Skip to content

Department of Education

Viewing archives for Teacher Education and Professional Learning

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Robert (Rob) Klassen joined the University of Oxford as Professor of Education in November 2023.  

Rob was previously at the University of York, where he worked from 2012 as Professor and Chair of the Psychology in Education Research Centre. Before coming to the UK, Rob was Assistant, Associate, and Full Professor in the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Alberta (2004-2012). Before entering academia he worked as an educational psychologist and high school teacher in his hometown of Vancouver. 

Rob’s primary research interests are in building an understanding of teacher motivation and development across the career span and across countries. His current work aims to develop and test theory-informed technological interventions related to teacher and school leader recruitment, selection, and development.  

Rob has published over 100 peer-reviewed journal articles, chapters, and books. Recent projects have been funded by the ESRC, the ERC, GIZ, and the World Bank, with recent projects in the UK, Australia, Africa (Morocco, Kenya, South Africa), and Europe. He has served as advisor to education ministries in England, Africa, Australia, Europe, and South America. In 2023 he founded the spinout company, TSP, in collaboration with the University of York. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and the American Psychological Association, and has served on editorial boards for the British Journal of Educational Psychology, the Journal of Educational Psychology, and the Oxford Review of Education.
 

Representative research includes: 

On teacher recruitment: Klassen, R. M., Rushby, J. V., & Wang, H. (2023). Can an online scenario-based learning activity influence preservice teachers’ self-efficacy, person-vocation fit, and career intentions? Computers and Education, 207, 104935. 

On teacher retention: Wang, H., & Klassen, R. M. (2023). Longitudinal relations between teachers’ utility values and quitting intentions. Teaching and Teacher Education, 127, 104109.

On teacher selection: Klassen, R. M., & Kim, L. E. (2021). Teacher selection: Evidence-based practices. Springer, ISBN 978-3-030-76186-8.

Rachel’s research focuses on exploring the experiences of ethnic minority trainee teachers with a view to better supporting their progress through teacher education and beyond.

Rachel received a BEng in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Birmingham. She later completed a PGCE in secondary science and an MSc in Teacher Education at the University of Oxford. She also has a MA in Photography.

Rachel taught physics for seven years in local Oxfordshire secondary schools, becoming a mentor to trainee science teachers and Head of Physics. She most recently worked on the second year Teach First science course at the Institute of Education at UCL and as a curriculum tutor on the Oxford science PGCE. She has taught the Teaching Physics in Schools option for second year physics undergraduates studying at Oxford for the past four years.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Laura is Co-Director of the University of Oxford Education Deanery and subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages. She also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Robert (Rob) Klassen joined the University of Oxford as Professor of Education in November 2023.  

Rob was previously at the University of York, where he worked from 2012 as Professor and Chair of the Psychology in Education Research Centre. Before coming to the UK, Rob was Assistant, Associate, and Full Professor in the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Alberta (2004-2012). Before entering academia he worked as an educational psychologist and high school teacher in his hometown of Vancouver. 

Rob’s primary research interests are in building an understanding of teacher motivation and development across the career span and across countries. His current work aims to develop and test theory-informed technological interventions related to teacher and school leader recruitment, selection, and development.  

Rob has published over 100 peer-reviewed journal articles, chapters, and books. Recent projects have been funded by the ESRC, the ERC, GIZ, and the World Bank, with recent projects in the UK, Australia, Africa (Morocco, Kenya, South Africa), and Europe. He has served as advisor to education ministries in England, Africa, Australia, Europe, and South America. In 2023 he founded the spinout company, TSP, in collaboration with the University of York. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and the American Psychological Association, and has served on editorial boards for the British Journal of Educational Psychology, the Journal of Educational Psychology, and the Oxford Review of Education.
 

Representative research includes: 

On teacher recruitment: Klassen, R. M., Rushby, J. V., & Wang, H. (2023). Can an online scenario-based learning activity influence preservice teachers’ self-efficacy, person-vocation fit, and career intentions? Computers and Education, 207, 104935. 

On teacher retention: Wang, H., & Klassen, R. M. (2023). Longitudinal relations between teachers’ utility values and quitting intentions. Teaching and Teacher Education, 127, 104109.

On teacher selection: Klassen, R. M., & Kim, L. E. (2021). Teacher selection: Evidence-based practices. Springer, ISBN 978-3-030-76186-8.

Rachel’s research focuses on exploring the experiences of ethnic minority trainee teachers with a view to better supporting their progress through teacher education and beyond.

Rachel received a BEng in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Birmingham. She later completed a PGCE in secondary science and an MSc in Teacher Education at the University of Oxford. She also has a MA in Photography.

Rachel taught physics for seven years in local Oxfordshire secondary schools, becoming a mentor to trainee science teachers and Head of Physics. She most recently worked on the second year Teach First science course at the Institute of Education at UCL and as a curriculum tutor on the Oxford science PGCE. She has taught the Teaching Physics in Schools option for second year physics undergraduates studying at Oxford for the past four years.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Laura is Co-Director of the University of Oxford Education Deanery and subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages. She also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Robert (Rob) Klassen joined the University of Oxford as Professor of Education in November 2023.  

Rob was previously at the University of York, where he worked from 2012 as Professor and Chair of the Psychology in Education Research Centre. Before coming to the UK, Rob was Assistant, Associate, and Full Professor in the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Alberta (2004-2012). Before entering academia he worked as an educational psychologist and high school teacher in his hometown of Vancouver. 

Rob’s primary research interests are in building an understanding of teacher motivation and development across the career span and across countries. His current work aims to develop and test theory-informed technological interventions related to teacher and school leader recruitment, selection, and development.  

Rob has published over 100 peer-reviewed journal articles, chapters, and books. Recent projects have been funded by the ESRC, the ERC, GIZ, and the World Bank, with recent projects in the UK, Australia, Africa (Morocco, Kenya, South Africa), and Europe. He has served as advisor to education ministries in England, Africa, Australia, Europe, and South America. In 2023 he founded the spinout company, TSP, in collaboration with the University of York. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and the American Psychological Association, and has served on editorial boards for the British Journal of Educational Psychology, the Journal of Educational Psychology, and the Oxford Review of Education.
 

Representative research includes: 

On teacher recruitment: Klassen, R. M., Rushby, J. V., & Wang, H. (2023). Can an online scenario-based learning activity influence preservice teachers’ self-efficacy, person-vocation fit, and career intentions? Computers and Education, 207, 104935. 

On teacher retention: Wang, H., & Klassen, R. M. (2023). Longitudinal relations between teachers’ utility values and quitting intentions. Teaching and Teacher Education, 127, 104109.

On teacher selection: Klassen, R. M., & Kim, L. E. (2021). Teacher selection: Evidence-based practices. Springer, ISBN 978-3-030-76186-8.

Rachel’s research focuses on exploring the experiences of ethnic minority trainee teachers with a view to better supporting their progress through teacher education and beyond.

Rachel received a BEng in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Birmingham. She later completed a PGCE in secondary science and an MSc in Teacher Education at the University of Oxford. She also has a MA in Photography.

Rachel taught physics for seven years in local Oxfordshire secondary schools, becoming a mentor to trainee science teachers and Head of Physics. She most recently worked on the second year Teach First science course at the Institute of Education at UCL and as a curriculum tutor on the Oxford science PGCE. She has taught the Teaching Physics in Schools option for second year physics undergraduates studying at Oxford for the past four years.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Laura is Co-Director of the University of Oxford Education Deanery and subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages. She also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Robert (Rob) Klassen joined the University of Oxford as Professor of Education in November 2023.  

Rob was previously at the University of York, where he worked from 2012 as Professor and Chair of the Psychology in Education Research Centre. Before coming to the UK, Rob was Assistant, Associate, and Full Professor in the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Alberta (2004-2012). Before entering academia he worked as an educational psychologist and high school teacher in his hometown of Vancouver. 

Rob’s primary research interests are in building an understanding of teacher motivation and development across the career span and across countries. His current work aims to develop and test theory-informed technological interventions related to teacher and school leader recruitment, selection, and development.  

Rob has published over 100 peer-reviewed journal articles, chapters, and books. Recent projects have been funded by the ESRC, the ERC, GIZ, and the World Bank, with recent projects in the UK, Australia, Africa (Morocco, Kenya, South Africa), and Europe. He has served as advisor to education ministries in England, Africa, Australia, Europe, and South America. In 2023 he founded the spinout company, TSP, in collaboration with the University of York. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and the American Psychological Association, and has served on editorial boards for the British Journal of Educational Psychology, the Journal of Educational Psychology, and the Oxford Review of Education.
 

Representative research includes: 

On teacher recruitment: Klassen, R. M., Rushby, J. V., & Wang, H. (2023). Can an online scenario-based learning activity influence preservice teachers’ self-efficacy, person-vocation fit, and career intentions? Computers and Education, 207, 104935. 

On teacher retention: Wang, H., & Klassen, R. M. (2023). Longitudinal relations between teachers’ utility values and quitting intentions. Teaching and Teacher Education, 127, 104109.

On teacher selection: Klassen, R. M., & Kim, L. E. (2021). Teacher selection: Evidence-based practices. Springer, ISBN 978-3-030-76186-8.

Rachel’s research focuses on exploring the experiences of ethnic minority trainee teachers with a view to better supporting their progress through teacher education and beyond.

Rachel received a BEng in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Birmingham. She later completed a PGCE in secondary science and an MSc in Teacher Education at the University of Oxford. She also has a MA in Photography.

Rachel taught physics for seven years in local Oxfordshire secondary schools, becoming a mentor to trainee science teachers and Head of Physics. She most recently worked on the second year Teach First science course at the Institute of Education at UCL and as a curriculum tutor on the Oxford science PGCE. She has taught the Teaching Physics in Schools option for second year physics undergraduates studying at Oxford for the past four years.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Laura is Co-Director of the University of Oxford Education Deanery and subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages. She also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Robert (Rob) Klassen joined the University of Oxford as Professor of Education in November 2023.  

Rob was previously at the University of York, where he worked from 2012 as Professor and Chair of the Psychology in Education Research Centre. Before coming to the UK, Rob was Assistant, Associate, and Full Professor in the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Alberta (2004-2012). Before entering academia he worked as an educational psychologist and high school teacher in his hometown of Vancouver. 

Rob’s primary research interests are in building an understanding of teacher motivation and development across the career span and across countries. His current work aims to develop and test theory-informed technological interventions related to teacher and school leader recruitment, selection, and development.  

Rob has published over 100 peer-reviewed journal articles, chapters, and books. Recent projects have been funded by the ESRC, the ERC, GIZ, and the World Bank, with recent projects in the UK, Australia, Africa (Morocco, Kenya, South Africa), and Europe. He has served as advisor to education ministries in England, Africa, Australia, Europe, and South America. In 2023 he founded the spinout company, TSP, in collaboration with the University of York. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and the American Psychological Association, and has served on editorial boards for the British Journal of Educational Psychology, the Journal of Educational Psychology, and the Oxford Review of Education.
 

Representative research includes: 

On teacher recruitment: Klassen, R. M., Rushby, J. V., & Wang, H. (2023). Can an online scenario-based learning activity influence preservice teachers’ self-efficacy, person-vocation fit, and career intentions? Computers and Education, 207, 104935. 

On teacher retention: Wang, H., & Klassen, R. M. (2023). Longitudinal relations between teachers’ utility values and quitting intentions. Teaching and Teacher Education, 127, 104109.

On teacher selection: Klassen, R. M., & Kim, L. E. (2021). Teacher selection: Evidence-based practices. Springer, ISBN 978-3-030-76186-8.

Rachel’s research focuses on exploring the experiences of ethnic minority trainee teachers with a view to better supporting their progress through teacher education and beyond.

Rachel received a BEng in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Birmingham. She later completed a PGCE in secondary science and an MSc in Teacher Education at the University of Oxford. She also has a MA in Photography.

Rachel taught physics for seven years in local Oxfordshire secondary schools, becoming a mentor to trainee science teachers and Head of Physics. She most recently worked on the second year Teach First science course at the Institute of Education at UCL and as a curriculum tutor on the Oxford science PGCE. She has taught the Teaching Physics in Schools option for second year physics undergraduates studying at Oxford for the past four years.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Laura is Co-Director of the University of Oxford Education Deanery and subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages. She also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Robert (Rob) Klassen joined the University of Oxford as Professor of Education in November 2023.  

Rob was previously at the University of York, where he worked from 2012 as Professor and Chair of the Psychology in Education Research Centre. Before coming to the UK, Rob was Assistant, Associate, and Full Professor in the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Alberta (2004-2012). Before entering academia he worked as an educational psychologist and high school teacher in his hometown of Vancouver. 

Rob’s primary research interests are in building an understanding of teacher motivation and development across the career span and across countries. His current work aims to develop and test theory-informed technological interventions related to teacher and school leader recruitment, selection, and development.  

Rob has published over 100 peer-reviewed journal articles, chapters, and books. Recent projects have been funded by the ESRC, the ERC, GIZ, and the World Bank, with recent projects in the UK, Australia, Africa (Morocco, Kenya, South Africa), and Europe. He has served as advisor to education ministries in England, Africa, Australia, Europe, and South America. In 2023 he founded the spinout company, TSP, in collaboration with the University of York. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and the American Psychological Association, and has served on editorial boards for the British Journal of Educational Psychology, the Journal of Educational Psychology, and the Oxford Review of Education.
 

Representative research includes: 

On teacher recruitment: Klassen, R. M., Rushby, J. V., & Wang, H. (2023). Can an online scenario-based learning activity influence preservice teachers’ self-efficacy, person-vocation fit, and career intentions? Computers and Education, 207, 104935. 

On teacher retention: Wang, H., & Klassen, R. M. (2023). Longitudinal relations between teachers’ utility values and quitting intentions. Teaching and Teacher Education, 127, 104109.

On teacher selection: Klassen, R. M., & Kim, L. E. (2021). Teacher selection: Evidence-based practices. Springer, ISBN 978-3-030-76186-8.

Rachel’s research focuses on exploring the experiences of ethnic minority trainee teachers with a view to better supporting their progress through teacher education and beyond.

Rachel received a BEng in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Birmingham. She later completed a PGCE in secondary science and an MSc in Teacher Education at the University of Oxford. She also has a MA in Photography.

Rachel taught physics for seven years in local Oxfordshire secondary schools, becoming a mentor to trainee science teachers and Head of Physics. She most recently worked on the second year Teach First science course at the Institute of Education at UCL and as a curriculum tutor on the Oxford science PGCE. She has taught the Teaching Physics in Schools option for second year physics undergraduates studying at Oxford for the past four years.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Laura is Co-Director of the University of Oxford Education Deanery and subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages. She also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Robert (Rob) Klassen joined the University of Oxford as Professor of Education in November 2023.  

Rob was previously at the University of York, where he worked from 2012 as Professor and Chair of the Psychology in Education Research Centre. Before coming to the UK, Rob was Assistant, Associate, and Full Professor in the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Alberta (2004-2012). Before entering academia he worked as an educational psychologist and high school teacher in his hometown of Vancouver. 

Rob’s primary research interests are in building an understanding of teacher motivation and development across the career span and across countries. His current work aims to develop and test theory-informed technological interventions related to teacher and school leader recruitment, selection, and development.  

Rob has published over 100 peer-reviewed journal articles, chapters, and books. Recent projects have been funded by the ESRC, the ERC, GIZ, and the World Bank, with recent projects in the UK, Australia, Africa (Morocco, Kenya, South Africa), and Europe. He has served as advisor to education ministries in England, Africa, Australia, Europe, and South America. In 2023 he founded the spinout company, TSP, in collaboration with the University of York. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and the American Psychological Association, and has served on editorial boards for the British Journal of Educational Psychology, the Journal of Educational Psychology, and the Oxford Review of Education.
 

Representative research includes: 

On teacher recruitment: Klassen, R. M., Rushby, J. V., & Wang, H. (2023). Can an online scenario-based learning activity influence preservice teachers’ self-efficacy, person-vocation fit, and career intentions? Computers and Education, 207, 104935. 

On teacher retention: Wang, H., & Klassen, R. M. (2023). Longitudinal relations between teachers’ utility values and quitting intentions. Teaching and Teacher Education, 127, 104109.

On teacher selection: Klassen, R. M., & Kim, L. E. (2021). Teacher selection: Evidence-based practices. Springer, ISBN 978-3-030-76186-8.

Rachel’s research focuses on exploring the experiences of ethnic minority trainee teachers with a view to better supporting their progress through teacher education and beyond.

Rachel received a BEng in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Birmingham. She later completed a PGCE in secondary science and an MSc in Teacher Education at the University of Oxford. She also has a MA in Photography.

Rachel taught physics for seven years in local Oxfordshire secondary schools, becoming a mentor to trainee science teachers and Head of Physics. She most recently worked on the second year Teach First science course at the Institute of Education at UCL and as a curriculum tutor on the Oxford science PGCE. She has taught the Teaching Physics in Schools option for second year physics undergraduates studying at Oxford for the past four years.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Laura is Co-Director of the University of Oxford Education Deanery and subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages. She also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Robert (Rob) Klassen joined the University of Oxford as Professor of Education in November 2023.  

Rob was previously at the University of York, where he worked from 2012 as Professor and Chair of the Psychology in Education Research Centre. Before coming to the UK, Rob was Assistant, Associate, and Full Professor in the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Alberta (2004-2012). Before entering academia he worked as an educational psychologist and high school teacher in his hometown of Vancouver. 

Rob’s primary research interests are in building an understanding of teacher motivation and development across the career span and across countries. His current work aims to develop and test theory-informed technological interventions related to teacher and school leader recruitment, selection, and development.  

Rob has published over 100 peer-reviewed journal articles, chapters, and books. Recent projects have been funded by the ESRC, the ERC, GIZ, and the World Bank, with recent projects in the UK, Australia, Africa (Morocco, Kenya, South Africa), and Europe. He has served as advisor to education ministries in England, Africa, Australia, Europe, and South America. In 2023 he founded the spinout company, TSP, in collaboration with the University of York. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and the American Psychological Association, and has served on editorial boards for the British Journal of Educational Psychology, the Journal of Educational Psychology, and the Oxford Review of Education.
 

Representative research includes: 

On teacher recruitment: Klassen, R. M., Rushby, J. V., & Wang, H. (2023). Can an online scenario-based learning activity influence preservice teachers’ self-efficacy, person-vocation fit, and career intentions? Computers and Education, 207, 104935. 

On teacher retention: Wang, H., & Klassen, R. M. (2023). Longitudinal relations between teachers’ utility values and quitting intentions. Teaching and Teacher Education, 127, 104109.

On teacher selection: Klassen, R. M., & Kim, L. E. (2021). Teacher selection: Evidence-based practices. Springer, ISBN 978-3-030-76186-8.

Rachel’s research focuses on exploring the experiences of ethnic minority trainee teachers with a view to better supporting their progress through teacher education and beyond.

Rachel received a BEng in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Birmingham. She later completed a PGCE in secondary science and an MSc in Teacher Education at the University of Oxford. She also has a MA in Photography.

Rachel taught physics for seven years in local Oxfordshire secondary schools, becoming a mentor to trainee science teachers and Head of Physics. She most recently worked on the second year Teach First science course at the Institute of Education at UCL and as a curriculum tutor on the Oxford science PGCE. She has taught the Teaching Physics in Schools option for second year physics undergraduates studying at Oxford for the past four years.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Laura is Co-Director of the University of Oxford Education Deanery and subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages. She also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Robert (Rob) Klassen joined the University of Oxford as Professor of Education in November 2023.  

Rob was previously at the University of York, where he worked from 2012 as Professor and Chair of the Psychology in Education Research Centre. Before coming to the UK, Rob was Assistant, Associate, and Full Professor in the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Alberta (2004-2012). Before entering academia he worked as an educational psychologist and high school teacher in his hometown of Vancouver. 

Rob’s primary research interests are in building an understanding of teacher motivation and development across the career span and across countries. His current work aims to develop and test theory-informed technological interventions related to teacher and school leader recruitment, selection, and development.  

Rob has published over 100 peer-reviewed journal articles, chapters, and books. Recent projects have been funded by the ESRC, the ERC, GIZ, and the World Bank, with recent projects in the UK, Australia, Africa (Morocco, Kenya, South Africa), and Europe. He has served as advisor to education ministries in England, Africa, Australia, Europe, and South America. In 2023 he founded the spinout company, TSP, in collaboration with the University of York. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and the American Psychological Association, and has served on editorial boards for the British Journal of Educational Psychology, the Journal of Educational Psychology, and the Oxford Review of Education.
 

Representative research includes: 

On teacher recruitment: Klassen, R. M., Rushby, J. V., & Wang, H. (2023). Can an online scenario-based learning activity influence preservice teachers’ self-efficacy, person-vocation fit, and career intentions? Computers and Education, 207, 104935. 

On teacher retention: Wang, H., & Klassen, R. M. (2023). Longitudinal relations between teachers’ utility values and quitting intentions. Teaching and Teacher Education, 127, 104109.

On teacher selection: Klassen, R. M., & Kim, L. E. (2021). Teacher selection: Evidence-based practices. Springer, ISBN 978-3-030-76186-8.

Rachel’s research focuses on exploring the experiences of ethnic minority trainee teachers with a view to better supporting their progress through teacher education and beyond.

Rachel received a BEng in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Birmingham. She later completed a PGCE in secondary science and an MSc in Teacher Education at the University of Oxford. She also has a MA in Photography.

Rachel taught physics for seven years in local Oxfordshire secondary schools, becoming a mentor to trainee science teachers and Head of Physics. She most recently worked on the second year Teach First science course at the Institute of Education at UCL and as a curriculum tutor on the Oxford science PGCE. She has taught the Teaching Physics in Schools option for second year physics undergraduates studying at Oxford for the past four years.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Laura is Co-Director of the University of Oxford Education Deanery and subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages. She also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Robert (Rob) Klassen joined the University of Oxford as Professor of Education in November 2023.  

Rob was previously at the University of York, where he worked from 2012 as Professor and Chair of the Psychology in Education Research Centre. Before coming to the UK, Rob was Assistant, Associate, and Full Professor in the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Alberta (2004-2012). Before entering academia he worked as an educational psychologist and high school teacher in his hometown of Vancouver. 

Rob’s primary research interests are in building an understanding of teacher motivation and development across the career span and across countries. His current work aims to develop and test theory-informed technological interventions related to teacher and school leader recruitment, selection, and development.  

Rob has published over 100 peer-reviewed journal articles, chapters, and books. Recent projects have been funded by the ESRC, the ERC, GIZ, and the World Bank, with recent projects in the UK, Australia, Africa (Morocco, Kenya, South Africa), and Europe. He has served as advisor to education ministries in England, Africa, Australia, Europe, and South America. In 2023 he founded the spinout company, TSP, in collaboration with the University of York. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and the American Psychological Association, and has served on editorial boards for the British Journal of Educational Psychology, the Journal of Educational Psychology, and the Oxford Review of Education.
 

Representative research includes: 

On teacher recruitment: Klassen, R. M., Rushby, J. V., & Wang, H. (2023). Can an online scenario-based learning activity influence preservice teachers’ self-efficacy, person-vocation fit, and career intentions? Computers and Education, 207, 104935. 

On teacher retention: Wang, H., & Klassen, R. M. (2023). Longitudinal relations between teachers’ utility values and quitting intentions. Teaching and Teacher Education, 127, 104109.

On teacher selection: Klassen, R. M., & Kim, L. E. (2021). Teacher selection: Evidence-based practices. Springer, ISBN 978-3-030-76186-8.

Rachel’s research focuses on exploring the experiences of ethnic minority trainee teachers with a view to better supporting their progress through teacher education and beyond.

Rachel received a BEng in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Birmingham. She later completed a PGCE in secondary science and an MSc in Teacher Education at the University of Oxford. She also has a MA in Photography.

Rachel taught physics for seven years in local Oxfordshire secondary schools, becoming a mentor to trainee science teachers and Head of Physics. She most recently worked on the second year Teach First science course at the Institute of Education at UCL and as a curriculum tutor on the Oxford science PGCE. She has taught the Teaching Physics in Schools option for second year physics undergraduates studying at Oxford for the past four years.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Laura is Co-Director of the University of Oxford Education Deanery and subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages. She also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Robert (Rob) Klassen joined the University of Oxford as Professor of Education in November 2023.  

Rob was previously at the University of York, where he worked from 2012 as Professor and Chair of the Psychology in Education Research Centre. Before coming to the UK, Rob was Assistant, Associate, and Full Professor in the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Alberta (2004-2012). Before entering academia he worked as an educational psychologist and high school teacher in his hometown of Vancouver. 

Rob’s primary research interests are in building an understanding of teacher motivation and development across the career span and across countries. His current work aims to develop and test theory-informed technological interventions related to teacher and school leader recruitment, selection, and development.  

Rob has published over 100 peer-reviewed journal articles, chapters, and books. Recent projects have been funded by the ESRC, the ERC, GIZ, and the World Bank, with recent projects in the UK, Australia, Africa (Morocco, Kenya, South Africa), and Europe. He has served as advisor to education ministries in England, Africa, Australia, Europe, and South America. In 2023 he founded the spinout company, TSP, in collaboration with the University of York. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and the American Psychological Association, and has served on editorial boards for the British Journal of Educational Psychology, the Journal of Educational Psychology, and the Oxford Review of Education.
 

Representative research includes: 

On teacher recruitment: Klassen, R. M., Rushby, J. V., & Wang, H. (2023). Can an online scenario-based learning activity influence preservice teachers’ self-efficacy, person-vocation fit, and career intentions? Computers and Education, 207, 104935. 

On teacher retention: Wang, H., & Klassen, R. M. (2023). Longitudinal relations between teachers’ utility values and quitting intentions. Teaching and Teacher Education, 127, 104109.

On teacher selection: Klassen, R. M., & Kim, L. E. (2021). Teacher selection: Evidence-based practices. Springer, ISBN 978-3-030-76186-8.

Rachel’s research focuses on exploring the experiences of ethnic minority trainee teachers with a view to better supporting their progress through teacher education and beyond.

Rachel received a BEng in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Birmingham. She later completed a PGCE in secondary science and an MSc in Teacher Education at the University of Oxford. She also has a MA in Photography.

Rachel taught physics for seven years in local Oxfordshire secondary schools, becoming a mentor to trainee science teachers and Head of Physics. She most recently worked on the second year Teach First science course at the Institute of Education at UCL and as a curriculum tutor on the Oxford science PGCE. She has taught the Teaching Physics in Schools option for second year physics undergraduates studying at Oxford for the past four years.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Laura is Co-Director of the University of Oxford Education Deanery and subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages. She also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Robert (Rob) Klassen joined the University of Oxford as Professor of Education in November 2023.  

Rob was previously at the University of York, where he worked from 2012 as Professor and Chair of the Psychology in Education Research Centre. Before coming to the UK, Rob was Assistant, Associate, and Full Professor in the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Alberta (2004-2012). Before entering academia he worked as an educational psychologist and high school teacher in his hometown of Vancouver. 

Rob’s primary research interests are in building an understanding of teacher motivation and development across the career span and across countries. His current work aims to develop and test theory-informed technological interventions related to teacher and school leader recruitment, selection, and development.  

Rob has published over 100 peer-reviewed journal articles, chapters, and books. Recent projects have been funded by the ESRC, the ERC, GIZ, and the World Bank, with recent projects in the UK, Australia, Africa (Morocco, Kenya, South Africa), and Europe. He has served as advisor to education ministries in England, Africa, Australia, Europe, and South America. In 2023 he founded the spinout company, TSP, in collaboration with the University of York. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and the American Psychological Association, and has served on editorial boards for the British Journal of Educational Psychology, the Journal of Educational Psychology, and the Oxford Review of Education.
 

Representative research includes: 

On teacher recruitment: Klassen, R. M., Rushby, J. V., & Wang, H. (2023). Can an online scenario-based learning activity influence preservice teachers’ self-efficacy, person-vocation fit, and career intentions? Computers and Education, 207, 104935. 

On teacher retention: Wang, H., & Klassen, R. M. (2023). Longitudinal relations between teachers’ utility values and quitting intentions. Teaching and Teacher Education, 127, 104109.

On teacher selection: Klassen, R. M., & Kim, L. E. (2021). Teacher selection: Evidence-based practices. Springer, ISBN 978-3-030-76186-8.

Rachel’s research focuses on exploring the experiences of ethnic minority trainee teachers with a view to better supporting their progress through teacher education and beyond.

Rachel received a BEng in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Birmingham. She later completed a PGCE in secondary science and an MSc in Teacher Education at the University of Oxford. She also has a MA in Photography.

Rachel taught physics for seven years in local Oxfordshire secondary schools, becoming a mentor to trainee science teachers and Head of Physics. She most recently worked on the second year Teach First science course at the Institute of Education at UCL and as a curriculum tutor on the Oxford science PGCE. She has taught the Teaching Physics in Schools option for second year physics undergraduates studying at Oxford for the past four years.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Laura is Co-Director of the University of Oxford Education Deanery and subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages. She also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Robert (Rob) Klassen joined the University of Oxford as Professor of Education in November 2023.  

Rob was previously at the University of York, where he worked from 2012 as Professor and Chair of the Psychology in Education Research Centre. Before coming to the UK, Rob was Assistant, Associate, and Full Professor in the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Alberta (2004-2012). Before entering academia he worked as an educational psychologist and high school teacher in his hometown of Vancouver. 

Rob’s primary research interests are in building an understanding of teacher motivation and development across the career span and across countries. His current work aims to develop and test theory-informed technological interventions related to teacher and school leader recruitment, selection, and development.  

Rob has published over 100 peer-reviewed journal articles, chapters, and books. Recent projects have been funded by the ESRC, the ERC, GIZ, and the World Bank, with recent projects in the UK, Australia, Africa (Morocco, Kenya, South Africa), and Europe. He has served as advisor to education ministries in England, Africa, Australia, Europe, and South America. In 2023 he founded the spinout company, TSP, in collaboration with the University of York. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and the American Psychological Association, and has served on editorial boards for the British Journal of Educational Psychology, the Journal of Educational Psychology, and the Oxford Review of Education.
 

Representative research includes: 

On teacher recruitment: Klassen, R. M., Rushby, J. V., & Wang, H. (2023). Can an online scenario-based learning activity influence preservice teachers’ self-efficacy, person-vocation fit, and career intentions? Computers and Education, 207, 104935. 

On teacher retention: Wang, H., & Klassen, R. M. (2023). Longitudinal relations between teachers’ utility values and quitting intentions. Teaching and Teacher Education, 127, 104109.

On teacher selection: Klassen, R. M., & Kim, L. E. (2021). Teacher selection: Evidence-based practices. Springer, ISBN 978-3-030-76186-8.

Rachel’s research focuses on exploring the experiences of ethnic minority trainee teachers with a view to better supporting their progress through teacher education and beyond.

Rachel received a BEng in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Birmingham. She later completed a PGCE in secondary science and an MSc in Teacher Education at the University of Oxford. She also has a MA in Photography.

Rachel taught physics for seven years in local Oxfordshire secondary schools, becoming a mentor to trainee science teachers and Head of Physics. She most recently worked on the second year Teach First science course at the Institute of Education at UCL and as a curriculum tutor on the Oxford science PGCE. She has taught the Teaching Physics in Schools option for second year physics undergraduates studying at Oxford for the past four years.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Laura is Co-Director of the University of Oxford Education Deanery and subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages. She also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Robert (Rob) Klassen joined the University of Oxford as Professor of Education in November 2023.  

