Seminars and Events

All events are held at 15 Norham Gardens, Oxford OX2 6PY unless otherwise stated.

All are welcome to those indicated as ‘public seminars’ in parentheses after the title. These are held on Monday evenings and there is no need to book. If you are coming from outside the Department and would like to attend any of the other seminars or events, please contact the convener(s) beforehand.
Click on the title of the event for further information.

Systems: systems of learning or learning systems?

24 January 2017 17:00 - 18:30
Syndicate Room, St Antony’s College

Speaker: Andrew Cunningham, Aga Khan Foundation.

Respondent: Michelle Holmes, The Partnership to Strengthen Innovation and Practice in Secondary Education (PSIPSE)

Conveners: Dr David Johnson, Caroline Arnold, and Andy Cunningham, Centre for Comparative and International Education Research

Further information: Naseemah Mohammed

Challenges of collaborative learning in higher education and professional practise

25 January 2017 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room D

Speaker: Professor Anton Havnes, Visiting Research Fellow from Oslo and Akershus University College of Applied Sciences

Conveners: Professor Harry Daniels and Dr Ian Thompson, OSAT

There has been an increasing interest in learning inherent in peer-interaction in schools, higher education and work practise. This interest contrasts what probably has been (and still is) the dominant depiction of learning: a process situated in a teacher–learner relationship with a predefined content to be learned. Instead of the vertical direction of the teacher–learning interaction, peer learning can be characterised as learning in ‘horizontal’ interactions. Yet, for learning to take place there needs to be some disparities - also among peers. Research has painted a picture of learning through peer interaction a powerful mode of learning, but also as potentially waste of time. Peer interaction is not synonymous with peer learning. There is research that direct the attention to some aspects of peer interaction that potentially promote peer learning.

This talk will address some of the challenges that have emerged from a series of research projects where learning among peers have been a focus, or it has emerged as a focus through the analysis. It will address learning in higher education and professional practice, but will also draw on insights from research on the relationship between peer interaction in school settings.

From teacher regulation to self-regulation: a multilevel meta-analysis and multilevel structural equation modeling analysis of Tools of the Mind's curricular effects

25 January 2017 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room K/L

Speakers: Alex Baron, Department of Education

Conveners: Professor Terezinha Nunes, Children Learning Research Group and Dr Maria Evangelou, FELL

The aim of this study is to analyse the ‘Tools of the Mind’ preschool curriculum, which emphasizes cultivation of students’ self-regulation as its paramount aim. Since its development in 1993, ‘Tools’ has spread to schools in the United States, Canada, and South America.  In the face of Tools’ proliferation, two questions emerge:  does 'Tools' significantly improve children’s self-regulation skills?  And, if so, then which of its effective elements could be applied across various educational contexts?

This presentation contains two studies.  In the first, I will systematically review extant research on ‘Tools’ and then execute a multilevel meta-analysis of the quantitative results.  Study one serves three purposes:  (1) to assess the quality of the existing Tools evidence base, (2) to estimate an aggregate curricular effect, and (3) to determine how that effect varies across contexts and student characteristics.

Whereas study one indicates whether 'Tools' at the curricular level improves students’ self-regulation, the second study will involve more granular analyses of the discrete learning activities that collectively comprise 'Tools'.  Specifically, study two will analyse child-level self-regulation and teacher-level 'Tools' implementation data for 1145 preschool children in 80 classrooms across six American school districts.  I will employ multilevel structural equation models to assess which 'Tools' activities are associated with self-regulation growth, which are associated with decline, and which exhibit no association at all.

Panel discussion: interviews - understandings from the field

26 January 2017 12:45 - 13:55
Seminar Room B

Panel members Laura Brace, Nicole Dingwall  and Emma Abotsi, Department of Education

Convener Dr Velda Elliott Qualitative Methods Hub

“The best laid schemes o' mice an' men / Gang aft agley”. In this panel discussion three current DPhil students will talk about lessons they learned while conducting interviews in the field, problems that arose, and reflect on how they dealt with them. Each panel member will talk for about ten minutes, as a stimulus for a more wide-ranging discussion with the whole audience on the potentials and pitfalls, dilemmas and debates of interviewing as you take your questions from paper to field.

Teacher Education and Professional Learning Reading Group

26 January 2017 16:00 - 17:30
Seminar Room G

Convener: Dr Katharine Burn, Teacher Education and Professional Learning Research Group

Reading:

Johnson, M. (2016) Feedback effectiveness in professional learning contexts Review of Education Vol. 4, No. 2, pp. 195–229 DOI: 10.1002/rev3.3061 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/rev3.3061/abstract

Using pairwise comparisons and calibrated exemplars in the assessment of student writing

30 January 2017 12:30 - 13:45
Seminar Room D

Speaker: Dr Joshua McGrane, Department of Education.

Conveners: Professor Steve Strand, Dr. Lars-Erik Malmberg and Dr. Daniel Caro, Quantitative Methods Hub

Standardised assessment programs have increasingly moved toward the inclusion of extended written performances, amplifying the need for reliable, valid and efficient methods for writing assessment. This presentation will overview a two-stage method using calibrated exemplars, based on the original work of Thurstone, as a viable alternative or complement to existing methods of writing assessment.  Written performances were taken from two years of Australia’s standardised assessment program, which included both narrative and persuasive performances from students aged 8 to 15. Overall, the findings support the viability of the method in writing assessment, demonstrating good levels of reliability and validity, and encourage the method’s broader application to performance assessments in a range of learning areas.

