 2021-2022. She currently serves as the Junior Coordinator for the EARLI SIG 24 on Researcher Education and Careers.

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Mariela is Postdoctoral Researcher at SKOPE carrying out research for the Nuffield Project, ‘Comparing UK policies, outcomes and inequalities in post-16 education & training.’ Her research interests encompass identity and wellbeing theories, in particular the recognition theory and the Capability Approach, children’s rights and the ethics of care. She takes a multi-disciplinary approach in research, drawing on theories in sociology, psychology, human rights and political science to explore what makes a good life, particularly for young people, in contemporary society.

She holds a doctorate in Social Sciences and a Master’s in International Human Rights Law from New College, University of Oxford. Prior to joining SKOPE, she conducted evaluation research for the Rees Centre, research in social care for  the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, and provided policy advice and conducted research with young people in refugee camps for the AMAR Foundation.

She is a former Head of the National Authority for Children’s Rights in Romania (2007-2009) and former Policy Officer for the office of the European Commission in Romania where she was responsible for the EU intervention to reform the child protection system in Romania (1999 – 2006). Mariela is founding member of the Oxford Children’s Rights Network.

She is the author of ‘Voices from the Silent Cradles’ (Policy Press, 2021), a book which sheds light on children’s homes, foster care, domestic and international adoption from the perspective of the young people who experienced these types of care and which has been reviewed as complementing Sir Michael Rutter’s longitudinal study of Romanian born adoptees. Her work has been published in The International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, the British Journal of Social Work and Children and Youth Services Review. Her article ‘Children by Request: Romania’s children between rights and international politics’ has been cited in John Tobin’s ‘The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: A Commentary’ (OUP, 2019) and in the 2017 report of the UN Rapporteur on the Sale and Exploitation of Children.

Visit Mariela’s website: https://marielaneagu.com

Kelsey is a Research Associate at the Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance, and a Supernumerary Fellow at Jesus College. Her research areas include doctoral education, scholarly writing and publishing, and PhD career trajectories.

Kelsey works on the OFS and Research England ‘Close the Gap’ project, which aims to transform the PhD selection and admissions processes at Oxford and Cambridge towards the goal of a more inclusive research culture.

Kelsey received a DPhil in Education in 2020 and worked as a Senior Researcher at the University of Applied Sciences and Arts Western Switzerland from 2021-2022. She currently serves as the Junior Coordinator for the EARLI SIG 24 on Researcher Education and Careers.

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Mariela is Postdoctoral Researcher at SKOPE carrying out research for the Nuffield Project, ‘Comparing UK policies, outcomes and inequalities in post-16 education & training.’ Her research interests encompass identity and wellbeing theories, in particular the recognition theory and the Capability Approach, children’s rights and the ethics of care. She takes a multi-disciplinary approach in research, drawing on theories in sociology, psychology, human rights and political science to explore what makes a good life, particularly for young people, in contemporary society.

She holds a doctorate in Social Sciences and a Master’s in International Human Rights Law from New College, University of Oxford. Prior to joining SKOPE, she conducted evaluation research for the Rees Centre, research in social care for  the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, and provided policy advice and conducted research with young people in refugee camps for the AMAR Foundation.

She is a former Head of the National Authority for Children’s Rights in Romania (2007-2009) and former Policy Officer for the office of the European Commission in Romania where she was responsible for the EU intervention to reform the child protection system in Romania (1999 – 2006). Mariela is founding member of the Oxford Children’s Rights Network.

She is the author of ‘Voices from the Silent Cradles’ (Policy Press, 2021), a book which sheds light on children’s homes, foster care, domestic and international adoption from the perspective of the young people who experienced these types of care and which has been reviewed as complementing Sir Michael Rutter’s longitudinal study of Romanian born adoptees. Her work has been published in The International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, the British Journal of Social Work and Children and Youth Services Review. Her article ‘Children by Request: Romania’s children between rights and international politics’ has been cited in John Tobin’s ‘The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: A Commentary’ (OUP, 2019) and in the 2017 report of the UN Rapporteur on the Sale and Exploitation of Children.

Visit Mariela’s website: https://marielaneagu.com

Kelsey is a Research Associate at the Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance, and a Supernumerary Fellow at Jesus College. Her research areas include doctoral education, scholarly writing and publishing, and PhD career trajectories.

Kelsey works on the OFS and Research England ‘Close the Gap’ project, which aims to transform the PhD selection and admissions processes at Oxford and Cambridge towards the goal of a more inclusive research culture.

Kelsey received a DPhil in Education in 2020 and worked as a Senior Researcher at the University of Applied Sciences and Arts Western Switzerland from 2021-2022. She currently serves as the Junior Coordinator for the EARLI SIG 24 on Researcher Education and Careers.

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Mariela is Postdoctoral Researcher at SKOPE carrying out research for the Nuffield Project, ‘Comparing UK policies, outcomes and inequalities in post-16 education & training.’ Her research interests encompass identity and wellbeing theories, in particular the recognition theory and the Capability Approach, children’s rights and the ethics of care. She takes a multi-disciplinary approach in research, drawing on theories in sociology, psychology, human rights and political science to explore what makes a good life, particularly for young people, in contemporary society.

She holds a doctorate in Social Sciences and a Master’s in International Human Rights Law from New College, University of Oxford. Prior to joining SKOPE, she conducted evaluation research for the Rees Centre, research in social care for  the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, and provided policy advice and conducted research with young people in refugee camps for the AMAR Foundation.

She is a former Head of the National Authority for Children’s Rights in Romania (2007-2009) and former Policy Officer for the office of the European Commission in Romania where she was responsible for the EU intervention to reform the child protection system in Romania (1999 – 2006). Mariela is founding member of the Oxford Children’s Rights Network.

She is the author of ‘Voices from the Silent Cradles’ (Policy Press, 2021), a book which sheds light on children’s homes, foster care, domestic and international adoption from the perspective of the young people who experienced these types of care and which has been reviewed as complementing Sir Michael Rutter’s longitudinal study of Romanian born adoptees. Her work has been published in The International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, the British Journal of Social Work and Children and Youth Services Review. Her article ‘Children by Request: Romania’s children between rights and international politics’ has been cited in John Tobin’s ‘The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: A Commentary’ (OUP, 2019) and in the 2017 report of the UN Rapporteur on the Sale and Exploitation of Children.

Visit Mariela’s website: https://marielaneagu.com

Kelsey is a Research Associate at the Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance, and a Supernumerary Fellow at Jesus College. Her research areas include doctoral education, scholarly writing and publishing, and PhD career trajectories.

Kelsey works on the OFS and Research England ‘Close the Gap’ project, which aims to transform the PhD selection and admissions processes at Oxford and Cambridge towards the goal of a more inclusive research culture.

Kelsey received a DPhil in Education in 2020 and worked as a Senior Researcher at the University of Applied Sciences and Arts Western Switzerland from 2021-2022. She currently serves as the Junior Coordinator for the EARLI SIG 24 on Researcher Education and Careers.

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Mariela is Postdoctoral Researcher at SKOPE carrying out research for the Nuffield Project, ‘Comparing UK policies, outcomes and inequalities in post-16 education & training.’ Her research interests encompass identity and wellbeing theories, in particular the recognition theory and the Capability Approach, children’s rights and the ethics of care. She takes a multi-disciplinary approach in research, drawing on theories in sociology, psychology, human rights and political science to explore what makes a good life, particularly for young people, in contemporary society.

She holds a doctorate in Social Sciences and a Master’s in International Human Rights Law from New College, University of Oxford. Prior to joining SKOPE, she conducted evaluation research for the Rees Centre, research in social care for  the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, and provided policy advice and conducted research with young people in refugee camps for the AMAR Foundation.

She is a former Head of the National Authority for Children’s Rights in Romania (2007-2009) and former Policy Officer for the office of the European Commission in Romania where she was responsible for the EU intervention to reform the child protection system in Romania (1999 – 2006). Mariela is founding member of the Oxford Children’s Rights Network.

She is the author of ‘Voices from the Silent Cradles’ (Policy Press, 2021), a book which sheds light on children’s homes, foster care, domestic and international adoption from the perspective of the young people who experienced these types of care and which has been reviewed as complementing Sir Michael Rutter’s longitudinal study of Romanian born adoptees. Her work has been published in The International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, the British Journal of Social Work and Children and Youth Services Review. Her article ‘Children by Request: Romania’s children between rights and international politics’ has been cited in John Tobin’s ‘The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: A Commentary’ (OUP, 2019) and in the 2017 report of the UN Rapporteur on the Sale and Exploitation of Children.

Visit Mariela’s website: https://marielaneagu.com

Kelsey is a Research Associate at the Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance, and a Supernumerary Fellow at Jesus College. Her research areas include doctoral education, scholarly writing and publishing, and PhD career trajectories.

Kelsey works on the OFS and Research England ‘Close the Gap’ project, which aims to transform the PhD selection and admissions processes at Oxford and Cambridge towards the goal of a more inclusive research culture.

Kelsey received a DPhil in Education in 2020 and worked as a Senior Researcher at the University of Applied Sciences and Arts Western Switzerland from 2021-2022. She currently serves as the Junior Coordinator for the EARLI SIG 24 on Researcher Education and Careers.

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Mariela is Postdoctoral Researcher at SKOPE carrying out research for the Nuffield Project, ‘Comparing UK policies, outcomes and inequalities in post-16 education & training.’ Her research interests encompass identity and wellbeing theories, in particular the recognition theory and the Capability Approach, children’s rights and the ethics of care. She takes a multi-disciplinary approach in research, drawing on theories in sociology, psychology, human rights and political science to explore what makes a good life, particularly for young people, in contemporary society.

She holds a doctorate in Social Sciences and a Master’s in International Human Rights Law from New College, University of Oxford. Prior to joining SKOPE, she conducted evaluation research for the Rees Centre, research in social care for  the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, and provided policy advice and conducted research with young people in refugee camps for the AMAR Foundation.

She is a former Head of the National Authority for Children’s Rights in Romania (2007-2009) and former Policy Officer for the office of the European Commission in Romania where she was responsible for the EU intervention to reform the child protection system in Romania (1999 – 2006). Mariela is founding member of the Oxford Children’s Rights Network.

She is the author of ‘Voices from the Silent Cradles’ (Policy Press, 2021), a book which sheds light on children’s homes, foster care, domestic and international adoption from the perspective of the young people who experienced these types of care and which has been reviewed as complementing Sir Michael Rutter’s longitudinal study of Romanian born adoptees. Her work has been published in The International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, the British Journal of Social Work and Children and Youth Services Review. Her article ‘Children by Request: Romania’s children between rights and international politics’ has been cited in John Tobin’s ‘The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: A Commentary’ (OUP, 2019) and in the 2017 report of the UN Rapporteur on the Sale and Exploitation of Children.

Visit Mariela’s website: https://marielaneagu.com

Kelsey is a Research Associate at the Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance, and a Supernumerary Fellow at Jesus College. Her research areas include doctoral education, scholarly writing and publishing, and PhD career trajectories.

Kelsey works on the OFS and Research England ‘Close the Gap’ project, which aims to transform the PhD selection and admissions processes at Oxford and Cambridge towards the goal of a more inclusive research culture.

Kelsey received a DPhil in Education in 2020 and worked as a Senior Researcher at the University of Applied Sciences and Arts Western Switzerland from 2021-2022. She currently serves as the Junior Coordinator for the EARLI SIG 24 on Researcher Education and Careers.

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Mariela is Postdoctoral Researcher at SKOPE carrying out research for the Nuffield Project, ‘Comparing UK policies, outcomes and inequalities in post-16 education & training.’ Her research interests encompass identity and wellbeing theories, in particular the recognition theory and the Capability Approach, children’s rights and the ethics of care. She takes a multi-disciplinary approach in research, drawing on theories in sociology, psychology, human rights and political science to explore what makes a good life, particularly for young people, in contemporary society.

She holds a doctorate in Social Sciences and a Master’s in International Human Rights Law from New College, University of Oxford. Prior to joining SKOPE, she conducted evaluation research for the Rees Centre, research in social care for  the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, and provided policy advice and conducted research with young people in refugee camps for the AMAR Foundation.

She is a former Head of the National Authority for Children’s Rights in Romania (2007-2009) and former Policy Officer for the office of the European Commission in Romania where she was responsible for the EU intervention to reform the child protection system in Romania (1999 – 2006). Mariela is founding member of the Oxford Children’s Rights Network.

She is the author of ‘Voices from the Silent Cradles’ (Policy Press, 2021), a book which sheds light on children’s homes, foster care, domestic and international adoption from the perspective of the young people who experienced these types of care and which has been reviewed as complementing Sir Michael Rutter’s longitudinal study of Romanian born adoptees. Her work has been published in The International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, the British Journal of Social Work and Children and Youth Services Review. Her article ‘Children by Request: Romania’s children between rights and international politics’ has been cited in John Tobin’s ‘The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: A Commentary’ (OUP, 2019) and in the 2017 report of the UN Rapporteur on the Sale and Exploitation of Children.

Visit Mariela’s website: https://marielaneagu.com

Kelsey is a Research Associate at the Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance, and a Supernumerary Fellow at Jesus College. Her research areas include doctoral education, scholarly writing and publishing, and PhD career trajectories.

Kelsey works on the OFS and Research England ‘Close the Gap’ project, which aims to transform the PhD selection and admissions processes at Oxford and Cambridge towards the goal of a more inclusive research culture.

Kelsey received a DPhil in Education in 2020 and worked as a Senior Researcher at the University of Applied Sciences and Arts Western Switzerland from 2021-2022. She currently serves as the Junior Coordinator for the EARLI SIG 24 on Researcher Education and Careers.

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Mariela is Postdoctoral Researcher at SKOPE carrying out research for the Nuffield Project, ‘Comparing UK policies, outcomes and inequalities in post-16 education & training.’ Her research interests encompass identity and wellbeing theories, in particular the recognition theory and the Capability Approach, children’s rights and the ethics of care. She takes a multi-disciplinary approach in research, drawing on theories in sociology, psychology, human rights and political science to explore what makes a good life, particularly for young people, in contemporary society.

She holds a doctorate in Social Sciences and a Master’s in International Human Rights Law from New College, University of Oxford. Prior to joining SKOPE, she conducted evaluation research for the Rees Centre, research in social care for  the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, and provided policy advice and conducted research with young people in refugee camps for the AMAR Foundation.