Rob was previously at the University of York, where he worked from 2012 as Professor and Chair of the Psychology in Education Research Centre. Before coming to the UK, Rob was Assistant, Associate, and Full Professor in the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Alberta (2004-2012). Before entering academia he worked as an educational psychologist and high school teacher in his hometown of Vancouver. 

Rob’s primary research interests are in building an understanding of teacher motivation and development across the career span and across countries. His current work aims to develop and test theory-informed technological interventions related to teacher and school leader recruitment, selection, and development.  

Rob has published over 100 peer-reviewed journal articles, chapters, and books. Recent projects have been funded by the ESRC, the ERC, GIZ, and the World Bank, with recent projects in the UK, Australia, Africa (Morocco, Kenya, South Africa), and Europe. He has served as advisor to education ministries in England, Africa, Australia, Europe, and South America. In 2023 he founded the spinout company, TSP, in collaboration with the University of York. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and the American Psychological Association, and has served on editorial boards for the British Journal of Educational Psychology, the Journal of Educational Psychology, and the Oxford Review of Education.
 

Representative research includes: 

On teacher recruitment: Klassen, R. M., Rushby, J. V., & Wang, H. (2023). Can an online scenario-based learning activity influence preservice teachers’ self-efficacy, person-vocation fit, and career intentions? Computers and Education, 207, 104935. 

On teacher retention: Wang, H., & Klassen, R. M. (2023). Longitudinal relations between teachers’ utility values and quitting intentions. Teaching and Teacher Education, 127, 104109.

On teacher selection: Klassen, R. M., & Kim, L. E. (2021). Teacher selection: Evidence-based practices. Springer, ISBN 978-3-030-76186-8.

Rachel’s research focuses on exploring the experiences of ethnic minority trainee teachers with a view to better supporting their progress through teacher education and beyond.

Rachel received a BEng in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Birmingham. She later completed a PGCE in secondary science and an MSc in Teacher Education at the University of Oxford. She also has a MA in Photography.

Rachel taught physics for seven years in local Oxfordshire secondary schools, becoming a mentor to trainee science teachers and Head of Physics. She most recently worked on the second year Teach First science course at the Institute of Education at UCL and as a curriculum tutor on the Oxford science PGCE. She has taught the Teaching Physics in Schools option for second year physics undergraduates studying at Oxford for the past four years.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Laura is Co-Director of the University of Oxford Education Deanery and subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages. She also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Robert (Rob) Klassen joined the University of Oxford as Professor of Education in November 2023.  

Rob was previously at the University of York, where he worked from 2012 as Professor and Chair of the Psychology in Education Research Centre. Before coming to the UK, Rob was Assistant, Associate, and Full Professor in the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Alberta (2004-2012). Before entering academia he worked as an educational psychologist and high school teacher in his hometown of Vancouver. 

Rob’s primary research interests are in building an understanding of teacher motivation and development across the career span and across countries. His current work aims to develop and test theory-informed technological interventions related to teacher and school leader recruitment, selection, and development.  

Rob has published over 100 peer-reviewed journal articles, chapters, and books. Recent projects have been funded by the ESRC, the ERC, GIZ, and the World Bank, with recent projects in the UK, Australia, Africa (Morocco, Kenya, South Africa), and Europe. He has served as advisor to education ministries in England, Africa, Australia, Europe, and South America. In 2023 he founded the spinout company, TSP, in collaboration with the University of York. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and the American Psychological Association, and has served on editorial boards for the British Journal of Educational Psychology, the Journal of Educational Psychology, and the Oxford Review of Education.
 

Representative research includes: 

On teacher recruitment: Klassen, R. M., Rushby, J. V., & Wang, H. (2023). Can an online scenario-based learning activity influence preservice teachers’ self-efficacy, person-vocation fit, and career intentions? Computers and Education, 207, 104935. 

On teacher retention: Wang, H., & Klassen, R. M. (2023). Longitudinal relations between teachers’ utility values and quitting intentions. Teaching and Teacher Education, 127, 104109.

On teacher selection: Klassen, R. M., & Kim, L. E. (2021). Teacher selection: Evidence-based practices. Springer, ISBN 978-3-030-76186-8.

Rachel’s research focuses on exploring the experiences of ethnic minority trainee teachers with a view to better supporting their progress through teacher education and beyond.

Rachel received a BEng in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Birmingham. She later completed a PGCE in secondary science and an MSc in Teacher Education at the University of Oxford. She also has a MA in Photography.

Rachel taught physics for seven years in local Oxfordshire secondary schools, becoming a mentor to trainee science teachers and Head of Physics. She most recently worked on the second year Teach First science course at the Institute of Education at UCL and as a curriculum tutor on the Oxford science PGCE. She has taught the Teaching Physics in Schools option for second year physics undergraduates studying at Oxford for the past four years.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Laura is Co-Director of the University of Oxford Education Deanery and subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages. She also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Robert (Rob) Klassen joined the University of Oxford as Professor of Education in November 2023.  

Rob was previously at the University of York, where he worked from 2012 as Professor and Chair of the Psychology in Education Research Centre. Before coming to the UK, Rob was Assistant, Associate, and Full Professor in the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Alberta (2004-2012). Before entering academia he worked as an educational psychologist and high school teacher in his hometown of Vancouver. 

Rob’s primary research interests are in building an understanding of teacher motivation and development across the career span and across countries. His current work aims to develop and test theory-informed technological interventions related to teacher and school leader recruitment, selection, and development.  

Rob has published over 100 peer-reviewed journal articles, chapters, and books. Recent projects have been funded by the ESRC, the ERC, GIZ, and the World Bank, with recent projects in the UK, Australia, Africa (Morocco, Kenya, South Africa), and Europe. He has served as advisor to education ministries in England, Africa, Australia, Europe, and South America. In 2023 he founded the spinout company, TSP, in collaboration with the University of York. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and the American Psychological Association, and has served on editorial boards for the British Journal of Educational Psychology, the Journal of Educational Psychology, and the Oxford Review of Education.
 

Representative research includes: 

On teacher recruitment: Klassen, R. M., Rushby, J. V., & Wang, H. (2023). Can an online scenario-based learning activity influence preservice teachers’ self-efficacy, person-vocation fit, and career intentions? Computers and Education, 207, 104935. 

On teacher retention: Wang, H., & Klassen, R. M. (2023). Longitudinal relations between teachers’ utility values and quitting intentions. Teaching and Teacher Education, 127, 104109.

On teacher selection: Klassen, R. M., & Kim, L. E. (2021). Teacher selection: Evidence-based practices. Springer, ISBN 978-3-030-76186-8.

Rachel’s research focuses on exploring the experiences of ethnic minority trainee teachers with a view to better supporting their progress through teacher education and beyond.

Rachel received a BEng in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Birmingham. She later completed a PGCE in secondary science and an MSc in Teacher Education at the University of Oxford. She also has a MA in Photography.

Rachel taught physics for seven years in local Oxfordshire secondary schools, becoming a mentor to trainee science teachers and Head of Physics. She most recently worked on the second year Teach First science course at the Institute of Education at UCL and as a curriculum tutor on the Oxford science PGCE. She has taught the Teaching Physics in Schools option for second year physics undergraduates studying at Oxford for the past four years.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Laura is Co-Director of the University of Oxford Education Deanery and subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages. She also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Robert (Rob) Klassen joined the University of Oxford as Professor of Education in November 2023.  

Rob was previously at the University of York, where he worked from 2012 as Professor and Chair of the Psychology in Education Research Centre. Before coming to the UK, Rob was Assistant, Associate, and Full Professor in the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Alberta (2004-2012). Before entering academia he worked as an educational psychologist and high school teacher in his hometown of Vancouver. 

Rob’s primary research interests are in building an understanding of teacher motivation and development across the career span and across countries. His current work aims to develop and test theory-informed technological interventions related to teacher and school leader recruitment, selection, and development.  

Rob has published over 100 peer-reviewed journal articles, chapters, and books. Recent projects have been funded by the ESRC, the ERC, GIZ, and the World Bank, with recent projects in the UK, Australia, Africa (Morocco, Kenya, South Africa), and Europe. He has served as advisor to education ministries in England, Africa, Australia, Europe, and South America. In 2023 he founded the spinout company, TSP, in collaboration with the University of York. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and the American Psychological Association, and has served on editorial boards for the British Journal of Educational Psychology, the Journal of Educational Psychology, and the Oxford Review of Education.
 

Representative research includes: 

On teacher recruitment: Klassen, R. M., Rushby, J. V., & Wang, H. (2023). Can an online scenario-based learning activity influence preservice teachers’ self-efficacy, person-vocation fit, and career intentions? Computers and Education, 207, 104935. 

On teacher retention: Wang, H., & Klassen, R. M. (2023). Longitudinal relations between teachers’ utility values and quitting intentions. Teaching and Teacher Education, 127, 104109.

On teacher selection: Klassen, R. M., & Kim, L. E. (2021). Teacher selection: Evidence-based practices. Springer, ISBN 978-3-030-76186-8.

Rachel’s research focuses on exploring the experiences of ethnic minority trainee teachers with a view to better supporting their progress through teacher education and beyond.

Rachel received a BEng in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Birmingham. She later completed a PGCE in secondary science and an MSc in Teacher Education at the University of Oxford. She also has a MA in Photography.

Rachel taught physics for seven years in local Oxfordshire secondary schools, becoming a mentor to trainee science teachers and Head of Physics. She most recently worked on the second year Teach First science course at the Institute of Education at UCL and as a curriculum tutor on the Oxford science PGCE. She has taught the Teaching Physics in Schools option for second year physics undergraduates studying at Oxford for the past four years.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Laura is Co-Director of the University of Oxford Education Deanery and subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages. She also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Robert (Rob) Klassen joined the University of Oxford as Professor of Education in November 2023.  

Rob was previously at the University of York, where he worked from 2012 as Professor and Chair of the Psychology in Education Research Centre. Before coming to the UK, Rob was Assistant, Associate, and Full Professor in the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Alberta (2004-2012). Before entering academia he worked as an educational psychologist and high school teacher in his hometown of Vancouver. 

Rob’s primary research interests are in building an understanding of teacher motivation and development across the career span and across countries. His current work aims to develop and test theory-informed technological interventions related to teacher and school leader recruitment, selection, and development.  

Rob has published over 100 peer-reviewed journal articles, chapters, and books. Recent projects have been funded by the ESRC, the ERC, GIZ, and the World Bank, with recent projects in the UK, Australia, Africa (Morocco, Kenya, South Africa), and Europe. He has served as advisor to education ministries in England, Africa, Australia, Europe, and South America. In 2023 he founded the spinout company, TSP, in collaboration with the University of York. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and the American Psychological Association, and has served on editorial boards for the British Journal of Educational Psychology, the Journal of Educational Psychology, and the Oxford Review of Education.
 

Representative research includes: 

On teacher recruitment: Klassen, R. M., Rushby, J. V., & Wang, H. (2023). Can an online scenario-based learning activity influence preservice teachers’ self-efficacy, person-vocation fit, and career intentions? Computers and Education, 207, 104935. 

On teacher retention: Wang, H., & Klassen, R. M. (2023). Longitudinal relations between teachers’ utility values and quitting intentions. Teaching and Teacher Education, 127, 104109.

On teacher selection: Klassen, R. M., & Kim, L. E. (2021). Teacher selection: Evidence-based practices. Springer, ISBN 978-3-030-76186-8.

Rachel’s research focuses on exploring the experiences of ethnic minority trainee teachers with a view to better supporting their progress through teacher education and beyond.

Rachel received a BEng in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Birmingham. She later completed a PGCE in secondary science and an MSc in Teacher Education at the University of Oxford. She also has a MA in Photography.

Rachel taught physics for seven years in local Oxfordshire secondary schools, becoming a mentor to trainee science teachers and Head of Physics. She most recently worked on the second year Teach First science course at the Institute of Education at UCL and as a curriculum tutor on the Oxford science PGCE. She has taught the Teaching Physics in Schools option for second year physics undergraduates studying at Oxford for the past four years.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Laura is Co-Director of the University of Oxford Education Deanery and subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages. She also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Robert (Rob) Klassen joined the University of Oxford as Professor of Education in November 2023.  

Rob was previously at the University of York, where he worked from 2012 as Professor and Chair of the Psychology in Education Research Centre. Before coming to the UK, Rob was Assistant, Associate, and Full Professor in the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Alberta (2004-2012). Before entering academia he worked as an educational psychologist and high school teacher in his hometown of Vancouver. 

Rob’s primary research interests are in building an understanding of teacher motivation and development across the career span and across countries. His current work aims to develop and test theory-informed technological interventions related to teacher and school leader recruitment, selection, and development.  

Rob has published over 100 peer-reviewed journal articles, chapters, and books. Recent projects have been funded by the ESRC, the ERC, GIZ, and the World Bank, with recent projects in the UK, Australia, Africa (Morocco, Kenya, South Africa), and Europe. He has served as advisor to education ministries in England, Africa, Australia, Europe, and South America. In 2023 he founded the spinout company, TSP, in collaboration with the University of York. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and the American Psychological Association, and has served on editorial boards for the British Journal of Educational Psychology, the Journal of Educational Psychology, and the Oxford Review of Education.
 

Representative research includes: 

On teacher recruitment: Klassen, R. M., Rushby, J. V., & Wang, H. (2023). Can an online scenario-based learning activity influence preservice teachers’ self-efficacy, person-vocation fit, and career intentions? Computers and Education, 207, 104935. 

On teacher retention: Wang, H., & Klassen, R. M. (2023). Longitudinal relations between teachers’ utility values and quitting intentions. Teaching and Teacher Education, 127, 104109.

On teacher selection: Klassen, R. M., & Kim, L. E. (2021). Teacher selection: Evidence-based practices. Springer, ISBN 978-3-030-76186-8.

Rachel’s research focuses on exploring the experiences of ethnic minority trainee teachers with a view to better supporting their progress through teacher education and beyond.

Rachel received a BEng in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Birmingham. She later completed a PGCE in secondary science and an MSc in Teacher Education at the University of Oxford. She also has a MA in Photography.

Rachel taught physics for seven years in local Oxfordshire secondary schools, becoming a mentor to trainee science teachers and Head of Physics. She most recently worked on the second year Teach First science course at the Institute of Education at UCL and as a curriculum tutor on the Oxford science PGCE. She has taught the Teaching Physics in Schools option for second year physics undergraduates studying at Oxford for the past four years.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Laura is Co-Director of the University of Oxford Education Deanery and subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages. She also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Robert (Rob) Klassen joined the University of Oxford as Professor of Education in November 2023.  

Rob was previously at the University of York, where he worked from 2012 as Professor and Chair of the Psychology in Education Research Centre. Before coming to the UK, Rob was Assistant, Associate, and Full Professor in the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Alberta (2004-2012). Before entering academia he worked as an educational psychologist and high school teacher in his hometown of Vancouver. 

Rob’s primary research interests are in building an understanding of teacher motivation and development across the career span and across countries. His current work aims to develop and test theory-informed technological interventions related to teacher and school leader recruitment, selection, and development.  

Rob has published over 100 peer-reviewed journal articles, chapters, and books. Recent projects have been funded by the ESRC, the ERC, GIZ, and the World Bank, with recent projects in the UK, Australia, Africa (Morocco, Kenya, South Africa), and Europe. He has served as advisor to education ministries in England, Africa, Australia, Europe, and South America. In 2023 he founded the spinout company, TSP, in collaboration with the University of York. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and the American Psychological Association, and has served on editorial boards for the British Journal of Educational Psychology, the Journal of Educational Psychology, and the Oxford Review of Education.
 

Representative research includes: 

On teacher recruitment: Klassen, R. M., Rushby, J. V., & Wang, H. (2023). Can an online scenario-based learning activity influence preservice teachers’ self-efficacy, person-vocation fit, and career intentions? Computers and Education, 207, 104935. 

On teacher retention: Wang, H., & Klassen, R. M. (2023). Longitudinal relations between teachers’ utility values and quitting intentions. Teaching and Teacher Education, 127, 104109.

On teacher selection: Klassen, R. M., & Kim, L. E. (2021). Teacher selection: Evidence-based practices. Springer, ISBN 978-3-030-76186-8.

Rachel’s research focuses on exploring the experiences of ethnic minority trainee teachers with a view to better supporting their progress through teacher education and beyond.

Rachel received a BEng in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Birmingham. She later completed a PGCE in secondary science and an MSc in Teacher Education at the University of Oxford. She also has a MA in Photography.

Rachel taught physics for seven years in local Oxfordshire secondary schools, becoming a mentor to trainee science teachers and Head of Physics. She most recently worked on the second year Teach First science course at the Institute of Education at UCL and as a curriculum tutor on the Oxford science PGCE. She has taught the Teaching Physics in Schools option for second year physics undergraduates studying at Oxford for the past four years.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Laura is Co-Director of the University of Oxford Education Deanery and subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages. She also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Robert (Rob) Klassen joined the University of Oxford as Professor of Education in November 2023.  

Rob was previously at the University of York, where he worked from 2012 as Professor and Chair of the Psychology in Education Research Centre. Before coming to the UK, Rob was Assistant, Associate, and Full Professor in the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Alberta (2004-2012). Before entering academia he worked as an educational psychologist and high school teacher in his hometown of Vancouver. 

Rob’s primary research interests are in building an understanding of teacher motivation and development across the career span and across countries. His current work aims to develop and test theory-informed technological interventions related to teacher and school leader recruitment, selection, and development.  

Rob has published over 100 peer-reviewed journal articles, chapters, and books. Recent projects have been funded by the ESRC, the ERC, GIZ, and the World Bank, with recent projects in the UK, Australia, Africa (Morocco, Kenya, South Africa), and Europe. He has served as advisor to education ministries in England, Africa, Australia, Europe, and South America. In 2023 he founded the spinout company, TSP, in collaboration with the University of York. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and the American Psychological Association, and has served on editorial boards for the British Journal of Educational Psychology, the Journal of Educational Psychology, and the Oxford Review of Education.
 

Representative research includes: 

On teacher recruitment: Klassen, R. M., Rushby, J. V., & Wang, H. (2023). Can an online scenario-based learning activity influence preservice teachers’ self-efficacy, person-vocation fit, and career intentions? Computers and Education, 207, 104935. 

On teacher retention: Wang, H., & Klassen, R. M. (2023). Longitudinal relations between teachers’ utility values and quitting intentions. Teaching and Teacher Education, 127, 104109.

On teacher selection: Klassen, R. M., & Kim, L. E. (2021). Teacher selection: Evidence-based practices. Springer, ISBN 978-3-030-76186-8.

Rachel’s research focuses on exploring the experiences of ethnic minority trainee teachers with a view to better supporting their progress through teacher education and beyond.

Rachel received a BEng in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Birmingham. She later completed a PGCE in secondary science and an MSc in Teacher Education at the University of Oxford. She also has a MA in Photography.

Rachel taught physics for seven years in local Oxfordshire secondary schools, becoming a mentor to trainee science teachers and Head of Physics. She most recently worked on the second year Teach First science course at the Institute of Education at UCL and as a curriculum tutor on the Oxford science PGCE. She has taught the Teaching Physics in Schools option for second year physics undergraduates studying at Oxford for the past four years.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Laura is Co-Director of the University of Oxford Education Deanery and subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages. She also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Robert (Rob) Klassen joined the University of Oxford as Professor of Education in November 2023.  

Rob was previously at the University of York, where he worked from 2012 as Professor and Chair of the Psychology in Education Research Centre. Before coming to the UK, Rob was Assistant, Associate, and Full Professor in the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Alberta (2004-2012). Before entering academia he worked as an educational psychologist and high school teacher in his hometown of Vancouver. 

Rob’s primary research interests are in building an understanding of teacher motivation and development across the career span and across countries. His current work aims to develop and test theory-informed technological interventions related to teacher and school leader recruitment, selection, and development.  

Rob has published over 100 peer-reviewed journal articles, chapters, and books. Recent projects have been funded by the ESRC, the ERC, GIZ, and the World Bank, with recent projects in the UK, Australia, Africa (Morocco, Kenya, South Africa), and Europe. He has served as advisor to education ministries in England, Africa, Australia, Europe, and South America. In 2023 he founded the spinout company, TSP, in collaboration with the University of York. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and the American Psychological Association, and has served on editorial boards for the British Journal of Educational Psychology, the Journal of Educational Psychology, and the Oxford Review of Education.
 

Representative research includes: 

On teacher recruitment: Klassen, R. M., Rushby, J. V., & Wang, H. (2023). Can an online scenario-based learning activity influence preservice teachers’ self-efficacy, person-vocation fit, and career intentions? Computers and Education, 207, 104935. 

On teacher retention: Wang, H., & Klassen, R. M. (2023). Longitudinal relations between teachers’ utility values and quitting intentions. Teaching and Teacher Education, 127, 104109.

On teacher selection: Klassen, R. M., & Kim, L. E. (2021). Teacher selection: Evidence-based practices. Springer, ISBN 978-3-030-76186-8.

Rachel’s research focuses on exploring the experiences of ethnic minority trainee teachers with a view to better supporting their progress through teacher education and beyond.

Rachel received a BEng in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Birmingham. She later completed a PGCE in secondary science and an MSc in Teacher Education at the University of Oxford. She also has a MA in Photography.

Rachel taught physics for seven years in local Oxfordshire secondary schools, becoming a mentor to trainee science teachers and Head of Physics. She most recently worked on the second year Teach First science course at the Institute of Education at UCL and as a curriculum tutor on the Oxford science PGCE. She has taught the Teaching Physics in Schools option for second year physics undergraduates studying at Oxford for the past four years.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Laura is Co-Director of the University of Oxford Education Deanery and subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages. She also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Robert (Rob) Klassen joined the University of Oxford as Professor of Education in November 2023.  

Rob was previously at the University of York, where he worked from 2012 as Professor and Chair of the Psychology in Education Research Centre. Before coming to the UK, Rob was Assistant, Associate, and Full Professor in the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Alberta (2004-2012). Before entering academia he worked as an educational psychologist and high school teacher in his hometown of Vancouver. 

Rob’s primary research interests are in building an understanding of teacher motivation and development across the career span and across countries. His current work aims to develop and test theory-informed technological interventions related to teacher and school leader recruitment, selection, and development.  

Rob has published over 100 peer-reviewed journal articles, chapters, and books. Recent projects have been funded by the ESRC, the ERC, GIZ, and the World Bank, with recent projects in the UK, Australia, Africa (Morocco, Kenya, South Africa), and Europe. He has served as advisor to education ministries in England, Africa, Australia, Europe, and South America. In 2023 he founded the spinout company, TSP, in collaboration with the University of York. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and the American Psychological Association, and has served on editorial boards for the British Journal of Educational Psychology, the Journal of Educational Psychology, and the Oxford Review of Education.
 

Representative research includes: 

On teacher recruitment: Klassen, R. M., Rushby, J. V., & Wang, H. (2023). Can an online scenario-based learning activity influence preservice teachers’ self-efficacy, person-vocation fit, and career intentions? Computers and Education, 207, 104935. 

On teacher retention: Wang, H., & Klassen, R. M. (2023). Longitudinal relations between teachers’ utility values and quitting intentions. Teaching and Teacher Education, 127, 104109.

On teacher selection: Klassen, R. M., & Kim, L. E. (2021). Teacher selection: Evidence-based practices. Springer, ISBN 978-3-030-76186-8.

Rachel’s research focuses on exploring the experiences of ethnic minority trainee teachers with a view to better supporting their progress through teacher education and beyond.

Rachel received a BEng in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Birmingham. She later completed a PGCE in secondary science and an MSc in Teacher Education at the University of Oxford. She also has a MA in Photography.

Rachel taught physics for seven years in local Oxfordshire secondary schools, becoming a mentor to trainee science teachers and Head of Physics. She most recently worked on the second year Teach First science course at the Institute of Education at UCL and as a curriculum tutor on the Oxford science PGCE. She has taught the Teaching Physics in Schools option for second year physics undergraduates studying at Oxford for the past four years.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Laura is Co-Director of the University of Oxford Education Deanery and subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages. She also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Robert (Rob) Klassen joined the University of Oxford as Professor of Education in November 2023.  

Rob was previously at the University of York, where he worked from 2012 as Professor and Chair of the Psychology in Education Research Centre. Before coming to the UK, Rob was Assistant, Associate, and Full Professor in the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Alberta (2004-2012). Before entering academia he worked as an educational psychologist and high school teacher in his hometown of Vancouver. 

Rob’s primary research interests are in building an understanding of teacher motivation and development across the career span and across countries. His current work aims to develop and test theory-informed technological interventions related to teacher and school leader recruitment, selection, and development.  

Rob has published over 100 peer-reviewed journal articles, chapters, and books. Recent projects have been funded by the ESRC, the ERC, GIZ, and the World Bank, with recent projects in the UK, Australia, Africa (Morocco, Kenya, South Africa), and Europe. He has served as advisor to education ministries in England, Africa, Australia, Europe, and South America. In 2023 he founded the spinout company, TSP, in collaboration with the University of York. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and the American Psychological Association, and has served on editorial boards for the British Journal of Educational Psychology, the Journal of Educational Psychology, and the Oxford Review of Education.
 

Representative research includes: 

On teacher recruitment: Klassen, R. M., Rushby, J. V., & Wang, H. (2023). Can an online scenario-based learning activity influence preservice teachers’ self-efficacy, person-vocation fit, and career intentions? Computers and Education, 207, 104935. 

On teacher retention: Wang, H., & Klassen, R. M. (2023). Longitudinal relations between teachers’ utility values and quitting intentions. Teaching and Teacher Education, 127, 104109.

On teacher selection: Klassen, R. M., & Kim, L. E. (2021). Teacher selection: Evidence-based practices. Springer, ISBN 978-3-030-76186-8.

Rachel’s research focuses on exploring the experiences of ethnic minority trainee teachers with a view to better supporting their progress through teacher education and beyond.

Rachel received a BEng in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Birmingham. She later completed a PGCE in secondary science and an MSc in Teacher Education at the University of Oxford. She also has a MA in Photography.

Rachel taught physics for seven years in local Oxfordshire secondary schools, becoming a mentor to trainee science teachers and Head of Physics. She most recently worked on the second year Teach First science course at the Institute of Education at UCL and as a curriculum tutor on the Oxford science PGCE. She has taught the Teaching Physics in Schools option for second year physics undergraduates studying at Oxford for the past four years.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Laura is Co-Director of the University of Oxford Education Deanery and subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages. She also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Robert (Rob) Klassen joined the University of Oxford as Professor of Education in November 2023.  

Rob was previously at the University of York, where he worked from 2012 as Professor and Chair of the Psychology in Education Research Centre. Before coming to the UK, Rob was Assistant, Associate, and Full Professor in the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Alberta (2004-2012). Before entering academia he worked as an educational psychologist and high school teacher in his hometown of Vancouver. 

Rob’s primary research interests are in building an understanding of teacher motivation and development across the career span and across countries. His current work aims to develop and test theory-informed technological interventions related to teacher and school leader recruitment, selection, and development.  

Rob has published over 100 peer-reviewed journal articles, chapters, and books. Recent projects have been funded by the ESRC, the ERC, GIZ, and the World Bank, with recent projects in the UK, Australia, Africa (Morocco, Kenya, South Africa), and Europe. He has served as advisor to education ministries in England, Africa, Australia, Europe, and South America. In 2023 he founded the spinout company, TSP, in collaboration with the University of York. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and the American Psychological Association, and has served on editorial boards for the British Journal of Educational Psychology, the Journal of Educational Psychology, and the Oxford Review of Education.
 

Representative research includes: 

On teacher recruitment: Klassen, R. M., Rushby, J. V., & Wang, H. (2023). Can an online scenario-based learning activity influence preservice teachers’ self-efficacy, person-vocation fit, and career intentions? Computers and Education, 207, 104935. 

On teacher retention: Wang, H., & Klassen, R. M. (2023). Longitudinal relations between teachers’ utility values and quitting intentions. Teaching and Teacher Education, 127, 104109.

On teacher selection: Klassen, R. M., & Kim, L. E. (2021). Teacher selection: Evidence-based practices. Springer, ISBN 978-3-030-76186-8.

Rachel’s research focuses on exploring the experiences of ethnic minority trainee teachers with a view to better supporting their progress through teacher education and beyond.

Rachel received a BEng in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Birmingham. She later completed a PGCE in secondary science and an MSc in Teacher Education at the University of Oxford. She also has a MA in Photography.

Rachel taught physics for seven years in local Oxfordshire secondary schools, becoming a mentor to trainee science teachers and Head of Physics. She most recently worked on the second year Teach First science course at the Institute of Education at UCL and as a curriculum tutor on the Oxford science PGCE. She has taught the Teaching Physics in Schools option for second year physics undergraduates studying at Oxford for the past four years.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Laura is Co-Director of the University of Oxford Education Deanery and subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages. She also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Robert (Rob) Klassen joined the University of Oxford as Professor of Education in November 2023.  

Rob was previously at the University of York, where he worked from 2012 as Professor and Chair of the Psychology in Education Research Centre. Before coming to the UK, Rob was Assistant, Associate, and Full Professor in the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Alberta (2004-2012). Before entering academia he worked as an educational psychologist and high school teacher in his hometown of Vancouver. 

Rob’s primary research interests are in building an understanding of teacher motivation and development across the career span and across countries. His current work aims to develop and test theory-informed technological interventions related to teacher and school leader recruitment, selection, and development.  

Rob has published over 100 peer-reviewed journal articles, chapters, and books. Recent projects have been funded by the ESRC, the ERC, GIZ, and the World Bank, with recent projects in the UK, Australia, Africa (Morocco, Kenya, South Africa), and Europe. He has served as advisor to education ministries in England, Africa, Australia, Europe, and South America. In 2023 he founded the spinout company, TSP, in collaboration with the University of York. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and the American Psychological Association, and has served on editorial boards for the British Journal of Educational Psychology, the Journal of Educational Psychology, and the Oxford Review of Education.
 

Representative research includes: 

On teacher recruitment: Klassen, R. M., Rushby, J. V., & Wang, H. (2023). Can an online scenario-based learning activity influence preservice teachers’ self-efficacy, person-vocation fit, and career intentions? Computers and Education, 207, 104935. 

On teacher retention: Wang, H., & Klassen, R. M. (2023). Longitudinal relations between teachers’ utility values and quitting intentions. Teaching and Teacher Education, 127, 104109.

On teacher selection: Klassen, R. M., & Kim, L. E. (2021). Teacher selection: Evidence-based practices. Springer, ISBN 978-3-030-76186-8.

Rachel’s research focuses on exploring the experiences of ethnic minority trainee teachers with a view to better supporting their progress through teacher education and beyond.

Rachel received a BEng in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Birmingham. She later completed a PGCE in secondary science and an MSc in Teacher Education at the University of Oxford. She also has a MA in Photography.

Rachel taught physics for seven years in local Oxfordshire secondary schools, becoming a mentor to trainee science teachers and Head of Physics. She most recently worked on the second year Teach First science course at the Institute of Education at UCL and as a curriculum tutor on the Oxford science PGCE. She has taught the Teaching Physics in Schools option for second year physics undergraduates studying at Oxford for the past four years.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Laura is Co-Director of the University of Oxford Education Deanery and subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages. She also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Robert (Rob) Klassen joined the University of Oxford as Professor of Education in November 2023.  