Imagining a future after schooling: young people navigating uncertainty in contemporary Britain (Public Seminar)

30 January 2017 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room A

Speakers: Professor Graham Butt and Dr Patrick Alexander, School of Education, Oxford Brookes University

Convener: Professor Jo-Anne Baird, Director of the Department of Education

This paper explores the emerging findings of the Urban-Rural Youth Transitions Project, an 18-month ethnographic inquiry into how young people imagine and experience life immediately after finishing secondary education.  The project seeks to interrogate the temporal and spatial dimensions of how young people interpret ‘the future’ as a context for imagining and enacting social identity. Here we focus in on the theme of uncertainty as an important but complex quality of the imagined futures of young people transitioning into early adulthood in 2016, under the looming shadow of recent political, social, and economic upheaval. The project entails participant observation and interviews with young people in their final year of schooling in Oxfordshire and London, looking forward to the future, as well as with individuals that we have followed from their final months in school through to their first months in Higher Education, employment, both, or neither. A third and final cohort includes young people whose stories we join in their first term at university as they make sense of new lives and new futures in London.  As their imaginings of life after school are reconciled with the rapidly shifting realities of life in early adulthood, these diverse groups of young people navigate uncertainty with a complex mix of enthusiasm, ambivalence, and profound anxiety. Drawing on theoretical perspectives of ‘the future’ and youth transitions from across the social sciences, we argue that the resulting multiplicity of future imagined selves suggests new directions for research into the spatial and temporal figuring of youth and social identity.

Dr. Patrick Alexander (Principal Investigator) is a social anthropologist specialising in education, childhood and youth studies. He is Director of the Centre for Educational Consultancy and Development (CECD) and a Senior Lecturer in Education (Anthropology and Sociology) University. In 2014 Patrick was awarded a Fulbright Peabody Scholarship to conduct research as a Visiting Scholar at New York University. This project comprises a two year comparative ethnographic study exploring aspiration and imagined futures in urban public/state schools in NYC and London. Find out more at the project blog.

Prof. Graham Butt  is a Professor in Education, Co Director of Research and Co Post Graduate Research Tutor at the School of Education, Oxford Brookes University. He is a founding member of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo). Graham’s research is predominantly in the field of geography education, although he has also published on assessment, teacher workload, and modernisation of the teaching workforce. Graham is a long established member of the Geographical Association and an invited member of the UK Committee of the International Geographical Union (IGU).

Tools: the television as a stimulus to distributed meaning-making

31 January 2017 17:00 - 18:30
Syndicate Room, St Antony’s College

Speaker: Dr David Johnson, Department of Education

Respondent: Aric Noboa, Discovery Learning Alliance

Conveners: Dr David Johnson, Caroline Arnold, and Andy Cunningham, Centre for Comparative and International Education Research

Further information: Naseemah Mohammed

Early literacy development in Asian writing systems

01 February 2017 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room K/L

Speakers: Dr Sonali Nag, Department of Education

Conveners: Professor Terezinha Nunes, Children Learning Research Group and Dr Maria Evangelou, FELL

Heroic ideals: holding tech space for learning

01 February 2017 17:00 - 18:15
Seminar Room E

Speaker: Dr George Roberts, Oxford Brookes University

Convener: Dr James Robson, Learning and New Technologies Research Group

What does it mean to “hold a safe space for learning” in the technologically mediated environments of higher education? I suggest in this seminar that the problem of holding space for learning through technology is generalisable to higher education and needs to be taken into account in any learning journey, or plan or curriculum: particularly those that assert the learner or world is or will be transformed by the endeavour in or through learning spaces. I address this question from two directions, dialogue-centred teaching in online spaces and narrative theories of learning.

To download more information click here.

View Dr Roberts’ profile here

What can school contexts teach us about researcher roles with children?

02 February 2017 12:45 - 13:55
Seminar Room B

Speaker: Marc Sarazin, Department of Education

Convener Dr Velda Elliott Qualitative Methods Hub

Researchers have adopted many roles and approaches when researching children, from being fully detached (adult) observers to fully participating in child-like roles. Many of these approaches, including Mandell’s (1998) least-adult role, focus on reducing power differentials between children and adults. They oppose the researcher to teachers and parents, two different sets of adults united in their authority over children. However, opposing the researcher to these adults draws attention away from the other adults which participate in children’s lives. Furthermore, focusing on what researchers are not gives little indication as to what they are, leaving many researchers and their research participants confused as to researchers’ exact roles.

In this talk I suggest that a closer look at children’s existing interactions in school settings can provide guidance on ecologically valid roles that researchers can adopt. To do this, I draw on fieldnotes from the ethnographic arm of my doctoral study in two French primary schools for disadvantaged students. I introduce the notion of the “third adult” – an adult that is neither a parent nor a teacher or any other figure of authority, yet which still holds a place in children’s lives. I note that in fact many such adults can exist in school settings, and describe how benchmarking my own behaviour on that of “third adults” in my study schools helped me solve my own role dilemmas. I also show how children’s relations with authority-holding adults can be nonreciprocal, especially when compared to relations between children. Crucially, I argue that this lack of reciprocity can be a key component of adult authority over children. In so doing, I suggest that thinking of relations as being reciprocal or nonreciprocal provides a clear framework for minimising power differentials between children and researchers. I support this with analyses of reciprocal interactions that I had with children in my study which were particularly successful in helping me build a rapport with them.

Are parent training courses still effective after the trial ends?

06 February 2017 12:30 - 13:45
Seminar Room D

Speaker: Dr Vaso Totsika, CEDAR, University of Warwick.