She is a former Head of the National Authority for Children’s Rights in Romania (2007-2009) and former Policy Officer for the office of the European Commission in Romania where she was responsible for the EU intervention to reform the child protection system in Romania (1999 – 2006). Mariela is founding member of the Oxford Children’s Rights Network.

She is the author of ‘Voices from the Silent Cradles’ (Policy Press, 2021), a book which sheds light on children’s homes, foster care, domestic and international adoption from the perspective of the young people who experienced these types of care and which has been reviewed as complementing Sir Michael Rutter’s longitudinal study of Romanian born adoptees. Her work has been published in The International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, the British Journal of Social Work and Children and Youth Services Review. Her article ‘Children by Request: Romania’s children between rights and international politics’ has been cited in John Tobin’s ‘The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: A Commentary’ (OUP, 2019) and in the 2017 report of the UN Rapporteur on the Sale and Exploitation of Children.

Visit Mariela’s website: https://marielaneagu.com

Kelsey is a Research Associate at the Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance, and a Supernumerary Fellow at Jesus College. Her research areas include doctoral education, scholarly writing and publishing, and PhD career trajectories.

Kelsey works on the OFS and Research England ‘Close the Gap’ project, which aims to transform the PhD selection and admissions processes at Oxford and Cambridge towards the goal of a more inclusive research culture.

Kelsey received a DPhil in Education in 2020 and worked as a Senior Researcher at the University of Applied Sciences and Arts Western Switzerland from 2021-2022. She currently serves as the Junior Coordinator for the EARLI SIG 24 on Researcher Education and Careers.

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Mariela is Postdoctoral Researcher at SKOPE carrying out research for the Nuffield Project, ‘Comparing UK policies, outcomes and inequalities in post-16 education & training.’ Her research interests encompass identity and wellbeing theories, in particular the recognition theory and the Capability Approach, children’s rights and the ethics of care. She takes a multi-disciplinary approach in research, drawing on theories in sociology, psychology, human rights and political science to explore what makes a good life, particularly for young people, in contemporary society.

She holds a doctorate in Social Sciences and a Master’s in International Human Rights Law from New College, University of Oxford. Prior to joining SKOPE, she conducted evaluation research for the Rees Centre, research in social care for  the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, and provided policy advice and conducted research with young people in refugee camps for the AMAR Foundation.

She is a former Head of the National Authority for Children’s Rights in Romania (2007-2009) and former Policy Officer for the office of the European Commission in Romania where she was responsible for the EU intervention to reform the child protection system in Romania (1999 – 2006). Mariela is founding member of the Oxford Children’s Rights Network.

She is the author of ‘Voices from the Silent Cradles’ (Policy Press, 2021), a book which sheds light on children’s homes, foster care, domestic and international adoption from the perspective of the young people who experienced these types of care and which has been reviewed as complementing Sir Michael Rutter’s longitudinal study of Romanian born adoptees. Her work has been published in The International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, the British Journal of Social Work and Children and Youth Services Review. Her article ‘Children by Request: Romania’s children between rights and international politics’ has been cited in John Tobin’s ‘The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: A Commentary’ (OUP, 2019) and in the 2017 report of the UN Rapporteur on the Sale and Exploitation of Children.

Visit Mariela’s website: https://marielaneagu.com

Kelsey is a Research Associate at the Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance, and a Supernumerary Fellow at Jesus College. Her research areas include doctoral education, scholarly writing and publishing, and PhD career trajectories.

Kelsey works on the OFS and Research England ‘Close the Gap’ project, which aims to transform the PhD selection and admissions processes at Oxford and Cambridge towards the goal of a more inclusive research culture.

Kelsey received a DPhil in Education in 2020 and worked as a Senior Researcher at the University of Applied Sciences and Arts Western Switzerland from 2021-2022. She currently serves as the Junior Coordinator for the EARLI SIG 24 on Researcher Education and Careers.

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Mariela is Postdoctoral Researcher at SKOPE carrying out research for the Nuffield Project, ‘Comparing UK policies, outcomes and inequalities in post-16 education & training.’ Her research interests encompass identity and wellbeing theories, in particular the recognition theory and the Capability Approach, children’s rights and the ethics of care. She takes a multi-disciplinary approach in research, drawing on theories in sociology, psychology, human rights and political science to explore what makes a good life, particularly for young people, in contemporary society.

She holds a doctorate in Social Sciences and a Master’s in International Human Rights Law from New College, University of Oxford. Prior to joining SKOPE, she conducted evaluation research for the Rees Centre, research in social care for  the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, and provided policy advice and conducted research with young people in refugee camps for the AMAR Foundation.

She is a former Head of the National Authority for Children’s Rights in Romania (2007-2009) and former Policy Officer for the office of the European Commission in Romania where she was responsible for the EU intervention to reform the child protection system in Romania (1999 – 2006). Mariela is founding member of the Oxford Children’s Rights Network.

She is the author of ‘Voices from the Silent Cradles’ (Policy Press, 2021), a book which sheds light on children’s homes, foster care, domestic and international adoption from the perspective of the young people who experienced these types of care and which has been reviewed as complementing Sir Michael Rutter’s longitudinal study of Romanian born adoptees. Her work has been published in The International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, the British Journal of Social Work and Children and Youth Services Review. Her article ‘Children by Request: Romania’s children between rights and international politics’ has been cited in John Tobin’s ‘The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: A Commentary’ (OUP, 2019) and in the 2017 report of the UN Rapporteur on the Sale and Exploitation of Children.

Visit Mariela’s website: https://marielaneagu.com

Kelsey is a Research Associate at the Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance, and a Supernumerary Fellow at Jesus College. Her research areas include doctoral education, scholarly writing and publishing, and PhD career trajectories.

Kelsey works on the OFS and Research England ‘Close the Gap’ project, which aims to transform the PhD selection and admissions processes at Oxford and Cambridge towards the goal of a more inclusive research culture.

Kelsey received a DPhil in Education in 2020 and worked as a Senior Researcher at the University of Applied Sciences and Arts Western Switzerland from 2021-2022. She currently serves as the Junior Coordinator for the EARLI SIG 24 on Researcher Education and Careers.

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Mariela is Postdoctoral Researcher at SKOPE carrying out research for the Nuffield Project, ‘Comparing UK policies, outcomes and inequalities in post-16 education & training.’ Her research interests encompass identity and wellbeing theories, in particular the recognition theory and the Capability Approach, children’s rights and the ethics of care. She takes a multi-disciplinary approach in research, drawing on theories in sociology, psychology, human rights and political science to explore what makes a good life, particularly for young people, in contemporary society.

She holds a doctorate in Social Sciences and a Master’s in International Human Rights Law from New College, University of Oxford. Prior to joining SKOPE, she conducted evaluation research for the Rees Centre, research in social care for  the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, and provided policy advice and conducted research with young people in refugee camps for the AMAR Foundation.

She is a former Head of the National Authority for Children’s Rights in Romania (2007-2009) and former Policy Officer for the office of the European Commission in Romania where she was responsible for the EU intervention to reform the child protection system in Romania (1999 – 2006). Mariela is founding member of the Oxford Children’s Rights Network.

She is the author of ‘Voices from the Silent Cradles’ (Policy Press, 2021), a book which sheds light on children’s homes, foster care, domestic and international adoption from the perspective of the young people who experienced these types of care and which has been reviewed as complementing Sir Michael Rutter’s longitudinal study of Romanian born adoptees. Her work has been published in The International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, the British Journal of Social Work and Children and Youth Services Review. Her article ‘Children by Request: Romania’s children between rights and international politics’ has been cited in John Tobin’s ‘The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: A Commentary’ (OUP, 2019) and in the 2017 report of the UN Rapporteur on the Sale and Exploitation of Children.

Visit Mariela’s website: https://marielaneagu.com

Kelsey is a Research Associate at the Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance, and a Supernumerary Fellow at Jesus College. Her research areas include doctoral education, scholarly writing and publishing, and PhD career trajectories.

Kelsey works on the OFS and Research England ‘Close the Gap’ project, which aims to transform the PhD selection and admissions processes at Oxford and Cambridge towards the goal of a more inclusive research culture.

Kelsey received a DPhil in Education in 2020 and worked as a Senior Researcher at the University of Applied Sciences and Arts Western Switzerland from 2021-2022. She currently serves as the Junior Coordinator for the EARLI SIG 24 on Researcher Education and Careers.

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Mariela is Postdoctoral Researcher at SKOPE carrying out research for the Nuffield Project, ‘Comparing UK policies, outcomes and inequalities in post-16 education & training.’ Her research interests encompass identity and wellbeing theories, in particular the recognition theory and the Capability Approach, children’s rights and the ethics of care. She takes a multi-disciplinary approach in research, drawing on theories in sociology, psychology, human rights and political science to explore what makes a good life, particularly for young people, in contemporary society.

She holds a doctorate in Social Sciences and a Master’s in International Human Rights Law from New College, University of Oxford. Prior to joining SKOPE, she conducted evaluation research for the Rees Centre, research in social care for  the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, and provided policy advice and conducted research with young people in refugee camps for the AMAR Foundation.

She is a former Head of the National Authority for Children’s Rights in Romania (2007-2009) and former Policy Officer for the office of the European Commission in Romania where she was responsible for the EU intervention to reform the child protection system in Romania (1999 – 2006). Mariela is founding member of the Oxford Children’s Rights Network.

She is the author of ‘Voices from the Silent Cradles’ (Policy Press, 2021), a book which sheds light on children’s homes, foster care, domestic and international adoption from the perspective of the young people who experienced these types of care and which has been reviewed as complementing Sir Michael Rutter’s longitudinal study of Romanian born adoptees. Her work has been published in The International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, the British Journal of Social Work and Children and Youth Services Review. Her article ‘Children by Request: Romania’s children between rights and international politics’ has been cited in John Tobin’s ‘The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: A Commentary’ (OUP, 2019) and in the 2017 report of the UN Rapporteur on the Sale and Exploitation of Children.

Visit Mariela’s website: https://marielaneagu.com

Kelsey is a Research Associate at the Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance, and a Supernumerary Fellow at Jesus College. Her research areas include doctoral education, scholarly writing and publishing, and PhD career trajectories.

Kelsey works on the OFS and Research England ‘Close the Gap’ project, which aims to transform the PhD selection and admissions processes at Oxford and Cambridge towards the goal of a more inclusive research culture.

Kelsey received a DPhil in Education in 2020 and worked as a Senior Researcher at the University of Applied Sciences and Arts Western Switzerland from 2021-2022. She currently serves as the Junior Coordinator for the EARLI SIG 24 on Researcher Education and Careers.

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Mariela is Postdoctoral Researcher at SKOPE carrying out research for the Nuffield Project, ‘Comparing UK policies, outcomes and inequalities in post-16 education & training.’ Her research interests encompass identity and wellbeing theories, in particular the recognition theory and the Capability Approach, children’s rights and the ethics of care. She takes a multi-disciplinary approach in research, drawing on theories in sociology, psychology, human rights and political science to explore what makes a good life, particularly for young people, in contemporary society.

She holds a doctorate in Social Sciences and a Master’s in International Human Rights Law from New College, University of Oxford. Prior to joining SKOPE, she conducted evaluation research for the Rees Centre, research in social care for  the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, and provided policy advice and conducted research with young people in refugee camps for the AMAR Foundation.

She is a former Head of the National Authority for Children’s Rights in Romania (2007-2009) and former Policy Officer for the office of the European Commission in Romania where she was responsible for the EU intervention to reform the child protection system in Romania (1999 – 2006). Mariela is founding member of the Oxford Children’s Rights Network.

She is the author of ‘Voices from the Silent Cradles’ (Policy Press, 2021), a book which sheds light on children’s homes, foster care, domestic and international adoption from the perspective of the young people who experienced these types of care and which has been reviewed as complementing Sir Michael Rutter’s longitudinal study of Romanian born adoptees. Her work has been published in The International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, the British Journal of Social Work and Children and Youth Services Review. Her article ‘Children by Request: Romania’s children between rights and international politics’ has been cited in John Tobin’s ‘The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: A Commentary’ (OUP, 2019) and in the 2017 report of the UN Rapporteur on the Sale and Exploitation of Children.

Visit Mariela’s website: https://marielaneagu.com

Kelsey is a Research Associate at the Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance, and a Supernumerary Fellow at Jesus College. Her research areas include doctoral education, scholarly writing and publishing, and PhD career trajectories.

Kelsey works on the OFS and Research England ‘Close the Gap’ project, which aims to transform the PhD selection and admissions processes at Oxford and Cambridge towards the goal of a more inclusive research culture.

Kelsey received a DPhil in Education in 2020 and worked as a Senior Researcher at the University of Applied Sciences and Arts Western Switzerland from 2021-2022. She currently serves as the Junior Coordinator for the EARLI SIG 24 on Researcher Education and Careers.

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Mariela is Postdoctoral Researcher at SKOPE carrying out research for the Nuffield Project, ‘Comparing UK policies, outcomes and inequalities in post-16 education & training.’ Her research interests encompass identity and wellbeing theories, in particular the recognition theory and the Capability Approach, children’s rights and the ethics of care. She takes a multi-disciplinary approach in research, drawing on theories in sociology, psychology, human rights and political science to explore what makes a good life, particularly for young people, in contemporary society.

She holds a doctorate in Social Sciences and a Master’s in International Human Rights Law from New College, University of Oxford. Prior to joining SKOPE, she conducted evaluation research for the Rees Centre, research in social care for  the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, and provided policy advice and conducted research with young people in refugee camps for the AMAR Foundation.

She is a former Head of the National Authority for Children’s Rights in Romania (2007-2009) and former Policy Officer for the office of the European Commission in Romania where she was responsible for the EU intervention to reform the child protection system in Romania (1999 – 2006). Mariela is founding member of the Oxford Children’s Rights Network.

She is the author of ‘Voices from the Silent Cradles’ (Policy Press, 2021), a book which sheds light on children’s homes, foster care, domestic and international adoption from the perspective of the young people who experienced these types of care and which has been reviewed as complementing Sir Michael Rutter’s longitudinal study of Romanian born adoptees. Her work has been published in The International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, the British Journal of Social Work and Children and Youth Services Review. Her article ‘Children by Request: Romania’s children between rights and international politics’ has been cited in John Tobin’s ‘The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: A Commentary’ (OUP, 2019) and in the 2017 report of the UN Rapporteur on the Sale and Exploitation of Children.

