Seminars and Events

All events are held at 15 Norham Gardens, Oxford OX2 6PY unless otherwise stated.

All are welcome to those indicated as ‘public seminars’ in parentheses after the title. These are held on Monday evenings and there is no need to book. If you are coming from outside the Department and would like to attend any of the other seminars or events, please contact the convener(s) beforehand.
Click on the title of the event for further information.

Studying how psychological treatments work using structural equation modelling.

Katy Sivyer, Department of Psychiatry

01 June 2015 12:15 - 13:45
Seminar Room D

Conveners: Dr Lars-Erik Malmberg, Quantitative Methods Hub

Abstract:
Psychological therapies are the leading evidence-based treatments for a number of psychiatric disorders, including eating disorders.  Although most of these treatments are theory-based, there has been little research on the mechanisms through which they achieve their effects, nor has it been established which of their components are responsible for change.  This presentation will describe an attempt to identify the mediators of action of two distinct evidence-based psychological treatments for eating disorders; cognitive behaviour therapy and interpersonal psychotherapy.  It will discuss some of the theoretical and statistical issues that arise when using longitudinal structural equation modelling for this purpose.

Questioning the UK government’s vision of higher education and social mobility: evidence from a non-graduate occupation (Public Seminar)

Dr Susan James Relly, Deputy Director of SKOPE

01 June 2015 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room A

Convener: Dr Alis Oancea, Research Theme Convener - Policy, Economy and Society

Abstract:
Over recent years UK governments have expanded higher education and with it the supply of graduates. This expansion is linked to social mobility through meritocracy. However, the number of traditionally graduate jobs has not increased in line with higher education expansion. One result of this policy is graduates entering not just graduate jobs but non-graduate jobs. Using qualitative and quantitative data from research on the occupation of real estate agents selling residential properties in the UK – a traditionally non-graduate occupation being ‘graduatised’ – this presentation asks: Is this trickle down the occupational hierarchy really what the government envisioned in terms of social mobility when expanding higher education and widening access?

About the Speaker:

Dr Susan James Relly is Assistant Director of SKOPE and Director of Doctoral Research in the Department. She is a Visiting Senior Research Fellow at the University of the Witswaterand, Johannesburg, South Africa. Susan’s entire career has been in education in various forms: she taught in secondary schools in Australia and England before starting her academic career. Susan completed a B.Ed in her native Queensland, Australia and read for a M.Sc in Comparative and International Education and a D.Phil in Education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests are varied including Vocational Education and Training (VET) systems and policy; vocational excellence; apprenticeship; work-based learning; on-the-job and off-the-job training, social mobility; and low skill and low wage occupations.

Webinar: Identifying and addressing the mental health needs of children in care

Dr Nikki Luke, Department of Education and Helen Drew, University of Sussex

03 June 2015 -
Seminar Room A

Abstract: This webinar will focus on two mental health projects involving the Rees Centre. Nikki Luke will discuss the key messages arising from the NSPCC/Rees Centre evidence review on What works in preventing and treating poor mental health in looked after children? Helen Drew from the University of Sussex will talk about the research she is conducting with schools and Virtual Schools about supporting the mental health needs of looked after children around the transition from primary to secondary school. The webinar will include an overview of both projects with plenty of time for discussion. Open to all, no registration required.

Specific details for logging in on the day will be posted on the website.

Competing for excellence: perverse and constructive effects of evaluation machines in academia

Professor Paul Wouters, University of Leiden

03 June 2015 17:00 - 18:30
Nuffield College

Convener: Professor Roger Goodman (Social Sciences Division) and Dr Alis Oancea (Education) for the impact and knowledge exchange in an evolving research environment seminar series https://www.socsci.ox.ac.uk/research/impact-and-knowledge-exchange-seminars

For details and to register your interest please email  sanja.djerasimovic@education.ox.ac.uk.

Abstract:
Many universities have become obsessed with performance indicators and their position in the global university rankings. This holds for education, but also for research. Evaluation has become formalized in national and local assessment protocols and is usually performed one or more steps removed from the primary process of education or research, often by evaluation professionals and managers. At the same time, research has become more competitive at a global scale, also in fields where competition was less prominent only a few decades ago. As a result, research leaders increasingly need to think strategically about their research portfolio and profile. However, the data they have at their disposal are often ill suited to their needs. Moreover, the type of evaluation they are interested in may not always be aligned with the existing formalized evaluation protocols.