Conveners: Professor Steve Strand, Dr. Lars-Erik Malmberg and Dr. Daniel Caro, Quantitative Methods Hub

Evidence has shown that training parents to manage their children’s behaviour reduces behaviour problems, increases parents’ mental well-being and improves parenting. Research has shown that gains from reductions in behaviour problems translate into actual societal cost savings by reduced criminality and improved employment and life chances in adulthood. Parent training programmes are a significant tool in achieving these outcomes. But does parent training work equally well when available as part of regular service provision? We do not yet know. We will address this question by comparing the effectiveness of parent training between researcher-led evaluation and service-led implementation.  Using a combination of research evaluation data and service monitoring data from over 9,000 parents, we will examine whether the effectiveness of evidence-based parenting programmes differs between the trial phase and the sustained implementation phase.

The long term implications of devolution and localism for FE in England (Public Seminar)

06 February 2017 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room A

Speaker: Professor Ewart Keep, Director, SKOPE

Convener: Dr Susan James Relly, Deputy Director, SKOPE

This lecture explores findings from a SKOPE research project (funded by the FE Trust for Leadership) on the implications of the devolution from central government to localities of certain aspects of post-19 further and adult education.

For the last 30 years English education has been subject to a process of delocalisation, centralisation and nationalisation.   Since 2010 there has been a revival of interest in devolution of power back to localities, and in education this means control over the adult skills budget for those aged 19+ and engaged in learning outside universities.  The project explored the implications of these developments, with research conducted in a number of locations, and via interviews, focus groups, conference sessions and other meetings, with further education (FE) college staff, governors, local stakeholders and national government and agencies.

The lecture will locate debates about the localisation of education within broader academic and policy discourses concerning devolution, governance and economic development.  It will explore how actors make sense of localism, and how they identify and develop strategies to support more devolved governance and funding.

The conceptual backbone of the project was the concept of 'metis' or localised, practice-based knowledge.  One of the key research questions was whether devolution allows metis to be deployed in conditions of trust between central government and localities, and between local actors and stakeholders, and the lecture will explore the considerable tensions between: rhetoric and reality concerning the scale and meaning attached to devolution by different parties; what central government was willing to contemplate and what localities aspired to; different localities’ capacity to assume new responsibilities; the levels of resources available and the potential scale of calls on these funds; and models based on systems and markets.  How these tensions and divergences will be resolved is as yet unclear.  The lecture discusses what actors can do to develop a compelling vision for localisation, and help metis to flourish.

Professor Ewart Keep holds a chair in Education, Training and Skills at the Department of Education, Oxford University.  He is the director of the Centre on Skills, Knowledge & Organisational Performance (SKOPE).  Before coming to Oxford, he worked for 21 years in Warwick Business School, and then at the School of Social Sciences, Cardiff University.

He has researched and written on apprenticeships, personnel management in schools and HE, HE policy more generally, the relationship between skills and economic performance, managerial attitudes towards investing in skills, the youth labour market, adult and lifelong learning, and skills policy across the four UK nations.

He has served on major committees of the SFC, HEFCE and HEFCW, as well as advising HM Treasury, DBIS, DfEE, the Scottish, Welsh, New South Wales, Queensland and New Zealand governments, the NAO, the OECD, and various professional bodies and think tanks.  He was one of the directorate of the Nuffield 14-19 project.  He is currently acting as an advisor to a Government Office for Science (Foresight) project on adult learning and the changing labour market.

Pluralism: learning to change or learning for change?

07 February 2017 17:00 - 18:30
Syndicate Room, St Antony’s College

Speaker: Dr Farid Panjwani, UCL

Respondent: Jayne Barlow, Global Centre for Pluralism

Conveners: Dr David Johnson, Caroline Arnold, and Andy Cunningham, Centre for Comparative and International Education Research

Further information: Naseemah Mohammed

The epistemological relevance of Peircean secondness for Vygotskian semiotic mediation

08 February 2017 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room D

Speaker: Dr James Ma, Canterbury Christchurch University

Conveners: Professor Harry Daniels and Dr Ian Thompson, OSAT

This presentation derives from a manuscript prepared for the ISCAR-affiliated journal Mind, Culture, and Activity. It concerns the author’s research project on the Peirce-Vygotsky co-articulation of signs, the first phase of which was reported in 2014 in this journal (21/4, “The synergy of Peirce and Vygotsky as an analytical approach to the multimodality of semiotic mediation”). The epistemology of Peircean pragmatics emphasises the life of the mind as integral to the making of human existence – in particular, the social, perceptual and logical nature of knowledge that determines the meaning of intellectual concepts by virtue of cooperative and open-ended endeavours. In challenging the methods of tenacity, authority and apriority, a Peircean vision of scientific inquiry elicits a new discourse upon the affordance of public meaning in knowledge construction. This, in turn, provides a rationale for developing further insights into Peircean semiotics, with specific reference to the self-perpetuating function of semiosis and its implication for addressing the cross-over of diverse modes of meaning in modern-day communication and representation. Premised on the fusion of deduction and abduction as a conceptual primer, it is argued that the intertwining of icon, index and symbol within Peircean secondness can come into play in Vygotskian semiotic mediation. This brings with it a tour d’horizon for the semiotic connectivity of language, meaning and consciousness – a central tenet of cultural-historical activity theory for understanding human interactions with the world. The presentation thus offers a fresh perspective on advocating semiotic methodology gleaned from the epistemological confluence of Peirce and Vygotsky.