Visit Mariela’s website: https://marielaneagu.com

Kelsey is a Research Associate at the Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance, and a Supernumerary Fellow at Jesus College. Her research areas include doctoral education, scholarly writing and publishing, and PhD career trajectories.

Kelsey works on the OFS and Research England ‘Close the Gap’ project, which aims to transform the PhD selection and admissions processes at Oxford and Cambridge towards the goal of a more inclusive research culture.

Kelsey received a DPhil in Education in 2020 and worked as a Senior Researcher at the University of Applied Sciences and Arts Western Switzerland from 2021-2022. She currently serves as the Junior Coordinator for the EARLI SIG 24 on Researcher Education and Careers.

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Mariela is Postdoctoral Researcher at SKOPE carrying out research for the Nuffield Project, ‘Comparing UK policies, outcomes and inequalities in post-16 education & training.’ Her research interests encompass identity and wellbeing theories, in particular the recognition theory and the Capability Approach, children’s rights and the ethics of care. She takes a multi-disciplinary approach in research, drawing on theories in sociology, psychology, human rights and political science to explore what makes a good life, particularly for young people, in contemporary society.

She holds a doctorate in Social Sciences and a Master’s in International Human Rights Law from New College, University of Oxford. Prior to joining SKOPE, she conducted evaluation research for the Rees Centre, research in social care for  the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, and provided policy advice and conducted research with young people in refugee camps for the AMAR Foundation.

She is a former Head of the National Authority for Children’s Rights in Romania (2007-2009) and former Policy Officer for the office of the European Commission in Romania where she was responsible for the EU intervention to reform the child protection system in Romania (1999 – 2006). Mariela is founding member of the Oxford Children’s Rights Network.

She is the author of ‘Voices from the Silent Cradles’ (Policy Press, 2021), a book which sheds light on children’s homes, foster care, domestic and international adoption from the perspective of the young people who experienced these types of care and which has been reviewed as complementing Sir Michael Rutter’s longitudinal study of Romanian born adoptees. Her work has been published in The International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, the British Journal of Social Work and Children and Youth Services Review. Her article ‘Children by Request: Romania’s children between rights and international politics’ has been cited in John Tobin’s ‘The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: A Commentary’ (OUP, 2019) and in the 2017 report of the UN Rapporteur on the Sale and Exploitation of Children.

Visit Mariela’s website: https://marielaneagu.com

Kelsey is a Research Associate at the Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance, and a Supernumerary Fellow at Jesus College. Her research areas include doctoral education, scholarly writing and publishing, and PhD career trajectories.

Kelsey works on the OFS and Research England ‘Close the Gap’ project, which aims to transform the PhD selection and admissions processes at Oxford and Cambridge towards the goal of a more inclusive research culture.

Kelsey received a DPhil in Education in 2020 and worked as a Senior Researcher at the University of Applied Sciences and Arts Western Switzerland from 2021-2022. She currently serves as the Junior Coordinator for the EARLI SIG 24 on Researcher Education and Careers.

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Mariela is Postdoctoral Researcher at SKOPE carrying out research for the Nuffield Project, ‘Comparing UK policies, outcomes and inequalities in post-16 education & training.’ Her research interests encompass identity and wellbeing theories, in particular the recognition theory and the Capability Approach, children’s rights and the ethics of care. She takes a multi-disciplinary approach in research, drawing on theories in sociology, psychology, human rights and political science to explore what makes a good life, particularly for young people, in contemporary society.

She holds a doctorate in Social Sciences and a Master’s in International Human Rights Law from New College, University of Oxford. Prior to joining SKOPE, she conducted evaluation research for the Rees Centre, research in social care for  the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, and provided policy advice and conducted research with young people in refugee camps for the AMAR Foundation.

She is a former Head of the National Authority for Children’s Rights in Romania (2007-2009) and former Policy Officer for the office of the European Commission in Romania where she was responsible for the EU intervention to reform the child protection system in Romania (1999 – 2006). Mariela is founding member of the Oxford Children’s Rights Network.

She is the author of ‘Voices from the Silent Cradles’ (Policy Press, 2021), a book which sheds light on children’s homes, foster care, domestic and international adoption from the perspective of the young people who experienced these types of care and which has been reviewed as complementing Sir Michael Rutter’s longitudinal study of Romanian born adoptees. Her work has been published in The International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, the British Journal of Social Work and Children and Youth Services Review. Her article ‘Children by Request: Romania’s children between rights and international politics’ has been cited in John Tobin’s ‘The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: A Commentary’ (OUP, 2019) and in the 2017 report of the UN Rapporteur on the Sale and Exploitation of Children.

Visit Mariela’s website: https://marielaneagu.com

Kelsey is a Research Associate at the Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance, and a Supernumerary Fellow at Jesus College. Her research areas include doctoral education, scholarly writing and publishing, and PhD career trajectories.

Kelsey works on the OFS and Research England ‘Close the Gap’ project, which aims to transform the PhD selection and admissions processes at Oxford and Cambridge towards the goal of a more inclusive research culture.

Kelsey received a DPhil in Education in 2020 and worked as a Senior Researcher at the University of Applied Sciences and Arts Western Switzerland from 2021-2022. She currently serves as the Junior Coordinator for the EARLI SIG 24 on Researcher Education and Careers.

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Mariela is Postdoctoral Researcher at SKOPE carrying out research for the Nuffield Project, ‘Comparing UK policies, outcomes and inequalities in post-16 education & training.’ Her research interests encompass identity and wellbeing theories, in particular the recognition theory and the Capability Approach, children’s rights and the ethics of care. She takes a multi-disciplinary approach in research, drawing on theories in sociology, psychology, human rights and political science to explore what makes a good life, particularly for young people, in contemporary society.

She holds a doctorate in Social Sciences and a Master’s in International Human Rights Law from New College, University of Oxford. Prior to joining SKOPE, she conducted evaluation research for the Rees Centre, research in social care for  the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, and provided policy advice and conducted research with young people in refugee camps for the AMAR Foundation.

She is a former Head of the National Authority for Children’s Rights in Romania (2007-2009) and former Policy Officer for the office of the European Commission in Romania where she was responsible for the EU intervention to reform the child protection system in Romania (1999 – 2006). Mariela is founding member of the Oxford Children’s Rights Network.

She is the author of ‘Voices from the Silent Cradles’ (Policy Press, 2021), a book which sheds light on children’s homes, foster care, domestic and international adoption from the perspective of the young people who experienced these types of care and which has been reviewed as complementing Sir Michael Rutter’s longitudinal study of Romanian born adoptees. Her work has been published in The International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, the British Journal of Social Work and Children and Youth Services Review. Her article ‘Children by Request: Romania’s children between rights and international politics’ has been cited in John Tobin’s ‘The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: A Commentary’ (OUP, 2019) and in the 2017 report of the UN Rapporteur on the Sale and Exploitation of Children.

Visit Mariela’s website: https://marielaneagu.com

Kelsey is a Research Associate at the Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance, and a Supernumerary Fellow at Jesus College. Her research areas include doctoral education, scholarly writing and publishing, and PhD career trajectories.

Kelsey works on the OFS and Research England ‘Close the Gap’ project, which aims to transform the PhD selection and admissions processes at Oxford and Cambridge towards the goal of a more inclusive research culture.

Kelsey received a DPhil in Education in 2020 and worked as a Senior Researcher at the University of Applied Sciences and Arts Western Switzerland from 2021-2022. She currently serves as the Junior Coordinator for the EARLI SIG 24 on Researcher Education and Careers.

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Mariela is Postdoctoral Researcher at SKOPE carrying out research for the Nuffield Project, ‘Comparing UK policies, outcomes and inequalities in post-16 education & training.’ Her research interests encompass identity and wellbeing theories, in particular the recognition theory and the Capability Approach, children’s rights and the ethics of care. She takes a multi-disciplinary approach in research, drawing on theories in sociology, psychology, human rights and political science to explore what makes a good life, particularly for young people, in contemporary society.

She holds a doctorate in Social Sciences and a Master’s in International Human Rights Law from New College, University of Oxford. Prior to joining SKOPE, she conducted evaluation research for the Rees Centre, research in social care for  the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, and provided policy advice and conducted research with young people in refugee camps for the AMAR Foundation.

She is a former Head of the National Authority for Children’s Rights in Romania (2007-2009) and former Policy Officer for the office of the European Commission in Romania where she was responsible for the EU intervention to reform the child protection system in Romania (1999 – 2006). Mariela is founding member of the Oxford Children’s Rights Network.

She is the author of ‘Voices from the Silent Cradles’ (Policy Press, 2021), a book which sheds light on children’s homes, foster care, domestic and international adoption from the perspective of the young people who experienced these types of care and which has been reviewed as complementing Sir Michael Rutter’s longitudinal study of Romanian born adoptees. Her work has been published in The International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, the British Journal of Social Work and Children and Youth Services Review. Her article ‘Children by Request: Romania’s children between rights and international politics’ has been cited in John Tobin’s ‘The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: A Commentary’ (OUP, 2019) and in the 2017 report of the UN Rapporteur on the Sale and Exploitation of Children.

Visit Mariela’s website: https://marielaneagu.com

Kelsey is a Research Associate at the Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance, and a Supernumerary Fellow at Jesus College. Her research areas include doctoral education, scholarly writing and publishing, and PhD career trajectories.

Kelsey works on the OFS and Research England ‘Close the Gap’ project, which aims to transform the PhD selection and admissions processes at Oxford and Cambridge towards the goal of a more inclusive research culture.

Kelsey received a DPhil in Education in 2020 and worked as a Senior Researcher at the University of Applied Sciences and Arts Western Switzerland from 2021-2022. She currently serves as the Junior Coordinator for the EARLI SIG 24 on Researcher Education and Careers.

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Mariela is Postdoctoral Researcher at SKOPE carrying out research for the Nuffield Project, ‘Comparing UK policies, outcomes and inequalities in post-16 education & training.’ Her research interests encompass identity and wellbeing theories, in particular the recognition theory and the Capability Approach, children’s rights and the ethics of care. She takes a multi-disciplinary approach in research, drawing on theories in sociology, psychology, human rights and political science to explore what makes a good life, particularly for young people, in contemporary society.

She holds a doctorate in Social Sciences and a Master’s in International Human Rights Law from New College, University of Oxford. Prior to joining SKOPE, she conducted evaluation research for the Rees Centre, research in social care for  the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, and provided policy advice and conducted research with young people in refugee camps for the AMAR Foundation.

She is a former Head of the National Authority for Children’s Rights in Romania (2007-2009) and former Policy Officer for the office of the European Commission in Romania where she was responsible for the EU intervention to reform the child protection system in Romania (1999 – 2006). Mariela is founding member of the Oxford Children’s Rights Network.

She is the author of ‘Voices from the Silent Cradles’ (Policy Press, 2021), a book which sheds light on children’s homes, foster care, domestic and international adoption from the perspective of the young people who experienced these types of care and which has been reviewed as complementing Sir Michael Rutter’s longitudinal study of Romanian born adoptees. Her work has been published in The International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, the British Journal of Social Work and Children and Youth Services Review. Her article ‘Children by Request: Romania’s children between rights and international politics’ has been cited in John Tobin’s ‘The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: A Commentary’ (OUP, 2019) and in the 2017 report of the UN Rapporteur on the Sale and Exploitation of Children.

Visit Mariela’s website: https://marielaneagu.com

Kelsey is a Research Associate at the Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance, and a Supernumerary Fellow at Jesus College. Her research areas include doctoral education, scholarly writing and publishing, and PhD career trajectories.

Kelsey works on the OFS and Research England ‘Close the Gap’ project, which aims to transform the PhD selection and admissions processes at Oxford and Cambridge towards the goal of a more inclusive research culture.

Kelsey received a DPhil in Education in 2020 and worked as a Senior Researcher at the University of Applied Sciences and Arts Western Switzerland from 2021-2022. She currently serves as the Junior Coordinator for the EARLI SIG 24 on Researcher Education and Careers.

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Mariela is Postdoctoral Researcher at SKOPE carrying out research for the Nuffield Project, ‘Comparing UK policies, outcomes and inequalities in post-16 education & training.’ Her research interests encompass identity and wellbeing theories, in particular the recognition theory and the Capability Approach, children’s rights and the ethics of care. She takes a multi-disciplinary approach in research, drawing on theories in sociology, psychology, human rights and political science to explore what makes a good life, particularly for young people, in contemporary society.

She holds a doctorate in Social Sciences and a Master’s in International Human Rights Law from New College, University of Oxford. Prior to joining SKOPE, she conducted evaluation research for the Rees Centre, research in social care for  the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, and provided policy advice and conducted research with young people in refugee camps for the AMAR Foundation.

She is a former Head of the National Authority for Children’s Rights in Romania (2007-2009) and former Policy Officer for the office of the European Commission in Romania where she was responsible for the EU intervention to reform the child protection system in Romania (1999 – 2006). Mariela is founding member of the Oxford Children’s Rights Network.

She is the author of ‘Voices from the Silent Cradles’ (Policy Press, 2021), a book which sheds light on children’s homes, foster care, domestic and international adoption from the perspective of the young people who experienced these types of care and which has been reviewed as complementing Sir Michael Rutter’s longitudinal study of Romanian born adoptees. Her work has been published in The International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, the British Journal of Social Work and Children and Youth Services Review. Her article ‘Children by Request: Romania’s children between rights and international politics’ has been cited in John Tobin’s ‘The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: A Commentary’ (OUP, 2019) and in the 2017 report of the UN Rapporteur on the Sale and Exploitation of Children.

Visit Mariela’s website: https://marielaneagu.com

Kelsey is a Research Associate at the Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance, and a Supernumerary Fellow at Jesus College. Her research areas include doctoral education, scholarly writing and publishing, and PhD career trajectories.

Kelsey works on the OFS and Research England ‘Close the Gap’ project, which aims to transform the PhD selection and admissions processes at Oxford and Cambridge towards the goal of a more inclusive research culture.

Kelsey received a DPhil in Education in 2020 and worked as a Senior Researcher at the University of Applied Sciences and Arts Western Switzerland from 2021-2022. She currently serves as the Junior Coordinator for the EARLI SIG 24 on Researcher Education and Careers.

