Seminars and Events

All events are held at 15 Norham Gardens, Oxford OX2 6PY unless otherwise stated.

All are welcome to those indicated as ‘public seminars’ in parentheses after the title. These are held on Monday evenings and there is no need to book. If you are coming from outside the Department and would like to attend any of the other seminars or events, please contact the convener(s) beforehand.
Click on the title of the event for further information.

Psychometric scales, social network analysis, ethnographic fieldwork: how can they each help us understand students’ social experiences and sense of community in school?

27 February 2017 12:30 - 13:45
Seminar Room D

Speaker: Marc Sarazin  Department of Education.

Conveners: Professor Steve Strand, Dr. Lars-Erik Malmberg and Dr. Daniel Caro, Quantitative Methods Hub

What can different methods tell us when trying to understand children’s social experiences, as well as their perceptions of their school as a community and learning environment? In this talk, I present how I used psychometric scales, social network analysis, and ethnographic fieldwork to shed light on these topics in a mixed-method case study of two French primary schools going through a collective music-making intervention (N=71). After describing the background, raison d’être, and design of my study, I examine each method in turn. I present the rationale for each method, with a focus on introducing social network analysis and ethnographic methods. I also look at how I used these three methods and some of the results that they have yielded. I conclude by reflecting on the bigger picture that these methods can create together.

Education and the new Conservatism: social wellbeing, national character, and British values (Public Seminar)

27 February 2017 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room A

Speaker: Professor Gary McCulloch, UCL Institute of Education

Convener: Dr Liam Gearon, Philosophy, Religion and Education Research Forum

Conservative policies in education have often been analysed in terms of their neoliberal characteristics.  In the early years of the 21st century, the neoconservative themes of education policy are also highly visible, in particular social wellbeing, national character, and British values, strongly influenced by broader contemporary issues but also by longer-term historical legacies.  In this seminar we will review briefly the key themes of Conservative policies in education in the 20th century before examining the emergence of neoconservative themes over the past decade, continuities and changes in education policy since the 1980s, and current prospects for new and alternative themes.

Professor Gary McCulloch is the Brian Simon Professor of the History of Education and Director of the International Centre for Historical Research in Education at UCL Institute of Education London.  He is currently vice-president and president-elect of the British Educational Research Association and Editor of the British Journal of Educational Studies.  His recent publications include The Struggle for the History of Education (2011) and (with Tom Woodin and Steven Cowan) Secondary Education and the Raising of the School Leaving Age (2013). He has recently completed a social history of educational studies and research.

Language in action: a study of what makes effective communication in pre-hospital resuscitation teams

28 February 2017 13:00 - 14:00
Seminar Room G/H

Speakers: Ernisa Marzuki, University of Edinburgh

Convener: Dr Jessica Briggs, Applied Linguistics Research Group

Historically, medical training has focused on the development and strengthening of clinical skills. After the adoption and adaptation of the aviation industry’s Crew Resource Management training programme and following a number of studies which highlighted the crucial role of non-technical skills (NTS) in minimising medical errors (e.g. Andersen et al., 2010; Cooper & Wakelam, 1999; Hull et al., 2012; Marsch et al., 2004; Van Wyl et al., 2009), the value of NTS has been acknowledged. There is currently a great deal of interest in the optimisation of teamwork during pre-hospital or out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) resuscitation. The Resuscitation Council UK recognises that effective communication is one of the major instruments for optimal teamwork, and indeed, all domains in existing NTS measurement tools essentially involve verbal communicative acts. Yet there are no fine-grained linguistic analyses of how raters and/or team members perceive effective medical team communication. Despite the major role of communication in NTS assessments, the question of whether specific linguistic patterns, markers, or practices are associated with high NTS scores has been little explored.

This study aims to identify specific communicative patterns applied in pre-hospital resuscitations through examination of the types and distributions of language categories, using McNeilis's (1995) doctor-patient language categorisation as a basis. Through this, we intend to provide clearer distinctions of what is construed as effective team communication, with the aim of assisting in the production of gold standards for measurement and training of related high-performance medical teams. We also plan to find out whether correlations exist between any language categories and the team leaders’ NTS scores.

A total of 20 authentic videos collected as part of the ongoing Resuscitation Research Group’s training and improvement programme will be transcribed and the contents subjected to linguistic analysis. This included verbal activities regarding information flow, categories of speech act, and politeness markers. A pilot study using simulations revealed that pre-hospital resuscitations proceeded through four recognisable stages. Various types of speech act were involved in the process of navigating this interaction, with directives being used most frequently, especially by the team leaders, but in a variety of forms. As expected, the linguistic patterns in resuscitation teams differed appreciably from those in doctor-patient dyads. Results also showed that politeness measures were duly utilised during resuscitations.