Rob was previously at the University of York, where he worked from 2012 as Professor and Chair of the Psychology in Education Research Centre. Before coming to the UK, Rob was Assistant, Associate, and Full Professor in the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Alberta (2004-2012). Before entering academia he worked as an educational psychologist and high school teacher in his hometown of Vancouver. 

Rob’s primary research interests are in building an understanding of teacher motivation and development across the career span and across countries. His current work aims to develop and test theory-informed technological interventions related to teacher and school leader recruitment, selection, and development.  

Rob has published over 100 peer-reviewed journal articles, chapters, and books. Recent projects have been funded by the ESRC, the ERC, GIZ, and the World Bank, with recent projects in the UK, Australia, Africa (Morocco, Kenya, South Africa), and Europe. He has served as advisor to education ministries in England, Africa, Australia, Europe, and South America. In 2023 he founded the spinout company, TSP, in collaboration with the University of York. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and the American Psychological Association, and has served on editorial boards for the British Journal of Educational Psychology, the Journal of Educational Psychology, and the Oxford Review of Education.
 

Representative research includes: 

On teacher recruitment: Klassen, R. M., Rushby, J. V., & Wang, H. (2023). Can an online scenario-based learning activity influence preservice teachers’ self-efficacy, person-vocation fit, and career intentions? Computers and Education, 207, 104935. 

On teacher retention: Wang, H., & Klassen, R. M. (2023). Longitudinal relations between teachers’ utility values and quitting intentions. Teaching and Teacher Education, 127, 104109.

On teacher selection: Klassen, R. M., & Kim, L. E. (2021). Teacher selection: Evidence-based practices. Springer, ISBN 978-3-030-76186-8.

Rachel’s research focuses on exploring the experiences of ethnic minority trainee teachers with a view to better supporting their progress through teacher education and beyond.

Rachel received a BEng in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Birmingham. She later completed a PGCE in secondary science and an MSc in Teacher Education at the University of Oxford. She also has a MA in Photography.

Rachel taught physics for seven years in local Oxfordshire secondary schools, becoming a mentor to trainee science teachers and Head of Physics. She most recently worked on the second year Teach First science course at the Institute of Education at UCL and as a curriculum tutor on the Oxford science PGCE. She has taught the Teaching Physics in Schools option for second year physics undergraduates studying at Oxford for the past four years.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Laura is Co-Director of the University of Oxford Education Deanery and subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages. She also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Robert (Rob) Klassen joined the University of Oxford as Professor of Education in November 2023.  

Rob was previously at the University of York, where he worked from 2012 as Professor and Chair of the Psychology in Education Research Centre. Before coming to the UK, Rob was Assistant, Associate, and Full Professor in the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Alberta (2004-2012). Before entering academia he worked as an educational psychologist and high school teacher in his hometown of Vancouver. 

Rob’s primary research interests are in building an understanding of teacher motivation and development across the career span and across countries. His current work aims to develop and test theory-informed technological interventions related to teacher and school leader recruitment, selection, and development.  

Rob has published over 100 peer-reviewed journal articles, chapters, and books. Recent projects have been funded by the ESRC, the ERC, GIZ, and the World Bank, with recent projects in the UK, Australia, Africa (Morocco, Kenya, South Africa), and Europe. He has served as advisor to education ministries in England, Africa, Australia, Europe, and South America. In 2023 he founded the spinout company, TSP, in collaboration with the University of York. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and the American Psychological Association, and has served on editorial boards for the British Journal of Educational Psychology, the Journal of Educational Psychology, and the Oxford Review of Education.
 

Representative research includes: 

On teacher recruitment: Klassen, R. M., Rushby, J. V., & Wang, H. (2023). Can an online scenario-based learning activity influence preservice teachers’ self-efficacy, person-vocation fit, and career intentions? Computers and Education, 207, 104935. 

On teacher retention: Wang, H., & Klassen, R. M. (2023). Longitudinal relations between teachers’ utility values and quitting intentions. Teaching and Teacher Education, 127, 104109.

On teacher selection: Klassen, R. M., & Kim, L. E. (2021). Teacher selection: Evidence-based practices. Springer, ISBN 978-3-030-76186-8.

Rachel’s research focuses on exploring the experiences of ethnic minority trainee teachers with a view to better supporting their progress through teacher education and beyond.

Rachel received a BEng in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Birmingham. She later completed a PGCE in secondary science and an MSc in Teacher Education at the University of Oxford. She also has a MA in Photography.

Rachel taught physics for seven years in local Oxfordshire secondary schools, becoming a mentor to trainee science teachers and Head of Physics. She most recently worked on the second year Teach First science course at the Institute of Education at UCL and as a curriculum tutor on the Oxford science PGCE. She has taught the Teaching Physics in Schools option for second year physics undergraduates studying at Oxford for the past four years.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Laura is Co-Director of the University of Oxford Education Deanery and subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages. She also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Robert (Rob) Klassen joined the University of Oxford as Professor of Education in November 2023.  

Rob was previously at the University of York, where he worked from 2012 as Professor and Chair of the Psychology in Education Research Centre. Before coming to the UK, Rob was Assistant, Associate, and Full Professor in the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Alberta (2004-2012). Before entering academia he worked as an educational psychologist and high school teacher in his hometown of Vancouver. 

Rob’s primary research interests are in building an understanding of teacher motivation and development across the career span and across countries. His current work aims to develop and test theory-informed technological interventions related to teacher and school leader recruitment, selection, and development.  

Rob has published over 100 peer-reviewed journal articles, chapters, and books. Recent projects have been funded by the ESRC, the ERC, GIZ, and the World Bank, with recent projects in the UK, Australia, Africa (Morocco, Kenya, South Africa), and Europe. He has served as advisor to education ministries in England, Africa, Australia, Europe, and South America. In 2023 he founded the spinout company, TSP, in collaboration with the University of York. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and the American Psychological Association, and has served on editorial boards for the British Journal of Educational Psychology, the Journal of Educational Psychology, and the Oxford Review of Education.
 

Representative research includes: 

On teacher recruitment: Klassen, R. M., Rushby, J. V., & Wang, H. (2023). Can an online scenario-based learning activity influence preservice teachers’ self-efficacy, person-vocation fit, and career intentions? Computers and Education, 207, 104935. 

On teacher retention: Wang, H., & Klassen, R. M. (2023). Longitudinal relations between teachers’ utility values and quitting intentions. Teaching and Teacher Education, 127, 104109.

On teacher selection: Klassen, R. M., & Kim, L. E. (2021). Teacher selection: Evidence-based practices. Springer, ISBN 978-3-030-76186-8.

Rachel’s research focuses on exploring the experiences of ethnic minority trainee teachers with a view to better supporting their progress through teacher education and beyond.

Rachel received a BEng in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Birmingham. She later completed a PGCE in secondary science and an MSc in Teacher Education at the University of Oxford. She also has a MA in Photography.

Rachel taught physics for seven years in local Oxfordshire secondary schools, becoming a mentor to trainee science teachers and Head of Physics. She most recently worked on the second year Teach First science course at the Institute of Education at UCL and as a curriculum tutor on the Oxford science PGCE. She has taught the Teaching Physics in Schools option for second year physics undergraduates studying at Oxford for the past four years.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Laura is Co-Director of the University of Oxford Education Deanery and subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages. She also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Robert (Rob) Klassen joined the University of Oxford as Professor of Education in November 2023.  

Rob was previously at the University of York, where he worked from 2012 as Professor and Chair of the Psychology in Education Research Centre. Before coming to the UK, Rob was Assistant, Associate, and Full Professor in the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Alberta (2004-2012). Before entering academia he worked as an educational psychologist and high school teacher in his hometown of Vancouver. 

Rob’s primary research interests are in building an understanding of teacher motivation and development across the career span and across countries. His current work aims to develop and test theory-informed technological interventions related to teacher and school leader recruitment, selection, and development.  

Rob has published over 100 peer-reviewed journal articles, chapters, and books. Recent projects have been funded by the ESRC, the ERC, GIZ, and the World Bank, with recent projects in the UK, Australia, Africa (Morocco, Kenya, South Africa), and Europe. He has served as advisor to education ministries in England, Africa, Australia, Europe, and South America. In 2023 he founded the spinout company, TSP, in collaboration with the University of York. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and the American Psychological Association, and has served on editorial boards for the British Journal of Educational Psychology, the Journal of Educational Psychology, and the Oxford Review of Education.
 

Representative research includes: 

On teacher recruitment: Klassen, R. M., Rushby, J. V., & Wang, H. (2023). Can an online scenario-based learning activity influence preservice teachers’ self-efficacy, person-vocation fit, and career intentions? Computers and Education, 207, 104935. 

On teacher retention: Wang, H., & Klassen, R. M. (2023). Longitudinal relations between teachers’ utility values and quitting intentions. Teaching and Teacher Education, 127, 104109.

On teacher selection: Klassen, R. M., & Kim, L. E. (2021). Teacher selection: Evidence-based practices. Springer, ISBN 978-3-030-76186-8.

Rachel’s research focuses on exploring the experiences of ethnic minority trainee teachers with a view to better supporting their progress through teacher education and beyond.

Rachel received a BEng in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Birmingham. She later completed a PGCE in secondary science and an MSc in Teacher Education at the University of Oxford. She also has a MA in Photography.

Rachel taught physics for seven years in local Oxfordshire secondary schools, becoming a mentor to trainee science teachers and Head of Physics. She most recently worked on the second year Teach First science course at the Institute of Education at UCL and as a curriculum tutor on the Oxford science PGCE. She has taught the Teaching Physics in Schools option for second year physics undergraduates studying at Oxford for the past four years.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Laura is Co-Director of the University of Oxford Education Deanery and subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages. She also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Robert (Rob) Klassen joined the University of Oxford as Professor of Education in November 2023.  

Rob was previously at the University of York, where he worked from 2012 as Professor and Chair of the Psychology in Education Research Centre. Before coming to the UK, Rob was Assistant, Associate, and Full Professor in the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Alberta (2004-2012). Before entering academia he worked as an educational psychologist and high school teacher in his hometown of Vancouver. 

Rob’s primary research interests are in building an understanding of teacher motivation and development across the career span and across countries. His current work aims to develop and test theory-informed technological interventions related to teacher and school leader recruitment, selection, and development.  

Rob has published over 100 peer-reviewed journal articles, chapters, and books. Recent projects have been funded by the ESRC, the ERC, GIZ, and the World Bank, with recent projects in the UK, Australia, Africa (Morocco, Kenya, South Africa), and Europe. He has served as advisor to education ministries in England, Africa, Australia, Europe, and South America. In 2023 he founded the spinout company, TSP, in collaboration with the University of York. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and the American Psychological Association, and has served on editorial boards for the British Journal of Educational Psychology, the Journal of Educational Psychology, and the Oxford Review of Education.
 

Representative research includes: 

On teacher recruitment: Klassen, R. M., Rushby, J. V., & Wang, H. (2023). Can an online scenario-based learning activity influence preservice teachers’ self-efficacy, person-vocation fit, and career intentions? Computers and Education, 207, 104935. 

On teacher retention: Wang, H., & Klassen, R. M. (2023). Longitudinal relations between teachers’ utility values and quitting intentions. Teaching and Teacher Education, 127, 104109.

On teacher selection: Klassen, R. M., & Kim, L. E. (2021). Teacher selection: Evidence-based practices. Springer, ISBN 978-3-030-76186-8.

Rachel’s research focuses on exploring the experiences of ethnic minority trainee teachers with a view to better supporting their progress through teacher education and beyond.

Rachel received a BEng in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Birmingham. She later completed a PGCE in secondary science and an MSc in Teacher Education at the University of Oxford. She also has a MA in Photography.

Rachel taught physics for seven years in local Oxfordshire secondary schools, becoming a mentor to trainee science teachers and Head of Physics. She most recently worked on the second year Teach First science course at the Institute of Education at UCL and as a curriculum tutor on the Oxford science PGCE. She has taught the Teaching Physics in Schools option for second year physics undergraduates studying at Oxford for the past four years.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Laura is Co-Director of the University of Oxford Education Deanery and subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages. She also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Robert (Rob) Klassen joined the University of Oxford as Professor of Education in November 2023.  

Rob was previously at the University of York, where he worked from 2012 as Professor and Chair of the Psychology in Education Research Centre. Before coming to the UK, Rob was Assistant, Associate, and Full Professor in the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Alberta (2004-2012). Before entering academia he worked as an educational psychologist and high school teacher in his hometown of Vancouver. 

Rob’s primary research interests are in building an understanding of teacher motivation and development across the career span and across countries. His current work aims to develop and test theory-informed technological interventions related to teacher and school leader recruitment, selection, and development.  

Rob has published over 100 peer-reviewed journal articles, chapters, and books. Recent projects have been funded by the ESRC, the ERC, GIZ, and the World Bank, with recent projects in the UK, Australia, Africa (Morocco, Kenya, South Africa), and Europe. He has served as advisor to education ministries in England, Africa, Australia, Europe, and South America. In 2023 he founded the spinout company, TSP, in collaboration with the University of York. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and the American Psychological Association, and has served on editorial boards for the British Journal of Educational Psychology, the Journal of Educational Psychology, and the Oxford Review of Education.
 

Representative research includes: 

On teacher recruitment: Klassen, R. M., Rushby, J. V., & Wang, H. (2023). Can an online scenario-based learning activity influence preservice teachers’ self-efficacy, person-vocation fit, and career intentions? Computers and Education, 207, 104935. 

On teacher retention: Wang, H., & Klassen, R. M. (2023). Longitudinal relations between teachers’ utility values and quitting intentions. Teaching and Teacher Education, 127, 104109.

On teacher selection: Klassen, R. M., & Kim, L. E. (2021). Teacher selection: Evidence-based practices. Springer, ISBN 978-3-030-76186-8.

Rachel’s research focuses on exploring the experiences of ethnic minority trainee teachers with a view to better supporting their progress through teacher education and beyond.

Rachel received a BEng in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Birmingham. She later completed a PGCE in secondary science and an MSc in Teacher Education at the University of Oxford. She also has a MA in Photography.

Rachel taught physics for seven years in local Oxfordshire secondary schools, becoming a mentor to trainee science teachers and Head of Physics. She most recently worked on the second year Teach First science course at the Institute of Education at UCL and as a curriculum tutor on the Oxford science PGCE. She has taught the Teaching Physics in Schools option for second year physics undergraduates studying at Oxford for the past four years.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Laura is Co-Director of the University of Oxford Education Deanery and subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages. She also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Robert (Rob) Klassen joined the University of Oxford as Professor of Education in November 2023.  

Rob was previously at the University of York, where he worked from 2012 as Professor and Chair of the Psychology in Education Research Centre. Before coming to the UK, Rob was Assistant, Associate, and Full Professor in the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Alberta (2004-2012). Before entering academia he worked as an educational psychologist and high school teacher in his hometown of Vancouver. 

Rob’s primary research interests are in building an understanding of teacher motivation and development across the career span and across countries. His current work aims to develop and test theory-informed technological interventions related to teacher and school leader recruitment, selection, and development.  

Rob has published over 100 peer-reviewed journal articles, chapters, and books. Recent projects have been funded by the ESRC, the ERC, GIZ, and the World Bank, with recent projects in the UK, Australia, Africa (Morocco, Kenya, South Africa), and Europe. He has served as advisor to education ministries in England, Africa, Australia, Europe, and South America. In 2023 he founded the spinout company, TSP, in collaboration with the University of York. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and the American Psychological Association, and has served on editorial boards for the British Journal of Educational Psychology, the Journal of Educational Psychology, and the Oxford Review of Education.
 

Representative research includes: 

On teacher recruitment: Klassen, R. M., Rushby, J. V., & Wang, H. (2023). Can an online scenario-based learning activity influence preservice teachers’ self-efficacy, person-vocation fit, and career intentions? Computers and Education, 207, 104935. 

On teacher retention: Wang, H., & Klassen, R. M. (2023). Longitudinal relations between teachers’ utility values and quitting intentions. Teaching and Teacher Education, 127, 104109.

On teacher selection: Klassen, R. M., & Kim, L. E. (2021). Teacher selection: Evidence-based practices. Springer, ISBN 978-3-030-76186-8.

Rachel’s research focuses on exploring the experiences of ethnic minority trainee teachers with a view to better supporting their progress through teacher education and beyond.

Rachel received a BEng in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Birmingham. She later completed a PGCE in secondary science and an MSc in Teacher Education at the University of Oxford. She also has a MA in Photography.

Rachel taught physics for seven years in local Oxfordshire secondary schools, becoming a mentor to trainee science teachers and Head of Physics. She most recently worked on the second year Teach First science course at the Institute of Education at UCL and as a curriculum tutor on the Oxford science PGCE. She has taught the Teaching Physics in Schools option for second year physics undergraduates studying at Oxford for the past four years.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Laura is Co-Director of the University of Oxford Education Deanery and subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages. She also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Robert (Rob) Klassen joined the University of Oxford as Professor of Education in November 2023.  

Rob was previously at the University of York, where he worked from 2012 as Professor and Chair of the Psychology in Education Research Centre. Before coming to the UK, Rob was Assistant, Associate, and Full Professor in the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Alberta (2004-2012). Before entering academia he worked as an educational psychologist and high school teacher in his hometown of Vancouver. 

Rob’s primary research interests are in building an understanding of teacher motivation and development across the career span and across countries. His current work aims to develop and test theory-informed technological interventions related to teacher and school leader recruitment, selection, and development.  

Rob has published over 100 peer-reviewed journal articles, chapters, and books. Recent projects have been funded by the ESRC, the ERC, GIZ, and the World Bank, with recent projects in the UK, Australia, Africa (Morocco, Kenya, South Africa), and Europe. He has served as advisor to education ministries in England, Africa, Australia, Europe, and South America. In 2023 he founded the spinout company, TSP, in collaboration with the University of York. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and the American Psychological Association, and has served on editorial boards for the British Journal of Educational Psychology, the Journal of Educational Psychology, and the Oxford Review of Education.
 

Representative research includes: 

On teacher recruitment: Klassen, R. M., Rushby, J. V., & Wang, H. (2023). Can an online scenario-based learning activity influence preservice teachers’ self-efficacy, person-vocation fit, and career intentions? Computers and Education, 207, 104935. 

On teacher retention: Wang, H., & Klassen, R. M. (2023). Longitudinal relations between teachers’ utility values and quitting intentions. Teaching and Teacher Education, 127, 104109.

On teacher selection: Klassen, R. M., & Kim, L. E. (2021). Teacher selection: Evidence-based practices. Springer, ISBN 978-3-030-76186-8.

Rachel’s research focuses on exploring the experiences of ethnic minority trainee teachers with a view to better supporting their progress through teacher education and beyond.

Rachel received a BEng in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Birmingham. She later completed a PGCE in secondary science and an MSc in Teacher Education at the University of Oxford. She also has a MA in Photography.

Rachel taught physics for seven years in local Oxfordshire secondary schools, becoming a mentor to trainee science teachers and Head of Physics. She most recently worked on the second year Teach First science course at the Institute of Education at UCL and as a curriculum tutor on the Oxford science PGCE. She has taught the Teaching Physics in Schools option for second year physics undergraduates studying at Oxford for the past four years.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Laura is Co-Director of the University of Oxford Education Deanery and subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages. She also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Robert (Rob) Klassen joined the University of Oxford as Professor of Education in November 2023.  

Rob was previously at the University of York, where he worked from 2012 as Professor and Chair of the Psychology in Education Research Centre. Before coming to the UK, Rob was Assistant, Associate, and Full Professor in the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Alberta (2004-2012). Before entering academia he worked as an educational psychologist and high school teacher in his hometown of Vancouver. 

Rob’s primary research interests are in building an understanding of teacher motivation and development across the career span and across countries. His current work aims to develop and test theory-informed technological interventions related to teacher and school leader recruitment, selection, and development.  

Rob has published over 100 peer-reviewed journal articles, chapters, and books. Recent projects have been funded by the ESRC, the ERC, GIZ, and the World Bank, with recent projects in the UK, Australia, Africa (Morocco, Kenya, South Africa), and Europe. He has served as advisor to education ministries in England, Africa, Australia, Europe, and South America. In 2023 he founded the spinout company, TSP, in collaboration with the University of York. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and the American Psychological Association, and has served on editorial boards for the British Journal of Educational Psychology, the Journal of Educational Psychology, and the Oxford Review of Education.
 

Representative research includes: 

On teacher recruitment: Klassen, R. M., Rushby, J. V., & Wang, H. (2023). Can an online scenario-based learning activity influence preservice teachers’ self-efficacy, person-vocation fit, and career intentions? Computers and Education, 207, 104935. 

On teacher retention: Wang, H., & Klassen, R. M. (2023). Longitudinal relations between teachers’ utility values and quitting intentions. Teaching and Teacher Education, 127, 104109.

On teacher selection: Klassen, R. M., & Kim, L. E. (2021). Teacher selection: Evidence-based practices. Springer, ISBN 978-3-030-76186-8.

Rachel’s research focuses on exploring the experiences of ethnic minority trainee teachers with a view to better supporting their progress through teacher education and beyond.

Rachel received a BEng in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Birmingham. She later completed a PGCE in secondary science and an MSc in Teacher Education at the University of Oxford. She also has a MA in Photography.

Rachel taught physics for seven years in local Oxfordshire secondary schools, becoming a mentor to trainee science teachers and Head of Physics. She most recently worked on the second year Teach First science course at the Institute of Education at UCL and as a curriculum tutor on the Oxford science PGCE. She has taught the Teaching Physics in Schools option for second year physics undergraduates studying at Oxford for the past four years.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Laura is Co-Director of the University of Oxford Education Deanery and subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages. She also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Robert (Rob) Klassen joined the University of Oxford as Professor of Education in November 2023.  

Rob was previously at the University of York, where he worked from 2012 as Professor and Chair of the Psychology in Education Research Centre. Before coming to the UK, Rob was Assistant, Associate, and Full Professor in the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Alberta (2004-2012). Before entering academia he worked as an educational psychologist and high school teacher in his hometown of Vancouver. 

Rob’s primary research interests are in building an understanding of teacher motivation and development across the career span and across countries. His current work aims to develop and test theory-informed technological interventions related to teacher and school leader recruitment, selection, and development.  

Rob has published over 100 peer-reviewed journal articles, chapters, and books. Recent projects have been funded by the ESRC, the ERC, GIZ, and the World Bank, with recent projects in the UK, Australia, Africa (Morocco, Kenya, South Africa), and Europe. He has served as advisor to education ministries in England, Africa, Australia, Europe, and South America. In 2023 he founded the spinout company, TSP, in collaboration with the University of York. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and the American Psychological Association, and has served on editorial boards for the British Journal of Educational Psychology, the Journal of Educational Psychology, and the Oxford Review of Education.
 

Representative research includes: 

On teacher recruitment: Klassen, R. M., Rushby, J. V., & Wang, H. (2023). Can an online scenario-based learning activity influence preservice teachers’ self-efficacy, person-vocation fit, and career intentions? Computers and Education, 207, 104935. 

On teacher retention: Wang, H., & Klassen, R. M. (2023). Longitudinal relations between teachers’ utility values and quitting intentions. Teaching and Teacher Education, 127, 104109.

On teacher selection: Klassen, R. M., & Kim, L. E. (2021). Teacher selection: Evidence-based practices. Springer, ISBN 978-3-030-76186-8.

Rachel’s research focuses on exploring the experiences of ethnic minority trainee teachers with a view to better supporting their progress through teacher education and beyond.

Rachel received a BEng in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Birmingham. She later completed a PGCE in secondary science and an MSc in Teacher Education at the University of Oxford. She also has a MA in Photography.

Rachel taught physics for seven years in local Oxfordshire secondary schools, becoming a mentor to trainee science teachers and Head of Physics. She most recently worked on the second year Teach First science course at the Institute of Education at UCL and as a curriculum tutor on the Oxford science PGCE. She has taught the Teaching Physics in Schools option for second year physics undergraduates studying at Oxford for the past four years.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Laura is Co-Director of the University of Oxford Education Deanery and subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages. She also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Robert (Rob) Klassen joined the University of Oxford as Professor of Education in November 2023.  

Rob was previously at the University of York, where he worked from 2012 as Professor and Chair of the Psychology in Education Research Centre. Before coming to the UK, Rob was Assistant, Associate, and Full Professor in the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Alberta (2004-2012). Before entering academia he worked as an educational psychologist and high school teacher in his hometown of Vancouver. 

Rob’s primary research interests are in building an understanding of teacher motivation and development across the career span and across countries. His current work aims to develop and test theory-informed technological interventions related to teacher and school leader recruitment, selection, and development.  

Rob has published over 100 peer-reviewed journal articles, chapters, and books. Recent projects have been funded by the ESRC, the ERC, GIZ, and the World Bank, with recent projects in the UK, Australia, Africa (Morocco, Kenya, South Africa), and Europe. He has served as advisor to education ministries in England, Africa, Australia, Europe, and South America. In 2023 he founded the spinout company, TSP, in collaboration with the University of York. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and the American Psychological Association, and has served on editorial boards for the British Journal of Educational Psychology, the Journal of Educational Psychology, and the Oxford Review of Education.
 

Representative research includes: 

On teacher recruitment: Klassen, R. M., Rushby, J. V., & Wang, H. (2023). Can an online scenario-based learning activity influence preservice teachers’ self-efficacy, person-vocation fit, and career intentions? Computers and Education, 207, 104935. 

On teacher retention: Wang, H., & Klassen, R. M. (2023). Longitudinal relations between teachers’ utility values and quitting intentions. Teaching and Teacher Education, 127, 104109.

On teacher selection: Klassen, R. M., & Kim, L. E. (2021). Teacher selection: Evidence-based practices. Springer, ISBN 978-3-030-76186-8.

Rachel’s research focuses on exploring the experiences of ethnic minority trainee teachers with a view to better supporting their progress through teacher education and beyond.

Rachel received a BEng in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Birmingham. She later completed a PGCE in secondary science and an MSc in Teacher Education at the University of Oxford. She also has a MA in Photography.

Rachel taught physics for seven years in local Oxfordshire secondary schools, becoming a mentor to trainee science teachers and Head of Physics. She most recently worked on the second year Teach First science course at the Institute of Education at UCL and as a curriculum tutor on the Oxford science PGCE. She has taught the Teaching Physics in Schools option for second year physics undergraduates studying at Oxford for the past four years.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Laura is Co-Director of the University of Oxford Education Deanery and subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages. She also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Robert (Rob) Klassen joined the University of Oxford as Professor of Education in November 2023.  

Rob was previously at the University of York, where he worked from 2012 as Professor and Chair of the Psychology in Education Research Centre. Before coming to the UK, Rob was Assistant, Associate, and Full Professor in the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Alberta (2004-2012). Before entering academia he worked as an educational psychologist and high school teacher in his hometown of Vancouver. 

Rob’s primary research interests are in building an understanding of teacher motivation and development across the career span and across countries. His current work aims to develop and test theory-informed technological interventions related to teacher and school leader recruitment, selection, and development.  

Rob has published over 100 peer-reviewed journal articles, chapters, and books. Recent projects have been funded by the ESRC, the ERC, GIZ, and the World Bank, with recent projects in the UK, Australia, Africa (Morocco, Kenya, South Africa), and Europe. He has served as advisor to education ministries in England, Africa, Australia, Europe, and South America. In 2023 he founded the spinout company, TSP, in collaboration with the University of York. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and the American Psychological Association, and has served on editorial boards for the British Journal of Educational Psychology, the Journal of Educational Psychology, and the Oxford Review of Education.
 

Representative research includes: 

On teacher recruitment: Klassen, R. M., Rushby, J. V., & Wang, H. (2023). Can an online scenario-based learning activity influence preservice teachers’ self-efficacy, person-vocation fit, and career intentions? Computers and Education, 207, 104935. 

On teacher retention: Wang, H., & Klassen, R. M. (2023). Longitudinal relations between teachers’ utility values and quitting intentions. Teaching and Teacher Education, 127, 104109.

On teacher selection: Klassen, R. M., & Kim, L. E. (2021). Teacher selection: Evidence-based practices. Springer, ISBN 978-3-030-76186-8.

Rachel’s research focuses on exploring the experiences of ethnic minority trainee teachers with a view to better supporting their progress through teacher education and beyond.

Rachel received a BEng in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Birmingham. She later completed a PGCE in secondary science and an MSc in Teacher Education at the University of Oxford. She also has a MA in Photography.

Rachel taught physics for seven years in local Oxfordshire secondary schools, becoming a mentor to trainee science teachers and Head of Physics. She most recently worked on the second year Teach First science course at the Institute of Education at UCL and as a curriculum tutor on the Oxford science PGCE. She has taught the Teaching Physics in Schools option for second year physics undergraduates studying at Oxford for the past four years.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Laura is Co-Director of the University of Oxford Education Deanery and subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages. She also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Robert (Rob) Klassen joined the University of Oxford as Professor of Education in November 2023.  

Rob was previously at the University of York, where he worked from 2012 as Professor and Chair of the Psychology in Education Research Centre. Before coming to the UK, Rob was Assistant, Associate, and Full Professor in the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Alberta (2004-2012). Before entering academia he worked as an educational psychologist and high school teacher in his hometown of Vancouver. 

Rob’s primary research interests are in building an understanding of teacher motivation and development across the career span and across countries. His current work aims to develop and test theory-informed technological interventions related to teacher and school leader recruitment, selection, and development.  

Rob has published over 100 peer-reviewed journal articles, chapters, and books. Recent projects have been funded by the ESRC, the ERC, GIZ, and the World Bank, with recent projects in the UK, Australia, Africa (Morocco, Kenya, South Africa), and Europe. He has served as advisor to education ministries in England, Africa, Australia, Europe, and South America. In 2023 he founded the spinout company, TSP, in collaboration with the University of York. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and the American Psychological Association, and has served on editorial boards for the British Journal of Educational Psychology, the Journal of Educational Psychology, and the Oxford Review of Education.
 

Representative research includes: 

On teacher recruitment: Klassen, R. M., Rushby, J. V., & Wang, H. (2023). Can an online scenario-based learning activity influence preservice teachers’ self-efficacy, person-vocation fit, and career intentions? Computers and Education, 207, 104935. 

On teacher retention: Wang, H., & Klassen, R. M. (2023). Longitudinal relations between teachers’ utility values and quitting intentions. Teaching and Teacher Education, 127, 104109.

On teacher selection: Klassen, R. M., & Kim, L. E. (2021). Teacher selection: Evidence-based practices. Springer, ISBN 978-3-030-76186-8.

Rachel’s research focuses on exploring the experiences of ethnic minority trainee teachers with a view to better supporting their progress through teacher education and beyond.

Rachel received a BEng in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Birmingham. She later completed a PGCE in secondary science and an MSc in Teacher Education at the University of Oxford. She also has a MA in Photography.

Rachel taught physics for seven years in local Oxfordshire secondary schools, becoming a mentor to trainee science teachers and Head of Physics. She most recently worked on the second year Teach First science course at the Institute of Education at UCL and as a curriculum tutor on the Oxford science PGCE. She has taught the Teaching Physics in Schools option for second year physics undergraduates studying at Oxford for the past four years.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Laura is Co-Director of the University of Oxford Education Deanery and subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages. She also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Robert (Rob) Klassen joined the University of Oxford as Professor of Education in November 2023.  