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Mariela is Postdoctoral Researcher at SKOPE carrying out research for the Nuffield Project, ‘Comparing UK policies, outcomes and inequalities in post-16 education & training.’ Her research interests encompass identity and wellbeing theories, in particular the recognition theory and the Capability Approach, children’s rights and the ethics of care. She takes a multi-disciplinary approach in research, drawing on theories in sociology, psychology, human rights and political science to explore what makes a good life, particularly for young people, in contemporary society.

She holds a doctorate in Social Sciences and a Master’s in International Human Rights Law from New College, University of Oxford. Prior to joining SKOPE, she conducted evaluation research for the Rees Centre, research in social care for  the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, and provided policy advice and conducted research with young people in refugee camps for the AMAR Foundation.

She is a former Head of the National Authority for Children’s Rights in Romania (2007-2009) and former Policy Officer for the office of the European Commission in Romania where she was responsible for the EU intervention to reform the child protection system in Romania (1999 – 2006). Mariela is founding member of the Oxford Children’s Rights Network.

She is the author of ‘Voices from the Silent Cradles’ (Policy Press, 2021), a book which sheds light on children’s homes, foster care, domestic and international adoption from the perspective of the young people who experienced these types of care and which has been reviewed as complementing Sir Michael Rutter’s longitudinal study of Romanian born adoptees. Her work has been published in The International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, the British Journal of Social Work and Children and Youth Services Review. Her article ‘Children by Request: Romania’s children between rights and international politics’ has been cited in John Tobin’s ‘The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: A Commentary’ (OUP, 2019) and in the 2017 report of the UN Rapporteur on the Sale and Exploitation of Children.

Visit Mariela’s website: https://marielaneagu.com

Kelsey is a Research Associate at the Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance, and a Supernumerary Fellow at Jesus College. Her research areas include doctoral education, scholarly writing and publishing, and PhD career trajectories.

Kelsey works on the OFS and Research England ‘Close the Gap’ project, which aims to transform the PhD selection and admissions processes at Oxford and Cambridge towards the goal of a more inclusive research culture.

Kelsey received a DPhil in Education in 2020 and worked as a Senior Researcher at the University of Applied Sciences and Arts Western Switzerland from 2021-2022. She currently serves as the Junior Coordinator for the EARLI SIG 24 on Researcher Education and Careers.

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Mariela is Postdoctoral Researcher at SKOPE carrying out research for the Nuffield Project, ‘Comparing UK policies, outcomes and inequalities in post-16 education & training.’ Her research interests encompass identity and wellbeing theories, in particular the recognition theory and the Capability Approach, children’s rights and the ethics of care. She takes a multi-disciplinary approach in research, drawing on theories in sociology, psychology, human rights and political science to explore what makes a good life, particularly for young people, in contemporary society.

She holds a doctorate in Social Sciences and a Master’s in International Human Rights Law from New College, University of Oxford. Prior to joining SKOPE, she conducted evaluation research for the Rees Centre, research in social care for  the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, and provided policy advice and conducted research with young people in refugee camps for the AMAR Foundation.

She is a former Head of the National Authority for Children’s Rights in Romania (2007-2009) and former Policy Officer for the office of the European Commission in Romania where she was responsible for the EU intervention to reform the child protection system in Romania (1999 – 2006). Mariela is founding member of the Oxford Children’s Rights Network.

She is the author of ‘Voices from the Silent Cradles’ (Policy Press, 2021), a book which sheds light on children’s homes, foster care, domestic and international adoption from the perspective of the young people who experienced these types of care and which has been reviewed as complementing Sir Michael Rutter’s longitudinal study of Romanian born adoptees. Her work has been published in The International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, the British Journal of Social Work and Children and Youth Services Review. Her article ‘Children by Request: Romania’s children between rights and international politics’ has been cited in John Tobin’s ‘The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: A Commentary’ (OUP, 2019) and in the 2017 report of the UN Rapporteur on the Sale and Exploitation of Children.

Visit Mariela’s website: https://marielaneagu.com

Kelsey is a Research Associate at the Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance, and a Supernumerary Fellow at Jesus College. Her research areas include doctoral education, scholarly writing and publishing, and PhD career trajectories.

Kelsey works on the OFS and Research England ‘Close the Gap’ project, which aims to transform the PhD selection and admissions processes at Oxford and Cambridge towards the goal of a more inclusive research culture.

Kelsey received a DPhil in Education in 2020 and worked as a Senior Researcher at the University of Applied Sciences and Arts Western Switzerland from 2021-2022. She currently serves as the Junior Coordinator for the EARLI SIG 24 on Researcher Education and Careers.

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Mariela is Postdoctoral Researcher at SKOPE carrying out research for the Nuffield Project, ‘Comparing UK policies, outcomes and inequalities in post-16 education & training.’ Her research interests encompass identity and wellbeing theories, in particular the recognition theory and the Capability Approach, children’s rights and the ethics of care. She takes a multi-disciplinary approach in research, drawing on theories in sociology, psychology, human rights and political science to explore what makes a good life, particularly for young people, in contemporary society.

She holds a doctorate in Social Sciences and a Master’s in International Human Rights Law from New College, University of Oxford. Prior to joining SKOPE, she conducted evaluation research for the Rees Centre, research in social care for  the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, and provided policy advice and conducted research with young people in refugee camps for the AMAR Foundation.

She is a former Head of the National Authority for Children’s Rights in Romania (2007-2009) and former Policy Officer for the office of the European Commission in Romania where she was responsible for the EU intervention to reform the child protection system in Romania (1999 – 2006). Mariela is founding member of the Oxford Children’s Rights Network.

She is the author of ‘Voices from the Silent Cradles’ (Policy Press, 2021), a book which sheds light on children’s homes, foster care, domestic and international adoption from the perspective of the young people who experienced these types of care and which has been reviewed as complementing Sir Michael Rutter’s longitudinal study of Romanian born adoptees. Her work has been published in The International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, the British Journal of Social Work and Children and Youth Services Review. Her article ‘Children by Request: Romania’s children between rights and international politics’ has been cited in John Tobin’s ‘The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: A Commentary’ (OUP, 2019) and in the 2017 report of the UN Rapporteur on the Sale and Exploitation of Children.

Visit Mariela’s website: https://marielaneagu.com

Kelsey is a Research Associate at the Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance, and a Supernumerary Fellow at Jesus College. Her research areas include doctoral education, scholarly writing and publishing, and PhD career trajectories.

Kelsey works on the OFS and Research England ‘Close the Gap’ project, which aims to transform the PhD selection and admissions processes at Oxford and Cambridge towards the goal of a more inclusive research culture.

Kelsey received a DPhil in Education in 2020 and worked as a Senior Researcher at the University of Applied Sciences and Arts Western Switzerland from 2021-2022. She currently serves as the Junior Coordinator for the EARLI SIG 24 on Researcher Education and Careers.

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Mariela is Postdoctoral Researcher at SKOPE carrying out research for the Nuffield Project, ‘Comparing UK policies, outcomes and inequalities in post-16 education & training.’ Her research interests encompass identity and wellbeing theories, in particular the recognition theory and the Capability Approach, children’s rights and the ethics of care. She takes a multi-disciplinary approach in research, drawing on theories in sociology, psychology, human rights and political science to explore what makes a good life, particularly for young people, in contemporary society.

She holds a doctorate in Social Sciences and a Master’s in International Human Rights Law from New College, University of Oxford. Prior to joining SKOPE, she conducted evaluation research for the Rees Centre, research in social care for  the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, and provided policy advice and conducted research with young people in refugee camps for the AMAR Foundation.

She is a former Head of the National Authority for Children’s Rights in Romania (2007-2009) and former Policy Officer for the office of the European Commission in Romania where she was responsible for the EU intervention to reform the child protection system in Romania (1999 – 2006). Mariela is founding member of the Oxford Children’s Rights Network.

She is the author of ‘Voices from the Silent Cradles’ (Policy Press, 2021), a book which sheds light on children’s homes, foster care, domestic and international adoption from the perspective of the young people who experienced these types of care and which has been reviewed as complementing Sir Michael Rutter’s longitudinal study of Romanian born adoptees. Her work has been published in The International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, the British Journal of Social Work and Children and Youth Services Review. Her article ‘Children by Request: Romania’s children between rights and international politics’ has been cited in John Tobin’s ‘The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: A Commentary’ (OUP, 2019) and in the 2017 report of the UN Rapporteur on the Sale and Exploitation of Children.

Visit Mariela’s website: https://marielaneagu.com

Kelsey is a Research Associate at the Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance, and a Supernumerary Fellow at Jesus College. Her research areas include doctoral education, scholarly writing and publishing, and PhD career trajectories.

Kelsey works on the OFS and Research England ‘Close the Gap’ project, which aims to transform the PhD selection and admissions processes at Oxford and Cambridge towards the goal of a more inclusive research culture.

Kelsey received a DPhil in Education in 2020 and worked as a Senior Researcher at the University of Applied Sciences and Arts Western Switzerland from 2021-2022. She currently serves as the Junior Coordinator for the EARLI SIG 24 on Researcher Education and Careers.

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Mariela is Postdoctoral Researcher at SKOPE carrying out research for the Nuffield Project, ‘Comparing UK policies, outcomes and inequalities in post-16 education & training.’ Her research interests encompass identity and wellbeing theories, in particular the recognition theory and the Capability Approach, children’s rights and the ethics of care. She takes a multi-disciplinary approach in research, drawing on theories in sociology, psychology, human rights and political science to explore what makes a good life, particularly for young people, in contemporary society.

She holds a doctorate in Social Sciences and a Master’s in International Human Rights Law from New College, University of Oxford. Prior to joining SKOPE, she conducted evaluation research for the Rees Centre, research in social care for  the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, and provided policy advice and conducted research with young people in refugee camps for the AMAR Foundation.

She is a former Head of the National Authority for Children’s Rights in Romania (2007-2009) and former Policy Officer for the office of the European Commission in Romania where she was responsible for the EU intervention to reform the child protection system in Romania (1999 – 2006). Mariela is founding member of the Oxford Children’s Rights Network.

She is the author of ‘Voices from the Silent Cradles’ (Policy Press, 2021), a book which sheds light on children’s homes, foster care, domestic and international adoption from the perspective of the young people who experienced these types of care and which has been reviewed as complementing Sir Michael Rutter’s longitudinal study of Romanian born adoptees. Her work has been published in The International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, the British Journal of Social Work and Children and Youth Services Review. Her article ‘Children by Request: Romania’s children between rights and international politics’ has been cited in John Tobin’s ‘The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: A Commentary’ (OUP, 2019) and in the 2017 report of the UN Rapporteur on the Sale and Exploitation of Children.

Visit Mariela’s website: https://marielaneagu.com

Kelsey is a Research Associate at the Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance, and a Supernumerary Fellow at Jesus College. Her research areas include doctoral education, scholarly writing and publishing, and PhD career trajectories.

Kelsey works on the OFS and Research England ‘Close the Gap’ project, which aims to transform the PhD selection and admissions processes at Oxford and Cambridge towards the goal of a more inclusive research culture.

Kelsey received a DPhil in Education in 2020 and worked as a Senior Researcher at the University of Applied Sciences and Arts Western Switzerland from 2021-2022. She currently serves as the Junior Coordinator for the EARLI SIG 24 on Researcher Education and Careers.

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Mariela is Postdoctoral Researcher at SKOPE carrying out research for the Nuffield Project, ‘Comparing UK policies, outcomes and inequalities in post-16 education & training.’ Her research interests encompass identity and wellbeing theories, in particular the recognition theory and the Capability Approach, children’s rights and the ethics of care. She takes a multi-disciplinary approach in research, drawing on theories in sociology, psychology, human rights and political science to explore what makes a good life, particularly for young people, in contemporary society.

She holds a doctorate in Social Sciences and a Master’s in International Human Rights Law from New College, University of Oxford. Prior to joining SKOPE, she conducted evaluation research for the Rees Centre, research in social care for  the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, and provided policy advice and conducted research with young people in refugee camps for the AMAR Foundation.

She is a former Head of the National Authority for Children’s Rights in Romania (2007-2009) and former Policy Officer for the office of the European Commission in Romania where she was responsible for the EU intervention to reform the child protection system in Romania (1999 – 2006). Mariela is founding member of the Oxford Children’s Rights Network.

She is the author of ‘Voices from the Silent Cradles’ (Policy Press, 2021), a book which sheds light on children’s homes, foster care, domestic and international adoption from the perspective of the young people who experienced these types of care and which has been reviewed as complementing Sir Michael Rutter’s longitudinal study of Romanian born adoptees. Her work has been published in The International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, the British Journal of Social Work and Children and Youth Services Review. Her article ‘Children by Request: Romania’s children between rights and international politics’ has been cited in John Tobin’s ‘The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: A Commentary’ (OUP, 2019) and in the 2017 report of the UN Rapporteur on the Sale and Exploitation of Children.

Visit Mariela’s website: https://marielaneagu.com

Kelsey is a Research Associate at the Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance, and a Supernumerary Fellow at Jesus College. Her research areas include doctoral education, scholarly writing and publishing, and PhD career trajectories.

Kelsey works on the OFS and Research England ‘Close the Gap’ project, which aims to transform the PhD selection and admissions processes at Oxford and Cambridge towards the goal of a more inclusive research culture.

Kelsey received a DPhil in Education in 2020 and worked as a Senior Researcher at the University of Applied Sciences and Arts Western Switzerland from 2021-2022. She currently serves as the Junior Coordinator for the EARLI SIG 24 on Researcher Education and Careers.

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Mariela is Postdoctoral Researcher at SKOPE carrying out research for the Nuffield Project, ‘Comparing UK policies, outcomes and inequalities in post-16 education & training.’ Her research interests encompass identity and wellbeing theories, in particular the recognition theory and the Capability Approach, children’s rights and the ethics of care. She takes a multi-disciplinary approach in research, drawing on theories in sociology, psychology, human rights and political science to explore what makes a good life, particularly for young people, in contemporary society.

She holds a doctorate in Social Sciences and a Master’s in International Human Rights Law from New College, University of Oxford. Prior to joining SKOPE, she conducted evaluation research for the Rees Centre, research in social care for  the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, and provided policy advice and conducted research with young people in refugee camps for the AMAR Foundation.