The VaRiSS Project: Vocabulary and Reading in Secondary School

08 February 2017 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room K/L

Speakers: Dr Jessie Ricketts, Royal Holloway, University of London

Conveners: Professor Terezinha Nunes, Children Learning Research Group and Dr Maria Evangelou, FELL

How to stay ‘objective’ (and not become depressed!) when researching your peers: the journey of a junior researcher analysing junior researchers’ journeys

09 February 2017 12:45 - 13:55
Seminar Room B

Speaker: Dr  Isabelle Skakni, Visiting Scholar, Department of Education

Convener Dr Velda Elliott Qualitative Methods Hub

Speaking in and about the (mathematics) classroom: Lessons from four international studies

09 February 2017 16:00 - 17:30
Seminar Room G/H

Speakers: Professor David Clarke and Dr Man Ching Esther Chan, University of Melbourne

Conveners: Dr Gabriel Stylianides, Subject Pedagogy Research Group and Dr Katharine Burn, Teacher Education and Professional Learning Research Group

In this presentation, we report and connect the key findings from four complementary projects:

  • student and teacher speech in selected mathematics classrooms in eight countries (The Learner’s Perspective Study)
  • the study of student learning when engaged in individual, pair and collaborative group work (The Social Unit of Learning Project),
  • the role of teacher selective attention in facilitating teacher professional learning (The Learning from Lessons Project) and
  • the identification of the professional lexicon employed by middle school mathematics teachers in Australia and eight other countries to describe the events of the mathematics classroom (The International Lexicon Project).

These four studies find their nexus in the social nature of learning in classrooms. We discuss the implications of the project findings for the optimal functioning of the (mathematics) classroom as a site for student and teacher learning.

Professor David Clarke is Director of the International Centre for Classroom Research (ICCR) at the University of Melbourne. Over the last twenty years, his research activity has centred on capturing the complexity of classroom practice through a program of international video-based classroom research in more than 20 countries. Other significant research has addressed teacher professional learning, metacognition, problem-based learning, assessment, multi-theoretic research designs, cross-cultural analyses, curricular alignment, and the challenge of research synthesis in education. Professor Clarke has written books on assessment and on classroom research and has published his research work in around 200 book chapters, journal articles and conference proceedings papers. The establishment of the Science of Learning Research Classroom at the Melbourne Graduate School of Education in 2015 provides Professor Clarke with access to new levels of detail and experimental precision for his classroom research.

Dr Man Ching Esther Chan is a Research Fellow in the ICCR at The University of Melbourne. She is a registered psychologist who specialises in educational psychology and assessment. She is currently involved in several research projects at the ICCR, and is project manager of The Social Unit of Learning Project, and The Learning from Lessons Project. Prior to joining the ICCR, she worked on several Australian Government funded projects in student wellbeing and achievement, early literacy assessment, and school retention. She was awarded an Endeavour Research Fellowship in 2015 by the Australian Government and was hosted for six months by the University of California, Berkeley.

Teacher self-efficacy in student engagement, instruction and classroom management in 32 OECD countries: investigating teacher, classroom, principal and school effects

13 February 2017 12:30 - 13:45
Seminar Room D

Speaker: Sina Fackler, Department of Education.

Conveners: Professor Steve Strand, Dr. Lars-Erik Malmberg and Dr. Daniel Caro, Quantitative Methods Hub

Teacher self-efficacy (TSE) is specified as to which extent teachers believe in their own abilities to successfully teach students, although students might be difficult or unmotivated. It is supposed to be associated with the quality of teaching and is subdivided into three dimensions that reflect key aspects of the teachers work: TSE for student engagement (ETSE), instruction (ITSE) and classroom management (MTSE). In this study we used the second sweep of the Teaching and Learning International Survey (TALIS) carried out by the OECD in 2013. The sample consists of 104.358 teachers of upper secondary students, nested in 6.455 schools across 32 countries. Both teachers and principals filled in self-assessment questionnaires. We specified three-level structural equation models (MSEM) using MPlus to (1) take into account factors from the teacher (e.g., teaching experience), classroom (e.g., classroom climate) and school level (e.g., state vs. private school), (2) extend the previously emphasised North American context and (3) investigate jointly predictors that have been used in single studies so far and show the following results: Not all predictors seem to be equally associated with all three dimensions of TSE. Most differences seem to appear among the classroom characteristics with respect to the three dimensions of TSE. Most variance could be explained among teachers, least among schools. Accordingly, the school a teacher works in seems to make a big difference.

The social justice dispositions of teachers and their pedagogic work (Public Seminar)

13 February 2017 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room A

Speaker: Professor Trevor Gale, School of Education, University of Glasgow

Convener: Trevor Mutton, Teacher Education and Professional Learning Research Group

Teaching and learning secondary science through English: classroom interactions, perceptions of teachers and students in Hong Kong

14 February 2017 13:00 - 14:00
Seminar Room G/H

Speakers: Jack Pun, Department of Education

Convener: Dr Jessica Briggs, Applied Linguistics Research Group

Teaching science through English is a growing phenomenon around the world. In this presentation, I will discuss the latest research into English medium of instruction (EMI) around the globe and the challenges that teachers and students face when learning science through English in many cultural contexts.

In particular, I will report a study in Hong Kong which explores the teaching and learning process in EMI science classrooms (Physics, Chemistry, Biology) from 8 secondary schools. Drawing the multiple sources of data from semi-structured interviews, questionnaires and 34 hours video-recorded classroom observations of 19 teachers and 545 students, we explore the patterns of classroom interactions (turn-taking, ratio of talk, language choices, question types) in both traditional (or early-full) EMI vs MOI-switching (or late-partial) schools (switching from L1 Cantonese to L2 English), between Grades 10 and 11 in both schools. The teachers and students' perceptions on EMI teaching and learning process including their views on EMI, choices of classroom language, the language challenges, coping strategies will also be investigated. By providing an evidence-based, detailed analysis of authentic classroom interactions, this research hopefully shed light on ways for improving the quality of instructional practices in different EMI classrooms worldwide.

Emotions: a necessary disposition for learning?