Rob was previously at the University of York, where he worked from 2012 as Professor and Chair of the Psychology in Education Research Centre. Before coming to the UK, Rob was Assistant, Associate, and Full Professor in the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Alberta (2004-2012). Before entering academia he worked as an educational psychologist and high school teacher in his hometown of Vancouver. 

Rob’s primary research interests are in building an understanding of teacher motivation and development across the career span and across countries. His current work aims to develop and test theory-informed technological interventions related to teacher and school leader recruitment, selection, and development.  

Rob has published over 100 peer-reviewed journal articles, chapters, and books. Recent projects have been funded by the ESRC, the ERC, GIZ, and the World Bank, with recent projects in the UK, Australia, Africa (Morocco, Kenya, South Africa), and Europe. He has served as advisor to education ministries in England, Africa, Australia, Europe, and South America. In 2023 he founded the spinout company, TSP, in collaboration with the University of York. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and the American Psychological Association, and has served on editorial boards for the British Journal of Educational Psychology, the Journal of Educational Psychology, and the Oxford Review of Education.
 

Representative research includes: 

On teacher recruitment: Klassen, R. M., Rushby, J. V., & Wang, H. (2023). Can an online scenario-based learning activity influence preservice teachers’ self-efficacy, person-vocation fit, and career intentions? Computers and Education, 207, 104935. 

On teacher retention: Wang, H., & Klassen, R. M. (2023). Longitudinal relations between teachers’ utility values and quitting intentions. Teaching and Teacher Education, 127, 104109.

On teacher selection: Klassen, R. M., & Kim, L. E. (2021). Teacher selection: Evidence-based practices. Springer, ISBN 978-3-030-76186-8.

Rachel’s research focuses on exploring the experiences of ethnic minority trainee teachers with a view to better supporting their progress through teacher education and beyond.

Rachel received a BEng in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Birmingham. She later completed a PGCE in secondary science and an MSc in Teacher Education at the University of Oxford. She also has a MA in Photography.

Rachel taught physics for seven years in local Oxfordshire secondary schools, becoming a mentor to trainee science teachers and Head of Physics. She most recently worked on the second year Teach First science course at the Institute of Education at UCL and as a curriculum tutor on the Oxford science PGCE. She has taught the Teaching Physics in Schools option for second year physics undergraduates studying at Oxford for the past four years.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Laura is Co-Director of the University of Oxford Education Deanery and subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages. She also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Robert (Rob) Klassen joined the University of Oxford as Professor of Education in November 2023.  

Rob was previously at the University of York, where he worked from 2012 as Professor and Chair of the Psychology in Education Research Centre. Before coming to the UK, Rob was Assistant, Associate, and Full Professor in the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Alberta (2004-2012). Before entering academia he worked as an educational psychologist and high school teacher in his hometown of Vancouver. 

Rob’s primary research interests are in building an understanding of teacher motivation and development across the career span and across countries. His current work aims to develop and test theory-informed technological interventions related to teacher and school leader recruitment, selection, and development.  

Rob has published over 100 peer-reviewed journal articles, chapters, and books. Recent projects have been funded by the ESRC, the ERC, GIZ, and the World Bank, with recent projects in the UK, Australia, Africa (Morocco, Kenya, South Africa), and Europe. He has served as advisor to education ministries in England, Africa, Australia, Europe, and South America. In 2023 he founded the spinout company, TSP, in collaboration with the University of York. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and the American Psychological Association, and has served on editorial boards for the British Journal of Educational Psychology, the Journal of Educational Psychology, and the Oxford Review of Education.
 

Representative research includes: 

On teacher recruitment: Klassen, R. M., Rushby, J. V., & Wang, H. (2023). Can an online scenario-based learning activity influence preservice teachers’ self-efficacy, person-vocation fit, and career intentions? Computers and Education, 207, 104935. 

On teacher retention: Wang, H., & Klassen, R. M. (2023). Longitudinal relations between teachers’ utility values and quitting intentions. Teaching and Teacher Education, 127, 104109.

On teacher selection: Klassen, R. M., & Kim, L. E. (2021). Teacher selection: Evidence-based practices. Springer, ISBN 978-3-030-76186-8.

Rachel’s research focuses on exploring the experiences of ethnic minority trainee teachers with a view to better supporting their progress through teacher education and beyond.

Rachel received a BEng in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Birmingham. She later completed a PGCE in secondary science and an MSc in Teacher Education at the University of Oxford. She also has a MA in Photography.

Rachel taught physics for seven years in local Oxfordshire secondary schools, becoming a mentor to trainee science teachers and Head of Physics. She most recently worked on the second year Teach First science course at the Institute of Education at UCL and as a curriculum tutor on the Oxford science PGCE. She has taught the Teaching Physics in Schools option for second year physics undergraduates studying at Oxford for the past four years.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Laura is Co-Director of the University of Oxford Education Deanery and subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages. She also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Robert (Rob) Klassen joined the University of Oxford as Professor of Education in November 2023.  

Rob was previously at the University of York, where he worked from 2012 as Professor and Chair of the Psychology in Education Research Centre. Before coming to the UK, Rob was Assistant, Associate, and Full Professor in the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Alberta (2004-2012). Before entering academia he worked as an educational psychologist and high school teacher in his hometown of Vancouver. 

Rob’s primary research interests are in building an understanding of teacher motivation and development across the career span and across countries. His current work aims to develop and test theory-informed technological interventions related to teacher and school leader recruitment, selection, and development.  

Rob has published over 100 peer-reviewed journal articles, chapters, and books. Recent projects have been funded by the ESRC, the ERC, GIZ, and the World Bank, with recent projects in the UK, Australia, Africa (Morocco, Kenya, South Africa), and Europe. He has served as advisor to education ministries in England, Africa, Australia, Europe, and South America. In 2023 he founded the spinout company, TSP, in collaboration with the University of York. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and the American Psychological Association, and has served on editorial boards for the British Journal of Educational Psychology, the Journal of Educational Psychology, and the Oxford Review of Education.
 

Representative research includes: 

On teacher recruitment: Klassen, R. M., Rushby, J. V., & Wang, H. (2023). Can an online scenario-based learning activity influence preservice teachers’ self-efficacy, person-vocation fit, and career intentions? Computers and Education, 207, 104935. 

On teacher retention: Wang, H., & Klassen, R. M. (2023). Longitudinal relations between teachers’ utility values and quitting intentions. Teaching and Teacher Education, 127, 104109.

On teacher selection: Klassen, R. M., & Kim, L. E. (2021). Teacher selection: Evidence-based practices. Springer, ISBN 978-3-030-76186-8.

Rachel’s research focuses on exploring the experiences of ethnic minority trainee teachers with a view to better supporting their progress through teacher education and beyond.

Rachel received a BEng in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Birmingham. She later completed a PGCE in secondary science and an MSc in Teacher Education at the University of Oxford. She also has a MA in Photography.

Rachel taught physics for seven years in local Oxfordshire secondary schools, becoming a mentor to trainee science teachers and Head of Physics. She most recently worked on the second year Teach First science course at the Institute of Education at UCL and as a curriculum tutor on the Oxford science PGCE. She has taught the Teaching Physics in Schools option for second year physics undergraduates studying at Oxford for the past four years.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Laura is Co-Director of the University of Oxford Education Deanery and subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages. She also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Robert (Rob) Klassen joined the University of Oxford as Professor of Education in November 2023.  

Rob was previously at the University of York, where he worked from 2012 as Professor and Chair of the Psychology in Education Research Centre. Before coming to the UK, Rob was Assistant, Associate, and Full Professor in the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Alberta (2004-2012). Before entering academia he worked as an educational psychologist and high school teacher in his hometown of Vancouver. 

Rob’s primary research interests are in building an understanding of teacher motivation and development across the career span and across countries. His current work aims to develop and test theory-informed technological interventions related to teacher and school leader recruitment, selection, and development.  

Rob has published over 100 peer-reviewed journal articles, chapters, and books. Recent projects have been funded by the ESRC, the ERC, GIZ, and the World Bank, with recent projects in the UK, Australia, Africa (Morocco, Kenya, South Africa), and Europe. He has served as advisor to education ministries in England, Africa, Australia, Europe, and South America. In 2023 he founded the spinout company, TSP, in collaboration with the University of York. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and the American Psychological Association, and has served on editorial boards for the British Journal of Educational Psychology, the Journal of Educational Psychology, and the Oxford Review of Education.
 

Representative research includes: 

On teacher recruitment: Klassen, R. M., Rushby, J. V., & Wang, H. (2023). Can an online scenario-based learning activity influence preservice teachers’ self-efficacy, person-vocation fit, and career intentions? Computers and Education, 207, 104935. 

On teacher retention: Wang, H., & Klassen, R. M. (2023). Longitudinal relations between teachers’ utility values and quitting intentions. Teaching and Teacher Education, 127, 104109.

On teacher selection: Klassen, R. M., & Kim, L. E. (2021). Teacher selection: Evidence-based practices. Springer, ISBN 978-3-030-76186-8.

Rachel’s research focuses on exploring the experiences of ethnic minority trainee teachers with a view to better supporting their progress through teacher education and beyond.

Rachel received a BEng in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Birmingham. She later completed a PGCE in secondary science and an MSc in Teacher Education at the University of Oxford. She also has a MA in Photography.

Rachel taught physics for seven years in local Oxfordshire secondary schools, becoming a mentor to trainee science teachers and Head of Physics. She most recently worked on the second year Teach First science course at the Institute of Education at UCL and as a curriculum tutor on the Oxford science PGCE. She has taught the Teaching Physics in Schools option for second year physics undergraduates studying at Oxford for the past four years.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Laura is Co-Director of the University of Oxford Education Deanery and subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages. She also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Robert (Rob) Klassen joined the University of Oxford as Professor of Education in November 2023.  

Rob was previously at the University of York, where he worked from 2012 as Professor and Chair of the Psychology in Education Research Centre. Before coming to the UK, Rob was Assistant, Associate, and Full Professor in the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Alberta (2004-2012). Before entering academia he worked as an educational psychologist and high school teacher in his hometown of Vancouver. 

Rob’s primary research interests are in building an understanding of teacher motivation and development across the career span and across countries. His current work aims to develop and test theory-informed technological interventions related to teacher and school leader recruitment, selection, and development.  

Rob has published over 100 peer-reviewed journal articles, chapters, and books. Recent projects have been funded by the ESRC, the ERC, GIZ, and the World Bank, with recent projects in the UK, Australia, Africa (Morocco, Kenya, South Africa), and Europe. He has served as advisor to education ministries in England, Africa, Australia, Europe, and South America. In 2023 he founded the spinout company, TSP, in collaboration with the University of York. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and the American Psychological Association, and has served on editorial boards for the British Journal of Educational Psychology, the Journal of Educational Psychology, and the Oxford Review of Education.
 

Representative research includes: 

On teacher recruitment: Klassen, R. M., Rushby, J. V., & Wang, H. (2023). Can an online scenario-based learning activity influence preservice teachers’ self-efficacy, person-vocation fit, and career intentions? Computers and Education, 207, 104935. 

On teacher retention: Wang, H., & Klassen, R. M. (2023). Longitudinal relations between teachers’ utility values and quitting intentions. Teaching and Teacher Education, 127, 104109.

On teacher selection: Klassen, R. M., & Kim, L. E. (2021). Teacher selection: Evidence-based practices. Springer, ISBN 978-3-030-76186-8.

Rachel’s research focuses on exploring the experiences of ethnic minority trainee teachers with a view to better supporting their progress through teacher education and beyond.

Rachel received a BEng in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Birmingham. She later completed a PGCE in secondary science and an MSc in Teacher Education at the University of Oxford. She also has a MA in Photography.

Rachel taught physics for seven years in local Oxfordshire secondary schools, becoming a mentor to trainee science teachers and Head of Physics. She most recently worked on the second year Teach First science course at the Institute of Education at UCL and as a curriculum tutor on the Oxford science PGCE. She has taught the Teaching Physics in Schools option for second year physics undergraduates studying at Oxford for the past four years.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Laura is Co-Director of the University of Oxford Education Deanery and subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages. She also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Robert (Rob) Klassen joined the University of Oxford as Professor of Education in November 2023.  

Rob was previously at the University of York, where he worked from 2012 as Professor and Chair of the Psychology in Education Research Centre. Before coming to the UK, Rob was Assistant, Associate, and Full Professor in the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Alberta (2004-2012). Before entering academia he worked as an educational psychologist and high school teacher in his hometown of Vancouver. 

Rob’s primary research interests are in building an understanding of teacher motivation and development across the career span and across countries. His current work aims to develop and test theory-informed technological interventions related to teacher and school leader recruitment, selection, and development.  

Rob has published over 100 peer-reviewed journal articles, chapters, and books. Recent projects have been funded by the ESRC, the ERC, GIZ, and the World Bank, with recent projects in the UK, Australia, Africa (Morocco, Kenya, South Africa), and Europe. He has served as advisor to education ministries in England, Africa, Australia, Europe, and South America. In 2023 he founded the spinout company, TSP, in collaboration with the University of York. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and the American Psychological Association, and has served on editorial boards for the British Journal of Educational Psychology, the Journal of Educational Psychology, and the Oxford Review of Education.
 

Representative research includes: 

On teacher recruitment: Klassen, R. M., Rushby, J. V., & Wang, H. (2023). Can an online scenario-based learning activity influence preservice teachers’ self-efficacy, person-vocation fit, and career intentions? Computers and Education, 207, 104935. 

On teacher retention: Wang, H., & Klassen, R. M. (2023). Longitudinal relations between teachers’ utility values and quitting intentions. Teaching and Teacher Education, 127, 104109.

On teacher selection: Klassen, R. M., & Kim, L. E. (2021). Teacher selection: Evidence-based practices. Springer, ISBN 978-3-030-76186-8.

Rachel’s research focuses on exploring the experiences of ethnic minority trainee teachers with a view to better supporting their progress through teacher education and beyond.

Rachel received a BEng in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Birmingham. She later completed a PGCE in secondary science and an MSc in Teacher Education at the University of Oxford. She also has a MA in Photography.

Rachel taught physics for seven years in local Oxfordshire secondary schools, becoming a mentor to trainee science teachers and Head of Physics. She most recently worked on the second year Teach First science course at the Institute of Education at UCL and as a curriculum tutor on the Oxford science PGCE. She has taught the Teaching Physics in Schools option for second year physics undergraduates studying at Oxford for the past four years.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Laura is Co-Director of the University of Oxford Education Deanery and subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages. She also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Robert (Rob) Klassen joined the University of Oxford as Professor of Education in November 2023.  

Rob was previously at the University of York, where he worked from 2012 as Professor and Chair of the Psychology in Education Research Centre. Before coming to the UK, Rob was Assistant, Associate, and Full Professor in the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Alberta (2004-2012). Before entering academia he worked as an educational psychologist and high school teacher in his hometown of Vancouver. 

Rob’s primary research interests are in building an understanding of teacher motivation and development across the career span and across countries. His current work aims to develop and test theory-informed technological interventions related to teacher and school leader recruitment, selection, and development.  

Rob has published over 100 peer-reviewed journal articles, chapters, and books. Recent projects have been funded by the ESRC, the ERC, GIZ, and the World Bank, with recent projects in the UK, Australia, Africa (Morocco, Kenya, South Africa), and Europe. He has served as advisor to education ministries in England, Africa, Australia, Europe, and South America. In 2023 he founded the spinout company, TSP, in collaboration with the University of York. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and the American Psychological Association, and has served on editorial boards for the British Journal of Educational Psychology, the Journal of Educational Psychology, and the Oxford Review of Education.
 

Representative research includes: 

On teacher recruitment: Klassen, R. M., Rushby, J. V., & Wang, H. (2023). Can an online scenario-based learning activity influence preservice teachers’ self-efficacy, person-vocation fit, and career intentions? Computers and Education, 207, 104935. 

On teacher retention: Wang, H., & Klassen, R. M. (2023). Longitudinal relations between teachers’ utility values and quitting intentions. Teaching and Teacher Education, 127, 104109.

On teacher selection: Klassen, R. M., & Kim, L. E. (2021). Teacher selection: Evidence-based practices. Springer, ISBN 978-3-030-76186-8.

Rachel’s research focuses on exploring the experiences of ethnic minority trainee teachers with a view to better supporting their progress through teacher education and beyond.

Rachel received a BEng in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Birmingham. She later completed a PGCE in secondary science and an MSc in Teacher Education at the University of Oxford. She also has a MA in Photography.

Rachel taught physics for seven years in local Oxfordshire secondary schools, becoming a mentor to trainee science teachers and Head of Physics. She most recently worked on the second year Teach First science course at the Institute of Education at UCL and as a curriculum tutor on the Oxford science PGCE. She has taught the Teaching Physics in Schools option for second year physics undergraduates studying at Oxford for the past four years.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Laura is Co-Director of the University of Oxford Education Deanery and subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages. She also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Robert (Rob) Klassen joined the University of Oxford as Professor of Education in November 2023.  

Rob was previously at the University of York, where he worked from 2012 as Professor and Chair of the Psychology in Education Research Centre. Before coming to the UK, Rob was Assistant, Associate, and Full Professor in the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Alberta (2004-2012). Before entering academia he worked as an educational psychologist and high school teacher in his hometown of Vancouver. 

Rob’s primary research interests are in building an understanding of teacher motivation and development across the career span and across countries. His current work aims to develop and test theory-informed technological interventions related to teacher and school leader recruitment, selection, and development.  

Rob has published over 100 peer-reviewed journal articles, chapters, and books. Recent projects have been funded by the ESRC, the ERC, GIZ, and the World Bank, with recent projects in the UK, Australia, Africa (Morocco, Kenya, South Africa), and Europe. He has served as advisor to education ministries in England, Africa, Australia, Europe, and South America. In 2023 he founded the spinout company, TSP, in collaboration with the University of York. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and the American Psychological Association, and has served on editorial boards for the British Journal of Educational Psychology, the Journal of Educational Psychology, and the Oxford Review of Education.
 

Representative research includes: 

On teacher recruitment: Klassen, R. M., Rushby, J. V., & Wang, H. (2023). Can an online scenario-based learning activity influence preservice teachers’ self-efficacy, person-vocation fit, and career intentions? Computers and Education, 207, 104935. 

On teacher retention: Wang, H., & Klassen, R. M. (2023). Longitudinal relations between teachers’ utility values and quitting intentions. Teaching and Teacher Education, 127, 104109.

On teacher selection: Klassen, R. M., & Kim, L. E. (2021). Teacher selection: Evidence-based practices. Springer, ISBN 978-3-030-76186-8.

Rachel’s research focuses on exploring the experiences of ethnic minority trainee teachers with a view to better supporting their progress through teacher education and beyond.

Rachel received a BEng in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Birmingham. She later completed a PGCE in secondary science and an MSc in Teacher Education at the University of Oxford. She also has a MA in Photography.

Rachel taught physics for seven years in local Oxfordshire secondary schools, becoming a mentor to trainee science teachers and Head of Physics. She most recently worked on the second year Teach First science course at the Institute of Education at UCL and as a curriculum tutor on the Oxford science PGCE. She has taught the Teaching Physics in Schools option for second year physics undergraduates studying at Oxford for the past four years.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Laura is Co-Director of the University of Oxford Education Deanery and subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages. She also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Robert (Rob) Klassen joined the University of Oxford as Professor of Education in November 2023.  

Rob was previously at the University of York, where he worked from 2012 as Professor and Chair of the Psychology in Education Research Centre. Before coming to the UK, Rob was Assistant, Associate, and Full Professor in the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Alberta (2004-2012). Before entering academia he worked as an educational psychologist and high school teacher in his hometown of Vancouver. 

Rob’s primary research interests are in building an understanding of teacher motivation and development across the career span and across countries. His current work aims to develop and test theory-informed technological interventions related to teacher and school leader recruitment, selection, and development.  

Rob has published over 100 peer-reviewed journal articles, chapters, and books. Recent projects have been funded by the ESRC, the ERC, GIZ, and the World Bank, with recent projects in the UK, Australia, Africa (Morocco, Kenya, South Africa), and Europe. He has served as advisor to education ministries in England, Africa, Australia, Europe, and South America. In 2023 he founded the spinout company, TSP, in collaboration with the University of York. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and the American Psychological Association, and has served on editorial boards for the British Journal of Educational Psychology, the Journal of Educational Psychology, and the Oxford Review of Education.
 

Representative research includes: 

On teacher recruitment: Klassen, R. M., Rushby, J. V., & Wang, H. (2023). Can an online scenario-based learning activity influence preservice teachers’ self-efficacy, person-vocation fit, and career intentions? Computers and Education, 207, 104935. 

On teacher retention: Wang, H., & Klassen, R. M. (2023). Longitudinal relations between teachers’ utility values and quitting intentions. Teaching and Teacher Education, 127, 104109.

On teacher selection: Klassen, R. M., & Kim, L. E. (2021). Teacher selection: Evidence-based practices. Springer, ISBN 978-3-030-76186-8.

Rachel’s research focuses on exploring the experiences of ethnic minority trainee teachers with a view to better supporting their progress through teacher education and beyond.

Rachel received a BEng in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Birmingham. She later completed a PGCE in secondary science and an MSc in Teacher Education at the University of Oxford. She also has a MA in Photography.

Rachel taught physics for seven years in local Oxfordshire secondary schools, becoming a mentor to trainee science teachers and Head of Physics. She most recently worked on the second year Teach First science course at the Institute of Education at UCL and as a curriculum tutor on the Oxford science PGCE. She has taught the Teaching Physics in Schools option for second year physics undergraduates studying at Oxford for the past four years.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Laura is Co-Director of the University of Oxford Education Deanery and subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages. She also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Robert (Rob) Klassen joined the University of Oxford as Professor of Education in November 2023.  

Rob was previously at the University of York, where he worked from 2012 as Professor and Chair of the Psychology in Education Research Centre. Before coming to the UK, Rob was Assistant, Associate, and Full Professor in the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Alberta (2004-2012). Before entering academia he worked as an educational psychologist and high school teacher in his hometown of Vancouver. 

Rob’s primary research interests are in building an understanding of teacher motivation and development across the career span and across countries. His current work aims to develop and test theory-informed technological interventions related to teacher and school leader recruitment, selection, and development.  

Rob has published over 100 peer-reviewed journal articles, chapters, and books. Recent projects have been funded by the ESRC, the ERC, GIZ, and the World Bank, with recent projects in the UK, Australia, Africa (Morocco, Kenya, South Africa), and Europe. He has served as advisor to education ministries in England, Africa, Australia, Europe, and South America. In 2023 he founded the spinout company, TSP, in collaboration with the University of York. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and the American Psychological Association, and has served on editorial boards for the British Journal of Educational Psychology, the Journal of Educational Psychology, and the Oxford Review of Education.
 

Representative research includes: 

On teacher recruitment: Klassen, R. M., Rushby, J. V., & Wang, H. (2023). Can an online scenario-based learning activity influence preservice teachers’ self-efficacy, person-vocation fit, and career intentions? Computers and Education, 207, 104935. 

On teacher retention: Wang, H., & Klassen, R. M. (2023). Longitudinal relations between teachers’ utility values and quitting intentions. Teaching and Teacher Education, 127, 104109.

On teacher selection: Klassen, R. M., & Kim, L. E. (2021). Teacher selection: Evidence-based practices. Springer, ISBN 978-3-030-76186-8.

Rachel’s research focuses on exploring the experiences of ethnic minority trainee teachers with a view to better supporting their progress through teacher education and beyond.

Rachel received a BEng in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Birmingham. She later completed a PGCE in secondary science and an MSc in Teacher Education at the University of Oxford. She also has a MA in Photography.

Rachel taught physics for seven years in local Oxfordshire secondary schools, becoming a mentor to trainee science teachers and Head of Physics. She most recently worked on the second year Teach First science course at the Institute of Education at UCL and as a curriculum tutor on the Oxford science PGCE. She has taught the Teaching Physics in Schools option for second year physics undergraduates studying at Oxford for the past four years.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Laura is Co-Director of the University of Oxford Education Deanery and subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages. She also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Robert (Rob) Klassen joined the University of Oxford as Professor of Education in November 2023.  

Rob was previously at the University of York, where he worked from 2012 as Professor and Chair of the Psychology in Education Research Centre. Before coming to the UK, Rob was Assistant, Associate, and Full Professor in the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Alberta (2004-2012). Before entering academia he worked as an educational psychologist and high school teacher in his hometown of Vancouver. 

Rob’s primary research interests are in building an understanding of teacher motivation and development across the career span and across countries. His current work aims to develop and test theory-informed technological interventions related to teacher and school leader recruitment, selection, and development.  

Rob has published over 100 peer-reviewed journal articles, chapters, and books. Recent projects have been funded by the ESRC, the ERC, GIZ, and the World Bank, with recent projects in the UK, Australia, Africa (Morocco, Kenya, South Africa), and Europe. He has served as advisor to education ministries in England, Africa, Australia, Europe, and South America. In 2023 he founded the spinout company, TSP, in collaboration with the University of York. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and the American Psychological Association, and has served on editorial boards for the British Journal of Educational Psychology, the Journal of Educational Psychology, and the Oxford Review of Education.
 

Representative research includes: 

On teacher recruitment: Klassen, R. M., Rushby, J. V., & Wang, H. (2023). Can an online scenario-based learning activity influence preservice teachers’ self-efficacy, person-vocation fit, and career intentions? Computers and Education, 207, 104935. 

On teacher retention: Wang, H., & Klassen, R. M. (2023). Longitudinal relations between teachers’ utility values and quitting intentions. Teaching and Teacher Education, 127, 104109.

On teacher selection: Klassen, R. M., & Kim, L. E. (2021). Teacher selection: Evidence-based practices. Springer, ISBN 978-3-030-76186-8.

Rachel’s research focuses on exploring the experiences of ethnic minority trainee teachers with a view to better supporting their progress through teacher education and beyond.

Rachel received a BEng in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Birmingham. She later completed a PGCE in secondary science and an MSc in Teacher Education at the University of Oxford. She also has a MA in Photography.

Rachel taught physics for seven years in local Oxfordshire secondary schools, becoming a mentor to trainee science teachers and Head of Physics. She most recently worked on the second year Teach First science course at the Institute of Education at UCL and as a curriculum tutor on the Oxford science PGCE. She has taught the Teaching Physics in Schools option for second year physics undergraduates studying at Oxford for the past four years.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Laura is Co-Director of the University of Oxford Education Deanery and subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages. She also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Robert (Rob) Klassen joined the University of Oxford as Professor of Education in November 2023.  

Rob was previously at the University of York, where he worked from 2012 as Professor and Chair of the Psychology in Education Research Centre. Before coming to the UK, Rob was Assistant, Associate, and Full Professor in the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Alberta (2004-2012). Before entering academia he worked as an educational psychologist and high school teacher in his hometown of Vancouver. 

Rob’s primary research interests are in building an understanding of teacher motivation and development across the career span and across countries. His current work aims to develop and test theory-informed technological interventions related to teacher and school leader recruitment, selection, and development.  

Rob has published over 100 peer-reviewed journal articles, chapters, and books. Recent projects have been funded by the ESRC, the ERC, GIZ, and the World Bank, with recent projects in the UK, Australia, Africa (Morocco, Kenya, South Africa), and Europe. He has served as advisor to education ministries in England, Africa, Australia, Europe, and South America. In 2023 he founded the spinout company, TSP, in collaboration with the University of York. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and the American Psychological Association, and has served on editorial boards for the British Journal of Educational Psychology, the Journal of Educational Psychology, and the Oxford Review of Education.
 

Representative research includes: 

On teacher recruitment: Klassen, R. M., Rushby, J. V., & Wang, H. (2023). Can an online scenario-based learning activity influence preservice teachers’ self-efficacy, person-vocation fit, and career intentions? Computers and Education, 207, 104935. 

On teacher retention: Wang, H., & Klassen, R. M. (2023). Longitudinal relations between teachers’ utility values and quitting intentions. Teaching and Teacher Education, 127, 104109.

On teacher selection: Klassen, R. M., & Kim, L. E. (2021). Teacher selection: Evidence-based practices. Springer, ISBN 978-3-030-76186-8.

Rachel’s research focuses on exploring the experiences of ethnic minority trainee teachers with a view to better supporting their progress through teacher education and beyond.

Rachel received a BEng in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Birmingham. She later completed a PGCE in secondary science and an MSc in Teacher Education at the University of Oxford. She also has a MA in Photography.

Rachel taught physics for seven years in local Oxfordshire secondary schools, becoming a mentor to trainee science teachers and Head of Physics. She most recently worked on the second year Teach First science course at the Institute of Education at UCL and as a curriculum tutor on the Oxford science PGCE. She has taught the Teaching Physics in Schools option for second year physics undergraduates studying at Oxford for the past four years.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Laura is Co-Director of the University of Oxford Education Deanery and subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages. She also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Robert (Rob) Klassen joined the University of Oxford as Professor of Education in November 2023.  

Rob was previously at the University of York, where he worked from 2012 as Professor and Chair of the Psychology in Education Research Centre. Before coming to the UK, Rob was Assistant, Associate, and Full Professor in the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Alberta (2004-2012). Before entering academia he worked as an educational psychologist and high school teacher in his hometown of Vancouver. 

Rob’s primary research interests are in building an understanding of teacher motivation and development across the career span and across countries. His current work aims to develop and test theory-informed technological interventions related to teacher and school leader recruitment, selection, and development.  

Rob has published over 100 peer-reviewed journal articles, chapters, and books. Recent projects have been funded by the ESRC, the ERC, GIZ, and the World Bank, with recent projects in the UK, Australia, Africa (Morocco, Kenya, South Africa), and Europe. He has served as advisor to education ministries in England, Africa, Australia, Europe, and South America. In 2023 he founded the spinout company, TSP, in collaboration with the University of York. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and the American Psychological Association, and has served on editorial boards for the British Journal of Educational Psychology, the Journal of Educational Psychology, and the Oxford Review of Education.
 

Representative research includes: 

On teacher recruitment: Klassen, R. M., Rushby, J. V., & Wang, H. (2023). Can an online scenario-based learning activity influence preservice teachers’ self-efficacy, person-vocation fit, and career intentions? Computers and Education, 207, 104935. 

On teacher retention: Wang, H., & Klassen, R. M. (2023). Longitudinal relations between teachers’ utility values and quitting intentions. Teaching and Teacher Education, 127, 104109.

On teacher selection: Klassen, R. M., & Kim, L. E. (2021). Teacher selection: Evidence-based practices. Springer, ISBN 978-3-030-76186-8.

Rachel’s research focuses on exploring the experiences of ethnic minority trainee teachers with a view to better supporting their progress through teacher education and beyond.

Rachel received a BEng in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Birmingham. She later completed a PGCE in secondary science and an MSc in Teacher Education at the University of Oxford. She also has a MA in Photography.

Rachel taught physics for seven years in local Oxfordshire secondary schools, becoming a mentor to trainee science teachers and Head of Physics. She most recently worked on the second year Teach First science course at the Institute of Education at UCL and as a curriculum tutor on the Oxford science PGCE. She has taught the Teaching Physics in Schools option for second year physics undergraduates studying at Oxford for the past four years.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Laura is Co-Director of the University of Oxford Education Deanery and subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages. She also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Robert (Rob) Klassen joined the University of Oxford as Professor of Education in November 2023.  