She is a former Head of the National Authority for Children’s Rights in Romania (2007-2009) and former Policy Officer for the office of the European Commission in Romania where she was responsible for the EU intervention to reform the child protection system in Romania (1999 – 2006). Mariela is founding member of the Oxford Children’s Rights Network.

She is the author of ‘Voices from the Silent Cradles’ (Policy Press, 2021), a book which sheds light on children’s homes, foster care, domestic and international adoption from the perspective of the young people who experienced these types of care and which has been reviewed as complementing Sir Michael Rutter’s longitudinal study of Romanian born adoptees. Her work has been published in The International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, the British Journal of Social Work and Children and Youth Services Review. Her article ‘Children by Request: Romania’s children between rights and international politics’ has been cited in John Tobin’s ‘The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: A Commentary’ (OUP, 2019) and in the 2017 report of the UN Rapporteur on the Sale and Exploitation of Children.

Visit Mariela’s website: https://marielaneagu.com

Kelsey is a Research Associate at the Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance, and a Supernumerary Fellow at Jesus College. Her research areas include doctoral education, scholarly writing and publishing, and PhD career trajectories.

Kelsey works on the OFS and Research England ‘Close the Gap’ project, which aims to transform the PhD selection and admissions processes at Oxford and Cambridge towards the goal of a more inclusive research culture.

Kelsey received a DPhil in Education in 2020 and worked as a Senior Researcher at the University of Applied Sciences and Arts Western Switzerland from 2021-2022. She currently serves as the Junior Coordinator for the EARLI SIG 24 on Researcher Education and Careers.

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Mariela is Postdoctoral Researcher at SKOPE carrying out research for the Nuffield Project, ‘Comparing UK policies, outcomes and inequalities in post-16 education & training.’ Her research interests encompass identity and wellbeing theories, in particular the recognition theory and the Capability Approach, children’s rights and the ethics of care. She takes a multi-disciplinary approach in research, drawing on theories in sociology, psychology, human rights and political science to explore what makes a good life, particularly for young people, in contemporary society.

She holds a doctorate in Social Sciences and a Master’s in International Human Rights Law from New College, University of Oxford. Prior to joining SKOPE, she conducted evaluation research for the Rees Centre, research in social care for  the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, and provided policy advice and conducted research with young people in refugee camps for the AMAR Foundation.

She is a former Head of the National Authority for Children’s Rights in Romania (2007-2009) and former Policy Officer for the office of the European Commission in Romania where she was responsible for the EU intervention to reform the child protection system in Romania (1999 – 2006). Mariela is founding member of the Oxford Children’s Rights Network.

She is the author of ‘Voices from the Silent Cradles’ (Policy Press, 2021), a book which sheds light on children’s homes, foster care, domestic and international adoption from the perspective of the young people who experienced these types of care and which has been reviewed as complementing Sir Michael Rutter’s longitudinal study of Romanian born adoptees. Her work has been published in The International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, the British Journal of Social Work and Children and Youth Services Review. Her article ‘Children by Request: Romania’s children between rights and international politics’ has been cited in John Tobin’s ‘The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: A Commentary’ (OUP, 2019) and in the 2017 report of the UN Rapporteur on the Sale and Exploitation of Children.

Visit Mariela’s website: https://marielaneagu.com

Kelsey is a Research Associate at the Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance, and a Supernumerary Fellow at Jesus College. Her research areas include doctoral education, scholarly writing and publishing, and PhD career trajectories.

Kelsey works on the OFS and Research England ‘Close the Gap’ project, which aims to transform the PhD selection and admissions processes at Oxford and Cambridge towards the goal of a more inclusive research culture.

Kelsey received a DPhil in Education in 2020 and worked as a Senior Researcher at the University of Applied Sciences and Arts Western Switzerland from 2021-2022. She currently serves as the Junior Coordinator for the EARLI SIG 24 on Researcher Education and Careers.

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Mariela is Postdoctoral Researcher at SKOPE carrying out research for the Nuffield Project, ‘Comparing UK policies, outcomes and inequalities in post-16 education & training.’ Her research interests encompass identity and wellbeing theories, in particular the recognition theory and the Capability Approach, children’s rights and the ethics of care. She takes a multi-disciplinary approach in research, drawing on theories in sociology, psychology, human rights and political science to explore what makes a good life, particularly for young people, in contemporary society.

She holds a doctorate in Social Sciences and a Master’s in International Human Rights Law from New College, University of Oxford. Prior to joining SKOPE, she conducted evaluation research for the Rees Centre, research in social care for  the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, and provided policy advice and conducted research with young people in refugee camps for the AMAR Foundation.

She is a former Head of the National Authority for Children’s Rights in Romania (2007-2009) and former Policy Officer for the office of the European Commission in Romania where she was responsible for the EU intervention to reform the child protection system in Romania (1999 – 2006). Mariela is founding member of the Oxford Children’s Rights Network.

She is the author of ‘Voices from the Silent Cradles’ (Policy Press, 2021), a book which sheds light on children’s homes, foster care, domestic and international adoption from the perspective of the young people who experienced these types of care and which has been reviewed as complementing Sir Michael Rutter’s longitudinal study of Romanian born adoptees. Her work has been published in The International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, the British Journal of Social Work and Children and Youth Services Review. Her article ‘Children by Request: Romania’s children between rights and international politics’ has been cited in John Tobin’s ‘The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: A Commentary’ (OUP, 2019) and in the 2017 report of the UN Rapporteur on the Sale and Exploitation of Children.

Visit Mariela’s website: https://marielaneagu.com

Kelsey is a Research Associate at the Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance, and a Supernumerary Fellow at Jesus College. Her research areas include doctoral education, scholarly writing and publishing, and PhD career trajectories.

Kelsey works on the OFS and Research England ‘Close the Gap’ project, which aims to transform the PhD selection and admissions processes at Oxford and Cambridge towards the goal of a more inclusive research culture.

Kelsey received a DPhil in Education in 2020 and worked as a Senior Researcher at the University of Applied Sciences and Arts Western Switzerland from 2021-2022. She currently serves as the Junior Coordinator for the EARLI SIG 24 on Researcher Education and Careers.

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Mariela is Postdoctoral Researcher at SKOPE carrying out research for the Nuffield Project, ‘Comparing UK policies, outcomes and inequalities in post-16 education & training.’ Her research interests encompass identity and wellbeing theories, in particular the recognition theory and the Capability Approach, children’s rights and the ethics of care. She takes a multi-disciplinary approach in research, drawing on theories in sociology, psychology, human rights and political science to explore what makes a good life, particularly for young people, in contemporary society.

She holds a doctorate in Social Sciences and a Master’s in International Human Rights Law from New College, University of Oxford. Prior to joining SKOPE, she conducted evaluation research for the Rees Centre, research in social care for  the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, and provided policy advice and conducted research with young people in refugee camps for the AMAR Foundation.

She is a former Head of the National Authority for Children’s Rights in Romania (2007-2009) and former Policy Officer for the office of the European Commission in Romania where she was responsible for the EU intervention to reform the child protection system in Romania (1999 – 2006). Mariela is founding member of the Oxford Children’s Rights Network.

She is the author of ‘Voices from the Silent Cradles’ (Policy Press, 2021), a book which sheds light on children’s homes, foster care, domestic and international adoption from the perspective of the young people who experienced these types of care and which has been reviewed as complementing Sir Michael Rutter’s longitudinal study of Romanian born adoptees. Her work has been published in The International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, the British Journal of Social Work and Children and Youth Services Review. Her article ‘Children by Request: Romania’s children between rights and international politics’ has been cited in John Tobin’s ‘The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: A Commentary’ (OUP, 2019) and in the 2017 report of the UN Rapporteur on the Sale and Exploitation of Children.

Visit Mariela’s website: https://marielaneagu.com

Kelsey is a Research Associate at the Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance, and a Supernumerary Fellow at Jesus College. Her research areas include doctoral education, scholarly writing and publishing, and PhD career trajectories.

Kelsey works on the OFS and Research England ‘Close the Gap’ project, which aims to transform the PhD selection and admissions processes at Oxford and Cambridge towards the goal of a more inclusive research culture.

Kelsey received a DPhil in Education in 2020 and worked as a Senior Researcher at the University of Applied Sciences and Arts Western Switzerland from 2021-2022. She currently serves as the Junior Coordinator for the EARLI SIG 24 on Researcher Education and Careers.

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Mariela is Postdoctoral Researcher at SKOPE carrying out research for the Nuffield Project, ‘Comparing UK policies, outcomes and inequalities in post-16 education & training.’ Her research interests encompass identity and wellbeing theories, in particular the recognition theory and the Capability Approach, children’s rights and the ethics of care. She takes a multi-disciplinary approach in research, drawing on theories in sociology, psychology, human rights and political science to explore what makes a good life, particularly for young people, in contemporary society.

She holds a doctorate in Social Sciences and a Master’s in International Human Rights Law from New College, University of Oxford. Prior to joining SKOPE, she conducted evaluation research for the Rees Centre, research in social care for  the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, and provided policy advice and conducted research with young people in refugee camps for the AMAR Foundation.

She is a former Head of the National Authority for Children’s Rights in Romania (2007-2009) and former Policy Officer for the office of the European Commission in Romania where she was responsible for the EU intervention to reform the child protection system in Romania (1999 – 2006). Mariela is founding member of the Oxford Children’s Rights Network.

She is the author of ‘Voices from the Silent Cradles’ (Policy Press, 2021), a book which sheds light on children’s homes, foster care, domestic and international adoption from the perspective of the young people who experienced these types of care and which has been reviewed as complementing Sir Michael Rutter’s longitudinal study of Romanian born adoptees. Her work has been published in The International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, the British Journal of Social Work and Children and Youth Services Review. Her article ‘Children by Request: Romania’s children between rights and international politics’ has been cited in John Tobin’s ‘The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: A Commentary’ (OUP, 2019) and in the 2017 report of the UN Rapporteur on the Sale and Exploitation of Children.

Visit Mariela’s website: https://marielaneagu.com

Kelsey is a Research Associate at the Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance, and a Supernumerary Fellow at Jesus College. Her research areas include doctoral education, scholarly writing and publishing, and PhD career trajectories.

Kelsey works on the OFS and Research England ‘Close the Gap’ project, which aims to transform the PhD selection and admissions processes at Oxford and Cambridge towards the goal of a more inclusive research culture.

Kelsey received a DPhil in Education in 2020 and worked as a Senior Researcher at the University of Applied Sciences and Arts Western Switzerland from 2021-2022. She currently serves as the Junior Coordinator for the EARLI SIG 24 on Researcher Education and Careers.

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Mariela is Postdoctoral Researcher at SKOPE carrying out research for the Nuffield Project, ‘Comparing UK policies, outcomes and inequalities in post-16 education & training.’ Her research interests encompass identity and wellbeing theories, in particular the recognition theory and the Capability Approach, children’s rights and the ethics of care. She takes a multi-disciplinary approach in research, drawing on theories in sociology, psychology, human rights and political science to explore what makes a good life, particularly for young people, in contemporary society.

She holds a doctorate in Social Sciences and a Master’s in International Human Rights Law from New College, University of Oxford. Prior to joining SKOPE, she conducted evaluation research for the Rees Centre, research in social care for  the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, and provided policy advice and conducted research with young people in refugee camps for the AMAR Foundation.

She is a former Head of the National Authority for Children’s Rights in Romania (2007-2009) and former Policy Officer for the office of the European Commission in Romania where she was responsible for the EU intervention to reform the child protection system in Romania (1999 – 2006). Mariela is founding member of the Oxford Children’s Rights Network.

She is the author of ‘Voices from the Silent Cradles’ (Policy Press, 2021), a book which sheds light on children’s homes, foster care, domestic and international adoption from the perspective of the young people who experienced these types of care and which has been reviewed as complementing Sir Michael Rutter’s longitudinal study of Romanian born adoptees. Her work has been published in The International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, the British Journal of Social Work and Children and Youth Services Review. Her article ‘Children by Request: Romania’s children between rights and international politics’ has been cited in John Tobin’s ‘The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: A Commentary’ (OUP, 2019) and in the 2017 report of the UN Rapporteur on the Sale and Exploitation of Children.

Visit Mariela’s website: https://marielaneagu.com

Kelsey is a Research Associate at the Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance, and a Supernumerary Fellow at Jesus College. Her research areas include doctoral education, scholarly writing and publishing, and PhD career trajectories.

Kelsey works on the OFS and Research England ‘Close the Gap’ project, which aims to transform the PhD selection and admissions processes at Oxford and Cambridge towards the goal of a more inclusive research culture.

Kelsey received a DPhil in Education in 2020 and worked as a Senior Researcher at the University of Applied Sciences and Arts Western Switzerland from 2021-2022. She currently serves as the Junior Coordinator for the EARLI SIG 24 on Researcher Education and Careers.

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Mariela is Postdoctoral Researcher at SKOPE carrying out research for the Nuffield Project, ‘Comparing UK policies, outcomes and inequalities in post-16 education & training.’ Her research interests encompass identity and wellbeing theories, in particular the recognition theory and the Capability Approach, children’s rights and the ethics of care. She takes a multi-disciplinary approach in research, drawing on theories in sociology, psychology, human rights and political science to explore what makes a good life, particularly for young people, in contemporary society.

She holds a doctorate in Social Sciences and a Master’s in International Human Rights Law from New College, University of Oxford. Prior to joining SKOPE, she conducted evaluation research for the Rees Centre, research in social care for  the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, and provided policy advice and conducted research with young people in refugee camps for the AMAR Foundation.

She is a former Head of the National Authority for Children’s Rights in Romania (2007-2009) and former Policy Officer for the office of the European Commission in Romania where she was responsible for the EU intervention to reform the child protection system in Romania (1999 – 2006). Mariela is founding member of the Oxford Children’s Rights Network.

She is the author of ‘Voices from the Silent Cradles’ (Policy Press, 2021), a book which sheds light on children’s homes, foster care, domestic and international adoption from the perspective of the young people who experienced these types of care and which has been reviewed as complementing Sir Michael Rutter’s longitudinal study of Romanian born adoptees. Her work has been published in The International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, the British Journal of Social Work and Children and Youth Services Review. Her article ‘Children by Request: Romania’s children between rights and international politics’ has been cited in John Tobin’s ‘The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: A Commentary’ (OUP, 2019) and in the 2017 report of the UN Rapporteur on the Sale and Exploitation of Children.