14 February 2017 17:00 - 18:30
Syndicate Room, St Antony’s College

Speaker: Dr Kristen Bub, Illinois

Respondent: Zuloby Mamadfozilov, Aga Khan Foundation, Tajikistan

Conveners: Dr David Johnson, Caroline Arnold, and Andy Cunningham, Centre for Comparative and International Education Research

Further information: Naseemah Mohammed

Is neuroscience a useful guide to developing educational interventions?

15 February 2017 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room K/L

Speakers: Professor Charles Hulme, Department of Education

Conveners: Professor Terezinha Nunes, Children Learning Research Group and Dr Maria Evangelou, FELL

Students' mathematics self-efficacy expectations: relationship with test achievement and development in the classroom

20 February 2017 12:30 - 13:45
Seminar Room D

Speaker: Karin Street, Department of Education.

Conveners: Professor Steve Strand, Dr. Lars-Erik Malmberg and Dr. Daniel Caro, Quantitative Methods Hub

The role of WISE research in supporting creative action and building the future of education through collaboration (Public Seminar)

20 February 2017 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room A

Speaker: Dr Asmaa E. Al-Fadala, Director of Research at the World Innovation Summit for Education (WISE)

Convener: Dr Maia Chankseliani, Centre for Comparative and International Education Research

Dr. Asmaa Alfadala, Director of Research, WISE, will speak about how the World Innovation Summit for Education, through its research and other programs, raises international awareness of education’s crucial role of in the empowerment of communities and transformation of societies. Since its establishment in 2009 by Qatar Foundation, under the leadership of its Chairperson, Her Highness Sheikha Moza bint Nasser, WISE has grown into a thriving global, multi-sectoral platform dedicated to creative, purposeful action in education. WISE has raised the status of education among global priorities, and has established itself as a resource for new approaches to education.

The WISE community is a diverse network of stakeholders who share ideas, expertise, and solutions to address the wide range of evolving education challenges. WISE Research collaborates with recognized, leading experts from the community to produce concrete, focused examinations of core topics, often featuring improved practices in diverse contexts around the world, and including policy guidance for education leaders at all levels.

Dr. Alfadala will present the findings of her research on developing and supporting effective principals with leadership skills that reliably produce improved student learning.

Given the variety of unique school issues and contexts involved, her research is focused on identifying appropriate, innovative leadership development approaches and strategies that can be shown to drive sustainable change in teaching practice with positive impact on student learning.

The research includes case studies illustrating current approaches that systems and schools take to develop and support their principals, with the ultimate goal of identifying key lessons, tactics, and strategies that system leaders can take to build principals’ skills.

Becoming a (written) word: using eye movements to index incidental new word learning during reading

21 February 2017 13:00 - 14:00
Seminar Room G/H

Speakers: Dr. Holly Joseph, University of Reading

Convener: Dr Jessica Briggs, Applied Linguistics Research Group

From mid-childhood onwards, the majority of new words we learn are encountered incidentally through reading (Nagy et al., 1985). Yet little is known about this process, and the circumstances in which vocabulary acquisition is maximised. In this talk I will present two experiments in which the process of incidental word learning is examined in adults and children, using eye movements to track learning trajectories as novel words are encountered over multiple exposures. Capitalising on well-documented effects in the visual word recognition literature, I examine the effects of order of presentation (Expt. 1), and contextual diversity and redundancy (Expt. 2) on the efficiency with which new word meanings are acquired. Overall, results show that adults and children successfully learn some limited semantic information about new words without explicit instruction after as few as six exposures, that reading behaviour changes as a function of context type, that early presented words are learned better, and that it is possible to create a laboratory analogue of the learning process that we observe in real life development. I will also present some preliminary data that suggest that children who speak English as an additional language learn words more than their monolingual peers.

Who are the good immigrants? Teaching and testing citizenship for naturalisation

21 February 2017 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room D

Speaker: Kristine Gorgen, Department of Education

Conveners: Dr Liam Gearon and Professor Alis Oancea, Philosophy, Religion and Education Research Forum in association with the Philosophy of Education Society of Great Britain (Oxford branch).

2016 has seen politicians, the media and the wider public in heated arguments over immigration. In the UK debates raged over the number and characteristics of immigrants that were deemed desirable. Disagreement continues about ways to restrict and manage immigration in a way that yields maximum economic returns and minimum social disruption. One potential outcome of immigration is naturalisation, the process by which immigrants can become citizens of their destination country.

In her research Kristine focuses on naturalisation tests- who gets to decide on the content and design of naturalisation tests, what kinds of questions are asked, what values are implicitly and explicitly supported, what is the relationship of the naturalisation test to debates about immigration and integration. On this occasion she presents a work in progress and shares the results of her literature review.

Kristine Gorgen is a first year DPhil student at the Department of Education and a research assistant at OUCEA.

Contexts: mathematical thinking before and outside of school

21 February 2017 17:00 - 18:30
Syndicate Room, St Antony’s College

Speaker: Professor Terezinha Nunes, Department of Education

Respondent: Sheila Manji, Aga Khan Foundation

Conveners: Dr David Johnson, Caroline Arnold, and Andy Cunningham, Centre for Comparative and International Education Research

Further information: Naseemah Mohammed

Lessons about reading from the PIRLS international survey for English teachers

22 February 2017 16:30 - 18:00
Seminar Room A

Speakers: Dr Therese Hopfenbeck, OUCEA/Department of Education

Convener: Dr Velda Elliott, Forum for English, Drama and Media in Education

PIRLS is the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study, coordinated by the International Association for the Evaluation of Educational Achievement (IEA). PIRLS provides internationally comparative data about how well children from different countries read after four years of primary schooling. England has participated in PIRLS in all previous cycles (2001, 2006, and 2011) and continues this tradition in 2016. Despite the extensive information that PIRLS provides about the contexts of teaching and learning little is known for teachers. Some other countries (e.g. Norway) engage teachers in the process of understanding PIRLS findings and extracting their implications for teaching practice in ways that have not been attempted in the UK.