Rob was previously at the University of York, where he worked from 2012 as Professor and Chair of the Psychology in Education Research Centre. Before coming to the UK, Rob was Assistant, Associate, and Full Professor in the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Alberta (2004-2012). Before entering academia he worked as an educational psychologist and high school teacher in his hometown of Vancouver. 

Rob’s primary research interests are in building an understanding of teacher motivation and development across the career span and across countries. His current work aims to develop and test theory-informed technological interventions related to teacher and school leader recruitment, selection, and development.  

Rob has published over 100 peer-reviewed journal articles, chapters, and books. Recent projects have been funded by the ESRC, the ERC, GIZ, and the World Bank, with recent projects in the UK, Australia, Africa (Morocco, Kenya, South Africa), and Europe. He has served as advisor to education ministries in England, Africa, Australia, Europe, and South America. In 2023 he founded the spinout company, TSP, in collaboration with the University of York. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and the American Psychological Association, and has served on editorial boards for the British Journal of Educational Psychology, the Journal of Educational Psychology, and the Oxford Review of Education.
 

Representative research includes: 

On teacher recruitment: Klassen, R. M., Rushby, J. V., & Wang, H. (2023). Can an online scenario-based learning activity influence preservice teachers’ self-efficacy, person-vocation fit, and career intentions? Computers and Education, 207, 104935. 

On teacher retention: Wang, H., & Klassen, R. M. (2023). Longitudinal relations between teachers’ utility values and quitting intentions. Teaching and Teacher Education, 127, 104109.

On teacher selection: Klassen, R. M., & Kim, L. E. (2021). Teacher selection: Evidence-based practices. Springer, ISBN 978-3-030-76186-8.

Rachel’s research focuses on exploring the experiences of ethnic minority trainee teachers with a view to better supporting their progress through teacher education and beyond.

Rachel received a BEng in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Birmingham. She later completed a PGCE in secondary science and an MSc in Teacher Education at the University of Oxford. She also has a MA in Photography.

Rachel taught physics for seven years in local Oxfordshire secondary schools, becoming a mentor to trainee science teachers and Head of Physics. She most recently worked on the second year Teach First science course at the Institute of Education at UCL and as a curriculum tutor on the Oxford science PGCE. She has taught the Teaching Physics in Schools option for second year physics undergraduates studying at Oxford for the past four years.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Laura is Co-Director of the University of Oxford Education Deanery and subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages. She also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Robert (Rob) Klassen joined the University of Oxford as Professor of Education in November 2023.  

Rob was previously at the University of York, where he worked from 2012 as Professor and Chair of the Psychology in Education Research Centre. Before coming to the UK, Rob was Assistant, Associate, and Full Professor in the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Alberta (2004-2012). Before entering academia he worked as an educational psychologist and high school teacher in his hometown of Vancouver. 

Rob’s primary research interests are in building an understanding of teacher motivation and development across the career span and across countries. His current work aims to develop and test theory-informed technological interventions related to teacher and school leader recruitment, selection, and development.  

Rob has published over 100 peer-reviewed journal articles, chapters, and books. Recent projects have been funded by the ESRC, the ERC, GIZ, and the World Bank, with recent projects in the UK, Australia, Africa (Morocco, Kenya, South Africa), and Europe. He has served as advisor to education ministries in England, Africa, Australia, Europe, and South America. In 2023 he founded the spinout company, TSP, in collaboration with the University of York. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and the American Psychological Association, and has served on editorial boards for the British Journal of Educational Psychology, the Journal of Educational Psychology, and the Oxford Review of Education.
 

Representative research includes: 

On teacher recruitment: Klassen, R. M., Rushby, J. V., & Wang, H. (2023). Can an online scenario-based learning activity influence preservice teachers’ self-efficacy, person-vocation fit, and career intentions? Computers and Education, 207, 104935. 

On teacher retention: Wang, H., & Klassen, R. M. (2023). Longitudinal relations between teachers’ utility values and quitting intentions. Teaching and Teacher Education, 127, 104109.

On teacher selection: Klassen, R. M., & Kim, L. E. (2021). Teacher selection: Evidence-based practices. Springer, ISBN 978-3-030-76186-8.

Rachel’s research focuses on exploring the experiences of ethnic minority trainee teachers with a view to better supporting their progress through teacher education and beyond.

Rachel received a BEng in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Birmingham. She later completed a PGCE in secondary science and an MSc in Teacher Education at the University of Oxford. She also has a MA in Photography.

Rachel taught physics for seven years in local Oxfordshire secondary schools, becoming a mentor to trainee science teachers and Head of Physics. She most recently worked on the second year Teach First science course at the Institute of Education at UCL and as a curriculum tutor on the Oxford science PGCE. She has taught the Teaching Physics in Schools option for second year physics undergraduates studying at Oxford for the past four years.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Laura is Co-Director of the University of Oxford Education Deanery and subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages. She also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Robert (Rob) Klassen joined the University of Oxford as Professor of Education in November 2023.  

Rob was previously at the University of York, where he worked from 2012 as Professor and Chair of the Psychology in Education Research Centre. Before coming to the UK, Rob was Assistant, Associate, and Full Professor in the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Alberta (2004-2012). Before entering academia he worked as an educational psychologist and high school teacher in his hometown of Vancouver. 

Rob’s primary research interests are in building an understanding of teacher motivation and development across the career span and across countries. His current work aims to develop and test theory-informed technological interventions related to teacher and school leader recruitment, selection, and development.  

Rob has published over 100 peer-reviewed journal articles, chapters, and books. Recent projects have been funded by the ESRC, the ERC, GIZ, and the World Bank, with recent projects in the UK, Australia, Africa (Morocco, Kenya, South Africa), and Europe. He has served as advisor to education ministries in England, Africa, Australia, Europe, and South America. In 2023 he founded the spinout company, TSP, in collaboration with the University of York. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and the American Psychological Association, and has served on editorial boards for the British Journal of Educational Psychology, the Journal of Educational Psychology, and the Oxford Review of Education.
 

Representative research includes: 

On teacher recruitment: Klassen, R. M., Rushby, J. V., & Wang, H. (2023). Can an online scenario-based learning activity influence preservice teachers’ self-efficacy, person-vocation fit, and career intentions? Computers and Education, 207, 104935. 

On teacher retention: Wang, H., & Klassen, R. M. (2023). Longitudinal relations between teachers’ utility values and quitting intentions. Teaching and Teacher Education, 127, 104109.

On teacher selection: Klassen, R. M., & Kim, L. E. (2021). Teacher selection: Evidence-based practices. Springer, ISBN 978-3-030-76186-8.

Rachel’s research focuses on exploring the experiences of ethnic minority trainee teachers with a view to better supporting their progress through teacher education and beyond.

Rachel received a BEng in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Birmingham. She later completed a PGCE in secondary science and an MSc in Teacher Education at the University of Oxford. She also has a MA in Photography.

Rachel taught physics for seven years in local Oxfordshire secondary schools, becoming a mentor to trainee science teachers and Head of Physics. She most recently worked on the second year Teach First science course at the Institute of Education at UCL and as a curriculum tutor on the Oxford science PGCE. She has taught the Teaching Physics in Schools option for second year physics undergraduates studying at Oxford for the past four years.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Laura is Co-Director of the University of Oxford Education Deanery and subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages. She also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Robert (Rob) Klassen joined the University of Oxford as Professor of Education in November 2023.  

Rob was previously at the University of York, where he worked from 2012 as Professor and Chair of the Psychology in Education Research Centre. Before coming to the UK, Rob was Assistant, Associate, and Full Professor in the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Alberta (2004-2012). Before entering academia he worked as an educational psychologist and high school teacher in his hometown of Vancouver. 

Rob’s primary research interests are in building an understanding of teacher motivation and development across the career span and across countries. His current work aims to develop and test theory-informed technological interventions related to teacher and school leader recruitment, selection, and development.  

Rob has published over 100 peer-reviewed journal articles, chapters, and books. Recent projects have been funded by the ESRC, the ERC, GIZ, and the World Bank, with recent projects in the UK, Australia, Africa (Morocco, Kenya, South Africa), and Europe. He has served as advisor to education ministries in England, Africa, Australia, Europe, and South America. In 2023 he founded the spinout company, TSP, in collaboration with the University of York. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and the American Psychological Association, and has served on editorial boards for the British Journal of Educational Psychology, the Journal of Educational Psychology, and the Oxford Review of Education.
 

Representative research includes: 

On teacher recruitment: Klassen, R. M., Rushby, J. V., & Wang, H. (2023). Can an online scenario-based learning activity influence preservice teachers’ self-efficacy, person-vocation fit, and career intentions? Computers and Education, 207, 104935. 

On teacher retention: Wang, H., & Klassen, R. M. (2023). Longitudinal relations between teachers’ utility values and quitting intentions. Teaching and Teacher Education, 127, 104109.

On teacher selection: Klassen, R. M., & Kim, L. E. (2021). Teacher selection: Evidence-based practices. Springer, ISBN 978-3-030-76186-8.

Rachel’s research focuses on exploring the experiences of ethnic minority trainee teachers with a view to better supporting their progress through teacher education and beyond.

Rachel received a BEng in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Birmingham. She later completed a PGCE in secondary science and an MSc in Teacher Education at the University of Oxford. She also has a MA in Photography.

Rachel taught physics for seven years in local Oxfordshire secondary schools, becoming a mentor to trainee science teachers and Head of Physics. She most recently worked on the second year Teach First science course at the Institute of Education at UCL and as a curriculum tutor on the Oxford science PGCE. She has taught the Teaching Physics in Schools option for second year physics undergraduates studying at Oxford for the past four years.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Laura is Co-Director of the University of Oxford Education Deanery and subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages. She also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Robert (Rob) Klassen joined the University of Oxford as Professor of Education in November 2023.  

Rob was previously at the University of York, where he worked from 2012 as Professor and Chair of the Psychology in Education Research Centre. Before coming to the UK, Rob was Assistant, Associate, and Full Professor in the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Alberta (2004-2012). Before entering academia he worked as an educational psychologist and high school teacher in his hometown of Vancouver. 

Rob’s primary research interests are in building an understanding of teacher motivation and development across the career span and across countries. His current work aims to develop and test theory-informed technological interventions related to teacher and school leader recruitment, selection, and development.  

Rob has published over 100 peer-reviewed journal articles, chapters, and books. Recent projects have been funded by the ESRC, the ERC, GIZ, and the World Bank, with recent projects in the UK, Australia, Africa (Morocco, Kenya, South Africa), and Europe. He has served as advisor to education ministries in England, Africa, Australia, Europe, and South America. In 2023 he founded the spinout company, TSP, in collaboration with the University of York. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and the American Psychological Association, and has served on editorial boards for the British Journal of Educational Psychology, the Journal of Educational Psychology, and the Oxford Review of Education.
 

Representative research includes: 

On teacher recruitment: Klassen, R. M., Rushby, J. V., & Wang, H. (2023). Can an online scenario-based learning activity influence preservice teachers’ self-efficacy, person-vocation fit, and career intentions? Computers and Education, 207, 104935. 

On teacher retention: Wang, H., & Klassen, R. M. (2023). Longitudinal relations between teachers’ utility values and quitting intentions. Teaching and Teacher Education, 127, 104109.

On teacher selection: Klassen, R. M., & Kim, L. E. (2021). Teacher selection: Evidence-based practices. Springer, ISBN 978-3-030-76186-8.

Rachel’s research focuses on exploring the experiences of ethnic minority trainee teachers with a view to better supporting their progress through teacher education and beyond.

Rachel received a BEng in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Birmingham. She later completed a PGCE in secondary science and an MSc in Teacher Education at the University of Oxford. She also has a MA in Photography.

Rachel taught physics for seven years in local Oxfordshire secondary schools, becoming a mentor to trainee science teachers and Head of Physics. She most recently worked on the second year Teach First science course at the Institute of Education at UCL and as a curriculum tutor on the Oxford science PGCE. She has taught the Teaching Physics in Schools option for second year physics undergraduates studying at Oxford for the past four years.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Laura is Co-Director of the University of Oxford Education Deanery and subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages. She also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Robert (Rob) Klassen joined the University of Oxford as Professor of Education in November 2023.  

Rob was previously at the University of York, where he worked from 2012 as Professor and Chair of the Psychology in Education Research Centre. Before coming to the UK, Rob was Assistant, Associate, and Full Professor in the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Alberta (2004-2012). Before entering academia he worked as an educational psychologist and high school teacher in his hometown of Vancouver. 

Rob’s primary research interests are in building an understanding of teacher motivation and development across the career span and across countries. His current work aims to develop and test theory-informed technological interventions related to teacher and school leader recruitment, selection, and development.  

Rob has published over 100 peer-reviewed journal articles, chapters, and books. Recent projects have been funded by the ESRC, the ERC, GIZ, and the World Bank, with recent projects in the UK, Australia, Africa (Morocco, Kenya, South Africa), and Europe. He has served as advisor to education ministries in England, Africa, Australia, Europe, and South America. In 2023 he founded the spinout company, TSP, in collaboration with the University of York. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and the American Psychological Association, and has served on editorial boards for the British Journal of Educational Psychology, the Journal of Educational Psychology, and the Oxford Review of Education.
 

Representative research includes: 

On teacher recruitment: Klassen, R. M., Rushby, J. V., & Wang, H. (2023). Can an online scenario-based learning activity influence preservice teachers’ self-efficacy, person-vocation fit, and career intentions? Computers and Education, 207, 104935. 

On teacher retention: Wang, H., & Klassen, R. M. (2023). Longitudinal relations between teachers’ utility values and quitting intentions. Teaching and Teacher Education, 127, 104109.

On teacher selection: Klassen, R. M., & Kim, L. E. (2021). Teacher selection: Evidence-based practices. Springer, ISBN 978-3-030-76186-8.

Rachel’s research focuses on exploring the experiences of ethnic minority trainee teachers with a view to better supporting their progress through teacher education and beyond.

Rachel received a BEng in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Birmingham. She later completed a PGCE in secondary science and an MSc in Teacher Education at the University of Oxford. She also has a MA in Photography.

Rachel taught physics for seven years in local Oxfordshire secondary schools, becoming a mentor to trainee science teachers and Head of Physics. She most recently worked on the second year Teach First science course at the Institute of Education at UCL and as a curriculum tutor on the Oxford science PGCE. She has taught the Teaching Physics in Schools option for second year physics undergraduates studying at Oxford for the past four years.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Laura is Co-Director of the University of Oxford Education Deanery and subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages. She also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Robert (Rob) Klassen joined the University of Oxford as Professor of Education in November 2023.  

Rob was previously at the University of York, where he worked from 2012 as Professor and Chair of the Psychology in Education Research Centre. Before coming to the UK, Rob was Assistant, Associate, and Full Professor in the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Alberta (2004-2012). Before entering academia he worked as an educational psychologist and high school teacher in his hometown of Vancouver. 

Rob’s primary research interests are in building an understanding of teacher motivation and development across the career span and across countries. His current work aims to develop and test theory-informed technological interventions related to teacher and school leader recruitment, selection, and development.  

Rob has published over 100 peer-reviewed journal articles, chapters, and books. Recent projects have been funded by the ESRC, the ERC, GIZ, and the World Bank, with recent projects in the UK, Australia, Africa (Morocco, Kenya, South Africa), and Europe. He has served as advisor to education ministries in England, Africa, Australia, Europe, and South America. In 2023 he founded the spinout company, TSP, in collaboration with the University of York. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and the American Psychological Association, and has served on editorial boards for the British Journal of Educational Psychology, the Journal of Educational Psychology, and the Oxford Review of Education.
 

Representative research includes: 

On teacher recruitment: Klassen, R. M., Rushby, J. V., & Wang, H. (2023). Can an online scenario-based learning activity influence preservice teachers’ self-efficacy, person-vocation fit, and career intentions? Computers and Education, 207, 104935. 

On teacher retention: Wang, H., & Klassen, R. M. (2023). Longitudinal relations between teachers’ utility values and quitting intentions. Teaching and Teacher Education, 127, 104109.

On teacher selection: Klassen, R. M., & Kim, L. E. (2021). Teacher selection: Evidence-based practices. Springer, ISBN 978-3-030-76186-8.

Rachel’s research focuses on exploring the experiences of ethnic minority trainee teachers with a view to better supporting their progress through teacher education and beyond.

Rachel received a BEng in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Birmingham. She later completed a PGCE in secondary science and an MSc in Teacher Education at the University of Oxford. She also has a MA in Photography.

Rachel taught physics for seven years in local Oxfordshire secondary schools, becoming a mentor to trainee science teachers and Head of Physics. She most recently worked on the second year Teach First science course at the Institute of Education at UCL and as a curriculum tutor on the Oxford science PGCE. She has taught the Teaching Physics in Schools option for second year physics undergraduates studying at Oxford for the past four years.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Laura is Co-Director of the University of Oxford Education Deanery and subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages. She also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Robert (Rob) Klassen joined the University of Oxford as Professor of Education in November 2023.  

Rob was previously at the University of York, where he worked from 2012 as Professor and Chair of the Psychology in Education Research Centre. Before coming to the UK, Rob was Assistant, Associate, and Full Professor in the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Alberta (2004-2012). Before entering academia he worked as an educational psychologist and high school teacher in his hometown of Vancouver. 

Rob’s primary research interests are in building an understanding of teacher motivation and development across the career span and across countries. His current work aims to develop and test theory-informed technological interventions related to teacher and school leader recruitment, selection, and development.  

Rob has published over 100 peer-reviewed journal articles, chapters, and books. Recent projects have been funded by the ESRC, the ERC, GIZ, and the World Bank, with recent projects in the UK, Australia, Africa (Morocco, Kenya, South Africa), and Europe. He has served as advisor to education ministries in England, Africa, Australia, Europe, and South America. In 2023 he founded the spinout company, TSP, in collaboration with the University of York. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and the American Psychological Association, and has served on editorial boards for the British Journal of Educational Psychology, the Journal of Educational Psychology, and the Oxford Review of Education.
 

Representative research includes: 

On teacher recruitment: Klassen, R. M., Rushby, J. V., & Wang, H. (2023). Can an online scenario-based learning activity influence preservice teachers’ self-efficacy, person-vocation fit, and career intentions? Computers and Education, 207, 104935. 

On teacher retention: Wang, H., & Klassen, R. M. (2023). Longitudinal relations between teachers’ utility values and quitting intentions. Teaching and Teacher Education, 127, 104109.

On teacher selection: Klassen, R. M., & Kim, L. E. (2021). Teacher selection: Evidence-based practices. Springer, ISBN 978-3-030-76186-8.

Rachel’s research focuses on exploring the experiences of ethnic minority trainee teachers with a view to better supporting their progress through teacher education and beyond.

Rachel received a BEng in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Birmingham. She later completed a PGCE in secondary science and an MSc in Teacher Education at the University of Oxford. She also has a MA in Photography.

Rachel taught physics for seven years in local Oxfordshire secondary schools, becoming a mentor to trainee science teachers and Head of Physics. She most recently worked on the second year Teach First science course at the Institute of Education at UCL and as a curriculum tutor on the Oxford science PGCE. She has taught the Teaching Physics in Schools option for second year physics undergraduates studying at Oxford for the past four years.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Laura is Co-Director of the University of Oxford Education Deanery and subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages. She also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Robert (Rob) Klassen joined the University of Oxford as Professor of Education in November 2023.  

Rob was previously at the University of York, where he worked from 2012 as Professor and Chair of the Psychology in Education Research Centre. Before coming to the UK, Rob was Assistant, Associate, and Full Professor in the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Alberta (2004-2012). Before entering academia he worked as an educational psychologist and high school teacher in his hometown of Vancouver. 

Rob’s primary research interests are in building an understanding of teacher motivation and development across the career span and across countries. His current work aims to develop and test theory-informed technological interventions related to teacher and school leader recruitment, selection, and development.  

Rob has published over 100 peer-reviewed journal articles, chapters, and books. Recent projects have been funded by the ESRC, the ERC, GIZ, and the World Bank, with recent projects in the UK, Australia, Africa (Morocco, Kenya, South Africa), and Europe. He has served as advisor to education ministries in England, Africa, Australia, Europe, and South America. In 2023 he founded the spinout company, TSP, in collaboration with the University of York. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and the American Psychological Association, and has served on editorial boards for the British Journal of Educational Psychology, the Journal of Educational Psychology, and the Oxford Review of Education.
 

Representative research includes: 

On teacher recruitment: Klassen, R. M., Rushby, J. V., & Wang, H. (2023). Can an online scenario-based learning activity influence preservice teachers’ self-efficacy, person-vocation fit, and career intentions? Computers and Education, 207, 104935. 

On teacher retention: Wang, H., & Klassen, R. M. (2023). Longitudinal relations between teachers’ utility values and quitting intentions. Teaching and Teacher Education, 127, 104109.

On teacher selection: Klassen, R. M., & Kim, L. E. (2021). Teacher selection: Evidence-based practices. Springer, ISBN 978-3-030-76186-8.

Rachel’s research focuses on exploring the experiences of ethnic minority trainee teachers with a view to better supporting their progress through teacher education and beyond.

Rachel received a BEng in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Birmingham. She later completed a PGCE in secondary science and an MSc in Teacher Education at the University of Oxford. She also has a MA in Photography.

Rachel taught physics for seven years in local Oxfordshire secondary schools, becoming a mentor to trainee science teachers and Head of Physics. She most recently worked on the second year Teach First science course at the Institute of Education at UCL and as a curriculum tutor on the Oxford science PGCE. She has taught the Teaching Physics in Schools option for second year physics undergraduates studying at Oxford for the past four years.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Laura is Co-Director of the University of Oxford Education Deanery and subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages. She also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Robert (Rob) Klassen joined the University of Oxford as Professor of Education in November 2023.  

Rob was previously at the University of York, where he worked from 2012 as Professor and Chair of the Psychology in Education Research Centre. Before coming to the UK, Rob was Assistant, Associate, and Full Professor in the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Alberta (2004-2012). Before entering academia he worked as an educational psychologist and high school teacher in his hometown of Vancouver. 

Rob’s primary research interests are in building an understanding of teacher motivation and development across the career span and across countries. His current work aims to develop and test theory-informed technological interventions related to teacher and school leader recruitment, selection, and development.  

Rob has published over 100 peer-reviewed journal articles, chapters, and books. Recent projects have been funded by the ESRC, the ERC, GIZ, and the World Bank, with recent projects in the UK, Australia, Africa (Morocco, Kenya, South Africa), and Europe. He has served as advisor to education ministries in England, Africa, Australia, Europe, and South America. In 2023 he founded the spinout company, TSP, in collaboration with the University of York. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and the American Psychological Association, and has served on editorial boards for the British Journal of Educational Psychology, the Journal of Educational Psychology, and the Oxford Review of Education.
 

Representative research includes: 

On teacher recruitment: Klassen, R. M., Rushby, J. V., & Wang, H. (2023). Can an online scenario-based learning activity influence preservice teachers’ self-efficacy, person-vocation fit, and career intentions? Computers and Education, 207, 104935. 

On teacher retention: Wang, H., & Klassen, R. M. (2023). Longitudinal relations between teachers’ utility values and quitting intentions. Teaching and Teacher Education, 127, 104109.

On teacher selection: Klassen, R. M., & Kim, L. E. (2021). Teacher selection: Evidence-based practices. Springer, ISBN 978-3-030-76186-8.

Rachel’s research focuses on exploring the experiences of ethnic minority trainee teachers with a view to better supporting their progress through teacher education and beyond.

Rachel received a BEng in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Birmingham. She later completed a PGCE in secondary science and an MSc in Teacher Education at the University of Oxford. She also has a MA in Photography.

Rachel taught physics for seven years in local Oxfordshire secondary schools, becoming a mentor to trainee science teachers and Head of Physics. She most recently worked on the second year Teach First science course at the Institute of Education at UCL and as a curriculum tutor on the Oxford science PGCE. She has taught the Teaching Physics in Schools option for second year physics undergraduates studying at Oxford for the past four years.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Laura is Co-Director of the University of Oxford Education Deanery and subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages. She also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Robert (Rob) Klassen joined the University of Oxford as Professor of Education in November 2023.  

Rob was previously at the University of York, where he worked from 2012 as Professor and Chair of the Psychology in Education Research Centre. Before coming to the UK, Rob was Assistant, Associate, and Full Professor in the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Alberta (2004-2012). Before entering academia he worked as an educational psychologist and high school teacher in his hometown of Vancouver. 

Rob’s primary research interests are in building an understanding of teacher motivation and development across the career span and across countries. His current work aims to develop and test theory-informed technological interventions related to teacher and school leader recruitment, selection, and development.  

Rob has published over 100 peer-reviewed journal articles, chapters, and books. Recent projects have been funded by the ESRC, the ERC, GIZ, and the World Bank, with recent projects in the UK, Australia, Africa (Morocco, Kenya, South Africa), and Europe. He has served as advisor to education ministries in England, Africa, Australia, Europe, and South America. In 2023 he founded the spinout company, TSP, in collaboration with the University of York. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and the American Psychological Association, and has served on editorial boards for the British Journal of Educational Psychology, the Journal of Educational Psychology, and the Oxford Review of Education.
 

Representative research includes: 

On teacher recruitment: Klassen, R. M., Rushby, J. V., & Wang, H. (2023). Can an online scenario-based learning activity influence preservice teachers’ self-efficacy, person-vocation fit, and career intentions? Computers and Education, 207, 104935. 

On teacher retention: Wang, H., & Klassen, R. M. (2023). Longitudinal relations between teachers’ utility values and quitting intentions. Teaching and Teacher Education, 127, 104109.

On teacher selection: Klassen, R. M., & Kim, L. E. (2021). Teacher selection: Evidence-based practices. Springer, ISBN 978-3-030-76186-8.

Rachel’s research focuses on exploring the experiences of ethnic minority trainee teachers with a view to better supporting their progress through teacher education and beyond.

Rachel received a BEng in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Birmingham. She later completed a PGCE in secondary science and an MSc in Teacher Education at the University of Oxford. She also has a MA in Photography.

Rachel taught physics for seven years in local Oxfordshire secondary schools, becoming a mentor to trainee science teachers and Head of Physics. She most recently worked on the second year Teach First science course at the Institute of Education at UCL and as a curriculum tutor on the Oxford science PGCE. She has taught the Teaching Physics in Schools option for second year physics undergraduates studying at Oxford for the past four years.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Laura is Co-Director of the University of Oxford Education Deanery and subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages. She also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Robert (Rob) Klassen joined the University of Oxford as Professor of Education in November 2023.  

Rob was previously at the University of York, where he worked from 2012 as Professor and Chair of the Psychology in Education Research Centre. Before coming to the UK, Rob was Assistant, Associate, and Full Professor in the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Alberta (2004-2012). Before entering academia he worked as an educational psychologist and high school teacher in his hometown of Vancouver. 

Rob’s primary research interests are in building an understanding of teacher motivation and development across the career span and across countries. His current work aims to develop and test theory-informed technological interventions related to teacher and school leader recruitment, selection, and development.  

Rob has published over 100 peer-reviewed journal articles, chapters, and books. Recent projects have been funded by the ESRC, the ERC, GIZ, and the World Bank, with recent projects in the UK, Australia, Africa (Morocco, Kenya, South Africa), and Europe. He has served as advisor to education ministries in England, Africa, Australia, Europe, and South America. In 2023 he founded the spinout company, TSP, in collaboration with the University of York. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and the American Psychological Association, and has served on editorial boards for the British Journal of Educational Psychology, the Journal of Educational Psychology, and the Oxford Review of Education.
 

Representative research includes: 

On teacher recruitment: Klassen, R. M., Rushby, J. V., & Wang, H. (2023). Can an online scenario-based learning activity influence preservice teachers’ self-efficacy, person-vocation fit, and career intentions? Computers and Education, 207, 104935. 

On teacher retention: Wang, H., & Klassen, R. M. (2023). Longitudinal relations between teachers’ utility values and quitting intentions. Teaching and Teacher Education, 127, 104109.

On teacher selection: Klassen, R. M., & Kim, L. E. (2021). Teacher selection: Evidence-based practices. Springer, ISBN 978-3-030-76186-8.

Rachel’s research focuses on exploring the experiences of ethnic minority trainee teachers with a view to better supporting their progress through teacher education and beyond.

Rachel received a BEng in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Birmingham. She later completed a PGCE in secondary science and an MSc in Teacher Education at the University of Oxford. She also has a MA in Photography.

Rachel taught physics for seven years in local Oxfordshire secondary schools, becoming a mentor to trainee science teachers and Head of Physics. She most recently worked on the second year Teach First science course at the Institute of Education at UCL and as a curriculum tutor on the Oxford science PGCE. She has taught the Teaching Physics in Schools option for second year physics undergraduates studying at Oxford for the past four years.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Laura is Co-Director of the University of Oxford Education Deanery and subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages. She also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Robert (Rob) Klassen joined the University of Oxford as Professor of Education in November 2023.  

Rob was previously at the University of York, where he worked from 2012 as Professor and Chair of the Psychology in Education Research Centre. Before coming to the UK, Rob was Assistant, Associate, and Full Professor in the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Alberta (2004-2012). Before entering academia he worked as an educational psychologist and high school teacher in his hometown of Vancouver. 

Rob’s primary research interests are in building an understanding of teacher motivation and development across the career span and across countries. His current work aims to develop and test theory-informed technological interventions related to teacher and school leader recruitment, selection, and development.  

Rob has published over 100 peer-reviewed journal articles, chapters, and books. Recent projects have been funded by the ESRC, the ERC, GIZ, and the World Bank, with recent projects in the UK, Australia, Africa (Morocco, Kenya, South Africa), and Europe. He has served as advisor to education ministries in England, Africa, Australia, Europe, and South America. In 2023 he founded the spinout company, TSP, in collaboration with the University of York. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and the American Psychological Association, and has served on editorial boards for the British Journal of Educational Psychology, the Journal of Educational Psychology, and the Oxford Review of Education.
 

Representative research includes: 

On teacher recruitment: Klassen, R. M., Rushby, J. V., & Wang, H. (2023). Can an online scenario-based learning activity influence preservice teachers’ self-efficacy, person-vocation fit, and career intentions? Computers and Education, 207, 104935. 

On teacher retention: Wang, H., & Klassen, R. M. (2023). Longitudinal relations between teachers’ utility values and quitting intentions. Teaching and Teacher Education, 127, 104109.

On teacher selection: Klassen, R. M., & Kim, L. E. (2021). Teacher selection: Evidence-based practices. Springer, ISBN 978-3-030-76186-8.

Rachel’s research focuses on exploring the experiences of ethnic minority trainee teachers with a view to better supporting their progress through teacher education and beyond.

Rachel received a BEng in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Birmingham. She later completed a PGCE in secondary science and an MSc in Teacher Education at the University of Oxford. She also has a MA in Photography.

Rachel taught physics for seven years in local Oxfordshire secondary schools, becoming a mentor to trainee science teachers and Head of Physics. She most recently worked on the second year Teach First science course at the Institute of Education at UCL and as a curriculum tutor on the Oxford science PGCE. She has taught the Teaching Physics in Schools option for second year physics undergraduates studying at Oxford for the past four years.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Laura is Co-Director of the University of Oxford Education Deanery and subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages. She also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Robert (Rob) Klassen joined the University of Oxford as Professor of Education in November 2023.  

Rob was previously at the University of York, where he worked from 2012 as Professor and Chair of the Psychology in Education Research Centre. Before coming to the UK, Rob was Assistant, Associate, and Full Professor in the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Alberta (2004-2012). Before entering academia he worked as an educational psychologist and high school teacher in his hometown of Vancouver. 