Visit Mariela’s website: https://marielaneagu.com

Kelsey is a Research Associate at the Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance, and a Supernumerary Fellow at Jesus College. Her research areas include doctoral education, scholarly writing and publishing, and PhD career trajectories.

Kelsey works on the OFS and Research England ‘Close the Gap’ project, which aims to transform the PhD selection and admissions processes at Oxford and Cambridge towards the goal of a more inclusive research culture.

Kelsey received a DPhil in Education in 2020 and worked as a Senior Researcher at the University of Applied Sciences and Arts Western Switzerland from 2021-2022. She currently serves as the Junior Coordinator for the EARLI SIG 24 on Researcher Education and Careers.

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Mariela is Postdoctoral Researcher at SKOPE carrying out research for the Nuffield Project, ‘Comparing UK policies, outcomes and inequalities in post-16 education & training.’ Her research interests encompass identity and wellbeing theories, in particular the recognition theory and the Capability Approach, children’s rights and the ethics of care. She takes a multi-disciplinary approach in research, drawing on theories in sociology, psychology, human rights and political science to explore what makes a good life, particularly for young people, in contemporary society.

She holds a doctorate in Social Sciences and a Master’s in International Human Rights Law from New College, University of Oxford. Prior to joining SKOPE, she conducted evaluation research for the Rees Centre, research in social care for  the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, and provided policy advice and conducted research with young people in refugee camps for the AMAR Foundation.

She is a former Head of the National Authority for Children’s Rights in Romania (2007-2009) and former Policy Officer for the office of the European Commission in Romania where she was responsible for the EU intervention to reform the child protection system in Romania (1999 – 2006). Mariela is founding member of the Oxford Children’s Rights Network.

She is the author of ‘Voices from the Silent Cradles’ (Policy Press, 2021), a book which sheds light on children’s homes, foster care, domestic and international adoption from the perspective of the young people who experienced these types of care and which has been reviewed as complementing Sir Michael Rutter’s longitudinal study of Romanian born adoptees. Her work has been published in The International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, the British Journal of Social Work and Children and Youth Services Review. Her article ‘Children by Request: Romania’s children between rights and international politics’ has been cited in John Tobin’s ‘The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: A Commentary’ (OUP, 2019) and in the 2017 report of the UN Rapporteur on the Sale and Exploitation of Children.

Visit Mariela’s website: https://marielaneagu.com

Kelsey is a Research Associate at the Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance, and a Supernumerary Fellow at Jesus College. Her research areas include doctoral education, scholarly writing and publishing, and PhD career trajectories.

Kelsey works on the OFS and Research England ‘Close the Gap’ project, which aims to transform the PhD selection and admissions processes at Oxford and Cambridge towards the goal of a more inclusive research culture.

Kelsey received a DPhil in Education in 2020 and worked as a Senior Researcher at the University of Applied Sciences and Arts Western Switzerland from 2021-2022. She currently serves as the Junior Coordinator for the EARLI SIG 24 on Researcher Education and Careers.

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Mariela is Postdoctoral Researcher at SKOPE carrying out research for the Nuffield Project, ‘Comparing UK policies, outcomes and inequalities in post-16 education & training.’ Her research interests encompass identity and wellbeing theories, in particular the recognition theory and the Capability Approach, children’s rights and the ethics of care. She takes a multi-disciplinary approach in research, drawing on theories in sociology, psychology, human rights and political science to explore what makes a good life, particularly for young people, in contemporary society.

She holds a doctorate in Social Sciences and a Master’s in International Human Rights Law from New College, University of Oxford. Prior to joining SKOPE, she conducted evaluation research for the Rees Centre, research in social care for  the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, and provided policy advice and conducted research with young people in refugee camps for the AMAR Foundation.

She is a former Head of the National Authority for Children’s Rights in Romania (2007-2009) and former Policy Officer for the office of the European Commission in Romania where she was responsible for the EU intervention to reform the child protection system in Romania (1999 – 2006). Mariela is founding member of the Oxford Children’s Rights Network.

She is the author of ‘Voices from the Silent Cradles’ (Policy Press, 2021), a book which sheds light on children’s homes, foster care, domestic and international adoption from the perspective of the young people who experienced these types of care and which has been reviewed as complementing Sir Michael Rutter’s longitudinal study of Romanian born adoptees. Her work has been published in The International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, the British Journal of Social Work and Children and Youth Services Review. Her article ‘Children by Request: Romania’s children between rights and international politics’ has been cited in John Tobin’s ‘The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: A Commentary’ (OUP, 2019) and in the 2017 report of the UN Rapporteur on the Sale and Exploitation of Children.

Visit Mariela’s website: https://marielaneagu.com

Kelsey is a Research Associate at the Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance, and a Supernumerary Fellow at Jesus College. Her research areas include doctoral education, scholarly writing and publishing, and PhD career trajectories.

Kelsey works on the OFS and Research England ‘Close the Gap’ project, which aims to transform the PhD selection and admissions processes at Oxford and Cambridge towards the goal of a more inclusive research culture.

Kelsey received a DPhil in Education in 2020 and worked as a Senior Researcher at the University of Applied Sciences and Arts Western Switzerland from 2021-2022. She currently serves as the Junior Coordinator for the EARLI SIG 24 on Researcher Education and Careers.

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Mariela is Postdoctoral Researcher at SKOPE carrying out research for the Nuffield Project, ‘Comparing UK policies, outcomes and inequalities in post-16 education & training.’ Her research interests encompass identity and wellbeing theories, in particular the recognition theory and the Capability Approach, children’s rights and the ethics of care. She takes a multi-disciplinary approach in research, drawing on theories in sociology, psychology, human rights and political science to explore what makes a good life, particularly for young people, in contemporary society.

She holds a doctorate in Social Sciences and a Master’s in International Human Rights Law from New College, University of Oxford. Prior to joining SKOPE, she conducted evaluation research for the Rees Centre, research in social care for  the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, and provided policy advice and conducted research with young people in refugee camps for the AMAR Foundation.

She is a former Head of the National Authority for Children’s Rights in Romania (2007-2009) and former Policy Officer for the office of the European Commission in Romania where she was responsible for the EU intervention to reform the child protection system in Romania (1999 – 2006). Mariela is founding member of the Oxford Children’s Rights Network.

She is the author of ‘Voices from the Silent Cradles’ (Policy Press, 2021), a book which sheds light on children’s homes, foster care, domestic and international adoption from the perspective of the young people who experienced these types of care and which has been reviewed as complementing Sir Michael Rutter’s longitudinal study of Romanian born adoptees. Her work has been published in The International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, the British Journal of Social Work and Children and Youth Services Review. Her article ‘Children by Request: Romania’s children between rights and international politics’ has been cited in John Tobin’s ‘The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: A Commentary’ (OUP, 2019) and in the 2017 report of the UN Rapporteur on the Sale and Exploitation of Children.

Visit Mariela’s website: https://marielaneagu.com

Kelsey is a Research Associate at the Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance, and a Supernumerary Fellow at Jesus College. Her research areas include doctoral education, scholarly writing and publishing, and PhD career trajectories.

Kelsey works on the OFS and Research England ‘Close the Gap’ project, which aims to transform the PhD selection and admissions processes at Oxford and Cambridge towards the goal of a more inclusive research culture.

Kelsey received a DPhil in Education in 2020 and worked as a Senior Researcher at the University of Applied Sciences and Arts Western Switzerland from 2021-2022. She currently serves as the Junior Coordinator for the EARLI SIG 24 on Researcher Education and Careers.

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Mariela is Postdoctoral Researcher at SKOPE carrying out research for the Nuffield Project, ‘Comparing UK policies, outcomes and inequalities in post-16 education & training.’ Her research interests encompass identity and wellbeing theories, in particular the recognition theory and the Capability Approach, children’s rights and the ethics of care. She takes a multi-disciplinary approach in research, drawing on theories in sociology, psychology, human rights and political science to explore what makes a good life, particularly for young people, in contemporary society.

She holds a doctorate in Social Sciences and a Master’s in International Human Rights Law from New College, University of Oxford. Prior to joining SKOPE, she conducted evaluation research for the Rees Centre, research in social care for  the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, and provided policy advice and conducted research with young people in refugee camps for the AMAR Foundation.

She is a former Head of the National Authority for Children’s Rights in Romania (2007-2009) and former Policy Officer for the office of the European Commission in Romania where she was responsible for the EU intervention to reform the child protection system in Romania (1999 – 2006). Mariela is founding member of the Oxford Children’s Rights Network.

She is the author of ‘Voices from the Silent Cradles’ (Policy Press, 2021), a book which sheds light on children’s homes, foster care, domestic and international adoption from the perspective of the young people who experienced these types of care and which has been reviewed as complementing Sir Michael Rutter’s longitudinal study of Romanian born adoptees. Her work has been published in The International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, the British Journal of Social Work and Children and Youth Services Review. Her article ‘Children by Request: Romania’s children between rights and international politics’ has been cited in John Tobin’s ‘The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: A Commentary’ (OUP, 2019) and in the 2017 report of the UN Rapporteur on the Sale and Exploitation of Children.

Visit Mariela’s website: https://marielaneagu.com

Kelsey is a Research Associate at the Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance, and a Supernumerary Fellow at Jesus College. Her research areas include doctoral education, scholarly writing and publishing, and PhD career trajectories.

Kelsey works on the OFS and Research England ‘Close the Gap’ project, which aims to transform the PhD selection and admissions processes at Oxford and Cambridge towards the goal of a more inclusive research culture.

Kelsey received a DPhil in Education in 2020 and worked as a Senior Researcher at the University of Applied Sciences and Arts Western Switzerland from 2021-2022. She currently serves as the Junior Coordinator for the EARLI SIG 24 on Researcher Education and Careers.

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Mariela is Postdoctoral Researcher at SKOPE carrying out research for the Nuffield Project, ‘Comparing UK policies, outcomes and inequalities in post-16 education & training.’ Her research interests encompass identity and wellbeing theories, in particular the recognition theory and the Capability Approach, children’s rights and the ethics of care. She takes a multi-disciplinary approach in research, drawing on theories in sociology, psychology, human rights and political science to explore what makes a good life, particularly for young people, in contemporary society.

She holds a doctorate in Social Sciences and a Master’s in International Human Rights Law from New College, University of Oxford. Prior to joining SKOPE, she conducted evaluation research for the Rees Centre, research in social care for  the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, and provided policy advice and conducted research with young people in refugee camps for the AMAR Foundation.

She is a former Head of the National Authority for Children’s Rights in Romania (2007-2009) and former Policy Officer for the office of the European Commission in Romania where she was responsible for the EU intervention to reform the child protection system in Romania (1999 – 2006). Mariela is founding member of the Oxford Children’s Rights Network.

She is the author of ‘Voices from the Silent Cradles’ (Policy Press, 2021), a book which sheds light on children’s homes, foster care, domestic and international adoption from the perspective of the young people who experienced these types of care and which has been reviewed as complementing Sir Michael Rutter’s longitudinal study of Romanian born adoptees. Her work has been published in The International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, the British Journal of Social Work and Children and Youth Services Review. Her article ‘Children by Request: Romania’s children between rights and international politics’ has been cited in John Tobin’s ‘The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: A Commentary’ (OUP, 2019) and in the 2017 report of the UN Rapporteur on the Sale and Exploitation of Children.

Visit Mariela’s website: https://marielaneagu.com

Kelsey is a Research Associate at the Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance, and a Supernumerary Fellow at Jesus College. Her research areas include doctoral education, scholarly writing and publishing, and PhD career trajectories.

Kelsey works on the OFS and Research England ‘Close the Gap’ project, which aims to transform the PhD selection and admissions processes at Oxford and Cambridge towards the goal of a more inclusive research culture.

Kelsey received a DPhil in Education in 2020 and worked as a Senior Researcher at the University of Applied Sciences and Arts Western Switzerland from 2021-2022. She currently serves as the Junior Coordinator for the EARLI SIG 24 on Researcher Education and Careers.

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Mariela is Postdoctoral Researcher at SKOPE carrying out research for the Nuffield Project, ‘Comparing UK policies, outcomes and inequalities in post-16 education & training.’ Her research interests encompass identity and wellbeing theories, in particular the recognition theory and the Capability Approach, children’s rights and the ethics of care. She takes a multi-disciplinary approach in research, drawing on theories in sociology, psychology, human rights and political science to explore what makes a good life, particularly for young people, in contemporary society.

She holds a doctorate in Social Sciences and a Master’s in International Human Rights Law from New College, University of Oxford. Prior to joining SKOPE, she conducted evaluation research for the Rees Centre, research in social care for  the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, and provided policy advice and conducted research with young people in refugee camps for the AMAR Foundation.

She is a former Head of the National Authority for Children’s Rights in Romania (2007-2009) and former Policy Officer for the office of the European Commission in Romania where she was responsible for the EU intervention to reform the child protection system in Romania (1999 – 2006). Mariela is founding member of the Oxford Children’s Rights Network.

She is the author of ‘Voices from the Silent Cradles’ (Policy Press, 2021), a book which sheds light on children’s homes, foster care, domestic and international adoption from the perspective of the young people who experienced these types of care and which has been reviewed as complementing Sir Michael Rutter’s longitudinal study of Romanian born adoptees. Her work has been published in The International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, the British Journal of Social Work and Children and Youth Services Review. Her article ‘Children by Request: Romania’s children between rights and international politics’ has been cited in John Tobin’s ‘The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: A Commentary’ (OUP, 2019) and in the 2017 report of the UN Rapporteur on the Sale and Exploitation of Children.

Visit Mariela’s website: https://marielaneagu.com

Kelsey is a Research Associate at the Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance, and a Supernumerary Fellow at Jesus College. Her research areas include doctoral education, scholarly writing and publishing, and PhD career trajectories.

Kelsey works on the OFS and Research England ‘Close the Gap’ project, which aims to transform the PhD selection and admissions processes at Oxford and Cambridge towards the goal of a more inclusive research culture.

Kelsey received a DPhil in Education in 2020 and worked as a Senior Researcher at the University of Applied Sciences and Arts Western Switzerland from 2021-2022. She currently serves as the Junior Coordinator for the EARLI SIG 24 on Researcher Education and Careers.