Considering the public costs needed to participate in international studies, the link between this form of assessment and its impact on classroom pedagogy is alarmingly low and questions about the use of this data and related research grow more urgent.

The PIRLS for Teachers project (ESRC IAA funded) engaged with teachers to increase their knowledge about PIRLS and their capacity to use data and information provided by the survey. The project further aimed to increase researchers’ understanding of the challenges teachers face in dealing with PIRLS findings and identifying their specific needs and interests.

In this talk I will share experiences of how teachers and researchers acted as co-producers of relevant new knowledge by jointly interpreting the PIRLS findings, addressing new research questions and finding ways in which results can be used to improve teaching practice.

Exploring expert teachers’ sense making and meaning making of teaching and learning from classroom experiences

22 February 2017 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room D

Speaker: Sonia Khan, Department of Education

Conveners: Professor Harry Daniels and Dr Ian Thompson, OSAT

Expert teachers understand a relationship between teaching and learning as they not only enhance their students' learning but also the growth of their own professional knowledge of practice. The study seeks to gain an understanding of how expert teachers do what they do from within the boundary of their classroom teaching and learning experiences from sociocultural perspective, and what sense and meaning do they make from those experiences. In the classrooms, teachers introduce subject matter content, which is at the center of teaching and learning, through tasks. Sense making and meaning making happens through interaction with the tasks. The study aims to explore how expert teachers make sense and make meaning from teaching and learning experiences through setting of tasks. This is done by means of a multicase study that involves six English and six Mathematics expert teachers from different schools in Oxfordshire. Analysis will draw on the works of Bernstein and Vygotsky and focus on how institutional and classroom contexts shape human action.

Children Learning/FELL seminar - title to be announced

22 February 2017 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room K/L

Speakers: Professor Kate Cain, University of Lancaster

Conveners: Professor Terezinha Nunes, Children Learning Research Group and Dr Maria Evangelou, FELL

Using stimulated recall: videos as a base for interviews

23 February 2017 12:45 - 13:55
Seminar Room B

Speaker: Sonia Khan, Department of Education

Convener Dr Velda Elliott Qualitative Methods Hub

Video-stimulated recall has been adopted as a valuable technique to gain access to thoughts and decision making processes of others. This presentation will overview the use of stimulated recall in the ongoing research study, which includes video recording of 31 classroom observations from 11 teachers, and how these videos were used as a base for semi-structured interviews in making explicit teachers’ decision making processes in classroom teaching and learning. It will highlight the strengths and limitations of the use stimulated recall as a research method using examples from the data collected, and the ways in which the limitations can be turned to benefit by utilizing the underlying principle of the method.

Using video capture analysis with student-teachers in an ITE partnership: supporting the development of student-teachers' subject knowledge for teaching and reciprocal learning between schools and universities

23 February 2017 16:00 - 17:30
Seminar Room D

Speakers: Stefanie Sullivan, Director of Initial Teacher Education, University of Nottingham

Convener: Dr Katharine Burn, Teacher Education and Professional Learning Research Group

Combining social networks, psychometric scales and ethnographic data to study children's social relations and collective experiences in school

27 February 2017 12:30 - 13:45
Seminar Room D

Speaker: Marc Sarazin  Department of Education.

Conveners: Professor Steve Strand, Dr. Lars-Erik Malmberg and Dr. Daniel Caro, Quantitative Methods Hub

Education and the new Conservatism: social wellbeing, national character, and British values (Public Seminar)

27 February 2017 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room A

Speaker: Professor Gary McCulloch, UCL Institute of Education

Convener: Dr Liam Gearon, Philosophy, Religion and Education Research Forum

Conservative policies in education have often been analysed in terms of their neoliberal characteristics.  In the early years of the 21st century, the neoconservative themes of education policy are also highly visible, in particular social wellbeing, national character, and British values, strongly influenced by broader contemporary issues but also by longer-term historical legacies.  In this seminar we will review briefly the key themes of Conservative policies in education in the 20th century before examining the emergence of neoconservative themes over the past decade, continuities and changes in education policy since the 1980s, and current prospects for new and alternative themes.

Professor Gary McCulloch is the Brian Simon Professor of the History of Education and Director of the International Centre for Historical Research in Education at UCL Institute of Education London.  He is currently vice-president and president-elect of the British Educational Research Association and Editor of the British Journal of Educational Studies.  His recent publications include The Struggle for the History of Education (2011) and (with Tom Woodin and Steven Cowan) Secondary Education and the Raising of the School Leaving Age (2013). He has recently completed a social history of educational studies and research.

Language in action: a study of what makes effective communication in pre-hospital resuscitation teams

28 February 2017 13:00 - 14:00
Seminar Room G/H

Speakers: Ernisa Marzuki, University of Edinburgh

Convener: Dr Jessica Briggs, Applied Linguistics Research Group

Historically, medical training has focused on the development and strengthening of clinical skills. After the adoption and adaptation of the aviation industry’s Crew Resource Management training programme and following a number of studies which highlighted the crucial role of non-technical skills (NTS) in minimising medical errors (e.g. Andersen et al., 2010; Cooper & Wakelam, 1999; Hull et al., 2012; Marsch et al., 2004; Van Wyl et al., 2009), the value of NTS has been acknowledged. There is currently a great deal of interest in the optimisation of teamwork during pre-hospital or out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) resuscitation. The Resuscitation Council UK recognises that effective communication is one of the major instruments for optimal teamwork, and indeed, all domains in existing NTS measurement tools essentially involve verbal communicative acts. Yet there are no fine-grained linguistic analyses of how raters and/or team members perceive effective medical team communication. Despite the major role of communication in NTS assessments, the question of whether specific linguistic patterns, markers, or practices are associated with high NTS scores has been little explored.