Rob’s primary research interests are in building an understanding of teacher motivation and development across the career span and across countries. His current work aims to develop and test theory-informed technological interventions related to teacher and school leader recruitment, selection, and development.  

Rob has published over 100 peer-reviewed journal articles, chapters, and books. Recent projects have been funded by the ESRC, the ERC, GIZ, and the World Bank, with recent projects in the UK, Australia, Africa (Morocco, Kenya, South Africa), and Europe. He has served as advisor to education ministries in England, Africa, Australia, Europe, and South America. In 2023 he founded the spinout company, TSP, in collaboration with the University of York. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and the American Psychological Association, and has served on editorial boards for the British Journal of Educational Psychology, the Journal of Educational Psychology, and the Oxford Review of Education.
 

Representative research includes: 

On teacher recruitment: Klassen, R. M., Rushby, J. V., & Wang, H. (2023). Can an online scenario-based learning activity influence preservice teachers’ self-efficacy, person-vocation fit, and career intentions? Computers and Education, 207, 104935. 

On teacher retention: Wang, H., & Klassen, R. M. (2023). Longitudinal relations between teachers’ utility values and quitting intentions. Teaching and Teacher Education, 127, 104109.

On teacher selection: Klassen, R. M., & Kim, L. E. (2021). Teacher selection: Evidence-based practices. Springer, ISBN 978-3-030-76186-8.

Rachel’s research focuses on exploring the experiences of ethnic minority trainee teachers with a view to better supporting their progress through teacher education and beyond.

Rachel received a BEng in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Birmingham. She later completed a PGCE in secondary science and an MSc in Teacher Education at the University of Oxford. She also has a MA in Photography.

Rachel taught physics for seven years in local Oxfordshire secondary schools, becoming a mentor to trainee science teachers and Head of Physics. She most recently worked on the second year Teach First science course at the Institute of Education at UCL and as a curriculum tutor on the Oxford science PGCE. She has taught the Teaching Physics in Schools option for second year physics undergraduates studying at Oxford for the past four years.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Laura is Co-Director of the University of Oxford Education Deanery and subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages. She also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Robert (Rob) Klassen joined the University of Oxford as Professor of Education in November 2023.  

Rob was previously at the University of York, where he worked from 2012 as Professor and Chair of the Psychology in Education Research Centre. Before coming to the UK, Rob was Assistant, Associate, and Full Professor in the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Alberta (2004-2012). Before entering academia he worked as an educational psychologist and high school teacher in his hometown of Vancouver. 

Rob’s primary research interests are in building an understanding of teacher motivation and development across the career span and across countries. His current work aims to develop and test theory-informed technological interventions related to teacher and school leader recruitment, selection, and development.  

Rob has published over 100 peer-reviewed journal articles, chapters, and books. Recent projects have been funded by the ESRC, the ERC, GIZ, and the World Bank, with recent projects in the UK, Australia, Africa (Morocco, Kenya, South Africa), and Europe. He has served as advisor to education ministries in England, Africa, Australia, Europe, and South America. In 2023 he founded the spinout company, TSP, in collaboration with the University of York. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and the American Psychological Association, and has served on editorial boards for the British Journal of Educational Psychology, the Journal of Educational Psychology, and the Oxford Review of Education.
 

Representative research includes: 

On teacher recruitment: Klassen, R. M., Rushby, J. V., & Wang, H. (2023). Can an online scenario-based learning activity influence preservice teachers’ self-efficacy, person-vocation fit, and career intentions? Computers and Education, 207, 104935. 

On teacher retention: Wang, H., & Klassen, R. M. (2023). Longitudinal relations between teachers’ utility values and quitting intentions. Teaching and Teacher Education, 127, 104109.

On teacher selection: Klassen, R. M., & Kim, L. E. (2021). Teacher selection: Evidence-based practices. Springer, ISBN 978-3-030-76186-8.

Rachel’s research focuses on exploring the experiences of ethnic minority trainee teachers with a view to better supporting their progress through teacher education and beyond.

Rachel received a BEng in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Birmingham. She later completed a PGCE in secondary science and an MSc in Teacher Education at the University of Oxford. She also has a MA in Photography.

Rachel taught physics for seven years in local Oxfordshire secondary schools, becoming a mentor to trainee science teachers and Head of Physics. She most recently worked on the second year Teach First science course at the Institute of Education at UCL and as a curriculum tutor on the Oxford science PGCE. She has taught the Teaching Physics in Schools option for second year physics undergraduates studying at Oxford for the past four years.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Laura is Co-Director of the University of Oxford Education Deanery and subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages. She also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Robert (Rob) Klassen joined the University of Oxford as Professor of Education in November 2023.  

Rob was previously at the University of York, where he worked from 2012 as Professor and Chair of the Psychology in Education Research Centre. Before coming to the UK, Rob was Assistant, Associate, and Full Professor in the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Alberta (2004-2012). Before entering academia he worked as an educational psychologist and high school teacher in his hometown of Vancouver. 

Rob’s primary research interests are in building an understanding of teacher motivation and development across the career span and across countries. His current work aims to develop and test theory-informed technological interventions related to teacher and school leader recruitment, selection, and development.  

Rob has published over 100 peer-reviewed journal articles, chapters, and books. Recent projects have been funded by the ESRC, the ERC, GIZ, and the World Bank, with recent projects in the UK, Australia, Africa (Morocco, Kenya, South Africa), and Europe. He has served as advisor to education ministries in England, Africa, Australia, Europe, and South America. In 2023 he founded the spinout company, TSP, in collaboration with the University of York. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and the American Psychological Association, and has served on editorial boards for the British Journal of Educational Psychology, the Journal of Educational Psychology, and the Oxford Review of Education.
 

Representative research includes: 

On teacher recruitment: Klassen, R. M., Rushby, J. V., & Wang, H. (2023). Can an online scenario-based learning activity influence preservice teachers’ self-efficacy, person-vocation fit, and career intentions? Computers and Education, 207, 104935. 

On teacher retention: Wang, H., & Klassen, R. M. (2023). Longitudinal relations between teachers’ utility values and quitting intentions. Teaching and Teacher Education, 127, 104109.

On teacher selection: Klassen, R. M., & Kim, L. E. (2021). Teacher selection: Evidence-based practices. Springer, ISBN 978-3-030-76186-8.

Rachel’s research focuses on exploring the experiences of ethnic minority trainee teachers with a view to better supporting their progress through teacher education and beyond.

Rachel received a BEng in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Birmingham. She later completed a PGCE in secondary science and an MSc in Teacher Education at the University of Oxford. She also has a MA in Photography.

Rachel taught physics for seven years in local Oxfordshire secondary schools, becoming a mentor to trainee science teachers and Head of Physics. She most recently worked on the second year Teach First science course at the Institute of Education at UCL and as a curriculum tutor on the Oxford science PGCE. She has taught the Teaching Physics in Schools option for second year physics undergraduates studying at Oxford for the past four years.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Laura is Co-Director of the University of Oxford Education Deanery and subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages. She also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Robert (Rob) Klassen joined the University of Oxford as Professor of Education in November 2023.  

Rob was previously at the University of York, where he worked from 2012 as Professor and Chair of the Psychology in Education Research Centre. Before coming to the UK, Rob was Assistant, Associate, and Full Professor in the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Alberta (2004-2012). Before entering academia he worked as an educational psychologist and high school teacher in his hometown of Vancouver. 

Rob’s primary research interests are in building an understanding of teacher motivation and development across the career span and across countries. His current work aims to develop and test theory-informed technological interventions related to teacher and school leader recruitment, selection, and development.  

Rob has published over 100 peer-reviewed journal articles, chapters, and books. Recent projects have been funded by the ESRC, the ERC, GIZ, and the World Bank, with recent projects in the UK, Australia, Africa (Morocco, Kenya, South Africa), and Europe. He has served as advisor to education ministries in England, Africa, Australia, Europe, and South America. In 2023 he founded the spinout company, TSP, in collaboration with the University of York. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and the American Psychological Association, and has served on editorial boards for the British Journal of Educational Psychology, the Journal of Educational Psychology, and the Oxford Review of Education.
 

Representative research includes: 

On teacher recruitment: Klassen, R. M., Rushby, J. V., & Wang, H. (2023). Can an online scenario-based learning activity influence preservice teachers’ self-efficacy, person-vocation fit, and career intentions? Computers and Education, 207, 104935. 

On teacher retention: Wang, H., & Klassen, R. M. (2023). Longitudinal relations between teachers’ utility values and quitting intentions. Teaching and Teacher Education, 127, 104109.

On teacher selection: Klassen, R. M., & Kim, L. E. (2021). Teacher selection: Evidence-based practices. Springer, ISBN 978-3-030-76186-8.

Rachel’s research focuses on exploring the experiences of ethnic minority trainee teachers with a view to better supporting their progress through teacher education and beyond.

Rachel received a BEng in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Birmingham. She later completed a PGCE in secondary science and an MSc in Teacher Education at the University of Oxford. She also has a MA in Photography.

Rachel taught physics for seven years in local Oxfordshire secondary schools, becoming a mentor to trainee science teachers and Head of Physics. She most recently worked on the second year Teach First science course at the Institute of Education at UCL and as a curriculum tutor on the Oxford science PGCE. She has taught the Teaching Physics in Schools option for second year physics undergraduates studying at Oxford for the past four years.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Laura is Co-Director of the University of Oxford Education Deanery and subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages. She also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Robert (Rob) Klassen joined the University of Oxford as Professor of Education in November 2023.  

Rob was previously at the University of York, where he worked from 2012 as Professor and Chair of the Psychology in Education Research Centre. Before coming to the UK, Rob was Assistant, Associate, and Full Professor in the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Alberta (2004-2012). Before entering academia he worked as an educational psychologist and high school teacher in his hometown of Vancouver. 

Rob’s primary research interests are in building an understanding of teacher motivation and development across the career span and across countries. His current work aims to develop and test theory-informed technological interventions related to teacher and school leader recruitment, selection, and development.  

Rob has published over 100 peer-reviewed journal articles, chapters, and books. Recent projects have been funded by the ESRC, the ERC, GIZ, and the World Bank, with recent projects in the UK, Australia, Africa (Morocco, Kenya, South Africa), and Europe. He has served as advisor to education ministries in England, Africa, Australia, Europe, and South America. In 2023 he founded the spinout company, TSP, in collaboration with the University of York. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and the American Psychological Association, and has served on editorial boards for the British Journal of Educational Psychology, the Journal of Educational Psychology, and the Oxford Review of Education.
 

Representative research includes: 

On teacher recruitment: Klassen, R. M., Rushby, J. V., & Wang, H. (2023). Can an online scenario-based learning activity influence preservice teachers’ self-efficacy, person-vocation fit, and career intentions? Computers and Education, 207, 104935. 

On teacher retention: Wang, H., & Klassen, R. M. (2023). Longitudinal relations between teachers’ utility values and quitting intentions. Teaching and Teacher Education, 127, 104109.

On teacher selection: Klassen, R. M., & Kim, L. E. (2021). Teacher selection: Evidence-based practices. Springer, ISBN 978-3-030-76186-8.

Rachel’s research focuses on exploring the experiences of ethnic minority trainee teachers with a view to better supporting their progress through teacher education and beyond.

Rachel received a BEng in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Birmingham. She later completed a PGCE in secondary science and an MSc in Teacher Education at the University of Oxford. She also has a MA in Photography.

Rachel taught physics for seven years in local Oxfordshire secondary schools, becoming a mentor to trainee science teachers and Head of Physics. She most recently worked on the second year Teach First science course at the Institute of Education at UCL and as a curriculum tutor on the Oxford science PGCE. She has taught the Teaching Physics in Schools option for second year physics undergraduates studying at Oxford for the past four years.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Laura is Co-Director of the University of Oxford Education Deanery and subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages. She also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Robert (Rob) Klassen joined the University of Oxford as Professor of Education in November 2023.  

Rob was previously at the University of York, where he worked from 2012 as Professor and Chair of the Psychology in Education Research Centre. Before coming to the UK, Rob was Assistant, Associate, and Full Professor in the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Alberta (2004-2012). Before entering academia he worked as an educational psychologist and high school teacher in his hometown of Vancouver. 

Rob’s primary research interests are in building an understanding of teacher motivation and development across the career span and across countries. His current work aims to develop and test theory-informed technological interventions related to teacher and school leader recruitment, selection, and development.  

Rob has published over 100 peer-reviewed journal articles, chapters, and books. Recent projects have been funded by the ESRC, the ERC, GIZ, and the World Bank, with recent projects in the UK, Australia, Africa (Morocco, Kenya, South Africa), and Europe. He has served as advisor to education ministries in England, Africa, Australia, Europe, and South America. In 2023 he founded the spinout company, TSP, in collaboration with the University of York. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and the American Psychological Association, and has served on editorial boards for the British Journal of Educational Psychology, the Journal of Educational Psychology, and the Oxford Review of Education.
 

Representative research includes: 

On teacher recruitment: Klassen, R. M., Rushby, J. V., & Wang, H. (2023). Can an online scenario-based learning activity influence preservice teachers’ self-efficacy, person-vocation fit, and career intentions? Computers and Education, 207, 104935. 

On teacher retention: Wang, H., & Klassen, R. M. (2023). Longitudinal relations between teachers’ utility values and quitting intentions. Teaching and Teacher Education, 127, 104109.

On teacher selection: Klassen, R. M., & Kim, L. E. (2021). Teacher selection: Evidence-based practices. Springer, ISBN 978-3-030-76186-8.

Rachel’s research focuses on exploring the experiences of ethnic minority trainee teachers with a view to better supporting their progress through teacher education and beyond.

Rachel received a BEng in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Birmingham. She later completed a PGCE in secondary science and an MSc in Teacher Education at the University of Oxford. She also has a MA in Photography.

Rachel taught physics for seven years in local Oxfordshire secondary schools, becoming a mentor to trainee science teachers and Head of Physics. She most recently worked on the second year Teach First science course at the Institute of Education at UCL and as a curriculum tutor on the Oxford science PGCE. She has taught the Teaching Physics in Schools option for second year physics undergraduates studying at Oxford for the past four years.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Laura is Co-Director of the University of Oxford Education Deanery and subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages. She also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Robert (Rob) Klassen joined the University of Oxford as Professor of Education in November 2023.  

Rob was previously at the University of York, where he worked from 2012 as Professor and Chair of the Psychology in Education Research Centre. Before coming to the UK, Rob was Assistant, Associate, and Full Professor in the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Alberta (2004-2012). Before entering academia he worked as an educational psychologist and high school teacher in his hometown of Vancouver. 

Rob’s primary research interests are in building an understanding of teacher motivation and development across the career span and across countries. His current work aims to develop and test theory-informed technological interventions related to teacher and school leader recruitment, selection, and development.  

Rob has published over 100 peer-reviewed journal articles, chapters, and books. Recent projects have been funded by the ESRC, the ERC, GIZ, and the World Bank, with recent projects in the UK, Australia, Africa (Morocco, Kenya, South Africa), and Europe. He has served as advisor to education ministries in England, Africa, Australia, Europe, and South America. In 2023 he founded the spinout company, TSP, in collaboration with the University of York. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and the American Psychological Association, and has served on editorial boards for the British Journal of Educational Psychology, the Journal of Educational Psychology, and the Oxford Review of Education.
 

Representative research includes: 

On teacher recruitment: Klassen, R. M., Rushby, J. V., & Wang, H. (2023). Can an online scenario-based learning activity influence preservice teachers’ self-efficacy, person-vocation fit, and career intentions? Computers and Education, 207, 104935. 

On teacher retention: Wang, H., & Klassen, R. M. (2023). Longitudinal relations between teachers’ utility values and quitting intentions. Teaching and Teacher Education, 127, 104109.

On teacher selection: Klassen, R. M., & Kim, L. E. (2021). Teacher selection: Evidence-based practices. Springer, ISBN 978-3-030-76186-8.

Rachel’s research focuses on exploring the experiences of ethnic minority trainee teachers with a view to better supporting their progress through teacher education and beyond.

Rachel received a BEng in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Birmingham. She later completed a PGCE in secondary science and an MSc in Teacher Education at the University of Oxford. She also has a MA in Photography.

Rachel taught physics for seven years in local Oxfordshire secondary schools, becoming a mentor to trainee science teachers and Head of Physics. She most recently worked on the second year Teach First science course at the Institute of Education at UCL and as a curriculum tutor on the Oxford science PGCE. She has taught the Teaching Physics in Schools option for second year physics undergraduates studying at Oxford for the past four years.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Laura is Co-Director of the University of Oxford Education Deanery and subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages. She also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Robert (Rob) Klassen joined the University of Oxford as Professor of Education in November 2023.  

Rob was previously at the University of York, where he worked from 2012 as Professor and Chair of the Psychology in Education Research Centre. Before coming to the UK, Rob was Assistant, Associate, and Full Professor in the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Alberta (2004-2012). Before entering academia he worked as an educational psychologist and high school teacher in his hometown of Vancouver. 

Rob’s primary research interests are in building an understanding of teacher motivation and development across the career span and across countries. His current work aims to develop and test theory-informed technological interventions related to teacher and school leader recruitment, selection, and development.  

Rob has published over 100 peer-reviewed journal articles, chapters, and books. Recent projects have been funded by the ESRC, the ERC, GIZ, and the World Bank, with recent projects in the UK, Australia, Africa (Morocco, Kenya, South Africa), and Europe. He has served as advisor to education ministries in England, Africa, Australia, Europe, and South America. In 2023 he founded the spinout company, TSP, in collaboration with the University of York. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and the American Psychological Association, and has served on editorial boards for the British Journal of Educational Psychology, the Journal of Educational Psychology, and the Oxford Review of Education.
 

Representative research includes: 

On teacher recruitment: Klassen, R. M., Rushby, J. V., & Wang, H. (2023). Can an online scenario-based learning activity influence preservice teachers’ self-efficacy, person-vocation fit, and career intentions? Computers and Education, 207, 104935. 

On teacher retention: Wang, H., & Klassen, R. M. (2023). Longitudinal relations between teachers’ utility values and quitting intentions. Teaching and Teacher Education, 127, 104109.

On teacher selection: Klassen, R. M., & Kim, L. E. (2021). Teacher selection: Evidence-based practices. Springer, ISBN 978-3-030-76186-8.

Rachel’s research focuses on exploring the experiences of ethnic minority trainee teachers with a view to better supporting their progress through teacher education and beyond.

Rachel received a BEng in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Birmingham. She later completed a PGCE in secondary science and an MSc in Teacher Education at the University of Oxford. She also has a MA in Photography.

Rachel taught physics for seven years in local Oxfordshire secondary schools, becoming a mentor to trainee science teachers and Head of Physics. She most recently worked on the second year Teach First science course at the Institute of Education at UCL and as a curriculum tutor on the Oxford science PGCE. She has taught the Teaching Physics in Schools option for second year physics undergraduates studying at Oxford for the past four years.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Laura is Co-Director of the University of Oxford Education Deanery and subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages. She also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Robert (Rob) Klassen joined the University of Oxford as Professor of Education in November 2023.  

Rob was previously at the University of York, where he worked from 2012 as Professor and Chair of the Psychology in Education Research Centre. Before coming to the UK, Rob was Assistant, Associate, and Full Professor in the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Alberta (2004-2012). Before entering academia he worked as an educational psychologist and high school teacher in his hometown of Vancouver. 

Rob’s primary research interests are in building an understanding of teacher motivation and development across the career span and across countries. His current work aims to develop and test theory-informed technological interventions related to teacher and school leader recruitment, selection, and development.  

Rob has published over 100 peer-reviewed journal articles, chapters, and books. Recent projects have been funded by the ESRC, the ERC, GIZ, and the World Bank, with recent projects in the UK, Australia, Africa (Morocco, Kenya, South Africa), and Europe. He has served as advisor to education ministries in England, Africa, Australia, Europe, and South America. In 2023 he founded the spinout company, TSP, in collaboration with the University of York. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and the American Psychological Association, and has served on editorial boards for the British Journal of Educational Psychology, the Journal of Educational Psychology, and the Oxford Review of Education.
 

Representative research includes: 

On teacher recruitment: Klassen, R. M., Rushby, J. V., & Wang, H. (2023). Can an online scenario-based learning activity influence preservice teachers’ self-efficacy, person-vocation fit, and career intentions? Computers and Education, 207, 104935. 

On teacher retention: Wang, H., & Klassen, R. M. (2023). Longitudinal relations between teachers’ utility values and quitting intentions. Teaching and Teacher Education, 127, 104109.

On teacher selection: Klassen, R. M., & Kim, L. E. (2021). Teacher selection: Evidence-based practices. Springer, ISBN 978-3-030-76186-8.

Rachel’s research focuses on exploring the experiences of ethnic minority trainee teachers with a view to better supporting their progress through teacher education and beyond.

Rachel received a BEng in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Birmingham. She later completed a PGCE in secondary science and an MSc in Teacher Education at the University of Oxford. She also has a MA in Photography.

Rachel taught physics for seven years in local Oxfordshire secondary schools, becoming a mentor to trainee science teachers and Head of Physics. She most recently worked on the second year Teach First science course at the Institute of Education at UCL and as a curriculum tutor on the Oxford science PGCE. She has taught the Teaching Physics in Schools option for second year physics undergraduates studying at Oxford for the past four years.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Laura is Co-Director of the University of Oxford Education Deanery and subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages. She also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Robert (Rob) Klassen joined the University of Oxford as Professor of Education in November 2023.  

Rob was previously at the University of York, where he worked from 2012 as Professor and Chair of the Psychology in Education Research Centre. Before coming to the UK, Rob was Assistant, Associate, and Full Professor in the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Alberta (2004-2012). Before entering academia he worked as an educational psychologist and high school teacher in his hometown of Vancouver. 

Rob’s primary research interests are in building an understanding of teacher motivation and development across the career span and across countries. His current work aims to develop and test theory-informed technological interventions related to teacher and school leader recruitment, selection, and development.  

Rob has published over 100 peer-reviewed journal articles, chapters, and books. Recent projects have been funded by the ESRC, the ERC, GIZ, and the World Bank, with recent projects in the UK, Australia, Africa (Morocco, Kenya, South Africa), and Europe. He has served as advisor to education ministries in England, Africa, Australia, Europe, and South America. In 2023 he founded the spinout company, TSP, in collaboration with the University of York. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and the American Psychological Association, and has served on editorial boards for the British Journal of Educational Psychology, the Journal of Educational Psychology, and the Oxford Review of Education.
 

Representative research includes: 

On teacher recruitment: Klassen, R. M., Rushby, J. V., & Wang, H. (2023). Can an online scenario-based learning activity influence preservice teachers’ self-efficacy, person-vocation fit, and career intentions? Computers and Education, 207, 104935. 

On teacher retention: Wang, H., & Klassen, R. M. (2023). Longitudinal relations between teachers’ utility values and quitting intentions. Teaching and Teacher Education, 127, 104109.

On teacher selection: Klassen, R. M., & Kim, L. E. (2021). Teacher selection: Evidence-based practices. Springer, ISBN 978-3-030-76186-8.

Rachel’s research focuses on exploring the experiences of ethnic minority trainee teachers with a view to better supporting their progress through teacher education and beyond.

Rachel received a BEng in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Birmingham. She later completed a PGCE in secondary science and an MSc in Teacher Education at the University of Oxford. She also has a MA in Photography.

Rachel taught physics for seven years in local Oxfordshire secondary schools, becoming a mentor to trainee science teachers and Head of Physics. She most recently worked on the second year Teach First science course at the Institute of Education at UCL and as a curriculum tutor on the Oxford science PGCE. She has taught the Teaching Physics in Schools option for second year physics undergraduates studying at Oxford for the past four years.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Laura is Co-Director of the University of Oxford Education Deanery and subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages. She also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Robert (Rob) Klassen joined the University of Oxford as Professor of Education in November 2023.  

Rob was previously at the University of York, where he worked from 2012 as Professor and Chair of the Psychology in Education Research Centre. Before coming to the UK, Rob was Assistant, Associate, and Full Professor in the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Alberta (2004-2012). Before entering academia he worked as an educational psychologist and high school teacher in his hometown of Vancouver. 

Rob’s primary research interests are in building an understanding of teacher motivation and development across the career span and across countries. His current work aims to develop and test theory-informed technological interventions related to teacher and school leader recruitment, selection, and development.  

Rob has published over 100 peer-reviewed journal articles, chapters, and books. Recent projects have been funded by the ESRC, the ERC, GIZ, and the World Bank, with recent projects in the UK, Australia, Africa (Morocco, Kenya, South Africa), and Europe. He has served as advisor to education ministries in England, Africa, Australia, Europe, and South America. In 2023 he founded the spinout company, TSP, in collaboration with the University of York. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and the American Psychological Association, and has served on editorial boards for the British Journal of Educational Psychology, the Journal of Educational Psychology, and the Oxford Review of Education.
 

Representative research includes: 

On teacher recruitment: Klassen, R. M., Rushby, J. V., & Wang, H. (2023). Can an online scenario-based learning activity influence preservice teachers’ self-efficacy, person-vocation fit, and career intentions? Computers and Education, 207, 104935. 

On teacher retention: Wang, H., & Klassen, R. M. (2023). Longitudinal relations between teachers’ utility values and quitting intentions. Teaching and Teacher Education, 127, 104109.

On teacher selection: Klassen, R. M., & Kim, L. E. (2021). Teacher selection: Evidence-based practices. Springer, ISBN 978-3-030-76186-8.

Rachel’s research focuses on exploring the experiences of ethnic minority trainee teachers with a view to better supporting their progress through teacher education and beyond.

Rachel received a BEng in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Birmingham. She later completed a PGCE in secondary science and an MSc in Teacher Education at the University of Oxford. She also has a MA in Photography.

Rachel taught physics for seven years in local Oxfordshire secondary schools, becoming a mentor to trainee science teachers and Head of Physics. She most recently worked on the second year Teach First science course at the Institute of Education at UCL and as a curriculum tutor on the Oxford science PGCE. She has taught the Teaching Physics in Schools option for second year physics undergraduates studying at Oxford for the past four years.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Laura is Co-Director of the University of Oxford Education Deanery and subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages. She also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Robert (Rob) Klassen joined the University of Oxford as Professor of Education in November 2023.  

Rob was previously at the University of York, where he worked from 2012 as Professor and Chair of the Psychology in Education Research Centre. Before coming to the UK, Rob was Assistant, Associate, and Full Professor in the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Alberta (2004-2012). Before entering academia he worked as an educational psychologist and high school teacher in his hometown of Vancouver. 

Rob’s primary research interests are in building an understanding of teacher motivation and development across the career span and across countries. His current work aims to develop and test theory-informed technological interventions related to teacher and school leader recruitment, selection, and development.  

Rob has published over 100 peer-reviewed journal articles, chapters, and books. Recent projects have been funded by the ESRC, the ERC, GIZ, and the World Bank, with recent projects in the UK, Australia, Africa (Morocco, Kenya, South Africa), and Europe. He has served as advisor to education ministries in England, Africa, Australia, Europe, and South America. In 2023 he founded the spinout company, TSP, in collaboration with the University of York. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and the American Psychological Association, and has served on editorial boards for the British Journal of Educational Psychology, the Journal of Educational Psychology, and the Oxford Review of Education.
 

Representative research includes: 

On teacher recruitment: Klassen, R. M., Rushby, J. V., & Wang, H. (2023). Can an online scenario-based learning activity influence preservice teachers’ self-efficacy, person-vocation fit, and career intentions? Computers and Education, 207, 104935. 

On teacher retention: Wang, H., & Klassen, R. M. (2023). Longitudinal relations between teachers’ utility values and quitting intentions. Teaching and Teacher Education, 127, 104109.

On teacher selection: Klassen, R. M., & Kim, L. E. (2021). Teacher selection: Evidence-based practices. Springer, ISBN 978-3-030-76186-8.

Rachel’s research focuses on exploring the experiences of ethnic minority trainee teachers with a view to better supporting their progress through teacher education and beyond.

Rachel received a BEng in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Birmingham. She later completed a PGCE in secondary science and an MSc in Teacher Education at the University of Oxford. She also has a MA in Photography.

Rachel taught physics for seven years in local Oxfordshire secondary schools, becoming a mentor to trainee science teachers and Head of Physics. She most recently worked on the second year Teach First science course at the Institute of Education at UCL and as a curriculum tutor on the Oxford science PGCE. She has taught the Teaching Physics in Schools option for second year physics undergraduates studying at Oxford for the past four years.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Laura is Co-Director of the University of Oxford Education Deanery and subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages. She also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Robert (Rob) Klassen joined the University of Oxford as Professor of Education in November 2023.  

Rob was previously at the University of York, where he worked from 2012 as Professor and Chair of the Psychology in Education Research Centre. Before coming to the UK, Rob was Assistant, Associate, and Full Professor in the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Alberta (2004-2012). Before entering academia he worked as an educational psychologist and high school teacher in his hometown of Vancouver. 

Rob’s primary research interests are in building an understanding of teacher motivation and development across the career span and across countries. His current work aims to develop and test theory-informed technological interventions related to teacher and school leader recruitment, selection, and development.  

Rob has published over 100 peer-reviewed journal articles, chapters, and books. Recent projects have been funded by the ESRC, the ERC, GIZ, and the World Bank, with recent projects in the UK, Australia, Africa (Morocco, Kenya, South Africa), and Europe. He has served as advisor to education ministries in England, Africa, Australia, Europe, and South America. In 2023 he founded the spinout company, TSP, in collaboration with the University of York. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and the American Psychological Association, and has served on editorial boards for the British Journal of Educational Psychology, the Journal of Educational Psychology, and the Oxford Review of Education.
 

Representative research includes: 

On teacher recruitment: Klassen, R. M., Rushby, J. V., & Wang, H. (2023). Can an online scenario-based learning activity influence preservice teachers’ self-efficacy, person-vocation fit, and career intentions? Computers and Education, 207, 104935. 

On teacher retention: Wang, H., & Klassen, R. M. (2023). Longitudinal relations between teachers’ utility values and quitting intentions. Teaching and Teacher Education, 127, 104109.

On teacher selection: Klassen, R. M., & Kim, L. E. (2021). Teacher selection: Evidence-based practices. Springer, ISBN 978-3-030-76186-8.

Rachel’s research focuses on exploring the experiences of ethnic minority trainee teachers with a view to better supporting their progress through teacher education and beyond.

Rachel received a BEng in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Birmingham. She later completed a PGCE in secondary science and an MSc in Teacher Education at the University of Oxford. She also has a MA in Photography.

Rachel taught physics for seven years in local Oxfordshire secondary schools, becoming a mentor to trainee science teachers and Head of Physics. She most recently worked on the second year Teach First science course at the Institute of Education at UCL and as a curriculum tutor on the Oxford science PGCE. She has taught the Teaching Physics in Schools option for second year physics undergraduates studying at Oxford for the past four years.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Laura is Co-Director of the University of Oxford Education Deanery and subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages. She also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Robert (Rob) Klassen joined the University of Oxford as Professor of Education in November 2023.  

Rob was previously at the University of York, where he worked from 2012 as Professor and Chair of the Psychology in Education Research Centre. Before coming to the UK, Rob was Assistant, Associate, and Full Professor in the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Alberta (2004-2012). Before entering academia he worked as an educational psychologist and high school teacher in his hometown of Vancouver. 