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Mariela is Postdoctoral Researcher at SKOPE carrying out research for the Nuffield Project, ‘Comparing UK policies, outcomes and inequalities in post-16 education & training.’ Her research interests encompass identity and wellbeing theories, in particular the recognition theory and the Capability Approach, children’s rights and the ethics of care. She takes a multi-disciplinary approach in research, drawing on theories in sociology, psychology, human rights and political science to explore what makes a good life, particularly for young people, in contemporary society.

She holds a doctorate in Social Sciences and a Master’s in International Human Rights Law from New College, University of Oxford. Prior to joining SKOPE, she conducted evaluation research for the Rees Centre, research in social care for  the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, and provided policy advice and conducted research with young people in refugee camps for the AMAR Foundation.

She is a former Head of the National Authority for Children’s Rights in Romania (2007-2009) and former Policy Officer for the office of the European Commission in Romania where she was responsible for the EU intervention to reform the child protection system in Romania (1999 – 2006). Mariela is founding member of the Oxford Children’s Rights Network.

She is the author of ‘Voices from the Silent Cradles’ (Policy Press, 2021), a book which sheds light on children’s homes, foster care, domestic and international adoption from the perspective of the young people who experienced these types of care and which has been reviewed as complementing Sir Michael Rutter’s longitudinal study of Romanian born adoptees. Her work has been published in The International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, the British Journal of Social Work and Children and Youth Services Review. Her article ‘Children by Request: Romania’s children between rights and international politics’ has been cited in John Tobin’s ‘The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: A Commentary’ (OUP, 2019) and in the 2017 report of the UN Rapporteur on the Sale and Exploitation of Children.

Visit Mariela’s website: https://marielaneagu.com

Kelsey is a Research Associate at the Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance, and a Supernumerary Fellow at Jesus College. Her research areas include doctoral education, scholarly writing and publishing, and PhD career trajectories.

Kelsey works on the OFS and Research England ‘Close the Gap’ project, which aims to transform the PhD selection and admissions processes at Oxford and Cambridge towards the goal of a more inclusive research culture.

Kelsey received a DPhil in Education in 2020 and worked as a Senior Researcher at the University of Applied Sciences and Arts Western Switzerland from 2021-2022. She currently serves as the Junior Coordinator for the EARLI SIG 24 on Researcher Education and Careers.

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Mariela is Postdoctoral Researcher at SKOPE carrying out research for the Nuffield Project, ‘Comparing UK policies, outcomes and inequalities in post-16 education & training.’ Her research interests encompass identity and wellbeing theories, in particular the recognition theory and the Capability Approach, children’s rights and the ethics of care. She takes a multi-disciplinary approach in research, drawing on theories in sociology, psychology, human rights and political science to explore what makes a good life, particularly for young people, in contemporary society.

She holds a doctorate in Social Sciences and a Master’s in International Human Rights Law from New College, University of Oxford. Prior to joining SKOPE, she conducted evaluation research for the Rees Centre, research in social care for  the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, and provided policy advice and conducted research with young people in refugee camps for the AMAR Foundation.

She is a former Head of the National Authority for Children’s Rights in Romania (2007-2009) and former Policy Officer for the office of the European Commission in Romania where she was responsible for the EU intervention to reform the child protection system in Romania (1999 – 2006). Mariela is founding member of the Oxford Children’s Rights Network.

She is the author of ‘Voices from the Silent Cradles’ (Policy Press, 2021), a book which sheds light on children’s homes, foster care, domestic and international adoption from the perspective of the young people who experienced these types of care and which has been reviewed as complementing Sir Michael Rutter’s longitudinal study of Romanian born adoptees. Her work has been published in The International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, the British Journal of Social Work and Children and Youth Services Review. Her article ‘Children by Request: Romania’s children between rights and international politics’ has been cited in John Tobin’s ‘The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: A Commentary’ (OUP, 2019) and in the 2017 report of the UN Rapporteur on the Sale and Exploitation of Children.

Visit Mariela’s website: https://marielaneagu.com

Kelsey is a Research Associate at the Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance, and a Supernumerary Fellow at Jesus College. Her research areas include doctoral education, scholarly writing and publishing, and PhD career trajectories.

Kelsey works on the OFS and Research England ‘Close the Gap’ project, which aims to transform the PhD selection and admissions processes at Oxford and Cambridge towards the goal of a more inclusive research culture.

Kelsey received a DPhil in Education in 2020 and worked as a Senior Researcher at the University of Applied Sciences and Arts Western Switzerland from 2021-2022. She currently serves as the Junior Coordinator for the EARLI SIG 24 on Researcher Education and Careers.

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Mariela is Postdoctoral Researcher at SKOPE carrying out research for the Nuffield Project, ‘Comparing UK policies, outcomes and inequalities in post-16 education & training.’ Her research interests encompass identity and wellbeing theories, in particular the recognition theory and the Capability Approach, children’s rights and the ethics of care. She takes a multi-disciplinary approach in research, drawing on theories in sociology, psychology, human rights and political science to explore what makes a good life, particularly for young people, in contemporary society.

She holds a doctorate in Social Sciences and a Master’s in International Human Rights Law from New College, University of Oxford. Prior to joining SKOPE, she conducted evaluation research for the Rees Centre, research in social care for  the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, and provided policy advice and conducted research with young people in refugee camps for the AMAR Foundation.

She is a former Head of the National Authority for Children’s Rights in Romania (2007-2009) and former Policy Officer for the office of the European Commission in Romania where she was responsible for the EU intervention to reform the child protection system in Romania (1999 – 2006). Mariela is founding member of the Oxford Children’s Rights Network.

She is the author of ‘Voices from the Silent Cradles’ (Policy Press, 2021), a book which sheds light on children’s homes, foster care, domestic and international adoption from the perspective of the young people who experienced these types of care and which has been reviewed as complementing Sir Michael Rutter’s longitudinal study of Romanian born adoptees. Her work has been published in The International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, the British Journal of Social Work and Children and Youth Services Review. Her article ‘Children by Request: Romania’s children between rights and international politics’ has been cited in John Tobin’s ‘The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: A Commentary’ (OUP, 2019) and in the 2017 report of the UN Rapporteur on the Sale and Exploitation of Children.

Visit Mariela’s website: https://marielaneagu.com

Kelsey is a Research Associate at the Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance, and a Supernumerary Fellow at Jesus College. Her research areas include doctoral education, scholarly writing and publishing, and PhD career trajectories.

Kelsey works on the OFS and Research England ‘Close the Gap’ project, which aims to transform the PhD selection and admissions processes at Oxford and Cambridge towards the goal of a more inclusive research culture.

Kelsey received a DPhil in Education in 2020 and worked as a Senior Researcher at the University of Applied Sciences and Arts Western Switzerland from 2021-2022. She currently serves as the Junior Coordinator for the EARLI SIG 24 on Researcher Education and Careers.

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Mariela is Postdoctoral Researcher at SKOPE carrying out research for the Nuffield Project, ‘Comparing UK policies, outcomes and inequalities in post-16 education & training.’ Her research interests encompass identity and wellbeing theories, in particular the recognition theory and the Capability Approach, children’s rights and the ethics of care. She takes a multi-disciplinary approach in research, drawing on theories in sociology, psychology, human rights and political science to explore what makes a good life, particularly for young people, in contemporary society.

She holds a doctorate in Social Sciences and a Master’s in International Human Rights Law from New College, University of Oxford. Prior to joining SKOPE, she conducted evaluation research for the Rees Centre, research in social care for  the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, and provided policy advice and conducted research with young people in refugee camps for the AMAR Foundation.

She is a former Head of the National Authority for Children’s Rights in Romania (2007-2009) and former Policy Officer for the office of the European Commission in Romania where she was responsible for the EU intervention to reform the child protection system in Romania (1999 – 2006). Mariela is founding member of the Oxford Children’s Rights Network.

She is the author of ‘Voices from the Silent Cradles’ (Policy Press, 2021), a book which sheds light on children’s homes, foster care, domestic and international adoption from the perspective of the young people who experienced these types of care and which has been reviewed as complementing Sir Michael Rutter’s longitudinal study of Romanian born adoptees. Her work has been published in The International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, the British Journal of Social Work and Children and Youth Services Review. Her article ‘Children by Request: Romania’s children between rights and international politics’ has been cited in John Tobin’s ‘The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: A Commentary’ (OUP, 2019) and in the 2017 report of the UN Rapporteur on the Sale and Exploitation of Children.

Visit Mariela’s website: https://marielaneagu.com

Kelsey is a Research Associate at the Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance, and a Supernumerary Fellow at Jesus College. Her research areas include doctoral education, scholarly writing and publishing, and PhD career trajectories.

Kelsey works on the OFS and Research England ‘Close the Gap’ project, which aims to transform the PhD selection and admissions processes at Oxford and Cambridge towards the goal of a more inclusive research culture.

Kelsey received a DPhil in Education in 2020 and worked as a Senior Researcher at the University of Applied Sciences and Arts Western Switzerland from 2021-2022. She currently serves as the Junior Coordinator for the EARLI SIG 24 on Researcher Education and Careers.

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Mariela is Postdoctoral Researcher at SKOPE carrying out research for the Nuffield Project, ‘Comparing UK policies, outcomes and inequalities in post-16 education & training.’ Her research interests encompass identity and wellbeing theories, in particular the recognition theory and the Capability Approach, children’s rights and the ethics of care. She takes a multi-disciplinary approach in research, drawing on theories in sociology, psychology, human rights and political science to explore what makes a good life, particularly for young people, in contemporary society.

She holds a doctorate in Social Sciences and a Master’s in International Human Rights Law from New College, University of Oxford. Prior to joining SKOPE, she conducted evaluation research for the Rees Centre, research in social care for  the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, and provided policy advice and conducted research with young people in refugee camps for the AMAR Foundation.

She is a former Head of the National Authority for Children’s Rights in Romania (2007-2009) and former Policy Officer for the office of the European Commission in Romania where she was responsible for the EU intervention to reform the child protection system in Romania (1999 – 2006). Mariela is founding member of the Oxford Children’s Rights Network.

She is the author of ‘Voices from the Silent Cradles’ (Policy Press, 2021), a book which sheds light on children’s homes, foster care, domestic and international adoption from the perspective of the young people who experienced these types of care and which has been reviewed as complementing Sir Michael Rutter’s longitudinal study of Romanian born adoptees. Her work has been published in The International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, the British Journal of Social Work and Children and Youth Services Review. Her article ‘Children by Request: Romania’s children between rights and international politics’ has been cited in John Tobin’s ‘The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: A Commentary’ (OUP, 2019) and in the 2017 report of the UN Rapporteur on the Sale and Exploitation of Children.

Visit Mariela’s website: https://marielaneagu.com

Kelsey is a Research Associate at the Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance, and a Supernumerary Fellow at Jesus College. Her research areas include doctoral education, scholarly writing and publishing, and PhD career trajectories.

Kelsey works on the OFS and Research England ‘Close the Gap’ project, which aims to transform the PhD selection and admissions processes at Oxford and Cambridge towards the goal of a more inclusive research culture.

Kelsey received a DPhil in Education in 2020 and worked as a Senior Researcher at the University of Applied Sciences and Arts Western Switzerland from 2021-2022. She currently serves as the Junior Coordinator for the EARLI SIG 24 on Researcher Education and Careers.

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Mariela is Postdoctoral Researcher at SKOPE carrying out research for the Nuffield Project, ‘Comparing UK policies, outcomes and inequalities in post-16 education & training.’ Her research interests encompass identity and wellbeing theories, in particular the recognition theory and the Capability Approach, children’s rights and the ethics of care. She takes a multi-disciplinary approach in research, drawing on theories in sociology, psychology, human rights and political science to explore what makes a good life, particularly for young people, in contemporary society.

She holds a doctorate in Social Sciences and a Master’s in International Human Rights Law from New College, University of Oxford. Prior to joining SKOPE, she conducted evaluation research for the Rees Centre, research in social care for  the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, and provided policy advice and conducted research with young people in refugee camps for the AMAR Foundation.

She is a former Head of the National Authority for Children’s Rights in Romania (2007-2009) and former Policy Officer for the office of the European Commission in Romania where she was responsible for the EU intervention to reform the child protection system in Romania (1999 – 2006). Mariela is founding member of the Oxford Children’s Rights Network.

She is the author of ‘Voices from the Silent Cradles’ (Policy Press, 2021), a book which sheds light on children’s homes, foster care, domestic and international adoption from the perspective of the young people who experienced these types of care and which has been reviewed as complementing Sir Michael Rutter’s longitudinal study of Romanian born adoptees. Her work has been published in The International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, the British Journal of Social Work and Children and Youth Services Review. Her article ‘Children by Request: Romania’s children between rights and international politics’ has been cited in John Tobin’s ‘The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: A Commentary’ (OUP, 2019) and in the 2017 report of the UN Rapporteur on the Sale and Exploitation of Children.

Visit Mariela’s website: https://marielaneagu.com

Kelsey is a Research Associate at the Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance, and a Supernumerary Fellow at Jesus College. Her research areas include doctoral education, scholarly writing and publishing, and PhD career trajectories.

Kelsey works on the OFS and Research England ‘Close the Gap’ project, which aims to transform the PhD selection and admissions processes at Oxford and Cambridge towards the goal of a more inclusive research culture.

Kelsey received a DPhil in Education in 2020 and worked as a Senior Researcher at the University of Applied Sciences and Arts Western Switzerland from 2021-2022. She currently serves as the Junior Coordinator for the EARLI SIG 24 on Researcher Education and Careers.

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Mariela is Postdoctoral Researcher at SKOPE carrying out research for the Nuffield Project, ‘Comparing UK policies, outcomes and inequalities in post-16 education & training.’ Her research interests encompass identity and wellbeing theories, in particular the recognition theory and the Capability Approach, children’s rights and the ethics of care. She takes a multi-disciplinary approach in research, drawing on theories in sociology, psychology, human rights and political science to explore what makes a good life, particularly for young people, in contemporary society.

She holds a doctorate in Social Sciences and a Master’s in International Human Rights Law from New College, University of Oxford. Prior to joining SKOPE, she conducted evaluation research for the Rees Centre, research in social care for  the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, and provided policy advice and conducted research with young people in refugee camps for the AMAR Foundation.