In my talk, I will discuss the current tensions in the way researchers are being evaluated and assessed against the background of a short history of research evaluation and the rise of performance indicators in academia. I will introduce the concept of "evaluation machines" as developed by the Danish economist Peter Dahler-Larsen to understand the dynamics behind disconnected assessment practices. I aim to discuss how both a desire to develop science for the people and a drive to develop a knowledge-based economy and innovation have shaped a new context in which the old culture of peer trust was no longer the best available option for all purposes.

In the last part of my talk, I would like to discuss some possible scenarios for the future of knowledge creation in relation to accountability regimes in academia. I will also explore how we may wish to define excellence and scientific quality and will briefly sketch a possible alternative theory of how scientific quality might be defined.

About the speaker:
Paul Wouters is Professor in Scientometrics at the University of Leiden, and the director of the university’s interdisciplinary Centre for Science and Technology Studies (CWTS). His previous experience includes acting as a leader of the group for analysing the development of information technologies for research, both as research instruments and as new communication media, at the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences, followed by a five-year appointment as the programme leader for the Academy’s Virtual Knowledge Studio. He was also a visiting professor of cybermetrics at the University of Wolverhampton. Wouters is member of the editorial boards of Social Studies of Science, the Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology, Scholarly Communication, and Cybermetrics. He has been member of the council of the Society for the Social Study of Science and is currently member of the board of the Dutch graduate school Science, Technology, and Modern Culture (WTMC). He is involved in the European project NESSHI and is PI of the 7th Framework project ACUMEN.

Trauma and resilience

Yvonne Guest, University of the West of England

04 June 2015 12:30 - 14:00
Seminar Room B

Convener: Dr Susan James Relly, Director of Doctoral Studies


Internet use and health: using secondary data for spatial microsimulation.

Ulrike Deetjen, Oxford Internet Institute

08 June 2015 12:15 - 13:45
Seminar Room D

Conveners: Dr Lars-Erik Malmberg, Quantitative Methods Hub

Abstract:
Internet use is seen as a potential lever for empowering patients, levelling inequalities and reducing costs in the health system. However, we need to better understand the relationship between Internet use and health to assess potential benefits and adverse effects, with digital inclusion, health provision quality and health system efficiency being high on the agenda of UK and EU policymakers. This presentation addresses the research question of how Internet use influences individuals' health service use and their health perception. With a focus on health information seeking, it looks at the differences between users and non-users, what the mediating mechanisms between Internet use and health are, and what role individual and contextual factors play in their relationship. Using a mixed methods approach, this research analyses these questions in the context of England. Quantitative data from the Oxford Internet Surveys (OxIS), the English census and Hospital Episode Statistics was connected through spatial microsimulation based on output areas. In spatial microsimulation, a simulated dataset based on probabilistic methods is created from existing secondary data (existing surveys and routine data from the health system). As a spatial model, this provides a simulated dataset of all individuals in a given geographic area with their Internet use, health service use and perceived health, which can then be used to examine associations between characteristics similarly to a "real" dataset - with some caveats that will be discussed in the presentation. In addition, qualitative data was collected through 43 semi-structured face-to-face interviews primarily with former OxIS participants from purposively selected output areas used in the quantitative strand. Based on the qualitative insights, the quantitative data is revisited to analyse emerging themes on a larger scale. The findings of this research project advance the theoretical understanding of effects of Internet use on health, and provide practical implications for health professionals and policymakers with insights down to the local level. At the same time, this research demonstrates how secondary data can be linked in a privacy-preserving and cost-effective way, and in conjunction with qualitative data can deliver insights for the public well-being.

 

Design and practice: a study of the design, build and occupation of new schools (Public seminar)

Professor Harry Daniels and Hau Ming Tse

08 June 2015 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room A

Conveners: Professor Ernesto Macaro (OSAT)

 

Shoehorning Shakespeare

Dr Velda Elliott, Department of Education

09 June 2015 16:30 - 18:00
Seminar Room A

Convener: Dr Velda Elliott, Forum for English, Drama and Media in Education

Abstract

Shoehorning Shakespeare into genre-studies in the new A level Literature. We're used to various plays being categorised as 'Gothic' but how about as crime or social and political protest literature? We will be talking about the appropriateness of using anachronistic genre labels, what it adds to or subtracts from our understanding of the plays, and how it might play out pedagogically in the sixth form classroom.