Of roles and rules: towards a differentiated theory of professional ethics

28 February 2017 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room D

Speaker: Dr Gerard Lum, King’s College London

Conveners: Dr Liam Gearon and Professor Alis Oancea, Philosophy, Religion and Education Research Forum in association with the Philosophy of Education Society of Great Britain (Oxford branch).

There has, of late, been an increasing interest in the potential of virtue theory to provide a theoretical basis for professional ethics.  While virtue theory’s evident practitioner focus does much to explain its appeal, the approach remains susceptible to complaints that ethical practice should properly be bound by rules, or that practitioners must necessarily have an eye to the ultimate consequences of their actions or to the general good.  My aim here is to outline an alternative theoretical approach, one which by avoiding resort to the traditional deontological, utilitarian or virtue perspectives might provide a more cohesive theoretical basis for professional ethics.

My starting point is to differentiate, first, the three basic role types (the ‘practitioner’ being one such) that I suggest are necessarily implicated in ethical decision-making – something that seems to have been neglected by theories of ethics/ social justice which emphasise variously just one of the three roles.  Second, and drawing on previous work, I distinguish between three fundamentally different kinds of rules which delineate and essentially constitute professional practice; this, again, being something overlooked in the literature relating to professional practice where ‘rules’ are often conceived as being of a single type.  Having distinguished the relevant role/rule types I propose that professional ethics can usefully be conceived as an integrated framework of rules whereby ethical roles are at once both interconnected yet differentiated by dint of being differently configured in relation to the rules.  This, I will suggest, allows for a more coherent theory of professional ethics which can be seen to avoid many of the difficulties commonly associated with classical ethical theories.

Dr Gerard Lum is Senior Lecturer in Philosophy and Education Management at King's College London.  His research is primarily in the philosophy and theory of education. He has a particular interest in epistemological issues relating to education and in recent work has been concerned with questions about professional education and professional ethics.

Schools: learning as a precondition to teaching?

28 February 2017 17:00 - 18:30
Syndicate Room, St Antony’s College

Speaker: Margery Evans, Aga Khan Education Services

Respondents:Dr Ann Childs, Department of Education and Dr Barbara Bruns, The World Bank

Conveners: Dr David Johnson, Caroline Arnold, and Andy Cunningham, Centre for Comparative and International Education Research

Further information: Naseemah Mohammed

A validation of the Classroom Assessment Scoring system (CLASS) in lower secondary schools

01 March 2017 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room K/L

Speakers: Professor Sigrun Ertesvåg, University of Stavanger, Norway

Conveners: Professor Terezinha Nunes, Children Learning Research Group and Dr Maria Evangelou, FELL

Teachers continue to report that classroom management is one of their greatest challenges in the classroom. Classroom management involves teacher’s efforts to oversee classroom activities such as learning, social interaction, and student behaviour. The secondary version of the Classroom Assessment Scoring System (CLASS-S) offers an approach to observation of key aspects of classroom management. CLASS has perhaps the best documentation of the available protocols for systematic classroom observation. However, CLASS has previously not been validated in Norway. The presentation will discuss two approaches to the validation of CLASS and results from the examination of the validity in lower secondary classrooms in Norway. Although the discussion addresses the CLASS observation system, it will be of relevance to similar observation protocols. Moreover, some preliminary results from the Norwegian study Classroom interaction for enhanced student learning (CIESL) indicating differences in teaching quality between experienced and less experienced teachers are presented.

Non-directive and idiosyncratic methods for qualitative data generation

02 March 2017 12:45 - 13:55
Seminar Room B

Speaker: Professor Harry Daniels, Department of Education

Convener Dr Velda Elliott Qualitative Methods Hub

In this session I will draw on aspects of several research projects which presented challenges in gathering data concerned with the tacit aspects of understanding. The particular concern was with the formative effects of institutional settings. I will discuss the ways in which non directive methods were developed and deployed.

Wait-time: when, why and how can teachers use pauses effectively?

02 March 2017 16:30 - 18:00
Seminar Room A

Speakers: Dr Jenni Ingram and Nick Andrews, Department of Education

Convener: Dr Katharine Burn, Oxford Education Deanery

Left behind? Educational inequality and social mobility of the most disadvantaged youth in Germany

06 March 2017 12:30 - 13:45
Seminar Room D

Speaker: Bastian Betthaeuser, Department of Social Policy & Intervention.