She is a former Head of the National Authority for Children’s Rights in Romania (2007-2009) and former Policy Officer for the office of the European Commission in Romania where she was responsible for the EU intervention to reform the child protection system in Romania (1999 – 2006). Mariela is founding member of the Oxford Children’s Rights Network.

She is the author of ‘Voices from the Silent Cradles’ (Policy Press, 2021), a book which sheds light on children’s homes, foster care, domestic and international adoption from the perspective of the young people who experienced these types of care and which has been reviewed as complementing Sir Michael Rutter’s longitudinal study of Romanian born adoptees. Her work has been published in The International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, the British Journal of Social Work and Children and Youth Services Review. Her article ‘Children by Request: Romania’s children between rights and international politics’ has been cited in John Tobin’s ‘The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: A Commentary’ (OUP, 2019) and in the 2017 report of the UN Rapporteur on the Sale and Exploitation of Children.

Visit Mariela’s website: https://marielaneagu.com

Kelsey is a Research Associate at the Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance, and a Supernumerary Fellow at Jesus College. Her research areas include doctoral education, scholarly writing and publishing, and PhD career trajectories.

Kelsey works on the OFS and Research England ‘Close the Gap’ project, which aims to transform the PhD selection and admissions processes at Oxford and Cambridge towards the goal of a more inclusive research culture.

Kelsey received a DPhil in Education in 2020 and worked as a Senior Researcher at the University of Applied Sciences and Arts Western Switzerland from 2021-2022. She currently serves as the Junior Coordinator for the EARLI SIG 24 on Researcher Education and Careers.

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Mariela is Postdoctoral Researcher at SKOPE carrying out research for the Nuffield Project, ‘Comparing UK policies, outcomes and inequalities in post-16 education & training.’ Her research interests encompass identity and wellbeing theories, in particular the recognition theory and the Capability Approach, children’s rights and the ethics of care. She takes a multi-disciplinary approach in research, drawing on theories in sociology, psychology, human rights and political science to explore what makes a good life, particularly for young people, in contemporary society.

She holds a doctorate in Social Sciences and a Master’s in International Human Rights Law from New College, University of Oxford. Prior to joining SKOPE, she conducted evaluation research for the Rees Centre, research in social care for  the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, and provided policy advice and conducted research with young people in refugee camps for the AMAR Foundation.

She is a former Head of the National Authority for Children’s Rights in Romania (2007-2009) and former Policy Officer for the office of the European Commission in Romania where she was responsible for the EU intervention to reform the child protection system in Romania (1999 – 2006). Mariela is founding member of the Oxford Children’s Rights Network.

She is the author of ‘Voices from the Silent Cradles’ (Policy Press, 2021), a book which sheds light on children’s homes, foster care, domestic and international adoption from the perspective of the young people who experienced these types of care and which has been reviewed as complementing Sir Michael Rutter’s longitudinal study of Romanian born adoptees. Her work has been published in The International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, the British Journal of Social Work and Children and Youth Services Review. Her article ‘Children by Request: Romania’s children between rights and international politics’ has been cited in John Tobin’s ‘The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: A Commentary’ (OUP, 2019) and in the 2017 report of the UN Rapporteur on the Sale and Exploitation of Children.

Visit Mariela’s website: https://marielaneagu.com

Kelsey is a Research Associate at the Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance, and a Supernumerary Fellow at Jesus College. Her research areas include doctoral education, scholarly writing and publishing, and PhD career trajectories.

Kelsey works on the OFS and Research England ‘Close the Gap’ project, which aims to transform the PhD selection and admissions processes at Oxford and Cambridge towards the goal of a more inclusive research culture.

Kelsey received a DPhil in Education in 2020 and worked as a Senior Researcher at the University of Applied Sciences and Arts Western Switzerland from 2021-2022. She currently serves as the Junior Coordinator for the EARLI SIG 24 on Researcher Education and Careers.

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Mariela is Postdoctoral Researcher at SKOPE carrying out research for the Nuffield Project, ‘Comparing UK policies, outcomes and inequalities in post-16 education & training.’ Her research interests encompass identity and wellbeing theories, in particular the recognition theory and the Capability Approach, children’s rights and the ethics of care. She takes a multi-disciplinary approach in research, drawing on theories in sociology, psychology, human rights and political science to explore what makes a good life, particularly for young people, in contemporary society.

She holds a doctorate in Social Sciences and a Master’s in International Human Rights Law from New College, University of Oxford. Prior to joining SKOPE, she conducted evaluation research for the Rees Centre, research in social care for  the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, and provided policy advice and conducted research with young people in refugee camps for the AMAR Foundation.

She is a former Head of the National Authority for Children’s Rights in Romania (2007-2009) and former Policy Officer for the office of the European Commission in Romania where she was responsible for the EU intervention to reform the child protection system in Romania (1999 – 2006). Mariela is founding member of the Oxford Children’s Rights Network.

She is the author of ‘Voices from the Silent Cradles’ (Policy Press, 2021), a book which sheds light on children’s homes, foster care, domestic and international adoption from the perspective of the young people who experienced these types of care and which has been reviewed as complementing Sir Michael Rutter’s longitudinal study of Romanian born adoptees. Her work has been published in The International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, the British Journal of Social Work and Children and Youth Services Review. Her article ‘Children by Request: Romania’s children between rights and international politics’ has been cited in John Tobin’s ‘The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: A Commentary’ (OUP, 2019) and in the 2017 report of the UN Rapporteur on the Sale and Exploitation of Children.

Visit Mariela’s website: https://marielaneagu.com

Kelsey is a Research Associate at the Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance, and a Supernumerary Fellow at Jesus College. Her research areas include doctoral education, scholarly writing and publishing, and PhD career trajectories.

Kelsey works on the OFS and Research England ‘Close the Gap’ project, which aims to transform the PhD selection and admissions processes at Oxford and Cambridge towards the goal of a more inclusive research culture.

Kelsey received a DPhil in Education in 2020 and worked as a Senior Researcher at the University of Applied Sciences and Arts Western Switzerland from 2021-2022. She currently serves as the Junior Coordinator for the EARLI SIG 24 on Researcher Education and Careers.

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Mariela is Postdoctoral Researcher at SKOPE carrying out research for the Nuffield Project, ‘Comparing UK policies, outcomes and inequalities in post-16 education & training.’ Her research interests encompass identity and wellbeing theories, in particular the recognition theory and the Capability Approach, children’s rights and the ethics of care. She takes a multi-disciplinary approach in research, drawing on theories in sociology, psychology, human rights and political science to explore what makes a good life, particularly for young people, in contemporary society.

She holds a doctorate in Social Sciences and a Master’s in International Human Rights Law from New College, University of Oxford. Prior to joining SKOPE, she conducted evaluation research for the Rees Centre, research in social care for  the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, and provided policy advice and conducted research with young people in refugee camps for the AMAR Foundation.

She is a former Head of the National Authority for Children’s Rights in Romania (2007-2009) and former Policy Officer for the office of the European Commission in Romania where she was responsible for the EU intervention to reform the child protection system in Romania (1999 – 2006). Mariela is founding member of the Oxford Children’s Rights Network.

She is the author of ‘Voices from the Silent Cradles’ (Policy Press, 2021), a book which sheds light on children’s homes, foster care, domestic and international adoption from the perspective of the young people who experienced these types of care and which has been reviewed as complementing Sir Michael Rutter’s longitudinal study of Romanian born adoptees. Her work has been published in The International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, the British Journal of Social Work and Children and Youth Services Review. Her article ‘Children by Request: Romania’s children between rights and international politics’ has been cited in John Tobin’s ‘The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: A Commentary’ (OUP, 2019) and in the 2017 report of the UN Rapporteur on the Sale and Exploitation of Children.

Visit Mariela’s website: https://marielaneagu.com

Kelsey is a Research Associate at the Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance, and a Supernumerary Fellow at Jesus College. Her research areas include doctoral education, scholarly writing and publishing, and PhD career trajectories.

Kelsey works on the OFS and Research England ‘Close the Gap’ project, which aims to transform the PhD selection and admissions processes at Oxford and Cambridge towards the goal of a more inclusive research culture.

Kelsey received a DPhil in Education in 2020 and worked as a Senior Researcher at the University of Applied Sciences and Arts Western Switzerland from 2021-2022. She currently serves as the Junior Coordinator for the EARLI SIG 24 on Researcher Education and Careers.

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Mariela is Postdoctoral Researcher at SKOPE carrying out research for the Nuffield Project, ‘Comparing UK policies, outcomes and inequalities in post-16 education & training.’ Her research interests encompass identity and wellbeing theories, in particular the recognition theory and the Capability Approach, children’s rights and the ethics of care. She takes a multi-disciplinary approach in research, drawing on theories in sociology, psychology, human rights and political science to explore what makes a good life, particularly for young people, in contemporary society.

She holds a doctorate in Social Sciences and a Master’s in International Human Rights Law from New College, University of Oxford. Prior to joining SKOPE, she conducted evaluation research for the Rees Centre, research in social care for  the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, and provided policy advice and conducted research with young people in refugee camps for the AMAR Foundation.

She is a former Head of the National Authority for Children’s Rights in Romania (2007-2009) and former Policy Officer for the office of the European Commission in Romania where she was responsible for the EU intervention to reform the child protection system in Romania (1999 – 2006). Mariela is founding member of the Oxford Children’s Rights Network.

She is the author of ‘Voices from the Silent Cradles’ (Policy Press, 2021), a book which sheds light on children’s homes, foster care, domestic and international adoption from the perspective of the young people who experienced these types of care and which has been reviewed as complementing Sir Michael Rutter’s longitudinal study of Romanian born adoptees. Her work has been published in The International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, the British Journal of Social Work and Children and Youth Services Review. Her article ‘Children by Request: Romania’s children between rights and international politics’ has been cited in John Tobin’s ‘The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: A Commentary’ (OUP, 2019) and in the 2017 report of the UN Rapporteur on the Sale and Exploitation of Children.

Visit Mariela’s website: https://marielaneagu.com

Kelsey is a Research Associate at the Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance, and a Supernumerary Fellow at Jesus College. Her research areas include doctoral education, scholarly writing and publishing, and PhD career trajectories.

Kelsey works on the OFS and Research England ‘Close the Gap’ project, which aims to transform the PhD selection and admissions processes at Oxford and Cambridge towards the goal of a more inclusive research culture.

Kelsey received a DPhil in Education in 2020 and worked as a Senior Researcher at the University of Applied Sciences and Arts Western Switzerland from 2021-2022. She currently serves as the Junior Coordinator for the EARLI SIG 24 on Researcher Education and Careers.

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Mariela is Postdoctoral Researcher at SKOPE carrying out research for the Nuffield Project, ‘Comparing UK policies, outcomes and inequalities in post-16 education & training.’ Her research interests encompass identity and wellbeing theories, in particular the recognition theory and the Capability Approach, children’s rights and the ethics of care. She takes a multi-disciplinary approach in research, drawing on theories in sociology, psychology, human rights and political science to explore what makes a good life, particularly for young people, in contemporary society.

She holds a doctorate in Social Sciences and a Master’s in International Human Rights Law from New College, University of Oxford. Prior to joining SKOPE, she conducted evaluation research for the Rees Centre, research in social care for  the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, and provided policy advice and conducted research with young people in refugee camps for the AMAR Foundation.

She is a former Head of the National Authority for Children’s Rights in Romania (2007-2009) and former Policy Officer for the office of the European Commission in Romania where she was responsible for the EU intervention to reform the child protection system in Romania (1999 – 2006). Mariela is founding member of the Oxford Children’s Rights Network.

She is the author of ‘Voices from the Silent Cradles’ (Policy Press, 2021), a book which sheds light on children’s homes, foster care, domestic and international adoption from the perspective of the young people who experienced these types of care and which has been reviewed as complementing Sir Michael Rutter’s longitudinal study of Romanian born adoptees. Her work has been published in The International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, the British Journal of Social Work and Children and Youth Services Review. Her article ‘Children by Request: Romania’s children between rights and international politics’ has been cited in John Tobin’s ‘The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: A Commentary’ (OUP, 2019) and in the 2017 report of the UN Rapporteur on the Sale and Exploitation of Children.

Visit Mariela’s website: https://marielaneagu.com

Kelsey is a Research Associate at the Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance, and a Supernumerary Fellow at Jesus College. Her research areas include doctoral education, scholarly writing and publishing, and PhD career trajectories.

Kelsey works on the OFS and Research England ‘Close the Gap’ project, which aims to transform the PhD selection and admissions processes at Oxford and Cambridge towards the goal of a more inclusive research culture.

Kelsey received a DPhil in Education in 2020 and worked as a Senior Researcher at the University of Applied Sciences and Arts Western Switzerland from 2021-2022. She currently serves as the Junior Coordinator for the EARLI SIG 24 on Researcher Education and Careers.

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Mariela is Postdoctoral Researcher at SKOPE carrying out research for the Nuffield Project, ‘Comparing UK policies, outcomes and inequalities in post-16 education & training.’ Her research interests encompass identity and wellbeing theories, in particular the recognition theory and the Capability Approach, children’s rights and the ethics of care. She takes a multi-disciplinary approach in research, drawing on theories in sociology, psychology, human rights and political science to explore what makes a good life, particularly for young people, in contemporary society.

She holds a doctorate in Social Sciences and a Master’s in International Human Rights Law from New College, University of Oxford. Prior to joining SKOPE, she conducted evaluation research for the Rees Centre, research in social care for  the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, and provided policy advice and conducted research with young people in refugee camps for the AMAR Foundation.

She is a former Head of the National Authority for Children’s Rights in Romania (2007-2009) and former Policy Officer for the office of the European Commission in Romania where she was responsible for the EU intervention to reform the child protection system in Romania (1999 – 2006). Mariela is founding member of the Oxford Children’s Rights Network.

She is the author of ‘Voices from the Silent Cradles’ (Policy Press, 2021), a book which sheds light on children’s homes, foster care, domestic and international adoption from the perspective of the young people who experienced these types of care and which has been reviewed as complementing Sir Michael Rutter’s longitudinal study of Romanian born adoptees. Her work has been published in The International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, the British Journal of Social Work and Children and Youth Services Review. Her article ‘Children by Request: Romania’s children between rights and international politics’ has been cited in John Tobin’s ‘The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: A Commenta