Conservative education policy on free schools

Adrian Hilton

09 June 2015 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room D

Convener: Dr Alis Oancea, Philosophy of Education Society of Great Britain (Oxford branch), jointly hosted with the Religion, Philosophy and Education Research Forum.

Collaborating on complex problems

OSAT symposium

10 June 2015 16:30 - 18:10
Seminar Room D

Conveners: Professor Harry Daniels and Dr Ian Thompson (OSAT)

Speakers: Bipana Bantawa, Anne Edwards, Nigel Fancourt and Nick Hopwood.

Discussant: Kasper Munk

In this OSAT symposium four contributors to a book to be published by Cambridge University Press  in 2016 will make short presentations on how they have employed the concepts of relational expertise, common knowledge and relational agency in their work. Anne Edwards will outline the three concepts and some examples of how they are currently being used in different settings internationally; Nick Hopwood will draw on his research on multi-professional services for families in New South Wales; Bipana Bantawa will outline how relational expertise is deployed in Galaxy Zoo, a crowd-sourced science project; and Nigel Fancourt will illustrate how the ideas have informed the Oxford Education Deanery , making links between the concept of common knowledge and current narrative research. Kasper Munk, who has long been familiar with these ideas while studying in Denmark, will be discussant. There will be time for questions and discussion and all are welcome to this open symposium.

A short paper outlining the key concepts can be accessed here.  (But pre-reading is not obligatory.)

Approaches to facilitating research impact

Dr Simon Kerridge, University of Kent and ARMA

10 June 2015 17:00 - 18:30
Said Business School

Convener: Professor Roger Goodman (Social Sciences Division) and Dr Alis Oancea (Education) for the impact and knowledge exchange in an evolving research environment seminar series https://www.socsci.ox.ac.uk/research/impact-and-knowledge-exchange-seminars

For details and to register your interest please email  sanja.djerasimovic@education.ox.ac.uk.

Abstract:
Whilst research has always had impact, research impact is still a relatively new concept in REF terms. The talk will reflect on ways in which research can lead to impact and how this can be evidenced. The main focus will be on approaches and strategies for increasing impact with respect to the next REF. Ideally preparations should begin before the research starts but there are also activities that can be added on during and after the research which can increase the potential for impact.

About the Speaker:
Simon is responsible for the central research office of 25 staff at Kent covering all aspects of research support including pre-award, contracts, post-award, information, REF, ethics and governance. He has been a research manager and administrator for over 20 years and is a veteran of four RAE/REF submissions at two institutions. Simon is the Chair of the Association of Research Managers and Administrators (ARMA) and sits on a number of other related national groups and committees. He is a member of: the steering group of the Independent review of the role of metrics in research assessment which is advising the Higher Education Funding Council for England; the Universities UK Open Access Group; and the Jisc Open Access and ORCID steering groups. He holds a professional doctorate in electronic research administration.

Simulation as a scaffold for creative learning: Incorporating open-ended course elements as part of higher-education pedagogy.

Abby Loebenberg (Arizona State University)

11 June 2015 12:30 - 14:00
Seminar Room B

Convener: Dr Susan James Relly, Director of Doctoral Studies

Abstract:

http://barretthonors.asu.edu/2013/06/dr-abby-loebenberg/

Looking at new research in the study of creativity and the socio-biology of play in late adolescence, this seminar will be a forum to discuss the value and role of playful pedagogies in higher education settings.   I will introduce a number of models from single-class to entire-course frameworks with a particular focus on the use of immersive role-playing formats across a variety of social science and humanities subjects.  Some of these models are experimental and some established however, all of them rely on the facilitation of “mini-c” (Kaufmann and Beghetto: 2009) proto-creative processes in order to allow students to develop critical thinking skills through the internalization of an alternative self.  Harnessing valuable meta-cognitive reflections on this mini-c process can be useful to teach qualitative research methods in-classroom, to help students understand and filter historical processes through their own lived experience, or to illustrate the social value of a ‘strange’ (to them) cultural practice.   While these models primarily address the U.S. higher-education general education context, they could also be very useful for A-Level teachers in the UK in subjects like History, Sociology, Anthropology, Communication and Culture and so on.