This study aims to identify specific communicative patterns applied in pre-hospital resuscitations through examination of the types and distributions of language categories, using McNeilis's (1995) doctor-patient language categorisation as a basis. Through this, we intend to provide clearer distinctions of what is construed as effective team communication, with the aim of assisting in the production of gold standards for measurement and training of related high-performance medical teams. We also plan to find out whether correlations exist between any language categories and the team leaders’ NTS scores.

A total of 20 authentic videos collected as part of the ongoing Resuscitation Research Group’s training and improvement programme will be transcribed and the contents subjected to linguistic analysis. This included verbal activities regarding information flow, categories of speech act, and politeness markers. A pilot study using simulations revealed that pre-hospital resuscitations proceeded through four recognisable stages. Various types of speech act were involved in the process of navigating this interaction, with directives being used most frequently, especially by the team leaders, but in a variety of forms. As expected, the linguistic patterns in resuscitation teams differed appreciably from those in doctor-patient dyads. Results also showed that politeness measures were duly utilised during resuscitations.

Of roles and rules: towards a differentiated theory of professional ethics

28 February 2017 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room D

Speaker: Dr Gerard Lum, King’s College London

Conveners: Dr Liam Gearon and Professor Alis Oancea, Philosophy, Religion and Education Research Forum in association with the Philosophy of Education Society of Great Britain (Oxford branch).

There has, of late, been an increasing interest in the potential of virtue theory to provide a theoretical basis for professional ethics.  While virtue theory’s evident practitioner focus does much to explain its appeal, the approach remains susceptible to complaints that ethical practice should properly be bound by rules, or that practitioners must necessarily have an eye to the ultimate consequences of their actions or to the general good.  My aim here is to outline an alternative theoretical approach, one which by avoiding resort to the traditional deontological, utilitarian or virtue perspectives might provide a more cohesive theoretical basis for professional ethics.

My starting point is to differentiate, first, the three basic role types (the ‘practitioner’ being one such) that I suggest are necessarily implicated in ethical decision-making – something that seems to have been neglected by theories of ethics/ social justice which emphasise variously just one of the three roles.  Second, and drawing on previous work, I distinguish between three fundamentally different kinds of rules which delineate and essentially constitute professional practice; this, again, being something overlooked in the literature relating to professional practice where ‘rules’ are often conceived as being of a single type.  Having distinguished the relevant role/rule types I propose that professional ethics can usefully be conceived as an integrated framework of rules whereby ethical roles are at once both interconnected yet differentiated by dint of being differently configured in relation to the rules.  This, I will suggest, allows for a more coherent theory of professional ethics which can be seen to avoid many of the difficulties commonly associated with classical ethical theories.

Dr Gerard Lum is Senior Lecturer in Philosophy and Education Management at King's College London.  His research is primarily in the philosophy and theory of education. He has a particular interest in epistemological issues relating to education and in recent work has been concerned with questions about professional education and professional ethics.

Schools: learning as a precondition to teaching?

28 February 2017 17:00 - 18:30
Syndicate Room, St Antony’s College

Speaker: Margery Evans, Aga Khan Education Services

Respondents:Dr Ann Childs, Department of Education and Dr Barbara Bruns, The World Bank

Conveners: Dr David Johnson, Caroline Arnold, and Andy Cunningham, Centre for Comparative and International Education Research

Further information: Naseemah Mohammed

Children Learning/FELL seminar - title to be announced

01 March 2017 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room K/L

Speakers: Becki Holbrooke, Department of Education

Conveners: Professor Terezinha Nunes, Children Learning Research Group and Dr Maria Evangelou, FELL

Non-directive and idiosyncratic methods for qualitative data generation

02 March 2017 12:45 - 13:55
Seminar Room B

Speaker: Professor Harry Daniels, Department of Education

Convener Dr Velda Elliott Qualitative Methods Hub

In this session I will draw on aspects of several research projects which presented challenges in gathering data concerned with the tacit aspects of understanding. The particular concern was with the formative effects of institutional settings. I will discuss the ways in which non directive methods were developed and deployed.

Wait-time: when, why and how can teachers use pauses effectively?

02 March 2017 16:30 - 18:00
Seminar Room A

Speakers: Dr Jenni Ingram and Nick Andrews, Department of Education

Convener: Dr Katharine Burn, Oxford Education Deanery

Left behind? Educational inequality and social mobility of the most disadvantaged youth in Germany

06 March 2017 12:30 - 13:45
Seminar Room D

Speaker: Bastian Betthaeuser, Department of Social Policy & Intervention.

Conveners: Professor Steve Strand, Dr. Lars-Erik Malmberg and Dr. Daniel Caro, Quantitative Methods Hub

Learning French in the primary school classroom: the origins of morphosyntax (Public Seminar)

06 March 2017 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room A

Speaker: Professor Florence Myles, University of Essex

Convener: Professor Victoria Murphy, Applied Linguistics Research Group

Young instructed learners of a second language are known to rely extensively in the early stages on rotelearning and formulaic language; the relationship between this formulaic knowledge, and the eventual emergence of productive morphosyntax, is still poorly understood.

This paper draws on data from a longitudinal study of 73 classroom beginner learners of French, aged 5, 7 and 11. Divided by age, each group received 38 hours of instruction by the same teacher over a period of 19 weeks. All lessons were captured on video and transcribed, providing complete documentation of all L2 French classroom input and interaction. Children’s developing knowledge of French was regularly tested using a variety of receptive and productive tasks, including an elicited imitation test, a receptive vocabulary test, and a role play task.