Rob’s primary research interests are in building an understanding of teacher motivation and development across the career span and across countries. His current work aims to develop and test theory-informed technological interventions related to teacher and school leader recruitment, selection, and development.  

Rob has published over 100 peer-reviewed journal articles, chapters, and books. Recent projects have been funded by the ESRC, the ERC, GIZ, and the World Bank, with recent projects in the UK, Australia, Africa (Morocco, Kenya, South Africa), and Europe. He has served as advisor to education ministries in England, Africa, Australia, Europe, and South America. In 2023 he founded the spinout company, TSP, in collaboration with the University of York. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and the American Psychological Association, and has served on editorial boards for the British Journal of Educational Psychology, the Journal of Educational Psychology, and the Oxford Review of Education.
 

Representative research includes: 

On teacher recruitment: Klassen, R. M., Rushby, J. V., & Wang, H. (2023). Can an online scenario-based learning activity influence preservice teachers’ self-efficacy, person-vocation fit, and career intentions? Computers and Education, 207, 104935. 

On teacher retention: Wang, H., & Klassen, R. M. (2023). Longitudinal relations between teachers’ utility values and quitting intentions. Teaching and Teacher Education, 127, 104109.

On teacher selection: Klassen, R. M., & Kim, L. E. (2021). Teacher selection: Evidence-based practices. Springer, ISBN 978-3-030-76186-8.

Rachel’s research focuses on exploring the experiences of ethnic minority trainee teachers with a view to better supporting their progress through teacher education and beyond.

Rachel received a BEng in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Birmingham. She later completed a PGCE in secondary science and an MSc in Teacher Education at the University of Oxford. She also has a MA in Photography.

Rachel taught physics for seven years in local Oxfordshire secondary schools, becoming a mentor to trainee science teachers and Head of Physics. She most recently worked on the second year Teach First science course at the Institute of Education at UCL and as a curriculum tutor on the Oxford science PGCE. She has taught the Teaching Physics in Schools option for second year physics undergraduates studying at Oxford for the past four years.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Laura is Co-Director of the University of Oxford Education Deanery and subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages. She also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Robert (Rob) Klassen joined the University of Oxford as Professor of Education in November 2023.  

Rob was previously at the University of York, where he worked from 2012 as Professor and Chair of the Psychology in Education Research Centre. Before coming to the UK, Rob was Assistant, Associate, and Full Professor in the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Alberta (2004-2012). Before entering academia he worked as an educational psychologist and high school teacher in his hometown of Vancouver. 

Rob’s primary research interests are in building an understanding of teacher motivation and development across the career span and across countries. His current work aims to develop and test theory-informed technological interventions related to teacher and school leader recruitment, selection, and development.  

Rob has published over 100 peer-reviewed journal articles, chapters, and books. Recent projects have been funded by the ESRC, the ERC, GIZ, and the World Bank, with recent projects in the UK, Australia, Africa (Morocco, Kenya, South Africa), and Europe. He has served as advisor to education ministries in England, Africa, Australia, Europe, and South America. In 2023 he founded the spinout company, TSP, in collaboration with the University of York. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and the American Psychological Association, and has served on editorial boards for the British Journal of Educational Psychology, the Journal of Educational Psychology, and the Oxford Review of Education.
 

Representative research includes: 

On teacher recruitment: Klassen, R. M., Rushby, J. V., & Wang, H. (2023). Can an online scenario-based learning activity influence preservice teachers’ self-efficacy, person-vocation fit, and career intentions? Computers and Education, 207, 104935. 

On teacher retention: Wang, H., & Klassen, R. M. (2023). Longitudinal relations between teachers’ utility values and quitting intentions. Teaching and Teacher Education, 127, 104109.

On teacher selection: Klassen, R. M., & Kim, L. E. (2021). Teacher selection: Evidence-based practices. Springer, ISBN 978-3-030-76186-8.

Rachel’s research focuses on exploring the experiences of ethnic minority trainee teachers with a view to better supporting their progress through teacher education and beyond.

Rachel received a BEng in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Birmingham. She later completed a PGCE in secondary science and an MSc in Teacher Education at the University of Oxford. She also has a MA in Photography.

Rachel taught physics for seven years in local Oxfordshire secondary schools, becoming a mentor to trainee science teachers and Head of Physics. She most recently worked on the second year Teach First science course at the Institute of Education at UCL and as a curriculum tutor on the Oxford science PGCE. She has taught the Teaching Physics in Schools option for second year physics undergraduates studying at Oxford for the past four years.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Laura is Co-Director of the University of Oxford Education Deanery and subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages. She also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Robert (Rob) Klassen joined the University of Oxford as Professor of Education in November 2023.  

Rob was previously at the University of York, where he worked from 2012 as Professor and Chair of the Psychology in Education Research Centre. Before coming to the UK, Rob was Assistant, Associate, and Full Professor in the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Alberta (2004-2012). Before entering academia he worked as an educational psychologist and high school teacher in his hometown of Vancouver. 

Rob’s primary research interests are in building an understanding of teacher motivation and development across the career span and across countries. His current work aims to develop and test theory-informed technological interventions related to teacher and school leader recruitment, selection, and development.  

Rob has published over 100 peer-reviewed journal articles, chapters, and books. Recent projects have been funded by the ESRC, the ERC, GIZ, and the World Bank, with recent projects in the UK, Australia, Africa (Morocco, Kenya, South Africa), and Europe. He has served as advisor to education ministries in England, Africa, Australia, Europe, and South America. In 2023 he founded the spinout company, TSP, in collaboration with the University of York. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and the American Psychological Association, and has served on editorial boards for the British Journal of Educational Psychology, the Journal of Educational Psychology, and the Oxford Review of Education.
 

Representative research includes: 

On teacher recruitment: Klassen, R. M., Rushby, J. V., & Wang, H. (2023). Can an online scenario-based learning activity influence preservice teachers’ self-efficacy, person-vocation fit, and career intentions? Computers and Education, 207, 104935. 

On teacher retention: Wang, H., & Klassen, R. M. (2023). Longitudinal relations between teachers’ utility values and quitting intentions. Teaching and Teacher Education, 127, 104109.

On teacher selection: Klassen, R. M., & Kim, L. E. (2021). Teacher selection: Evidence-based practices. Springer, ISBN 978-3-030-76186-8.

Rachel’s research focuses on exploring the experiences of ethnic minority trainee teachers with a view to better supporting their progress through teacher education and beyond.

Rachel received a BEng in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Birmingham. She later completed a PGCE in secondary science and an MSc in Teacher Education at the University of Oxford. She also has a MA in Photography.

Rachel taught physics for seven years in local Oxfordshire secondary schools, becoming a mentor to trainee science teachers and Head of Physics. She most recently worked on the second year Teach First science course at the Institute of Education at UCL and as a curriculum tutor on the Oxford science PGCE. She has taught the Teaching Physics in Schools option for second year physics undergraduates studying at Oxford for the past four years.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Laura is Co-Director of the University of Oxford Education Deanery and subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages. She also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Robert (Rob) Klassen joined the University of Oxford as Professor of Education in November 2023.  

Rob was previously at the University of York, where he worked from 2012 as Professor and Chair of the Psychology in Education Research Centre. Before coming to the UK, Rob was Assistant, Associate, and Full Professor in the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Alberta (2004-2012). Before entering academia he worked as an educational psychologist and high school teacher in his hometown of Vancouver. 

Rob’s primary research interests are in building an understanding of teacher motivation and development across the career span and across countries. His current work aims to develop and test theory-informed technological interventions related to teacher and school leader recruitment, selection, and development.  

Rob has published over 100 peer-reviewed journal articles, chapters, and books. Recent projects have been funded by the ESRC, the ERC, GIZ, and the World Bank, with recent projects in the UK, Australia, Africa (Morocco, Kenya, South Africa), and Europe. He has served as advisor to education ministries in England, Africa, Australia, Europe, and South America. In 2023 he founded the spinout company, TSP, in collaboration with the University of York. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and the American Psychological Association, and has served on editorial boards for the British Journal of Educational Psychology, the Journal of Educational Psychology, and the Oxford Review of Education.
 

Representative research includes: 

On teacher recruitment: Klassen, R. M., Rushby, J. V., & Wang, H. (2023). Can an online scenario-based learning activity influence preservice teachers’ self-efficacy, person-vocation fit, and career intentions? Computers and Education, 207, 104935. 

On teacher retention: Wang, H., & Klassen, R. M. (2023). Longitudinal relations between teachers’ utility values and quitting intentions. Teaching and Teacher Education, 127, 104109.

On teacher selection: Klassen, R. M., & Kim, L. E. (2021). Teacher selection: Evidence-based practices. Springer, ISBN 978-3-030-76186-8.

Rachel’s research focuses on exploring the experiences of ethnic minority trainee teachers with a view to better supporting their progress through teacher education and beyond.

Rachel received a BEng in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Birmingham. She later completed a PGCE in secondary science and an MSc in Teacher Education at the University of Oxford. She also has a MA in Photography.

Rachel taught physics for seven years in local Oxfordshire secondary schools, becoming a mentor to trainee science teachers and Head of Physics. She most recently worked on the second year Teach First science course at the Institute of Education at UCL and as a curriculum tutor on the Oxford science PGCE. She has taught the Teaching Physics in Schools option for second year physics undergraduates studying at Oxford for the past four years.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Laura is Co-Director of the University of Oxford Education Deanery and subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages. She also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Robert (Rob) Klassen joined the University of Oxford as Professor of Education in November 2023.  

Rob was previously at the University of York, where he worked from 2012 as Professor and Chair of the Psychology in Education Research Centre. Before coming to the UK, Rob was Assistant, Associate, and Full Professor in the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Alberta (2004-2012). Before entering academia he worked as an educational psychologist and high school teacher in his hometown of Vancouver. 

Rob’s primary research interests are in building an understanding of teacher motivation and development across the career span and across countries. His current work aims to develop and test theory-informed technological interventions related to teacher and school leader recruitment, selection, and development.  

Rob has published over 100 peer-reviewed journal articles, chapters, and books. Recent projects have been funded by the ESRC, the ERC, GIZ, and the World Bank, with recent projects in the UK, Australia, Africa (Morocco, Kenya, South Africa), and Europe. He has served as advisor to education ministries in England, Africa, Australia, Europe, and South America. In 2023 he founded the spinout company, TSP, in collaboration with the University of York. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and the American Psychological Association, and has served on editorial boards for the British Journal of Educational Psychology, the Journal of Educational Psychology, and the Oxford Review of Education.
 

Representative research includes: 

On teacher recruitment: Klassen, R. M., Rushby, J. V., & Wang, H. (2023). Can an online scenario-based learning activity influence preservice teachers’ self-efficacy, person-vocation fit, and career intentions? Computers and Education, 207, 104935. 

On teacher retention: Wang, H., & Klassen, R. M. (2023). Longitudinal relations between teachers’ utility values and quitting intentions. Teaching and Teacher Education, 127, 104109.

On teacher selection: Klassen, R. M., & Kim, L. E. (2021). Teacher selection: Evidence-based practices. Springer, ISBN 978-3-030-76186-8.

Rachel’s research focuses on exploring the experiences of ethnic minority trainee teachers with a view to better supporting their progress through teacher education and beyond.

Rachel received a BEng in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Birmingham. She later completed a PGCE in secondary science and an MSc in Teacher Education at the University of Oxford. She also has a MA in Photography.

Rachel taught physics for seven years in local Oxfordshire secondary schools, becoming a mentor to trainee science teachers and Head of Physics. She most recently worked on the second year Teach First science course at the Institute of Education at UCL and as a curriculum tutor on the Oxford science PGCE. She has taught the Teaching Physics in Schools option for second year physics undergraduates studying at Oxford for the past four years.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Laura is Co-Director of the University of Oxford Education Deanery and subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages. She also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Robert (Rob) Klassen joined the University of Oxford as Professor of Education in November 2023.  

Rob was previously at the University of York, where he worked from 2012 as Professor and Chair of the Psychology in Education Research Centre. Before coming to the UK, Rob was Assistant, Associate, and Full Professor in the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Alberta (2004-2012). Before entering academia he worked as an educational psychologist and high school teacher in his hometown of Vancouver. 

Rob’s primary research interests are in building an understanding of teacher motivation and development across the career span and across countries. His current work aims to develop and test theory-informed technological interventions related to teacher and school leader recruitment, selection, and development.  

Rob has published over 100 peer-reviewed journal articles, chapters, and books. Recent projects have been funded by the ESRC, the ERC, GIZ, and the World Bank, with recent projects in the UK, Australia, Africa (Morocco, Kenya, South Africa), and Europe. He has served as advisor to education ministries in England, Africa, Australia, Europe, and South America. In 2023 he founded the spinout company, TSP, in collaboration with the University of York. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and the American Psychological Association, and has served on editorial boards for the British Journal of Educational Psychology, the Journal of Educational Psychology, and the Oxford Review of Education.
 

Representative research includes: 

On teacher recruitment: Klassen, R. M., Rushby, J. V., & Wang, H. (2023). Can an online scenario-based learning activity influence preservice teachers’ self-efficacy, person-vocation fit, and career intentions? Computers and Education, 207, 104935. 

On teacher retention: Wang, H., & Klassen, R. M. (2023). Longitudinal relations between teachers’ utility values and quitting intentions. Teaching and Teacher Education, 127, 104109.

On teacher selection: Klassen, R. M., & Kim, L. E. (2021). Teacher selection: Evidence-based practices. Springer, ISBN 978-3-030-76186-8.

Rachel’s research focuses on exploring the experiences of ethnic minority trainee teachers with a view to better supporting their progress through teacher education and beyond.

Rachel received a BEng in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Birmingham. She later completed a PGCE in secondary science and an MSc in Teacher Education at the University of Oxford. She also has a MA in Photography.

Rachel taught physics for seven years in local Oxfordshire secondary schools, becoming a mentor to trainee science teachers and Head of Physics. She most recently worked on the second year Teach First science course at the Institute of Education at UCL and as a curriculum tutor on the Oxford science PGCE. She has taught the Teaching Physics in Schools option for second year physics undergraduates studying at Oxford for the past four years.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Laura is Co-Director of the University of Oxford Education Deanery and subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages. She also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Robert (Rob) Klassen joined the University of Oxford as Professor of Education in November 2023.  

Rob was previously at the University of York, where he worked from 2012 as Professor and Chair of the Psychology in Education Research Centre. Before coming to the UK, Rob was Assistant, Associate, and Full Professor in the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Alberta (2004-2012). Before entering academia he worked as an educational psychologist and high school teacher in his hometown of Vancouver. 

Rob’s primary research interests are in building an understanding of teacher motivation and development across the career span and across countries. His current work aims to develop and test theory-informed technological interventions related to teacher and school leader recruitment, selection, and development.  

Rob has published over 100 peer-reviewed journal articles, chapters, and books. Recent projects have been funded by the ESRC, the ERC, GIZ, and the World Bank, with recent projects in the UK, Australia, Africa (Morocco, Kenya, South Africa), and Europe. He has served as advisor to education ministries in England, Africa, Australia, Europe, and South America. In 2023 he founded the spinout company, TSP, in collaboration with the University of York. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and the American Psychological Association, and has served on editorial boards for the British Journal of Educational Psychology, the Journal of Educational Psychology, and the Oxford Review of Education.
 

Representative research includes: 

On teacher recruitment: Klassen, R. M., Rushby, J. V., & Wang, H. (2023). Can an online scenario-based learning activity influence preservice teachers’ self-efficacy, person-vocation fit, and career intentions? Computers and Education, 207, 104935. 

On teacher retention: Wang, H., & Klassen, R. M. (2023). Longitudinal relations between teachers’ utility values and quitting intentions. Teaching and Teacher Education, 127, 104109.

On teacher selection: Klassen, R. M., & Kim, L. E. (2021). Teacher selection: Evidence-based practices. Springer, ISBN 978-3-030-76186-8.

Rachel’s research focuses on exploring the experiences of ethnic minority trainee teachers with a view to better supporting their progress through teacher education and beyond.

Rachel received a BEng in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Birmingham. She later completed a PGCE in secondary science and an MSc in Teacher Education at the University of Oxford. She also has a MA in Photography.

Rachel taught physics for seven years in local Oxfordshire secondary schools, becoming a mentor to trainee science teachers and Head of Physics. She most recently worked on the second year Teach First science course at the Institute of Education at UCL and as a curriculum tutor on the Oxford science PGCE. She has taught the Teaching Physics in Schools option for second year physics undergraduates studying at Oxford for the past four years.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Laura is Co-Director of the University of Oxford Education Deanery and subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages. She also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Robert (Rob) Klassen joined the University of Oxford as Professor of Education in November 2023.  

Rob was previously at the University of York, where he worked from 2012 as Professor and Chair of the Psychology in Education Research Centre. Before coming to the UK, Rob was Assistant, Associate, and Full Professor in the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Alberta (2004-2012). Before entering academia he worked as an educational psychologist and high school teacher in his hometown of Vancouver. 

Rob’s primary research interests are in building an understanding of teacher motivation and development across the career span and across countries. His current work aims to develop and test theory-informed technological interventions related to teacher and school leader recruitment, selection, and development.  

Rob has published over 100 peer-reviewed journal articles, chapters, and books. Recent projects have been funded by the ESRC, the ERC, GIZ, and the World Bank, with recent projects in the UK, Australia, Africa (Morocco, Kenya, South Africa), and Europe. He has served as advisor to education ministries in England, Africa, Australia, Europe, and South America. In 2023 he founded the spinout company, TSP, in collaboration with the University of York. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and the American Psychological Association, and has served on editorial boards for the British Journal of Educational Psychology, the Journal of Educational Psychology, and the Oxford Review of Education.
 

Representative research includes: 

On teacher recruitment: Klassen, R. M., Rushby, J. V., & Wang, H. (2023). Can an online scenario-based learning activity influence preservice teachers’ self-efficacy, person-vocation fit, and career intentions? Computers and Education, 207, 104935. 

On teacher retention: Wang, H., & Klassen, R. M. (2023). Longitudinal relations between teachers’ utility values and quitting intentions. Teaching and Teacher Education, 127, 104109.

On teacher selection: Klassen, R. M., & Kim, L. E. (2021). Teacher selection: Evidence-based practices. Springer, ISBN 978-3-030-76186-8.

Rachel’s research focuses on exploring the experiences of ethnic minority trainee teachers with a view to better supporting their progress through teacher education and beyond.

Rachel received a BEng in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Birmingham. She later completed a PGCE in secondary science and an MSc in Teacher Education at the University of Oxford. She also has a MA in Photography.

Rachel taught physics for seven years in local Oxfordshire secondary schools, becoming a mentor to trainee science teachers and Head of Physics. She most recently worked on the second year Teach First science course at the Institute of Education at UCL and as a curriculum tutor on the Oxford science PGCE. She has taught the Teaching Physics in Schools option for second year physics undergraduates studying at Oxford for the past four years.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Laura is Co-Director of the University of Oxford Education Deanery and subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages. She also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Robert (Rob) Klassen joined the University of Oxford as Professor of Education in November 2023.  

Rob was previously at the University of York, where he worked from 2012 as Professor and Chair of the Psychology in Education Research Centre. Before coming to the UK, Rob was Assistant, Associate, and Full Professor in the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Alberta (2004-2012). Before entering academia he worked as an educational psychologist and high school teacher in his hometown of Vancouver. 

Rob’s primary research interests are in building an understanding of teacher motivation and development across the career span and across countries. His current work aims to develop and test theory-informed technological interventions related to teacher and school leader recruitment, selection, and development.  

Rob has published over 100 peer-reviewed journal articles, chapters, and books. Recent projects have been funded by the ESRC, the ERC, GIZ, and the World Bank, with recent projects in the UK, Australia, Africa (Morocco, Kenya, South Africa), and Europe. He has served as advisor to education ministries in England, Africa, Australia, Europe, and South America. In 2023 he founded the spinout company, TSP, in collaboration with the University of York. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and the American Psychological Association, and has served on editorial boards for the British Journal of Educational Psychology, the Journal of Educational Psychology, and the Oxford Review of Education.
 

Representative research includes: 

On teacher recruitment: Klassen, R. M., Rushby, J. V., & Wang, H. (2023). Can an online scenario-based learning activity influence preservice teachers’ self-efficacy, person-vocation fit, and career intentions? Computers and Education, 207, 104935. 

On teacher retention: Wang, H., & Klassen, R. M. (2023). Longitudinal relations between teachers’ utility values and quitting intentions. Teaching and Teacher Education, 127, 104109.

On teacher selection: Klassen, R. M., & Kim, L. E. (2021). Teacher selection: Evidence-based practices. Springer, ISBN 978-3-030-76186-8.

Rachel’s research focuses on exploring the experiences of ethnic minority trainee teachers with a view to better supporting their progress through teacher education and beyond.

Rachel received a BEng in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Birmingham. She later completed a PGCE in secondary science and an MSc in Teacher Education at the University of Oxford. She also has a MA in Photography.

Rachel taught physics for seven years in local Oxfordshire secondary schools, becoming a mentor to trainee science teachers and Head of Physics. She most recently worked on the second year Teach First science course at the Institute of Education at UCL and as a curriculum tutor on the Oxford science PGCE. She has taught the Teaching Physics in Schools option for second year physics undergraduates studying at Oxford for the past four years.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Laura is Co-Director of the University of Oxford Education Deanery and subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages. She also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Robert (Rob) Klassen joined the University of Oxford as Professor of Education in November 2023.  

Rob was previously at the University of York, where he worked from 2012 as Professor and Chair of the Psychology in Education Research Centre. Before coming to the UK, Rob was Assistant, Associate, and Full Professor in the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Alberta (2004-2012). Before entering academia he worked as an educational psychologist and high school teacher in his hometown of Vancouver. 

Rob’s primary research interests are in building an understanding of teacher motivation and development across the career span and across countries. His current work aims to develop and test theory-informed technological interventions related to teacher and school leader recruitment, selection, and development.  

Rob has published over 100 peer-reviewed journal articles, chapters, and books. Recent projects have been funded by the ESRC, the ERC, GIZ, and the World Bank, with recent projects in the UK, Australia, Africa (Morocco, Kenya, South Africa), and Europe. He has served as advisor to education ministries in England, Africa, Australia, Europe, and South America. In 2023 he founded the spinout company, TSP, in collaboration with the University of York. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and the American Psychological Association, and has served on editorial boards for the British Journal of Educational Psychology, the Journal of Educational Psychology, and the Oxford Review of Education.
 

Representative research includes: 

On teacher recruitment: Klassen, R. M., Rushby, J. V., & Wang, H. (2023). Can an online scenario-based learning activity influence preservice teachers’ self-efficacy, person-vocation fit, and career intentions? Computers and Education, 207, 104935. 

On teacher retention: Wang, H., & Klassen, R. M. (2023). Longitudinal relations between teachers’ utility values and quitting intentions. Teaching and Teacher Education, 127, 104109.

On teacher selection: Klassen, R. M., & Kim, L. E. (2021). Teacher selection: Evidence-based practices. Springer, ISBN 978-3-030-76186-8.

Rachel’s research focuses on exploring the experiences of ethnic minority trainee teachers with a view to better supporting their progress through teacher education and beyond.

Rachel received a BEng in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Birmingham. She later completed a PGCE in secondary science and an MSc in Teacher Education at the University of Oxford. She also has a MA in Photography.

Rachel taught physics for seven years in local Oxfordshire secondary schools, becoming a mentor to trainee science teachers and Head of Physics. She most recently worked on the second year Teach First science course at the Institute of Education at UCL and as a curriculum tutor on the Oxford science PGCE. She has taught the Teaching Physics in Schools option for second year physics undergraduates studying at Oxford for the past four years.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Laura is Co-Director of the University of Oxford Education Deanery and subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages. She also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Robert (Rob) Klassen joined the University of Oxford as Professor of Education in November 2023.  

Rob was previously at the University of York, where he worked from 2012 as Professor and Chair of the Psychology in Education Research Centre. Before coming to the UK, Rob was Assistant, Associate, and Full Professor in the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Alberta (2004-2012). Before entering academia he worked as an educational psychologist and high school teacher in his hometown of Vancouver. 

Rob’s primary research interests are in building an understanding of teacher motivation and development across the career span and across countries. His current work aims to develop and test theory-informed technological interventions related to teacher and school leader recruitment, selection, and development.  

Rob has published over 100 peer-reviewed journal articles, chapters, and books. Recent projects have been funded by the ESRC, the ERC, GIZ, and the World Bank, with recent projects in the UK, Australia, Africa (Morocco, Kenya, South Africa), and Europe. He has served as advisor to education ministries in England, Africa, Australia, Europe, and South America. In 2023 he founded the spinout company, TSP, in collaboration with the University of York. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and the American Psychological Association, and has served on editorial boards for the British Journal of Educational Psychology, the Journal of Educational Psychology, and the Oxford Review of Education.
 

Representative research includes: 

On teacher recruitment: Klassen, R. M., Rushby, J. V., & Wang, H. (2023). Can an online scenario-based learning activity influence preservice teachers’ self-efficacy, person-vocation fit, and career intentions? Computers and Education, 207, 104935. 

On teacher retention: Wang, H., & Klassen, R. M. (2023). Longitudinal relations between teachers’ utility values and quitting intentions. Teaching and Teacher Education, 127, 104109.

On teacher selection: Klassen, R. M., & Kim, L. E. (2021). Teacher selection: Evidence-based practices. Springer, ISBN 978-3-030-76186-8.

Rachel’s research focuses on exploring the experiences of ethnic minority trainee teachers with a view to better supporting their progress through teacher education and beyond.

Rachel received a BEng in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Birmingham. She later completed a PGCE in secondary science and an MSc in Teacher Education at the University of Oxford. She also has a MA in Photography.

Rachel taught physics for seven years in local Oxfordshire secondary schools, becoming a mentor to trainee science teachers and Head of Physics. She most recently worked on the second year Teach First science course at the Institute of Education at UCL and as a curriculum tutor on the Oxford science PGCE. She has taught the Teaching Physics in Schools option for second year physics undergraduates studying at Oxford for the past four years.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Laura is Co-Director of the University of Oxford Education Deanery and subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages. She also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Robert (Rob) Klassen joined the University of Oxford as Professor of Education in November 2023.  

Rob was previously at the University of York, where he worked from 2012 as Professor and Chair of the Psychology in Education Research Centre. Before coming to the UK, Rob was Assistant, Associate, and Full Professor in the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Alberta (2004-2012). Before entering academia he worked as an educational psychologist and high school teacher in his hometown of Vancouver. 

Rob’s primary research interests are in building an understanding of teacher motivation and development across the career span and across countries. His current work aims to develop and test theory-informed technological interventions related to teacher and school leader recruitment, selection, and development.  

Rob has published over 100 peer-reviewed journal articles, chapters, and books. Recent projects have been funded by the ESRC, the ERC, GIZ, and the World Bank, with recent projects in the UK, Australia, Africa (Morocco, Kenya, South Africa), and Europe. He has served as advisor to education ministries in England, Africa, Australia, Europe, and South America. In 2023 he founded the spinout company, TSP, in collaboration with the University of York. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and the American Psychological Association, and has served on editorial boards for the British Journal of Educational Psychology, the Journal of Educational Psychology, and the Oxford Review of Education.
 

Representative research includes: 

On teacher recruitment: Klassen, R. M., Rushby, J. V., & Wang, H. (2023). Can an online scenario-based learning activity influence preservice teachers’ self-efficacy, person-vocation fit, and career intentions? Computers and Education, 207, 104935. 

On teacher retention: Wang, H., & Klassen, R. M. (2023). Longitudinal relations between teachers’ utility values and quitting intentions. Teaching and Teacher Education, 127, 104109.

On teacher selection: Klassen, R. M., & Kim, L. E. (2021). Teacher selection: Evidence-based practices. Springer, ISBN 978-3-030-76186-8.

Rachel’s research focuses on exploring the experiences of ethnic minority trainee teachers with a view to better supporting their progress through teacher education and beyond.

Rachel received a BEng in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Birmingham. She later completed a PGCE in secondary science and an MSc in Teacher Education at the University of Oxford. She also has a MA in Photography.

Rachel taught physics for seven years in local Oxfordshire secondary schools, becoming a mentor to trainee science teachers and Head of Physics. She most recently worked on the second year Teach First science course at the Institute of Education at UCL and as a curriculum tutor on the Oxford science PGCE. She has taught the Teaching Physics in Schools option for second year physics undergraduates studying at Oxford for the past four years.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Laura is Co-Director of the University of Oxford Education Deanery and subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages. She also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Robert (Rob) Klassen joined the University of Oxford as Professor of Education in November 2023.  

Rob was previously at the University of York, where he worked from 2012 as Professor and Chair of the Psychology in Education Research Centre. Before coming to the UK, Rob was Assistant, Associate, and Full Professor in the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Alberta (2004-2012). Before entering academia he worked as an educational psychologist and high school teacher in his hometown of Vancouver. 

Rob’s primary research interests are in building an understanding of teacher motivation and development across the career span and across countries. His current work aims to develop and test theory-informed technological interventions related to teacher and school leader recruitment, selection, and development.  

Rob has published over 100 peer-reviewed journal articles, chapters, and books. Recent projects have been funded by the ESRC, the ERC, GIZ, and the World Bank, with recent projects in the UK, Australia, Africa (Morocco, Kenya, South Africa), and Europe. He has served as advisor to education ministries in England, Africa, Australia, Europe, and South America. In 2023 he founded the spinout company, TSP, in collaboration with the University of York. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and the American Psychological Association, and has served on editorial boards for the British Journal of Educational Psychology, the Journal of Educational Psychology, and the Oxford Review of Education.
 

Representative research includes: 

On teacher recruitment: Klassen, R. M., Rushby, J. V., & Wang, H. (2023). Can an online scenario-based learning activity influence preservice teachers’ self-efficacy, person-vocation fit, and career intentions? Computers and Education, 207, 104935. 

On teacher retention: Wang, H., & Klassen, R. M. (2023). Longitudinal relations between teachers’ utility values and quitting intentions. Teaching and Teacher Education, 127, 104109.

On teacher selection: Klassen, R. M., & Kim, L. E. (2021). Teacher selection: Evidence-based practices. Springer, ISBN 978-3-030-76186-8.

Rachel’s research focuses on exploring the experiences of ethnic minority trainee teachers with a view to better supporting their progress through teacher education and beyond.

Rachel received a BEng in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Birmingham. She later completed a PGCE in secondary science and an MSc in Teacher Education at the University of Oxford. She also has a MA in Photography.

Rachel taught physics for seven years in local Oxfordshire secondary schools, becoming a mentor to trainee science teachers and Head of Physics. She most recently worked on the second year Teach First science course at the Institute of Education at UCL and as a curriculum tutor on the Oxford science PGCE. She has taught the Teaching Physics in Schools option for second year physics undergraduates studying at Oxford for the past four years.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Laura is Co-Director of the University of Oxford Education Deanery and subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages. She also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Robert (Rob) Klassen joined the University of Oxford as Professor of Education in November 2023.  

Rob was previously at the University of York, where he worked from 2012 as Professor and Chair of the Psychology in Education Research Centre. Before coming to the UK, Rob was Assistant, Associate, and Full Professor in the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Alberta (2004-2012). Before entering academia he worked as an educational psychologist and high school teacher in his hometown of Vancouver. 