Mathematics Education Reading Group

11 June 2015 15:00 - 16:30
Seminar Room G

Convener: Dr Gabriel Stylianides, Mathematics Education Research Group (MERG)

Reading

Concepts and mastery in learning and teaching mathematics

Dr Alf Coles, University of Bristol

11 June 2015 16:30 - 18:00
Seminar Room G

Convener: Dr Jenni Ingram, Mathematics Education Research Group

Abstract:  In this session, Alf will consider the question of how we come to acquire mastery over mathematical concepts. Two sources of evidence converge to bring into question the orthodoxy that learning mathematics entails a movement from concrete to abstract. The first is recent neuroscience research into the origins of number sense and the previously unacknowledged role of ordinality (see the work of Ian Lyons). The second source comes from reflection on three of the great mathematics educators of the twentieth century, Caleb Gattegno, Vasily Davydov and Bob Davis. All three authors developed mathematics curricula (shown to be highly effective) in which mathematical symbolism arose out of action and relationship, not as a referrent for concrete objects. Alf will work with the group actively on these ideas and the direct implications for the classroom. There will be space for feedback and discussion of issues.

Bayesian Model Averaging Over Directed Acyclic Graphs with Implications for the Predictive Performance of Structural Equation Models

David Kaplan, University of Wisconsin

15 June 2015 12:15 - 13:45
Seminar Room D

Conveners: Dr Lars-Erik Malmberg, Quantitative Methods Hub

Abstract:
This talk considers Bayesian model averaging as a means of improving the predictive performance of Bayesian structural equation models. Structural equation modeling from a Bayesian perspective addresses the problem of parameter uncertainty through the specification of prior distributions on all model parameters. In addition to parameter uncertainty, it is recognized that there is uncertainty in the choice of models themselves insofar as a particular model is chosen based on prior knowledge of the problem at hand. This form of uncertainty is not accounted for in frequentist structural equation modeling and neither has it been directly addressed in Bayesian structural equation modeling. An internally consistent Bayesian framework for structural equation modeling estimation must also account for model uncertainty. The current approach to addressing the problem of model uncertainty lies in the method of Bayesian model averaging. For this talk, we expand the framework of Madigan and his colleagues as well as Pearl by considering a structural equation model as a special case of a directed acyclic graph. We then provide an algorithm that searches the model space for sub-models that satisfy the conditions of Occam’s razor and Occam's window and obtains a weighted average of the sub-models using posterior model probabilities as weights. Our simulation studies indicate that the model-averaged sub-models provided better posterior predictive performance compared to the estimation of the initially specified model as measured by the log-scoring rule. The talk closes with a discussion of the role of prediction in structural equation modelling.

 

The rediscovery of teaching: in search of a progressive argument (Public seminar)

Professor Gert Biesta, University of Luxembourg and Brunel University

15 June 2015 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room A

Convener: Dr Rebecca Enyon, Learning and New Technologies Research Group, jointly hosted with the Religion, Philosophy and Education Research Forum.

Abstract:
Over the past decades the discourse of educational theory, policy and practice has shifted dramatically into the direction of learning. Some have even suggested that we have witnessed a paradigm shift from ‘teaching’ to ‘learning.’ Whereas there are good reasons for paying more attention to learning, I believe that something has also been lost in this shift, particularly with regard to the status, identity and role of the teacher. There is therefore a need to rebalance the situation, also because a theory of learning does not translate automatically into a theory of education — a theory in which teaching and the teacher play a central role. The difficulty, however, is that currently most arguments in favour of teaching and the teacher seem to come from the conservative end of the spectrum, where teaching is basically understood as an act of control. That is why, in my presentation, I will go in search of a progressive argument for ‘giving teaching back to education’ (Biesta 2012)