Conveners: Professor Steve Strand, Dr. Lars-Erik Malmberg and Dr. Daniel Caro, Quantitative Methods Hub

Research on intergenerational social mobility tends to focus on examining the level of overall social fluidity in society. However, from a social justice perspective it can be argued that the type of social fluidity that matters most is upward mobility from the lowest rung of the social ladder. Based on a newly constructed dataset, this presentation examines the labour market chances of children from parents in unskilled working class positions, relative to children from more advantaged backgrounds, and how they have changed across four birth cohorts in post-WWII Germany. The presentation addresses two main questions: Have children from unskilled working class backgrounds caught up with their more advantaged peers in terms of their labour market chances, or do they continue to be left behind? What is the role of educational inequality in accounting for the low relative labour market chances of individuals from unskilled working class backgrounds?

Learning French in the primary school classroom: the origins of morphosyntax (Public Seminar)

06 March 2017 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room A

Speaker: Professor Florence Myles, University of Essex

Convener: Professor Victoria Murphy, Applied Linguistics Research Group

Young instructed learners of a second language are known to rely extensively in the early stages on rotelearning and formulaic language; the relationship between this formulaic knowledge, and the eventual emergence of productive morphosyntax, is still poorly understood.

This paper draws on data from a longitudinal study of 73 classroom beginner learners of French, aged 5, 7 and 11. Divided by age, each group received 38 hours of instruction by the same teacher over a period of 19 weeks. All lessons were captured on video and transcribed, providing complete documentation of all L2 French classroom input and interaction. Children’s developing knowledge of French was regularly tested using a variety of receptive and productive tasks, including an elicited imitation test, a receptive vocabulary test, and a role play task.

Previous analyses have shown that the 11 year old beginners made faster overall progress in morphosyntax than the younger children. Here, we explore the relationship between use of formulaic language and the emergence of productive morphosyntax, for the different age groups, in order to explain the apparent advantage of the older group. We analyse children’s French oral productions in two datasets: a) the group role play tasks, and b) the elicited imitation test. We depart from established practice in the scoring of EI tests, which is primarily meaning-based and provides information on test-takers’ overall proficiency (Tracy-Ventura et al 2014), and instead focus on formal features of children’s production (the reproduction of NPs and VPs: McCormick & Zach, 2016). We explore the relative abilities of the different age groups in use of formulaic expressions and in the (re)production of non-formulaic morphosyntax, and discuss the implications for young learner pedagogy.

Florence Myles is Professor of Second Language Acquisition at the University of Essex and Director of its Centre for Research in Language Development throughout the Lifespan (LaDeLi http://www.essex.ac.uk/langling/research/ladeli/). She is the outgoing president of the European Second Language Association (EuroSLA). Her research interests are in the area of Second Language Acquisition (SLA), especially of French and she is particularly interested in morphosyntactic development, in the role of formulaic language in SLA, in how children of different ages learn foreign languages in the classroom, and in theory-building in SLA research. She has directed numerous research projects which have all had the dual aim of investigating learner development in English instructed learners of French and Spanish, and of constructing electronic databases of learner language oral corpora, available on the web to the research community (www.flloc.soton.ac.uk; www.splloc.soton.ac.uk).

Religious education and religious diversity

07 March 2017 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room D

Speaker: Dr Mark Halstead, Oxford Centre for Islamic Studies

Conveners: Dr Liam Gearon and Professor Alis Oancea, Philosophy, Religion and Education Research Forum in association with the Philosophy of Education Society of Great Britain (Oxford branch).

This paper explores a key problem in the relationship between religious diversity and religious education. It was the desire to show respect for the diversity of faiths in Britain more than anything else that underpinned the adoption of a World Religions approach to RE in all non-denominational schools. But what are the theological and practical implications of this move? The RE teacher must adopt a neutral position between different religions (and between belief and non-belief), and children are likely to pick up that all major world religions are simply different routes to the same spiritual goal, and therefore in a sense all equally true. The effect of this is that where children have been brought up to accept the exclusive claims to truth of their own faith, they are now being required by the school to accept a different framework of belief, namely that their own faith is no more and no less true that any other religion. Parents whose children are in this situation are unlikely to feel that their faith is being respected (which was the reason for the introduction of the World Faiths approach to RE in the first place).

Three ways forward are discussed: (i) abandoning RE altogether; (ii) insisting on a pluralist approach to RE and dismissing religious exclusivity as unethical; (iii) encouraging a frank and open discussion of differences between faiths within RE rather than brushing them under the carpet and trying to create an artificial unity.

The paper draws significantly on a volume published by Bloomsbury last year: Religious Education: educating for diversity, by Philip Barnes and Andrew Davis, edited by Mark Halstead.