Previous analyses have shown that the 11 year old beginners made faster overall progress in morphosyntax than the younger children. Here, we explore the relationship between use of formulaic language and the emergence of productive morphosyntax, for the different age groups, in order to explain the apparent advantage of the older group. We analyse children’s French oral productions in two datasets: a) the group role play tasks, and b) the elicited imitation test. We depart from established practice in the scoring of EI tests, which is primarily meaning-based and provides information on test-takers’ overall proficiency (Tracy-Ventura et al 2014), and instead focus on formal features of children’s production (the reproduction of NPs and VPs: McCormick & Zach, 2016). We explore the relative abilities of the different age groups in use of formulaic expressions and in the (re)production of non-formulaic morphosyntax, and discuss the implications for young learner pedagogy.

Florence Myles is Professor of Second Language Acquisition at the University of Essex and Director of its Centre for Research in Language Development throughout the Lifespan (LaDeLi http://www.essex.ac.uk/langling/research/ladeli/). She is the outgoing president of the European Second Language Association (EuroSLA). Her research interests are in the area of Second Language Acquisition (SLA), especially of French and she is particularly interested in morphosyntactic development, in the role of formulaic language in SLA, in how children of different ages learn foreign languages in the classroom, and in theory-building in SLA research. She has directed numerous research projects which have all had the dual aim of investigating learner development in English instructed learners of French and Spanish, and of constructing electronic databases of learner language oral corpora, available on the web to the research community (www.flloc.soton.ac.uk; www.splloc.soton.ac.uk).

Religious education and religious diversity

07 March 2017 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room D

Speaker: Dr Mark Halstead, Oxford Centre for Islamic Studies

Conveners: Dr Liam Gearon and Professor Alis Oancea, Philosophy, Religion and Education Research Forum in association with the Philosophy of Education Society of Great Britain (Oxford branch).

This paper explores a key problem in the relationship between religious diversity and religious education. It was the desire to show respect for the diversity of faiths in Britain more than anything else that underpinned the adoption of a World Religions approach to RE in all non-denominational schools. But what are the theological and practical implications of this move? The RE teacher must adopt a neutral position between different religions (and between belief and non-belief), and children are likely to pick up that all major world religions are simply different routes to the same spiritual goal, and therefore in a sense all equally true. The effect of this is that where children have been brought up to accept the exclusive claims to truth of their own faith, they are now being required by the school to accept a different framework of belief, namely that their own faith is no more and no less true that any other religion. Parents whose children are in this situation are unlikely to feel that their faith is being respected (which was the reason for the introduction of the World Faiths approach to RE in the first place).

Three ways forward are discussed: (i) abandoning RE altogether; (ii) insisting on a pluralist approach to RE and dismissing religious exclusivity as unethical; (iii) encouraging a frank and open discussion of differences between faiths within RE rather than brushing them under the carpet and trying to create an artificial unity.

The paper draws significantly on a volume published by Bloomsbury last year: Religious Education: educating for diversity, by Philip Barnes and Andrew Davis, edited by Mark Halstead.

Mark Halstead is Emeritus Professor of Education at the University of Huddersfield, and Azman Hashim Fellow and Co-ordinator of the Muslims in Britain project at the Oxford Centre for Islamic Studies.

Universities: learning from the past for the future

07 March 2017 17:00 - 18:30
Syndicate Room, St Antony’s College

Speaker: Dr Safaroz Niyozov, Aga Khan University, Institute of Education, Pakistan

Respondent: Dr Hubert Ertl, Department of Education

Conveners: Dr David Johnson, Caroline Arnold, and Andy Cunningham, Centre for Comparative and International Education Research

Further information: Naseemah Mohammed

Resources for navigating competing demands at work: identifying supports through an adaptation of the double stimulation method

08 March 2017 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room D

Speaker: Kasper Munk, Department of Education

Conveners: Professor Harry Daniels and Dr Ian Thompson, OSAT

Many jobs require professionals to navigate competing demands, juggling multiple commitments to settle on a course of action. Understanding which resources professionals make use of in such challenging situations is important for ensuring that professionals have adequate support in these situations. This presentation describes a method for identifying the supports professionals use when they are faced with such problematic work tasks. It presents an adaptation of the double stimulation method, a method receiving renewed attention within cultural historical research. This method, originally used within experimental settings, can be used for the analysis of the moment-to-moment unfolding of real-life situations, allowing us to describe the interplay between artefact mediation and changes in intentional orientations. The approach is illustrated with examples drawn from a study of English secondary school teachers.

Seeking "quick solutions" to persistent problems of students’ learning in mathematics

08 March 2017 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room K/L

Speakers: Dr Gabriel Stylianides  Department of Education

Conveners: Professor Terezinha Nunes, Children Learning Research Group and Dr Maria Evangelou, FELL

A Bayesian logic approach to micro-level qualitative data analysis

09 March 2017 12:45 - 13:55
Seminar Room B

Speaker: Kasper Munk, Department of Education

Convener Dr Velda Elliott Qualitative Methods Hub

Dealing with task uncertainty: complex demands in schools and teachers’ responses

09 March 2017 16:00 - 17:30
Seminar Room D

Speakers: Kasper Munk, Department of Education

Convener: Dr Katharine Burn, Teacher Education and Professional Learning Research Group

STORIES 2017

14 March 2017 -

A masterclass in close reading

25 April 2017 16:30 - 18:00
Seminar Room A

Speakers: Dr Andrea MacRae, Oxford Brookes University

Convener: Dr Velda Elliott, Forum for English, Drama and Media in Education