About the speaker:
Gert Biesta is Professor of Education and Director of Research at Brunel University. In addition he is Visiting Professor (Art Education) at ArtEZ, Institute of the Arts, the Netherlands. He also has visiting affiliations with NLA University College, Bergen, Norway, and NAFOL, the Norwegian Graduate School in Teacher Education. He previously worked at universities in Luxembourg, the UK and the Netherlands, and was a postdoctoral fellow with the National Academy of Education in the USA. Since 2015 he is an associate member of the ‘Onderwijsraad’ (the Education Council of the Netherlands), which is the main education advisory body for the Dutch government. He is joint-coordinator of SIG 25 (Educational Theory) of EARLI, The European Association for Research and Learning and Instruction, and co-editor of two book-series with Routledge: New Directions in the Philosophy of Education (with Michael A. Peters) and Theorizing Education (with Julie Allan and Richard Edwards). From 1999 to 2014 he was editor-in-chief of Studies in Philosophy and Education, and currently serves as chief advisory editor. His work focuses on the theory and philosophy of education, education policy, and the theory and philosophy of educational and social research. He has a particular interest in questions of democracy and democratisation.  His current research focuses on (1) the theory and philosophy of teaching; (2) teacher education theory and policy; (3) democratic professionality in education and related fields; (4) the impact of research policy on educational research; (5) teacher agency; (6) curriculum policy and theory; and (7) European policy concerning citizenship and lifelong learning. More information about his research can be found at www.gertbiesta.com

Introduction to R for the analysis of international assessment data

Instructor: Dr. Daniel Caro

16 June 2015 09:00 - 17:00
IT Room, Manor Road Building, Manor Road, Oxford, OX1 3UQ

The workshop will introduce the R software environment and train participants in how to analyse data from international assessments (PISA, TIMSS, and PIRLS) using R. It will present the basics of the R language and data analysis in R, including how to create and import data, calculate descriptive statistics, perform regression analysis, and conduct analysis by grouping variables. Lectures will introduce international assessments and the challenges associated with the analysis of assessment data (e.g., plausible values, replicate weights).
Hands-on exercises will reproduce main results in international assessment reports with the R package 'instvy'. The last part of the workshop will be dedicated to an assignment. The workshop is aimed at researchers interested in R and international assessments.

Workshop prerequisites: It is assumed that participants will have a background in basic statistical methods up to, and including, regression analysis. Some familiarity with syntax language from other statistical packages (e.g., Stata, SPSS) is desirable.

Note: This workshop is the first day of a four-day workshop on the analysis of international assessment data using R. This first day adopts a frequentist perspective and the second part (days 2-4) the Bayesian paradigm. Participants are encouraged, but not required, to sign up to the second part on Bayesian statistics by Professor David Kaplan.

Course fee:
Oxford University Participant (Students, Staff): No charge
Other Students: £30
External Other: £100
The course fee includes access to training sessions/events, event materials, lunch and refreshments. The fee does not include accommodation or travel.

Registration:
Oxford University participants should register via Weblearn. Browse by Department and select Education.
Other students and external participants please complete the registration form and return by email to lorena.ortega@education.ox.ac.uk.

ESRC Student Bursaries:

ESRC student bursaries are available to postgraduate students from Higher Education Institutions outside Oxford to provide up to £120 per day financial assistance toward the cost of attending the course. Students will also be able to claim reasonable travel costs within the UK to Oxford, plus reasonable accommodation costs up to £100 per night for the duration of the course. Students must pay upfront for the course and then claim costs back after they have attended, providing receipts for all expenses.

Please note: You must be a postgraduate research student at a UK Higher Education Institution to be eligible for bursary funding.

If you would like to apply for an ESRC student bursary please complete the ESRC bursary application form and return it by email to lorena.ortega@education.ox.ac.uk together with your registration form.

Developing Citizenship Education in England

Linda Bakkum

16 June 2015 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room D

Convener: Dr Alis Oancea, Philosophy of Education Society of Great Britain (Oxford branch), jointly hosted with the Religion, Philosophy and Education Research Forum.

 

Bayesian methods for international assessments

Instructor: Professor David Kaplan

17 June 2015 -
IT Room, Manor Road Building, Manor Road, Oxford, OX1 3UQ

Three day course: Wednesday 17th - Friday 19th June

The orientation of this workshop is to introduce social scientists to the basic elements of Bayesian statistics and to show through discussion and practice, why the Bayesian perspective provides a powerful alternative to the frequentist perspective. We will use data from international assessments to provide workshop participants with opportunities for practice. In addition, we will focus on the use of existing programs in the R software environment.