Rob’s primary research interests are in building an understanding of teacher motivation and development across the career span and across countries. His current work aims to develop and test theory-informed technological interventions related to teacher and school leader recruitment, selection, and development.  

Rob has published over 100 peer-reviewed journal articles, chapters, and books. Recent projects have been funded by the ESRC, the ERC, GIZ, and the World Bank, with recent projects in the UK, Australia, Africa (Morocco, Kenya, South Africa), and Europe. He has served as advisor to education ministries in England, Africa, Australia, Europe, and South America. In 2023 he founded the spinout company, TSP, in collaboration with the University of York. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and the American Psychological Association, and has served on editorial boards for the British Journal of Educational Psychology, the Journal of Educational Psychology, and the Oxford Review of Education.
 

Representative research includes: 

On teacher recruitment: Klassen, R. M., Rushby, J. V., & Wang, H. (2023). Can an online scenario-based learning activity influence preservice teachers’ self-efficacy, person-vocation fit, and career intentions? Computers and Education, 207, 104935. 

On teacher retention: Wang, H., & Klassen, R. M. (2023). Longitudinal relations between teachers’ utility values and quitting intentions. Teaching and Teacher Education, 127, 104109.

On teacher selection: Klassen, R. M., & Kim, L. E. (2021). Teacher selection: Evidence-based practices. Springer, ISBN 978-3-030-76186-8.

Rachel’s research focuses on exploring the experiences of ethnic minority trainee teachers with a view to better supporting their progress through teacher education and beyond.

Rachel received a BEng in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Birmingham. She later completed a PGCE in secondary science and an MSc in Teacher Education at the University of Oxford. She also has a MA in Photography.

Rachel taught physics for seven years in local Oxfordshire secondary schools, becoming a mentor to trainee science teachers and Head of Physics. She most recently worked on the second year Teach First science course at the Institute of Education at UCL and as a curriculum tutor on the Oxford science PGCE. She has taught the Teaching Physics in Schools option for second year physics undergraduates studying at Oxford for the past four years.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Laura is Co-Director of the University of Oxford Education Deanery and subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages. She also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Robert (Rob) Klassen joined the University of Oxford as Professor of Education in November 2023.  

Rob was previously at the University of York, where he worked from 2012 as Professor and Chair of the Psychology in Education Research Centre. Before coming to the UK, Rob was Assistant, Associate, and Full Professor in the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Alberta (2004-2012). Before entering academia he worked as an educational psychologist and high school teacher in his hometown of Vancouver. 

Rob’s primary research interests are in building an understanding of teacher motivation and development across the career span and across countries. His current work aims to develop and test theory-informed technological interventions related to teacher and school leader recruitment, selection, and development.  

Rob has published over 100 peer-reviewed journal articles, chapters, and books. Recent projects have been funded by the ESRC, the ERC, GIZ, and the World Bank, with recent projects in the UK, Australia, Africa (Morocco, Kenya, South Africa), and Europe. He has served as advisor to education ministries in England, Africa, Australia, Europe, and South America. In 2023 he founded the spinout company, TSP, in collaboration with the University of York. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and the American Psychological Association, and has served on editorial boards for the British Journal of Educational Psychology, the Journal of Educational Psychology, and the Oxford Review of Education.
 

Representative research includes: 

On teacher recruitment: Klassen, R. M., Rushby, J. V., & Wang, H. (2023). Can an online scenario-based learning activity influence preservice teachers’ self-efficacy, person-vocation fit, and career intentions? Computers and Education, 207, 104935. 

On teacher retention: Wang, H., & Klassen, R. M. (2023). Longitudinal relations between teachers’ utility values and quitting intentions. Teaching and Teacher Education, 127, 104109.

On teacher selection: Klassen, R. M., & Kim, L. E. (2021). Teacher selection: Evidence-based practices. Springer, ISBN 978-3-030-76186-8.

Rachel’s research focuses on exploring the experiences of ethnic minority trainee teachers with a view to better supporting their progress through teacher education and beyond.

Rachel received a BEng in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Birmingham. She later completed a PGCE in secondary science and an MSc in Teacher Education at the University of Oxford. She also has a MA in Photography.

Rachel taught physics for seven years in local Oxfordshire secondary schools, becoming a mentor to trainee science teachers and Head of Physics. She most recently worked on the second year Teach First science course at the Institute of Education at UCL and as a curriculum tutor on the Oxford science PGCE. She has taught the Teaching Physics in Schools option for second year physics undergraduates studying at Oxford for the past four years.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Laura is Co-Director of the University of Oxford Education Deanery and subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages. She also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Robert (Rob) Klassen joined the University of Oxford as Professor of Education in November 2023.  

Rob was previously at the University of York, where he worked from 2012 as Professor and Chair of the Psychology in Education Research Centre. Before coming to the UK, Rob was Assistant, Associate, and Full Professor in the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Alberta (2004-2012). Before entering academia he worked as an educational psychologist and high school teacher in his hometown of Vancouver. 

Rob’s primary research interests are in building an understanding of teacher motivation and development across the career span and across countries. His current work aims to develop and test theory-informed technological interventions related to teacher and school leader recruitment, selection, and development.  

Rob has published over 100 peer-reviewed journal articles, chapters, and books. Recent projects have been funded by the ESRC, the ERC, GIZ, and the World Bank, with recent projects in the UK, Australia, Africa (Morocco, Kenya, South Africa), and Europe. He has served as advisor to education ministries in England, Africa, Australia, Europe, and South America. In 2023 he founded the spinout company, TSP, in collaboration with the University of York. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and the American Psychological Association, and has served on editorial boards for the British Journal of Educational Psychology, the Journal of Educational Psychology, and the Oxford Review of Education.
 

Representative research includes: 

On teacher recruitment: Klassen, R. M., Rushby, J. V., & Wang, H. (2023). Can an online scenario-based learning activity influence preservice teachers’ self-efficacy, person-vocation fit, and career intentions? Computers and Education, 207, 104935. 

On teacher retention: Wang, H., & Klassen, R. M. (2023). Longitudinal relations between teachers’ utility values and quitting intentions. Teaching and Teacher Education, 127, 104109.

On teacher selection: Klassen, R. M., & Kim, L. E. (2021). Teacher selection: Evidence-based practices. Springer, ISBN 978-3-030-76186-8.

Rachel’s research focuses on exploring the experiences of ethnic minority trainee teachers with a view to better supporting their progress through teacher education and beyond.

Rachel received a BEng in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Birmingham. She later completed a PGCE in secondary science and an MSc in Teacher Education at the University of Oxford. She also has a MA in Photography.

Rachel taught physics for seven years in local Oxfordshire secondary schools, becoming a mentor to trainee science teachers and Head of Physics. She most recently worked on the second year Teach First science course at the Institute of Education at UCL and as a curriculum tutor on the Oxford science PGCE. She has taught the Teaching Physics in Schools option for second year physics undergraduates studying at Oxford for the past four years.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Laura is Co-Director of the University of Oxford Education Deanery and subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages. She also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Robert (Rob) Klassen joined the University of Oxford as Professor of Education in November 2023.  

Rob was previously at the University of York, where he worked from 2012 as Professor and Chair of the Psychology in Education Research Centre. Before coming to the UK, Rob was Assistant, Associate, and Full Professor in the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Alberta (2004-2012). Before entering academia he worked as an educational psychologist and high school teacher in his hometown of Vancouver. 

Rob’s primary research interests are in building an understanding of teacher motivation and development across the career span and across countries. His current work aims to develop and test theory-informed technological interventions related to teacher and school leader recruitment, selection, and development.  

Rob has published over 100 peer-reviewed journal articles, chapters, and books. Recent projects have been funded by the ESRC, the ERC, GIZ, and the World Bank, with recent projects in the UK, Australia, Africa (Morocco, Kenya, South Africa), and Europe. He has served as advisor to education ministries in England, Africa, Australia, Europe, and South America. In 2023 he founded the spinout company, TSP, in collaboration with the University of York. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and the American Psychological Association, and has served on editorial boards for the British Journal of Educational Psychology, the Journal of Educational Psychology, and the Oxford Review of Education.
 

Representative research includes: 

On teacher recruitment: Klassen, R. M., Rushby, J. V., & Wang, H. (2023). Can an online scenario-based learning activity influence preservice teachers’ self-efficacy, person-vocation fit, and career intentions? Computers and Education, 207, 104935. 

On teacher retention: Wang, H., & Klassen, R. M. (2023). Longitudinal relations between teachers’ utility values and quitting intentions. Teaching and Teacher Education, 127, 104109.

On teacher selection: Klassen, R. M., & Kim, L. E. (2021). Teacher selection: Evidence-based practices. Springer, ISBN 978-3-030-76186-8.

Rachel’s research focuses on exploring the experiences of ethnic minority trainee teachers with a view to better supporting their progress through teacher education and beyond.

Rachel received a BEng in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Birmingham. She later completed a PGCE in secondary science and an MSc in Teacher Education at the University of Oxford. She also has a MA in Photography.

Rachel taught physics for seven years in local Oxfordshire secondary schools, becoming a mentor to trainee science teachers and Head of Physics. She most recently worked on the second year Teach First science course at the Institute of Education at UCL and as a curriculum tutor on the Oxford science PGCE. She has taught the Teaching Physics in Schools option for second year physics undergraduates studying at Oxford for the past four years.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Laura is Co-Director of the University of Oxford Education Deanery and subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages. She also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Robert (Rob) Klassen joined the University of Oxford as Professor of Education in November 2023.  

Rob was previously at the University of York, where he worked from 2012 as Professor and Chair of the Psychology in Education Research Centre. Before coming to the UK, Rob was Assistant, Associate, and Full Professor in the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Alberta (2004-2012). Before entering academia he worked as an educational psychologist and high school teacher in his hometown of Vancouver. 

Rob’s primary research interests are in building an understanding of teacher motivation and development across the career span and across countries. His current work aims to develop and test theory-informed technological interventions related to teacher and school leader recruitment, selection, and development.  

Rob has published over 100 peer-reviewed journal articles, chapters, and books. Recent projects have been funded by the ESRC, the ERC, GIZ, and the World Bank, with recent projects in the UK, Australia, Africa (Morocco, Kenya, South Africa), and Europe. He has served as advisor to education ministries in England, Africa, Australia, Europe, and South America. In 2023 he founded the spinout company, TSP, in collaboration with the University of York. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and the American Psychological Association, and has served on editorial boards for the British Journal of Educational Psychology, the Journal of Educational Psychology, and the Oxford Review of Education.
 

Representative research includes: 

On teacher recruitment: Klassen, R. M., Rushby, J. V., & Wang, H. (2023). Can an online scenario-based learning activity influence preservice teachers’ self-efficacy, person-vocation fit, and career intentions? Computers and Education, 207, 104935. 

On teacher retention: Wang, H., & Klassen, R. M. (2023). Longitudinal relations between teachers’ utility values and quitting intentions. Teaching and Teacher Education, 127, 104109.

On teacher selection: Klassen, R. M., & Kim, L. E. (2021). Teacher selection: Evidence-based practices. Springer, ISBN 978-3-030-76186-8.

Rachel’s research focuses on exploring the experiences of ethnic minority trainee teachers with a view to better supporting their progress through teacher education and beyond.

Rachel received a BEng in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Birmingham. She later completed a PGCE in secondary science and an MSc in Teacher Education at the University of Oxford. She also has a MA in Photography.

Rachel taught physics for seven years in local Oxfordshire secondary schools, becoming a mentor to trainee science teachers and Head of Physics. She most recently worked on the second year Teach First science course at the Institute of Education at UCL and as a curriculum tutor on the Oxford science PGCE. She has taught the Teaching Physics in Schools option for second year physics undergraduates studying at Oxford for the past four years.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Laura is Co-Director of the University of Oxford Education Deanery and subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages. She also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Robert (Rob) Klassen joined the University of Oxford as Professor of Education in November 2023.  

Rob was previously at the University of York, where he worked from 2012 as Professor and Chair of the Psychology in Education Research Centre. Before coming to the UK, Rob was Assistant, Associate, and Full Professor in the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Alberta (2004-2012). Before entering academia he worked as an educational psychologist and high school teacher in his hometown of Vancouver. 

Rob’s primary research interests are in building an understanding of teacher motivation and development across the career span and across countries. His current work aims to develop and test theory-informed technological interventions related to teacher and school leader recruitment, selection, and development.  

Rob has published over 100 peer-reviewed journal articles, chapters, and books. Recent projects have been funded by the ESRC, the ERC, GIZ, and the World Bank, with recent projects in the UK, Australia, Africa (Morocco, Kenya, South Africa), and Europe. He has served as advisor to education ministries in England, Africa, Australia, Europe, and South America. In 2023 he founded the spinout company, TSP, in collaboration with the University of York. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and the American Psychological Association, and has served on editorial boards for the British Journal of Educational Psychology, the Journal of Educational Psychology, and the Oxford Review of Education.
 

Representative research includes: 

On teacher recruitment: Klassen, R. M., Rushby, J. V., & Wang, H. (2023). Can an online scenario-based learning activity influence preservice teachers’ self-efficacy, person-vocation fit, and career intentions? Computers and Education, 207, 104935. 

On teacher retention: Wang, H., & Klassen, R. M. (2023). Longitudinal relations between teachers’ utility values and quitting intentions. Teaching and Teacher Education, 127, 104109.

On teacher selection: Klassen, R. M., & Kim, L. E. (2021). Teacher selection: Evidence-based practices. Springer, ISBN 978-3-030-76186-8.

Rachel’s research focuses on exploring the experiences of ethnic minority trainee teachers with a view to better supporting their progress through teacher education and beyond.

Rachel received a BEng in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Birmingham. She later completed a PGCE in secondary science and an MSc in Teacher Education at the University of Oxford. She also has a MA in Photography.

Rachel taught physics for seven years in local Oxfordshire secondary schools, becoming a mentor to trainee science teachers and Head of Physics. She most recently worked on the second year Teach First science course at the Institute of Education at UCL and as a curriculum tutor on the Oxford science PGCE. She has taught the Teaching Physics in Schools option for second year physics undergraduates studying at Oxford for the past four years.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Laura is Co-Director of the University of Oxford Education Deanery and subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages. She also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Robert (Rob) Klassen joined the University of Oxford as Professor of Education in November 2023.  

Rob was previously at the University of York, where he worked from 2012 as Professor and Chair of the Psychology in Education Research Centre. Before coming to the UK, Rob was Assistant, Associate, and Full Professor in the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Alberta (2004-2012). Before entering academia he worked as an educational psychologist and high school teacher in his hometown of Vancouver. 

Rob’s primary research interests are in building an understanding of teacher motivation and development across the career span and across countries. His current work aims to develop and test theory-informed technological interventions related to teacher and school leader recruitment, selection, and development.  

Rob has published over 100 peer-reviewed journal articles, chapters, and books. Recent projects have been funded by the ESRC, the ERC, GIZ, and the World Bank, with recent projects in the UK, Australia, Africa (Morocco, Kenya, South Africa), and Europe. He has served as advisor to education ministries in England, Africa, Australia, Europe, and South America. In 2023 he founded the spinout company, TSP, in collaboration with the University of York. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and the American Psychological Association, and has served on editorial boards for the British Journal of Educational Psychology, the Journal of Educational Psychology, and the Oxford Review of Education.
 

Representative research includes: 

On teacher recruitment: Klassen, R. M., Rushby, J. V., & Wang, H. (2023). Can an online scenario-based learning activity influence preservice teachers’ self-efficacy, person-vocation fit, and career intentions? Computers and Education, 207, 104935. 

On teacher retention: Wang, H., & Klassen, R. M. (2023). Longitudinal relations between teachers’ utility values and quitting intentions. Teaching and Teacher Education, 127, 104109.

On teacher selection: Klassen, R. M., & Kim, L. E. (2021). Teacher selection: Evidence-based practices. Springer, ISBN 978-3-030-76186-8.

Rachel’s research focuses on exploring the experiences of ethnic minority trainee teachers with a view to better supporting their progress through teacher education and beyond.

Rachel received a BEng in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Birmingham. She later completed a PGCE in secondary science and an MSc in Teacher Education at the University of Oxford. She also has a MA in Photography.

Rachel taught physics for seven years in local Oxfordshire secondary schools, becoming a mentor to trainee science teachers and Head of Physics. She most recently worked on the second year Teach First science course at the Institute of Education at UCL and as a curriculum tutor on the Oxford science PGCE. She has taught the Teaching Physics in Schools option for second year physics undergraduates studying at Oxford for the past four years.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Laura is Co-Director of the University of Oxford Education Deanery and subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages. She also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Robert (Rob) Klassen joined the University of Oxford as Professor of Education in November 2023.  

Rob was previously at the University of York, where he worked from 2012 as Professor and Chair of the Psychology in Education Research Centre. Before coming to the UK, Rob was Assistant, Associate, and Full Professor in the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Alberta (2004-2012). Before entering academia he worked as an educational psychologist and high school teacher in his hometown of Vancouver. 

Rob’s primary research interests are in building an understanding of teacher motivation and development across the career span and across countries. His current work aims to develop and test theory-informed technological interventions related to teacher and school leader recruitment, selection, and development.  

Rob has published over 100 peer-reviewed journal articles, chapters, and books. Recent projects have been funded by the ESRC, the ERC, GIZ, and the World Bank, with recent projects in the UK, Australia, Africa (Morocco, Kenya, South Africa), and Europe. He has served as advisor to education ministries in England, Africa, Australia, Europe, and South America. In 2023 he founded the spinout company, TSP, in collaboration with the University of York. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and the American Psychological Association, and has served on editorial boards for the British Journal of Educational Psychology, the Journal of Educational Psychology, and the Oxford Review of Education.
 

Representative research includes: 

On teacher recruitment: Klassen, R. M., Rushby, J. V., & Wang, H. (2023). Can an online scenario-based learning activity influence preservice teachers’ self-efficacy, person-vocation fit, and career intentions? Computers and Education, 207, 104935. 

On teacher retention: Wang, H., & Klassen, R. M. (2023). Longitudinal relations between teachers’ utility values and quitting intentions. Teaching and Teacher Education, 127, 104109.

On teacher selection: Klassen, R. M., & Kim, L. E. (2021). Teacher selection: Evidence-based practices. Springer, ISBN 978-3-030-76186-8.

Rachel’s research focuses on exploring the experiences of ethnic minority trainee teachers with a view to better supporting their progress through teacher education and beyond.

Rachel received a BEng in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Birmingham. She later completed a PGCE in secondary science and an MSc in Teacher Education at the University of Oxford. She also has a MA in Photography.

Rachel taught physics for seven years in local Oxfordshire secondary schools, becoming a mentor to trainee science teachers and Head of Physics. She most recently worked on the second year Teach First science course at the Institute of Education at UCL and as a curriculum tutor on the Oxford science PGCE. She has taught the Teaching Physics in Schools option for second year physics undergraduates studying at Oxford for the past four years.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Laura is Co-Director of the University of Oxford Education Deanery and subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages. She also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Robert (Rob) Klassen joined the University of Oxford as Professor of Education in November 2023.  

Rob was previously at the University of York, where he worked from 2012 as Professor and Chair of the Psychology in Education Research Centre. Before coming to the UK, Rob was Assistant, Associate, and Full Professor in the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Alberta (2004-2012). Before entering academia he worked as an educational psychologist and high school teacher in his hometown of Vancouver. 

Rob’s primary research interests are in building an understanding of teacher motivation and development across the career span and across countries. His current work aims to develop and test theory-informed technological interventions related to teacher and school leader recruitment, selection, and development.  

Rob has published over 100 peer-reviewed journal articles, chapters, and books. Recent projects have been funded by the ESRC, the ERC, GIZ, and the World Bank, with recent projects in the UK, Australia, Africa (Morocco, Kenya, South Africa), and Europe. He has served as advisor to education ministries in England, Africa, Australia, Europe, and South America. In 2023 he founded the spinout company, TSP, in collaboration with the University of York. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and the American Psychological Association, and has served on editorial boards for the British Journal of Educational Psychology, the Journal of Educational Psychology, and the Oxford Review of Education.
 

Representative research includes: 

On teacher recruitment: Klassen, R. M., Rushby, J. V., & Wang, H. (2023). Can an online scenario-based learning activity influence preservice teachers’ self-efficacy, person-vocation fit, and career intentions? Computers and Education, 207, 104935. 

On teacher retention: Wang, H., & Klassen, R. M. (2023). Longitudinal relations between teachers’ utility values and quitting intentions. Teaching and Teacher Education, 127, 104109.

On teacher selection: Klassen, R. M., & Kim, L. E. (2021). Teacher selection: Evidence-based practices. Springer, ISBN 978-3-030-76186-8.

Rachel’s research focuses on exploring the experiences of ethnic minority trainee teachers with a view to better supporting their progress through teacher education and beyond.

Rachel received a BEng in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Birmingham. She later completed a PGCE in secondary science and an MSc in Teacher Education at the University of Oxford. She also has a MA in Photography.

Rachel taught physics for seven years in local Oxfordshire secondary schools, becoming a mentor to trainee science teachers and Head of Physics. She most recently worked on the second year Teach First science course at the Institute of Education at UCL and as a curriculum tutor on the Oxford science PGCE. She has taught the Teaching Physics in Schools option for second year physics undergraduates studying at Oxford for the past four years.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Laura is Co-Director of the University of Oxford Education Deanery and subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages. She also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Robert (Rob) Klassen joined the University of Oxford as Professor of Education in November 2023.  

Rob was previously at the University of York, where he worked from 2012 as Professor and Chair of the Psychology in Education Research Centre. Before coming to the UK, Rob was Assistant, Associate, and Full Professor in the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Alberta (2004-2012). Before entering academia he worked as an educational psychologist and high school teacher in his hometown of Vancouver. 

Rob’s primary research interests are in building an understanding of teacher motivation and development across the career span and across countries. His current work aims to develop and test theory-informed technological interventions related to teacher and school leader recruitment, selection, and development.  

Rob has published over 100 peer-reviewed journal articles, chapters, and books. Recent projects have been funded by the ESRC, the ERC, GIZ, and the World Bank, with recent projects in the UK, Australia, Africa (Morocco, Kenya, South Africa), and Europe. He has served as advisor to education ministries in England, Africa, Australia, Europe, and South America. In 2023 he founded the spinout company, TSP, in collaboration with the University of York. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and the American Psychological Association, and has served on editorial boards for the British Journal of Educational Psychology, the Journal of Educational Psychology, and the Oxford Review of Education.
 

Representative research includes: 

On teacher recruitment: Klassen, R. M., Rushby, J. V., & Wang, H. (2023). Can an online scenario-based learning activity influence preservice teachers’ self-efficacy, person-vocation fit, and career intentions? Computers and Education, 207, 104935. 

On teacher retention: Wang, H., & Klassen, R. M. (2023). Longitudinal relations between teachers’ utility values and quitting intentions. Teaching and Teacher Education, 127, 104109.

On teacher selection: Klassen, R. M., & Kim, L. E. (2021). Teacher selection: Evidence-based practices. Springer, ISBN 978-3-030-76186-8.

Rachel’s research focuses on exploring the experiences of ethnic minority trainee teachers with a view to better supporting their progress through teacher education and beyond.

Rachel received a BEng in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Birmingham. She later completed a PGCE in secondary science and an MSc in Teacher Education at the University of Oxford. She also has a MA in Photography.

Rachel taught physics for seven years in local Oxfordshire secondary schools, becoming a mentor to trainee science teachers and Head of Physics. She most recently worked on the second year Teach First science course at the Institute of Education at UCL and as a curriculum tutor on the Oxford science PGCE. She has taught the Teaching Physics in Schools option for second year physics undergraduates studying at Oxford for the past four years.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Laura is Co-Director of the University of Oxford Education Deanery and subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages. She also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Robert (Rob) Klassen joined the University of Oxford as Professor of Education in November 2023.  

Rob was previously at the University of York, where he worked from 2012 as Professor and Chair of the Psychology in Education Research Centre. Before coming to the UK, Rob was Assistant, Associate, and Full Professor in the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Alberta (2004-2012). Before entering academia he worked as an educational psychologist and high school teacher in his hometown of Vancouver. 

Rob’s primary research interests are in building an understanding of teacher motivation and development across the career span and across countries. His current work aims to develop and test theory-informed technological interventions related to teacher and school leader recruitment, selection, and development.  

Rob has published over 100 peer-reviewed journal articles, chapters, and books. Recent projects have been funded by the ESRC, the ERC, GIZ, and the World Bank, with recent projects in the UK, Australia, Africa (Morocco, Kenya, South Africa), and Europe. He has served as advisor to education ministries in England, Africa, Australia, Europe, and South America. In 2023 he founded the spinout company, TSP, in collaboration with the University of York. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and the American Psychological Association, and has served on editorial boards for the British Journal of Educational Psychology, the Journal of Educational Psychology, and the Oxford Review of Education.
 

Representative research includes: 

On teacher recruitment: Klassen, R. M., Rushby, J. V., & Wang, H. (2023). Can an online scenario-based learning activity influence preservice teachers’ self-efficacy, person-vocation fit, and career intentions? Computers and Education, 207, 104935. 

On teacher retention: Wang, H., & Klassen, R. M. (2023). Longitudinal relations between teachers’ utility values and quitting intentions. Teaching and Teacher Education, 127, 104109.

On teacher selection: Klassen, R. M., & Kim, L. E. (2021). Teacher selection: Evidence-based practices. Springer, ISBN 978-3-030-76186-8.

Rachel’s research focuses on exploring the experiences of ethnic minority trainee teachers with a view to better supporting their progress through teacher education and beyond.

Rachel received a BEng in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Birmingham. She later completed a PGCE in secondary science and an MSc in Teacher Education at the University of Oxford. She also has a MA in Photography.

Rachel taught physics for seven years in local Oxfordshire secondary schools, becoming a mentor to trainee science teachers and Head of Physics. She most recently worked on the second year Teach First science course at the Institute of Education at UCL and as a curriculum tutor on the Oxford science PGCE. She has taught the Teaching Physics in Schools option for second year physics undergraduates studying at Oxford for the past four years.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Laura is Co-Director of the University of Oxford Education Deanery and subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages. She also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Robert (Rob) Klassen joined the University of Oxford as Professor of Education in November 2023.  

Rob was previously at the University of York, where he worked from 2012 as Professor and Chair of the Psychology in Education Research Centre. Before coming to the UK, Rob was Assistant, Associate, and Full Professor in the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Alberta (2004-2012). Before entering academia he worked as an educational psychologist and high school teacher in his hometown of Vancouver. 

Rob’s primary research interests are in building an understanding of teacher motivation and development across the career span and across countries. His current work aims to develop and test theory-informed technological interventions related to teacher and school leader recruitment, selection, and development.  

Rob has published over 100 peer-reviewed journal articles, chapters, and books. Recent projects have been funded by the ESRC, the ERC, GIZ, and the World Bank, with recent projects in the UK, Australia, Africa (Morocco, Kenya, South Africa), and Europe. He has served as advisor to education ministries in England, Africa, Australia, Europe, and South America. In 2023 he founded the spinout company, TSP, in collaboration with the University of York. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and the American Psychological Association, and has served on editorial boards for the British Journal of Educational Psychology, the Journal of Educational Psychology, and the Oxford Review of Education.
 

Representative research includes: 

On teacher recruitment: Klassen, R. M., Rushby, J. V., & Wang, H. (2023). Can an online scenario-based learning activity influence preservice teachers’ self-efficacy, person-vocation fit, and career intentions? Computers and Education, 207, 104935. 

On teacher retention: Wang, H., & Klassen, R. M. (2023). Longitudinal relations between teachers’ utility values and quitting intentions. Teaching and Teacher Education, 127, 104109.

On teacher selection: Klassen, R. M., & Kim, L. E. (2021). Teacher selection: Evidence-based practices. Springer, ISBN 978-3-030-76186-8.

Rachel’s research focuses on exploring the experiences of ethnic minority trainee teachers with a view to better supporting their progress through teacher education and beyond.

Rachel received a BEng in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Birmingham. She later completed a PGCE in secondary science and an MSc in Teacher Education at the University of Oxford. She also has a MA in Photography.

Rachel taught physics for seven years in local Oxfordshire secondary schools, becoming a mentor to trainee science teachers and Head of Physics. She most recently worked on the second year Teach First science course at the Institute of Education at UCL and as a curriculum tutor on the Oxford science PGCE. She has taught the Teaching Physics in Schools option for second year physics undergraduates studying at Oxford for the past four years.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Laura is Co-Director of the University of Oxford Education Deanery and subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages. She also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Robert (Rob) Klassen joined the University of Oxford as Professor of Education in November 2023.  

Rob was previously at the University of York, where he worked from 2012 as Professor and Chair of the Psychology in Education Research Centre. Before coming to the UK, Rob was Assistant, Associate, and Full Professor in the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Alberta (2004-2012). Before entering academia he worked as an educational psychologist and high school teacher in his hometown of Vancouver. 

Rob’s primary research interests are in building an understanding of teacher motivation and development across the career span and across countries. His current work aims to develop and test theory-informed technological interventions related to teacher and school leader recruitment, selection, and development.  

Rob has published over 100 peer-reviewed journal articles, chapters, and books. Recent projects have been funded by the ESRC, the ERC, GIZ, and the World Bank, with recent projects in the UK, Australia, Africa (Morocco, Kenya, South Africa), and Europe. He has served as advisor to education ministries in England, Africa, Australia, Europe, and South America. In 2023 he founded the spinout company, TSP, in collaboration with the University of York. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and the American Psychological Association, and has served on editorial boards for the British Journal of Educational Psychology, the Journal of Educational Psychology, and the Oxford Review of Education.
 

Representative research includes: 

On teacher recruitment: Klassen, R. M., Rushby, J. V., & Wang, H. (2023). Can an online scenario-based learning activity influence preservice teachers’ self-efficacy, person-vocation fit, and career intentions? Computers and Education, 207, 104935. 

On teacher retention: Wang, H., & Klassen, R. M. (2023). Longitudinal relations between teachers’ utility values and quitting intentions. Teaching and Teacher Education, 127, 104109.

On teacher selection: Klassen, R. M., & Kim, L. E. (2021). Teacher selection: Evidence-based practices. Springer, ISBN 978-3-030-76186-8.

Rachel’s research focuses on exploring the experiences of ethnic minority trainee teachers with a view to better supporting their progress through teacher education and beyond.

Rachel received a BEng in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Birmingham. She later completed a PGCE in secondary science and an MSc in Teacher Education at the University of Oxford. She also has a MA in Photography.

Rachel taught physics for seven years in local Oxfordshire secondary schools, becoming a mentor to trainee science teachers and Head of Physics. She most recently worked on the second year Teach First science course at the Institute of Education at UCL and as a curriculum tutor on the Oxford science PGCE. She has taught the Teaching Physics in Schools option for second year physics undergraduates studying at Oxford for the past four years.

Laura is currently working on the FoSTER project which seeks to understand the range of ways that schools support teachers to engage with and in research across the UK and Ireland.

This involves conducting a survey of teachers’ engagement with/in research, followed by detailed case studies of schools who are successfully supporting teachers to engage with/in research. Laura is also a practising primary school teacher and is studying for an EdD Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research uses a constructivist grounded theory methodology to explore children’s lived experience of the maths mastery policy, through the lens of social justice.

 

 

 

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Laura is Co-Director of the University of Oxford Education Deanery and subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages. She also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Q