Mark Halstead is Emeritus Professor of Education at the University of Huddersfield, and Azman Hashim Fellow and Co-ordinator of the Muslims in Britain project at the Oxford Centre for Islamic Studies.

Universities: learning from the past for the future

07 March 2017 17:00 - 18:30
Syndicate Room, St Antony’s College

Speaker: Dr Safaroz Niyozov, Aga Khan University, Institute of Education, Pakistan

Respondent: Dr Hubert Ertl, Department of Education

Conveners: Dr David Johnson, Caroline Arnold, and Andy Cunningham, Centre for Comparative and International Education Research

Further information: Naseemah Mohammed

Classroom interaction in lower secondary school: a mixed methods approach

08 March 2017 13:15 - 14:30
Seminar Room A

Resources for navigating competing demands at work: identifying supports through an adaptation of the double stimulation method

08 March 2017 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room D

Speaker: Kasper Munk, Department of Education

Conveners: Professor Harry Daniels and Dr Ian Thompson, OSAT

Many jobs require professionals to navigate competing demands, juggling multiple commitments to settle on a course of action. Understanding which resources professionals make use of in such challenging situations is important for ensuring that professionals have adequate support in these situations. This presentation describes a method for identifying the supports professionals use when they are faced with such problematic work tasks. It presents an adaptation of the double stimulation method, a method receiving renewed attention within cultural historical research. This method, originally used within experimental settings, can be used for the analysis of the moment-to-moment unfolding of real-life situations, allowing us to describe the interplay between artefact mediation and changes in intentional orientations. The approach is illustrated with examples drawn from a study of English secondary school teachers.

Seeking "quick solutions" to persistent problems of students’ learning in mathematics

08 March 2017 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room K/L

Speakers: Dr Gabriel Stylianides  Department of Education

Conveners: Professor Terezinha Nunes, Children Learning Research Group and Dr Maria Evangelou, FELL

A Bayesian logic approach to micro-level qualitative data analysis

09 March 2017 12:45 - 13:55
Seminar Room B

Speaker: Kasper Munk, Department of Education

Convener Dr Velda Elliott Qualitative Methods Hub

Methodological discussions about Bayesian logic qualitative data analysis have been focusing on strengthening the rigour of research designs and data analysis in the fields of political science and history and, in these disciplines, the use of Bayesian logic qualitative approaches has concentrated on macro-level processes. This presentation seeks to demonstrate how other disciplines can take advantage of a Bayesian logic approach to qualitative data analysis. It illustrates how Bayesian logic principles can be adopted for the analysis of micro-level processes. The approach is exemplified by using classroom observation data to analyse the moment-to-moment unfolding of challenging teaching situations in an English secondary school. The Bayesian logic approach to qualitative data analysis, it is argued, allows us to systematically evaluate and update theoretically derived priors through iterations of data analysis. The approach helps us specify which information is most informative when it comes to evaluating particular conclusions and it provides a systematic and transparent way to assess the roles that different pieces of evidence play in the inferences we make from qualitative data.

Dealing with task uncertainty: complex demands in schools and teachers’ responses

09 March 2017 16:00 - 17:30
Seminar Room D

Speakers: Kasper Munk, Department of Education

Convener: Dr Katharine Burn, Teacher Education and Professional Learning Research Group

STORIES 2017

14 March 2017 -

A masterclass in close reading

25 April 2017 16:30 - 18:00
Seminar Room A

Speakers: Dr Andrea MacRae, Oxford Brookes University

Convener: Dr Velda Elliott, Forum for English, Drama and Media in Education

Introduction to Item Response Theory and Rasch modelling

09 May 2017 10:00 - 15:30
IT Room, Manor Road Building, Manor Road, Oxford, OX1 3UQ

Introduction to Structural Equation Modelling

10 May 2017 10:00 - 15:30
IT Room, Manor Road Building, Manor Road, Oxford, OX1 3UQ

Structural Equation Modelling of longitudinal data

11 May 2017 10:00 - 15:30
IT Room, Manor Road Building, Manor Road, Oxford, OX1 3UQ

Multilevel Structural Equation Modelling

12 May 2017 10:00 - 15:30
IT Room, Manor Road Building, Manor Road, Oxford, OX1 3UQ

Longitudinal SEM: higher-order and nested factor models

16 May 2017 10:00 - 15:30
IT Room, Manor Road Building, Manor Road, Oxford, OX1 3UQ

Latent transition analysis

17 May 2017 10:00 - 15:30
IT Room, Manor Road Building, Manor Road, Oxford, OX1 3UQ

Continuous time structural equation modelling using CTSEM (2 days)

18 May 2017 10:00 - 15:30
IT Room, Manor Road Building, Manor Road, Oxford, OX1 3UQ