Course prerequisite: It is assumed that participants will have a background in basic statistical methods up to, and including, regression analysis. Some exposure to growth curve modelling is desirable.

Note: This workshop is the second part (days 2-4) of a four-day workshop on the analysis of international assessment data using R. Participants who require an introduction to R and international assessments should sign up to the first day workshop by Dr. Daniel Caro (listed above).

Participants are expected to attend the full three days of the course.

Course fee:
Oxford University Participant (Students, Staff): No charge
Other Students: £90
External Other: £300
The course fee includes access to training sessions/events, event materials, lunch and refreshments. The fee does not include accommodation or travel.

Registration:
Oxford University participants should register via Weblearn. Browse by Department and select Education.
Other students and external participants please complete the registration form and return by email to lorena.ortega@education.ox.ac.uk.

ESRC Student Bursaries:

ESRC student bursaries are available to postgraduate students from Higher Education Institutions outside Oxford to provide up to £120 per day financial assistance toward the cost of attending the course. Students will also be able to claim reasonable travel costs within the UK to Oxford, plus reasonable accommodation costs up to £100 per night for the duration of the course. Students must pay upfront for the course and then claim costs back after they have attended, providing receipts for all expenses.

Please note: You must be a postgraduate research student at a UK Higher Education Institution to be eligible for bursary funding.

If you would like to apply for an ESRC student bursary please complete the ESRC bursary application form and return it by email to lorena.ortega@education.ox.ac.uk together with your registration form.

Impact and knowledge exchange in an evolving research environment

Panel debate: Sir Andrew Dilnot, University of Oxford, Professor Roger Goodman, University of Oxford, Dr Claire Donovan, Brunel University, TBC

17 June 2015 17:00 - 18:30
Said Business School

Convener: Professor Roger Goodman (Social Sciences Division) and Dr Alis Oancea (Education) for the impact and knowledge exchange in an evolving research environment seminar series https://www.socsci.ox.ac.uk/research/impact-and-knowledge-exchange-seminars

For details and to register your interest please email  sanja.djerasimovic@education.ox.ac.uk.

About the speakers:
Sir Andrew Dilnot is Warden of Nuffield College Oxford and Chairman of the UK Statistics Authority. He was the Chairman of the Commission on the Funding of Care and Support, which reported in 2011.  He was Principal of St Hugh’s College, Oxford, from 2002 to 2012. He is the presenter of BBC Radio 4’s ‘A History of Britain in Numbers’, and was the founding presenter of BBC Radio 4’s series on the beauty of numbers, ‘More or Less’. He was Director of the IFS (Institute for Fiscal Studies) from 1991 to 2002.

Claire Donovan is Reader in Science and Technology Studies, and joined Brunel University London in 2010. She previously held research and teaching positions at the Research School of Social Sciences, The Australian National University; Nuffield College, Oxford University; and The Open University. She has published extensively on research evaluation and research policy, and has long been an advocate for considering the unique qualities of the humanities, arts and social sciences within science-based evaluation systems. In 2006 she was Chair of an Australian Government Technical Working Group on Research Impact where she championed the use of case studies and narratives alongside robust impact indicators. The work of this group influenced the design of REF2014.

During 2015 Claire is Visiting Research Fellow in the Department of Education, Oxford University, and a Visiting Fellow in the Research School of Social Sciences at The Australian National University. She has been a visiting fellow at Cambridge University, Harvard University, the London School of Economics, the National University of Singapore, and the University of Sussex. In 2013 she was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts.

WorldSkills competitors and entrepreneurship: strengths and limitations of the study design, data analysis, and findings

Maia Chankseliani

18 June 2015 12:30 - 14:00
Seminar Room B

Convener: Dr Susan James Relly, Director of Doctoral Studies

 

 


Webinar: Education progress of looked after children. Linking care and education.

Professor Judy Sebba, Department of Education

01 July 2015 -
Seminar Room A

Specific details for logging in on the day will be posted on the website.